America and West Indies
May 1674

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

W. Noel Sainsbury (editor)

Year published

1889

Pages

576-589

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: May 1674', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 7: 1669-1674 (1889), pp. 576-589. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70249 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

May 1674

May 1.
Jamaica.
1269. Grant of Lieut.-Governor Sir Thos. Lynch, in the name of the King to Henry Ward and John Wait, and their successors, churchwardens of the town of Port Royal, and for the use of the town of the right of keeping a market every Saturday in such places and under such regulations as they shall think meet; with power to appoint a clerk, and make rules for the government there-of not repugnant to the known laws of England and of the island. Endorsed, Inrolled in the Inrolment Office, 15th day of November 1675, p. me. Peter Beckford, C. of the Inrollments." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXI., No. 34.]
May 6. 1270. Articles of Agreement between the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Having taken into their considerations how absolutely requisite it is to supply Carolina with clothing and other necessaries until the inhabitants by the product of vendible commodities be able to draw a trade of merchandise to themselves, and being also sensible that if some speedy care be not taken of said plantation it will be utterly ruined and forsaken, and all former charges as well as future expectations quite lost. And whereas said Lords Proprietors have resolved that a supply to the value of 700l. at least shall be yearly raised, expended and disbursed for the benefit of said plantation in the manner and form hereafter mentioned. Each Lord Proprietor hereby agrees within 10 days from the date hereof to pay to Peter Jones of St. Clement Danes or such other Treasurer as may be appointed the sum of 100l. and the like annual sum of 100l. during the space of seven years to be reckoned from the date hereof. Signed by the Duke of Albemarle in the presence of J. Baynes and Ant. Bowes, Earl of Craven in the presence of Wm. Jones, and Ra. Marshall, Earl of Shaftesbury in the presence of John Locke and Tho. Stringer, Lord Visct. Cornbury in the presence of Garrett Cotter and Will. Parham, Lord Berkeley in the presence of Philip Frowde and Jas. Worrall, and Sir George Carteret in the presence of John Locke and Rich. Davey. Sir Peter Colleton has not signed. Parchment. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 93.]
May 11. 1271. Commission from Henry Viscount Cornbury, one of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Appointing Stephen Bull his Lordship's Deputy in Carolina with power to act as in the Fundamental Constitutions, Temporary laws and Instructions provided. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XX., p. 101.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
1272. Additional instructions to Sir Jonathan Atkins, Governor of Barbadoes. In the same words (mutatis mutandis) as the report of Council for Plantations of 13th April. (See ante, No. 1264.) 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XCIII., fo. 91; also No. XCV., 91–2.]
May 11.
St. Kitts.
1273. Minutes of the Council of St. Kitts. On debate concerning the military affairs of this island, it was ordered that upon any alarm all officers and soldiers upon the windward side meet at the old training-place at Nicholas town, there to expect further orders, the horse patrol to keep moving near the frontiers, and Captain Elrington and other officers to meet as herein directed. The mountain path from windward to leeward to be repaired. Copy of letter from Governor Abed. Mathew sent to Mons. Laguarigne, with answer to the protest delivered to the Governor by MM. de Mouchet, de Poyett, and Bonnemere, 14/24 March last, dated 31 March 1673. 2 1/2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVIII., No. 69.]
May 11–13. 1274. Journals of the Assembly of Jamaica. Complaint of Mr. Osborne that having, by virtue of his marriage with Mary Noy, daughter of Capt. Noy, deceased, taken out a patent for 940 acres of land patented in Capt. Noy's name, Benj. Smith tore the same whilst he was recording it, said Benj. Smith was, by order of the House, sent for, and the business was referred to consideration on Wednesday next. Voted that the Acts be published on the Parade Place forthwith.
May 13. On information of Capt. Knapman's abusing the Assembly in scurrilous words, vizt.:—that they were knaves and fools, and made laws to ease their own purses and lay burdens upon his and others, 4 members nominated to request the Government speedily to call a Council, and by some legal way bring Knapman to condign punishment, and to take care to prosecute him. Voted that the same gentlemen request the Governor to take care that sufficient security be given for the due execution of the offices of the island by such as shall execute them.
Also that the patent taken out by Capt. Noy be delivered to his heirs or their order. Adjourned "to the 1st January 1675." 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., XXXVII., fo. 99d.]
May 13. 1275. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Order brought by the Assembly for providing to receive Sir Jonathan Atkins, the Governor. Ordered that the President open all letters directed to the President and Council, and in case they contain anything of moment summon the Council, but not otherwise. 1/2 p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XI., 270.]
May 14. 1276. Minutes of the Council of Nevis at the house of Caesar Rodney all sworn to secrecy. If war should break out with the French, the Governor "proposed" what should be done for the transfer of forces for the defence of St. Kitts. Ordered that upon any expedition 600 men be transferred from this island, 300 from Antigua, and 300 from Montserrat, with officers chosen by the Governor, provisions, arms, and ammunition. But in case of overtures of peace, it is likewise voted that the Governor treat for same. His Majesty's Proclamation of Peace with Spain to be published. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVIII., No. 60.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
1277. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to [...]. Send herewith a patent to Mr. West to be Landgrave, and a Commission to be Governor, who has all along, by his care, fidelity, and prudence in the management of their affairs to their general satisfaction, recommended himself to them as the fittest man for this trust. Cannot forbear plainly to say, though having a great regard for Sir John Yeamans, when Mr. West had formerly the management of affairs, things were being put into such a posture as appear by the Acts of Parliament, made at the latter end of his government, herewith sent confirmed, that the Lords Proprietors had some encouragement to send supplies, but immediately Sir John assumed the government the face of things altered, the first news being proposals for increasing their Lordships' charge, which hath since continued, and in his very last despatches he sent a scheme for supplies which would require the disbursement of several thousand pounds without the least mention of how they might be repaid, either their past debts which amounted to several thousand pounds, or be better answered for the future. But instead thereof, complaints made and reproaches insinuated as if the Lords Proprietors had dealt ill and unjustly with them, because the Lords would not continue to feed and clothe them on without expectation or demand of any returns. All which put a stop to the supplies more than the Dutch war, for they thought it time to give over a charge which was like to have no end, and the country was not worth having at that rate, for it must be a bad soil that would not maintain industrious people, or the Lords Proprietors must be very silly that would maintain the idle, but they have no suspicions at all of the barrenness or any other ill qualities of the country which some are so well assured of, that at their own private charge they are going to settle a plantation at Edisto without expecting a farthing assistance from the Lords. Are well satisfied that Sir John Yeamans' management has brought things to this pass. Perhaps it would very well have served his purpose if the Lords had supplied him, and he had reaped the profits of your labours at his own rates, and our own Plantation had been so ordered that in reputation, people and improvement, it might arrive at no other pitch than to be subservient in provision and timber to the interest of Barbadoes. The people that have gone to them from New York and the Northward, by their planting and way of living have fully satisfied the Lords that they are in earnest, and desire the settlement and prosperity of the province. Have sent another supply of clothing and tools as an encouragement to honest and industrious men, and have engaged to send yearly supplies, whereby the stores shall never want necessaries for the use of the industrious planter at moderate rates. Are agreed not to make any more desperate debts, and intend to be at the charge of procuring vines, olives, or any other useful plants or commodities, and men skilled in the management of them. They will do well to consider how they will pay the Lords, in what commodities, and how the trade in them can be turned to account, for we aim not at the profit of merchants but the encouragement of landlords. Refer to their frequent mention of wanting a stock of cattle, but the design of the Lords Proprietors is to have planters in Carolina, and not graziers. If their intention was to stock Carolina at that rate, the Lords could do better by their own bailiffs and servants, who would be more observant of orders than you have been. Signed in Locke's handwriting by Craven, Shaftesbury, and G. Carteret. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XX., pp. 93–95.]
May 20. 1278. Commission from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Andrew Percivall, Governor of the Plantation, to be settled on both sides, Edisto or Ashipow River. Giving him power to let, set, convey and assure lands, under the conditions set forth in his instructions. Also to execute all powers and authorities in relation to the government, in case of his absence or sickness to appoint a deputy, and in case of death power to the householders of said Plantation, by a majority of votes to choose a Governor. Signed by Shaftesbury, Cornbury, Berkeley, and Carteret. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XX., pp. 99, 100.]
(May.) 1279. Petition of William Dyer, of New England, gentleman, to the King. The prosperity of the colonies settled in New England is greatly obstructed by controversies arising from unsettled boundaries, which have caused much dissension among the governments by reason of the usurpation of the Massachusetts. Prays the King to purchase of Mason and Gorges, the Provinces of New Hampshire and Maine, which will give an absolute and immediate dominion pver all New England, and bring to his Majesty the most considerable advantages. Annexed,
1279. I. Description of the Provincesof New Hampshire and Maine, belonging to Robt. Mason and Ferd. Gorges, with a brief collection of such advantages as are to be made by the same if they were in your Majesty's possession and settled under your Majesty's immediate government. Boundaries :—The Merrimack has its easterly beginning 22 miles N. by E. from Cape Anne, the north side of the river being in 42o 57′ N. lat., running S.W. as far as Newbury on the south, and Salisbury on the north, where the river is about half a mile broad, and the torrent swift, but mitigated by an island in the middle, and from thence to Hauverill, W.S.W., and so continues westward as high as any settlement of English, and is said to proceed from the lakes of Iroquois, but it is certain that no principal part lies more northerly than the north side of the entrance, three English miles to the N. of which was built a hut called the Boundhouse, standing in 43o N. lat., and is the septentrional confines of the Massachusetts line according to their grant, nor did they pretend to claim more until the colonies, apprehensive of danger from the French and Indians, craved their protection, which is now claimed as their right. If the Merrimack runs as far N. as 45o, taking into the land three English miles further north, and thence stretching a direct parallel line eastward to the Atlantic (as the Massachusetts would have their grant), then New Hampshire and Maine must fall within the Massachusetts bounds, and likewise from the south of the southwest stream of Charles River and three English miles south of that, running a due south course into the ocean, New York, Newhaven, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and New Plymouth will be comprehended, the thought of which boundless possessions might swell them of the Massachusetts colony into an ambitious conceit of being absolute lords of a great empire and arrogate to themselves a liberty of prescribing laws and exercising dominion over all the inhabitants of New England. To prevent this title and settle other patentees, there is nothing plainer, both from the words of the charter and the course of the river, than that the intent of the patent was three miles N. of the northernmost part of Merrimack, taking it gradually into the land parallel with the river as it runs up the river S.W., and not to exceed three miles to the S. of the S.W. side of Charles River, still taking it up along the said river's side, and not from the heads thereof, which would include all the southern and northern colony as aforesaid, rendering their patents insignificant. It is only in the King's power to put a final issue to these controversies, which is earnestly desired by those that wish well to his honour and interest, and may be done by the purchase of New Hampshire and Maine. New Hampshire is bounded on the S. and S.W. by the Massachusetts, and parted by the river of Naumkeck, N.E. by Maine, and separated by the rivers Pascattaway and Newichawanock, E. and S.E. by the sea, stretching westward into the continent, lies between 42o and 43o N. lat., in which are many good towns, fronting the sea and inland and on navigable rivers, on the S.W. of the Pascattaway are commodious and profitable saw mills, with sundry good islands, and the south half of the Isles of Shoulds. Maine is bounded on the S. and S.W. by New Hampshire, stretching W. into the continent 120 miles, on the E. and S.E. by the sea, and N.E., by the rivers Sagadahock and Kenebeck, with several good towns and islands, the N. half of the Isles of Shoulds and others of great importance. Climate and air of both Provinces temperate, sweet, clear, and healthy; soil, fertile; harbours, commodious; country well furnished with rivers and lakes, store of champion ground, ranges, level lands, meadows, swamps, thickets, marshes, uplands, hills, and fruitful valleys, where grow cedars, oaks, elms, walnut, chesnut, ash, beech, maple, birch, aspen, holly, hazel, alder, shumack, willow, buttonwood, poplar, sassafras, cypress with fir, spruce, and pines, and the most incomparable timber for shipbuilding in the world; plenty of vines, apples and pears, peaches, mallagatoons, quinces, apricots, plums, cherries, currants, strawberries, cranberries, musk, melons, water melons, cucumbers, small nuts and filberts, with all manner of herbs and roots; the pastures clothed with grass, the fields produce plenty of wheat, pease, beans, barley, rye, and oats, with other sorts of grains; droves of good cattle are raised there, with horses, sheep, and hogs, but the natural inhabitants of the woods, hills, and swamps, are incredible numbers of wild beasts, bears, moose-deer, stags, wolves, foxes, beavers, otters, mincks, martins, musquashes, sables, squirrels, raccoons, wild cats, porcupines, rabbits, hares, and woodchucks. The bowels of the earth are enriched with plenty of iron ore, tin, copper, lead, coals, sulphur, and other minerals, offering themselves to public view. There are infinite quantities of fish, such as bass, salmon, trout, pike, perch, pickering, pouts, and on the sea coasts, whales, grampus, seals, sharks, herringhogs, porpoise, dogfish, sturgeons, halibut, cod, haddock, hake, polluck, mackarel, soles, skate, lamperns, smelts, thornback, eels, herrings, capelin; and of shell-fish, lobster, crab, crayfish, oysters, tortoise, clams, mussels, cockles, and scallops. The islands and woods yield swarms of birds, turkeys, pheasants, heath-hens, pigeons, thrushes, turtle-doves, swans, geese, brants, murrs, penguins, mallard, teal, and widgeon; all which is beneficial to the planting and peopling of the country. If the King purchased Maine and New Hampshire, he would have absolute dominion over those seas and might settle a duty on all fisheries there, and might reduce those of the Massachusetts to a ready subjection. The King could be supplied thence with masts, tar, timber, &c., at a much cheaper rate, which would conduce to the safety of his maritime affairs. A considerable trade might be settled with the Indians for beaver and all other peltry. The King being the entire owner of these Provinces, the tranquillity of the subjects and prosperity of commerce would be greatly advanced. The King could receive a considerable revenue from a small duty on fish, on timber, and on wine, fruit, and brandy. Endorsed, presented to his Majesty in May 1674, 4 pp. Two copies. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXI., Nos. 35, 36.]
May 20.
Westminster.
1280. Certificate of B. Worsley, Secretary to the Council for Trade and Plantations. Certifies at the request of the clerks and other officers of the Council for Trade that, during his attendance as Secretary and Treasurer, he never received orders to pay the clerks and other officers more than half a year's salary, beginning at the feast of St. Michael, 1672, and determining at the Annunciation of the B. V. M., 1673. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXI., No. 37.]
May 20. 1281. Certificate of Sir P. Colleton that the following 11 papers certified on the oath of John Pryse, gentleman, are copies of the original records in the Secretary's office of Barbadoes, vizt. :—
I. Petition of Edwyn Stede, Esq., Deputy and Attorney to John Daws, Secretary of the island, to the President and Council. In accordance with his Majesty's Letters Patents to said John Daws, and Mandamus, prays that he may be admitted to the clerks' places in the several courts, which had been refused by the several judges.
II. Petition of Edwyn Stede, Provost-Marshal of Barbadoes, to same. In accordance with his Majesty's Letters Patent to himself to be Provost-Marshal, and Mandamus, prays he may be admitted to the Marshals' places of the several courts, which had been refused by the judges.
III. Order of the President and Council of Barbadoes to deliver to John Walrond, deputy to John Daws, the records, and admit him to the execution of the office of clerk of that court in accordance with his Majesty's Letters Patent to said John Daws, dated 17th August 1660. Dated 1674, March 17.
IV. Address of the Assembly to the President and Council, complaining that an Act passed 5th September 1667, directing how the clerks and marshals for the Courts of Common Pleas shall be appointed, has been omitted to be duly recorded amongst other laws of this island, and moving that same way be forthwith entered. 1674, April 7.
V. Same to same. About 12 years since his Majesty granted Letters Patent to John Daws for the office of clerk to all the Courts of Common Pleas in the island, but afterwards by his Governor suspended said letters, and in 1667 passed a law whereby said patent was suspended, and said offices as also those of Marshal left to the appointment of the chief Judges; yet some persons preferring their private interests to the public good, have of late without any new authority from his Majesty endeavoured to revive said patent. They therefore present the evil consequences that said practices may bring on the island, and pray that the orders lately issued from the President and Council to any of the chief Judges in favour of said patentee may be declared void, and that none may be imposed as officers on said Judges in derogation of his Majesty's laws and his subjects' liberties. 1674, April 8.
VI. Minutes of a meeting of the President and Council of Barbadoes. Being an answer to the Assembly's above address. 1674, April 8.
VII. The Assembly's reply to the answer of the President and Council. Are well assured that for the Council without command from the King to take upon them to make appointments directly contrary to a law of the island is of most dangerous consequence to the island. Cannot easily be induced to believe that his Majesty, in favour of any patentee, will make void any established law of this island, and have reason to believe that the law for the clerks' and marshals' places has been sent home and approved by his Majesty. Pray the Council to cease their endeavours to overthrow it, and that till his Majesty's pleasure be further known, they will cause that law to be duly regarded. 1674, April 9.
VIII. Minutes of a meeting of the President and Council of Barbadoes. Answer to the Assembly's last paper, and their reply. Think it necessary to acquaint the Assembly that in his Majesty's patent for the Provost-Marshal's place, which was granted since the making of the law the Assembly mention, is a non-obstante to any law made or to be made, therefore desire to understand whether the Assembly wish them to withstand his Majesty's command till his pleasure be therein further consulted. 1674, April 9.
IX. Reply of the Assembly. Conceive it was his Majesty's intent that his annulling of any law of the island should be in some instrument expressly designed for that purpose, and not by any collateral clause in an instrument made for another purpose; but the matter being of great difficulty desire it may be deferred till the arrival of his Majesty's new Governor, who in all probability will bring fresh instructions from his Majesty. 1674, April 9.
X. Minutes of Council. Resolved on petition of James Beeke and Edward Bowden, Attorneys to John Dawes, that the offices of Clerk of the Chancery and Clerk of the Peace, as well as of Clerks of the Courts of Common Pleas are included in his Majesty's Patent to said John Dawes. 1662, August 27, 28.
XI. Order of Council to the Sergeant-at-Arms and the Marshals of the several Courts of Common Pleas. That whereas, in Jan. 1661, his Majesty's Letters Patent of 2 August 1660 to Francis Craddock for the office of Provost-Marshal-General of this island, were suspended till his Majesty's pleasure, since which they have been fully satisfied therein, require them forthwith to yield obedience to said Letters Patent. Together, 22 1/2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXI., No. 38.]
May 22.
Whitehall.
1282. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Joseph West, agent in Carolina. Let Dr. Henry Woddard (sic), the bearer, have out of the stores what he desires to the value of 9l., there being so much remaining due to him of the 100l. formerly promised to him. Signed in the handwriting of John Locke, Craven, Shaftesbury, G. Carteret; with Mem. by Locke that Mr. Andrew Percivall had a copy of the Fundamental Constitutions signed and sealed with him. [Col. Entry Blk., Vol. XX., p. 97.]
May 23.
Exeter House.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
1283. Earl of Shaftesbury to his very affectionate friend, Joseph West. Great tracts of land have been taken up upon Ashley River, and small care taken to set apart for his Lordship a commodious Signiory who had designed to come and plant amongst the people, so he is driven to seek out some other new place to settle in. Yet is so much a friend to the plantation at Ashley River that he has at last with much labour got the rest of the Lords Proprietors to agree to lay out more money there, but cannot advise them to be at any further charge in supplies till he send rational proposals how they may be paid in commodities produced there, which at the markets they must be carried to shall really reimburse them. When he has drawn and sent them a scheme of such a trade will be ready to send such things as are wanted at more reasonable rates than they can be had from merchants, but the Lords Proprietors cannot afford to give them away. A present supply of clothes and tools are sent by his Lordship's dogger, which he must use his best discretion in disposing of, for he is the man whom his Lordship must rely upon. Has procured a patent and commission [see ante, No. 1265] for him, which he will receive from Mr. Percivall, with whom he is to have a friendly communication and to be assisting to each other in the support and carrying on of both plantations. The Lords Proprietors design laying out their money for the future in getting the best improvements for this climate from all parts of the world, and experienced in the right management of them and in the Signiory to be taken up for them, they would make the first trials and have a stock of cattle ready, whereby they intend to offer encouragement to rich men to come amongst them, who would have cattle at a cheap rate and assistance in planting such things which the Lords Proprietors upon trial at their own cost have found successful. Would have despatches from himself and Mr. Percivall jointly. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 142, 143.]
May 23.
Exeter House.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
1284. Instructions from the Earl of Shaftesbury to Andrew Percivall. To take charge of the cargo on board the Edisto dogger, and sail with all possible speed to Bermudas. There to store himself with Indian corn for six months and other necessaries fit for the plantation of Carolina, as hogs, poultry, potatoes, orange trees, &c. To inquire the price of cattle and what number to be had fit to be transported, so as to see whether best to furnish himself from Maryland, for he is not without further order to trade either to New York or Virginia. To inform himself at Bermudas of the way of planting and using cassatha for bread and drink, which grows in Virginia, and all other husbandry applicable to Carolina. He may take with him from Bermudas to Carolina some grown cattle for a present supply of the family with milk. To consider whether the best cargo for his vessel returning be not cedar from Edisto and oranges from Bermudas. To settle with a fit man as a correspondent in Bermudas. To ascertain at what rates orange flower and rose water, honey, and other rarities are to be had. After taking in supplies at Bermudas to sail directly to Edisto River, and there choose a convenient place to settle upon Locke Island, and mark out 2 1/2 miles on either side his settlement in a straight line and 4 1/2 miles back from the river, "being for my first Signiory." Not to suffer anyone to take up any plantation on Locke Island without direction from Shaftesbury, any that come to settle in townships upon the opposite shore, and not scatteringly, as they have done at Ashley River. Having chosen the place, forthwith to build a house for himself and stores and such as lodge with him, the other for a common lodging-room for the servants, and a third for corn and other products of the country. After building to set the hands to planting provisions or in clearing ground for same, and to fence it in from hogs or cattle. To endeavour to make Irish potatoes grow, for if other provisions fail they will, as in Ireland, both boiled, roasted, and baked, supply his necessities. To make his provisions chiefly of Indian corn, but in the meantime to sow English grain where there is clay, which preserves the mould moister in dry weather. After unloading the ship, immediately to send her either to Bermudas or Maryland for cattle, some to be milch cows, it being Lord Shaftesbury's intention to have 300 or 400 cattle upon the place as soon as he can. The vessel returned to his settlement with cattle, to send her immediately to Bermudas with stock of best cedar, leaving one-fifth freight for Bermudas oranges, which being taken in to order, the master to sail directly hence. If not convenient to touch at Bermudas, to lade her fully with cedar, and to employ in the meantime hands in cutting and squaring cedar to load her. To send word the most convenient season for sending home his vessel hereafter, and when to get the most profitable freight of oranges, also about preparing dry chests in Carolina for same. To endeavour to begin a trade with the Spaniards for negroes, clothes, or other commodities, but to take special care they get no intelligence of his strength or place of settlement. That Dr. Woodward write by some trusty Indian to Don Pedro Melinza to let him know he is employed by English nobility the most affectionate to the Spaniards, who desire commerce with them. To send account from time to time of the country and what he has done in each of the above articles. To take up a Signiory for Lord Shaftesbury in Locke Island, and get it settled according to the usual form of the Lords Proprietors' grants of land in Carolina. He is in no way under the government of the plantation at Ashley River, which does not extend so far south, therefore he has liberty to trade as he thinks fit with the natives. If any from Ashley River apply for clothes or tools they may be supplied at 25 per cent. profit for ready pay, but by no means to give them any credit. If any come to him willing to be entertained as leetmen, to receive them on condition they be first Shaftesbury's servants for two years, at the end of which they shall have the terms of his leetmen, viz.: Every leetman to have a house in a town, with 60 acres of land, copyhold, with common for three or four cows; to have at the end of his service two cows, two sows, and 15 bushels of corn; to pay one eighth yearly of the value of the land to be let, and one-third calf till three yearlings have been paid for every cow, and the same proportion of sow pigs at two months old. His posterity to settle on the land, and his Lordship to settle their children, when they marry, in a living of at least 10 acres. Every servant or leetman to be entered according to the 25th Fundamental Constitutions, and a register book to that purpose to be kept. Conditions upon which planters bringing a year's provisions are to be received. To send samples of mast trees and dyeing drugs and any sort of timber or finely grained or scented wood fit for cabinets or other fine work. To send soundings and a draught of Edisto River. To send advice of the state of affairs by every opportunity. To send a scheme of the trade of pipe staves. To clear and plant the town lot first. If no freight for Shaftesbury's vessel at Carolina or Bermudas, to take in freight at Maryland. To consult with Mr. West about the plantation at Ashley River and how a trade may be settled, so that the supplies may be paid for in commodities. What can become of the poor people there that have no stocks, unless they will become leetmen to some that are able to support them. The Lords Proprietors are resolved only to supply those who can pay, and to lay out their money in procuring skilful men and fit materials for the improvement of the country in wine, silk, oil, &c. And to this purpose Mr. West should consider where to lay out 12,000 acres for a plantation for the Lords Proprietors, where leetmen may be entertained and settled and those experiments made. If he will remove to Edisto River he shall be Governor of both places, for the condition of the people and way of planting at Ashley River will be a hindrance to towns and the coming of rich men thither. That he should dispose the poorer sort to become leetmen, which will be a very comfortable living, as he may see by the conditions proposed. 8 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 127–133 and 141.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
1285. Instructions from Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Andrew Percivall. To grant land according to the draught delivered to him, viz.: To each house built in a town and form 50 acres home lot, that is, five acres for a house and garden, 10 acres in the common cow pasture, and 35 in a piece beyond the common, and an out-lot of 300 more in one piece in the same Colony, provided it be taken up within 16 years after grant of a home lot, the home lot always to belong to the house, and whenever not inhabited or kept up to devolve to the Lords Proprietors. The home lot to pay no rent till 1690. The town to be built and laid out as the Lords Proprietors direct. Stores of provisions to be planted. To keep fair correspondence with the Indians. To deliver to Joseph West all the goods now sent in the Edisto dogger for supply of the people at Ashley and Cooper Rivers. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XX., p. 98.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
1286. Instructions from Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the Governor and Council at Ashley River. To afford upon all occasions countenance, help, and assistance to the plantation in Locke Island. To affix the public seal to all grants Andrew Percivall, Governor of that plantation, shall send to them signed by his hand. Signed by Craven, Shaftesbury, and G. Carteret. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XX., p. 97.]
May 23.
Exeter House.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
1287. Instructions from Lord Shaftesbury to Henry Woodward. To treat with the Indians of Edisto for the island and buy it of them, and make a friendship with them. To settle a trade with the Indians for furs and other commodities for supply of the plantation and advantageous for trade. To consider whether it be best to make a peace with the Westoes or Cussitaws, a more powerful nation, said to have pearl and silver, and by whose assistance the Westoes may be rooted out, but to include our neighbour Indians at amity with us. To have the consent and direction of Mr. Percivall, my principal agent. To consider what other commodities may be profitable. He is to have one fifth of the profits of the Indian trade. Having consulted Percivall to to write to Don Pedro Meliuza about settling a trade with the Spaniards. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, p. 134.]
May 23.
Exeter House.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
1288. Earl of Shaftesbury to Maurice Matthews. Is sorry he did not come to England so as to discourse with and make him fully understand his Lordship's design in planting in Carolina. 'Tis not out of dislike to him that his Lordship has employed another from hence, a relation, to manage a plantation settling there, which Matthews could not well attend at such a distance from Ashley River, where his Lordship's thoughts were to have planted, but the people took up for themselves all the best conveniences on that river, and left not a tolerable place nearer than two miles from the water, that his Lordship was forced to seek another place and take up a Signiory on Edisto River. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, p. 144.]
May 24. 1289. Relation of the manner of Clois Brandt, his working with the King of Acra for forcing John Cook, merchant, of the vessel the Two Brothers, after being in custody and before sent before the Court of Admiralty, at Cape Corse Castle. Signed by Thos. Amy and John Browninge, and attested by Will. Mellish. 5 pp. [Col. Papers, XXXI., No. 39.]
May 26. 1290. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Ordered, in obedience to his Majesty's command by Secretary Coventry, that the Proclamation of Peace be this day proclaimed with the usual ceremonies, and set up in fit places in the island. 1/2 p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XI., p. 271.]
May 27. 1291. Order of the Council for Trade and Plantations. That John Locke, Esq., Treasurer, pay to Corney Froude 75l. for half a year's salary, and the like sum to Wm. Pottle for three-quarters of a year's salary as clerks to this Council. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XCIV., p. 117.]
May 27. 1292. Similar order to pay Gawyn Wilson 25l., one quarter's salary, a clerk of this Council, and John Sampson, messenger, and Thos. Roe, doorkeeper, 22l. 10s. each for three-quarters' salary. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XCIV., p. 118.]
May 30.
Exeter House.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
1293. Earl of Shaftesbury to Joseph West. Understands that one John Barley and Henry Pretty are at Ashley River, whose friends in England are very desirous they should come over. if they are in debt to the Lords Proprietors let that be no hindrance to their coming, but it is not enough to permit them to come away; his Lordship would have him, if he find either averse to it, to persuade them, and be as instant with them as he can, especially with Barley, whose father has a very considerable estate, and till of late knew not what was become of his son, who it seems transported himself without the knowledge of his father or friends. Mr. Dalton, who wishes to come home, is to be allowed to do so when he pleases. Encloses,
1293. I. Earl of Shaftesbury to John Barley. His father, without whose consent he went to Carolina, has applied to his Lordship for him to come home again. Until his Lordship heard it from Barley's friends he knew neither his name nor condition, and cannot but wonder that he whose father is of so considerable estate and able to do so well for him should transport himself into another country upon the terms he did, and without acquainting any of his friends, or at least making himself known to some of the Lords Proprietors. Must acquaint him that his father, whose heir he is, is very earnest that he should return; desires him therefore to prepare himself to return to England. Exeter House, 1674, May 30.
1293. II. Earl of Shaftesbury to Henry Pretty. His relations who are his Lordship's friends, say it is of great concernment to him to come to England by the first opportunity and that he will suffer inconveniences in his estate here if he do not so. They have promised he shall be at liberty to return to Carolina if he pleases. He may be assured his Lordship should not be willing to draw away so considerable a planter out of his country, but his Lordship cannot forbear to press him to give his friends this satisfaction, wherein they only propose his own advantage and the establishment of his affairs. Exeter House, 1674, May 30. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 145–147.]
May ? 1294. Lords Proprietors' instructions to Joseph West, our agent at Ashley River, in eight articles. Find, by his account, Sir John Yeamans owes 100l, and upwards, and Mr. Foster above 30l., they are both responsible men, so their Lordships know not why they should not presently pay. Dr. Woodard (sic) has a bill for 9l. upon the stores, to which amount he may draw, and Thos. Butler of Carolina 14l. 13s. 4d. to be paid out of the stores. To get in the remainder of the debts and pay himself 40l. per annum for the time past, and for the time to come 100l. per annum, till their Lordships are in a condition to make a better settlement upon him. Send a bill upon Henry Hughes for 10l. lent to his wife by their Lordships in England. To discourse with And. Percivall, Governor of the plantation upon Edisto River, how to be reimbursed for the present supply and about settling a plantation in a signiory of 12,000 acres for the Lords Proprietors. To sell the sloop he has seized for debts. To receive from Mr. Percivall the supply now sent by the Edisto dogger, and dispose of the things to the best of his discretion. Signed in Locke's hand by Craven, Shaftesbury, and G. Carteret. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XX., p. 96.]