America and West Indies
July 1674

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. Noel Sainsbury (editor)

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1889

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594-603

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'America and West Indies: July 1674', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 7: 1669-1674 (1889), pp. 594-603. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70251 Date accessed: 21 September 2014.


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Contents

July 1674

July 1.
Windsor.
1311. Commission from the Duke of York. Appointing Major Edmund Andros his Lieutenant and Governor for his province of New York. 2 pp. Printed in New York Documents,III., 215. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXI., No. 47 also Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX., 1.]
? 1674 1312. Mem. that "His Royal Highness (The Duke of York) desires his Majesty will be pleased to give him the several things undermentioned out of his Majesty's stores to be sent to New York, in America." 100 firelocks, 100 matchlocks, 50 pikes, 30 barrels of powder, half a proportion of match, 1 barrel of flint stones, 150 beds. Endorsed by Sir Joseph Williamson, Habiliamts for New York. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXI., No. 48.]
July 1.
Windsor.
1313. Instructions from the Duke of York to Edmund Andros "my Lt.-Gov. of Long Island, New York, and my adjacent territories in America," in seventeen articles. For taking possession of the territory described in the Duke's grant according to the Treaty of Peace with the States General. To satisfy the inhabitants both strangers and English, that his coming is for their protection and benefit. To take care that strict discipline be kept among the soldiers and officers under his command. Not to molest any inhabitant who has lately dealt treacherously except he be an Englishman, then to proceed against him according to law, but to remove any Foreigner if posted in any place of strength, and of doubtful affections. To take especial care of the forts of New York and New Albany, as places upon which the safety and trade of the whole country depend. To give every encouragement to planters of all nations, especially Englishmen, to settle under his government and assign lands either unplanted or confiscated, and apply the rents to the maintenance of the Government. For the settlement of the public payments and impositions, and the course of Justice. Rates to be established for the Customs at New York. N.B.—Sir J. Werden has written in the margin "This particular of salt hath been blotted out by his Royal Highness' order to the end salt may be comprehended amongst other goods paying only 2 pr. cent. ad valorem." Rates to be paid for goods coming up into New York. To administer justice to Dutch and English without partiality. Not to farm out any part of the public revenue for above one year. Choice of a Council, Magistrates, and all officers of trust. Toleration in religion. To observe the New England rules as near as may be in granting lands. To send a map of the whole territory under his government, with the fortifications and list of officers employed, also the public charges and the present revenue. To lessen the charges of Government, so the Duke may reap some advantages for the great expense and trouble of protecting the Colony. To seize the opportunities which may arise of purchasing great tracts of land from the Indians for small sums. Lieut. Anthony Brockholes to succeed him in case of death. All warrants, writs, executions to run in the King's name as hath been practised by Col. Nicholls and Col. Lovelace. 5 pp. Printed in New York Documents, III., 216–219. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX., 4–9.]
July 1.
Windsor.
1314. Establishment for the pay of the officers and soldiers of my colony at New York, estimated after the rate of beaver there. One Captain at 8s. a day, 2 lieutenants at 4s. each, an ensign at 3s., 3 serjeants at 1s. 6d. each, 4 corporals at 1s. each, 2 drums at 1s. each, 100 privates at 8d. each, a master gunner at 2s., 4 matrosses at 1s., a chirurgeon at 2s., a chaplain at 6s. 8d., a storekeeper at 2s. Printed in New York Documents, III., 220. I p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. LXX., p. 10.]
July 1.
Windsor.
1315. Commission from the Duke of York, for Major Andros to be captain of a company raised for New York. Printed in New York Documents, III., 219. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX., p. 3.]
July 2.
Windsor.
1316. Similar Commissions for Anthony Brockholes to be first Lieutenant, and Christopher Billopp to be Lieutenant, and Caesar Knapton, Ensign, to Major Andros' company. Printed in New York Documents, III., 220–221. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX., pp. 3–4.]
July 2.
Windsor.
1317. Commission from the Duke of York to Wm. Dyre, appointing him Chief Customer or Collector of Customs at New York. Printed in New York Documents, III., 221–222. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX., p. 4.]
July 2.
Windsor.
1318. The Duke of York's instructions for Wm. Dyre, Chief Customer and Collector of my Customs at New York. Printed in New York Documents, III., 222–223. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX., pp. 11–12.]
July 2.
St. Jago
de la Vega.
1319. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. The Governor communicated a vote of the late Assembly, recommending the examination of Captain John Knapman on a complaint of Robt. Bridgewood, Capt. Ant. Swimmer, and Benj. Whitcombe; but being called in, and declaring they had nothing to allege against said Capt. Knapman, and could not prove the allegations mentioned in said vote, ordered that Capt. Knapman be dismissed. Ordered, that the Patent of the Royal African Company, and the powers by them granted to Thomas Matthews and Francis Man, and certified under the City Seal, be a sufficient authority for the Clerks of the enrolments to record them. The Governor's choice of Sam. Bernard to be Treasurer of the island, and Lt.-Col. Fuller and Capt. Hender Molesworth his securities, according to the Acts of the last Assembly, approved by the Council. 1 1/2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXXV., 368–369.]
[July 3.] 1320. Petition of Edmund Cooke to the King and Council. That on his petition of 5th December last (see ante, Nos. 1178, 1178. I.), setting forth the barbarous usage of the Spaniards in the West Indies towards petitioner and his company, his Majesty ordered the Earl of Arlington to write effectually to his Majesty's Ambassador in Spain to require reparation, and to acquaint the Spanish Ambassador here with same, and procure speedy satisfaction, petitioner having been already at the Havana with an agent sent by the Governor of Jamaica in the Portland frigate to demand satisfaction, which was utterly denied him. That by order of 27th February petitioner (amongst others) was referred to the Lords Committee for Trade and Plantations, who reported on 11th March to his Majesty (see ante, No. 1226) that for the inhuman cruelties and losses by petitioner, his merchants, and companions sustained, reparation and satisfaction should be earnestly insisted on both in the Court of Spain and to the Spanish ambassador here, which, if denied or unreasonably delayed, his Majesty could not deny his subjects satisfaction by way of reprisal agreeable to the law of nations, and his Majesty approved thereof. That according to order from said Lords of 5th March petitioner made oath before the Judge of the Admiralty of the circumstances of the capture of ship (Virgin) and the losses sustained thereby, as by an exemplification under the seal of the Court of Admiralty hereto annexed appears. That petitioner being denied relief at the Havana and unreasonably delayed here by the Spanish Ambassador, who instead of redress gave him very abusive language, it may prove of very ill consequence to all his Majesty's subjects trading to the West Indies. Petitioner therefore implores his Majesty to grant himself and his merchants relief by letters of reprisal or otherwise, as his Majesty shall think agreeable to justice. Endorsed, "Read in Council 3 July 1674." Annexed,
1320. I. Order of the King in Council on above petition. In consideration of how long a time is passed since application was first made to the Spanish Ambassador here for redress, and how his Majesty's Ambassador in Spain has made repeated instances without effect; but his Majesty remembering with how much tenderness he has proceeded in all things which have concerned good correspondence with his Catholic Majesty, and therefore to give a further opportunity to the Court of Spain to consider the very hard circumstances of the case, hereby orders, that petitioner and merchants present some fit person to the Earl of Arlington to be sent with credentials from his Majesty to the Court of Spain, and therewith to attend his Majesty's Ambassador for satisfaction and reparation for said losses, amounting to 12,863l. 8s. 1d., as by said exemplification appears; and if thereupon satisfaction or reparation be denied or unreasonably delayed above four months after his arrival there, his Majesty will grant letters of reprisal to petitioner and his merchants that they may recover satisfaction for their said losses, together with the interest and charges, according to the law of nations and the 14th Art. of the Treaty concluded at Madrid the 8/18th of July 1670. Endorsed by Lord Arlington "Mdm., I lent to Capt. Cooke the original of this to have translated." Together 3 1/2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXI., Nos.49., 49. I.]
July 8.
Windsor.
1321. The King to Sir Jonathan Atkins, Governor of Barbadoes. To the same effect as the Report of the Council for Plantations on petition of Edwin Steed, Provost Marshal of Barbadoes (see ante, No. 1238). 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XCIII., 103.]
July 8. 1322. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Ordered, that the Bill for excise on liquors imported be passed and carried to the Assembly with two alterations; and that the Act for encouragement of the Greenland and Eastland trades, and for better securing the plantation trade, made in England in his Majesty's 25th year, be forthwith published in the parish churches; as also his Majesty's proclamation recalling his former dispensation relating to the Acts of Trade and Navigation, in the churches of the four seaport towns. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XI., 272–273.]
July 10.
Villiers House.
1323. (The Council for Plantations) to (Sec. Coventry). Mr. Brounker has signified that it is his Majesty's pleasure that Mr. Cranfield (one of his Majesty's gentleman ushers) be one of the Commissioners to be sent to bring off his Majesty's subjects from Surinam. [Col. Entry Bk., No. LXXVII., 64.] Unfinished letter.
July 13. 1324. Minutes of the Council of Antigua. Ordered at the request of the Assembly, that Willoughby Bay, The Road, Dixon's Bay, and Parham landing place, be henceforth the places appointed for the payment of sugar besides Falmouth and St. Johns, and that all merchants be obliged to receive their sugar at one of the said places. 1/2 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 55*.]
July 15. 1325. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Ordered, on inspecting Capt. Wyborne's account of what he had disbursed at New England for victualling H.M.S. Garland, over and above three bills of exchange, amounting to over 535l., drawn on the President and Council, that the Commissioners for sale of his Majesty's provisions, pay to Capt. Wyborne out of the proceeds thereof, 127l. 6s. 6d. so laid out; that the Assembly and the members of this board present be summoned to meet on Wednesday morning next; and that the Deputy Secretary prepare letters to be sent by Capt. Wyborne to Lord Arlington, the Council for Plantations, the Commissioners of the Navy, and Sir John Werden, Secretary to H.R.H. [the Duke of York]. 1 1/2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XI., 273, 274.]
July 16.
Barbadoes.
1326. The President and Council of Barbadoes to the Council for Trade and Plantations. Since their last, nothing of moment has offered, only they have received and proclaimed the happy news of peace. Send this by Capt. John Wyborne of H.M.S. Garland, which the worm has much damaged, besides the hurt she received, when convoy to one of the Royal African Company's ships to Guinea, in her engagement with a great Dutch East India ship; having spent all her own provisions, have furnished over and above what was sent for her from England, account of which is sent to the Commissioners of the Navy; she convoys several considerable merchant ships. I p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXI., No. 50. See also Col. Entry Bk., No. V., 174.]
[July 17.] 1327. Petition of Thomas Jarvis, Richard Ashall, and William How, merchants, to the King in Council. To the same effect as the petition of Edmund Cooke [No. 1320]. Pray for letters of reprisal for obtaining their satisfaction, for that they have already used all means, both in England and Spain, pursuant to the 14th Article of the last Treaty, for above 12 months last past. Signed by the petitioners and endorsed by Locke. "Read in Council 17 July 1674." 1p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXI., No. 51.]
July 19. 1328. Cargo exported for the Duke of York from London to New York. Woollen cloth to the value of 207l.; linen cloth, 100l.; haberdashery, 100l.; mercery ware, 70l.; shoes, 48l.; badges, 20l.; silk stockings, 17l. 8s.; worsted stockings, 17l. 12s.; woollen hose, 19l. 10s.; castors, 10l.; ironware, 20l.; powder, 30l.; fuses, 20l.; rapiers, &c., 20l.; pistol powder and lead, grocery, 30l.; laces for heads, 20l.; dimetys, 20.; tin ware, 10l.; ticking and rugs, 15l.; brass, 50l. Underwritten is a request for the Duke of York's signature in order to the obtaining of a bill of store at the custom house, signed R. Downes, and also by the Duke of York. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX., p. 12.]
July 22, 23. 1329. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Ordered, that Lt.-Col. Wm. Bate provide for H.M.S. Garland 20 quires of the largest and strongest royal paper that can be got; and pay for same out of the proceeds of his Majesty's provisions sold. The Assembly attended with a short Act for continuing the excise on liquors imported; an order for presenting Capt. Wyborne with a ton of white sugar, and a note about bills, as follows, viz.:—That the Assembly conceive a Bill for raising money ought to move primarily from them, and therefore they cannot proceed on the Bill sent them from the President and Council for an Imposition on Liquors Imported, but have prepared a Bill for reviving and establishing same.
July 23. Answer of the President and Council to above paper of the Assembly, viz.:—That they cannot concede to the opinion of the Assembly concerning the primary motion of Bills, knowing that no Assembly of Representatives of this Island ever did or could claim it as their due, and therefore advise this Assembly to follow the prudent and modest steps of their predecessors without intrenching on his Majesty's prerogative, lest they be forced in a severer manner to let them know the evil of such usurpations. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XI., 274–276.]
July 23. 1330. The Duke of York to Major Andros. Nichalaus van Renselaer having made his request to be recommended to be minister of one of the Dutch churches in New York or Albany, when a vacancy shall happen, desires him to signify his consent to the parishioners, and that he shall look upon their compliance as a mark of their respect and good inclinations. Printed in New York Documents, III., 225. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX., p 16.]
July 23.
Windsor.
1331. Warrant from the Duke of York to Sir Francis Winnington, Attorney-General, and Sir John Churchill, Solicitor-General. To prepare a grant of lands to Sir George Carteret, the bounds of which are described and formed the Province of East Jersey. Printed in New York Documents, III., 223–224. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX., p. 13.]
[July 23.] 1332. Petition of the Patrons and Proprietors of the Colony called Renselaerswyck, in New Albany [to the Duke of York]. New York and Albany having been restored to his sacred Majesty by Treaty, pray that the ancient rights, jurisdictions, and privileges of Renselaerswick may be preserved. With reference by the Duke of York to Major Andros, Windsor, 23 July 1674. Printed in New York Documents, III., 224–225. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX., p. 14.]
July 23.
Nevis.
1333. Governor Stapleton to the Council for Trade and Plantations. Cannot omit any opportunity of entreating them to represent to his Majesty their often repeated grievances as well for injuries on St. Christopher's, as the detention of their negroes of Montserrat and Antigua. By the enclosed their Lordships will find how they are lately wronged by the French General as to their slaves. Begs them to consider that he is hitherto without salary for himself or payment for the two companies at St. Christopher's. By his letter to Lord Arlington they will find Admiral de Ruyter's small success amongst the French islands with 40 sail; wishes he had not come, or had not left their neighbours new occasion of vapouring. Please to remember the seal for the islands. Begs that Sir Charles Wheler's aspersion against him may give no impression till he be heard. Understand Sir Charles accuses him of two crimes, one being of the Romish religion, the other, of selling his plantation on Col. Strode's bare letter; both imputations are but arguments of his inveteracy at this distance against one who never did him harm. Hopes he has enough religion to save his soul, but what little he has was learnt amidst the noises of drums and trumpets in his Majesty's service, and he prays God it may do him no good if he would not venture 1,000 lives, if he had them, to defend his Sovereign's rights or to destroy all manner of persons, emperors, kings, popes, or prelates, invading any part of his Majesty's territories. Had no hand in selling Sir Charles Wheler's plantation; there was a verdict of a jury that Sir Charles promised payment to the soldiers for a year, and owned he had it in his own hand; the Governor, Council, and Assembly sat at the trial. Stapleton did not sit or sign the execution; and there were two other executions. The whole country certainly would not have given a wrong judgment nor the jury a false verdict. Has not fled to the French and run away from his post as Sir Charles did 24 hours before he knew by any credential hand that the King had revoked his commission. Sent Col. Reade and Capt. Hodges of the Council at Montserrat to him with the King's letter, but he could not be found in English or French ground, he went to Guadaloupe in a French sloop. Has not traded to Curaçao or Statia as he has done contrary to his oath. Sir Charles has embezzled or made away part of the King's stores. Begs pardon for this recrimination, which he should think no clearing for himself had he committed any punishable fact, offers it, however, in his vindication. Dares boldly say that Sir Charles shall find no merchant, planter, or master of a ship, unless of evil repute, that can say he has wittingly wronged anybody these seven years he has been Governor of Montserrat and Governor-in-Chief. Endorsed, "Recd and read 13 Oct. 1674." Encloses,
1333. I. Governor Stapleton to M. de Baas. Supposes he has long since received his answer to his letter of 22nd Dec. 1673, also his then demands and answer to the French grievances. Writes to put him in mind of the articles passed betwixt him and Sir Charles Wheler as to runaway negroes, and to beseech him to deliver to the bearer 15 slaves runaways from Antigua to Guadaloupe. Has without looking back into former wrongs delivered to two Frenchmen, two slaves, runaways from St. Christopher's, on their first demand, and were he in Montserrat could send copies of several French receipts for runaways, particularly of M. le Chevalier de la Poiterie [sic]. Nevis, 1674, April 8.
1333. II. M. de Baas to Governor Stapleton. Four months ago, M. St. Leon, Governor of Guadaloupe, advised him that 15 slaves had arrived there, who said they came from Tobago, where the Hollanders had placed them; on which he ordered them to be kept for a month, and, no one then claiming them, to be sold, and the proceeds he has employed in the King's affairs. He, therefore, speaks too late about this restitution, which otherwise would be subject to a great discussion, since Messrs. Hinselin and de Praille, of Guadaloupe, have each lost 12 negroes long ago, and always vainly sought restitution. He can, however, if he pleases, write to the English Ambassador at the French Court, to demand that, in virtue of the treaty made by M. de Baas with Sir Charles Wheler, these negroes should be restored, and those that bought them be reimbursed. Has sent to Court his own letter of the 22nd November, with Stapleton's reply and 10 demands, and when he knows his Majesty's pleasure therein, will let him know, if necessary. Martinique, 1674, June 1/11. French. Certified copy by Governor Stapleton. Endorsed by John Locke, 11 June 1674. "M. de Baas to Col. Stapleton. Rec. 13 Oct. 1674. Read then in Council."
1333 III. Governor Stapleton to M. de Baas. It may be that the 15 negroes were four months without being demanded, for nobody imagined but they would run to Leeward, but they were no perishing comodity, and might have been kept a year and a day to be restored to their owners, and it had been more conformable to the law of nations, the union betwixt the Kings, and his agreement with Sir Charles Wheler to have enquired whether any such were runaway from his neighbours. He says he is always disposed to continue the good and great union betwixt the Kings and their subjects, but must tell him plainly that his proceedings prove otherwise. What likelihood was there that he should believe these negroes were from Tobago, or that they were Dutch, since these parts were sensible that two years past Tobago was taken by Lord Willoughby's forces, and not a slave or beast left but what might be wild, and the very boat in which they went was enough to show they came from some inhabited island. Has formerly written that he knows nothing of M. de Praille's negroes. M. de Henselin never demanded 12 negroes, nor was there any reason for their restitution because they ran away within the time limited for hostilities, and they were also English negroes. May hereafter deny restitution of French negroes (which he never yet did) since De Baas will not restore these and giving no just reason for their detention. As to writing to the English Ambassador in France, knows he may write if he please, but since De Baas is the first violator of his own treaty with Sir Charles Wheler, will never so much as mention it. Cannot afford a longer answer at present, having a great fleet in sight, which he guesses to be the same De Baas lately entertained. Is glad De Baas has sent home his letter and demands, as Stapleton has done with his; and till he knows his Majesty's pleasure will more effectually than De Baas does, endeavour to maintain that great union which ought to be betwixt the subjects in imitation of their masters. Nevis, 1674, July 18. Endorsed by John Locke. "Rec. 13 Oct. 1674. Read then in Council." Two copies. Together, 9 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXI., Nos. 52, 52, I., II., III.; see also Col. Entry Bk., No. XCIV., 184–188.]
July 23.
Nevis.
1334. Governor Stapleton to Sec. Lord Arlington. Admiral Michael De Ruyter arrived at Martinico with 40 sail of men-of-war, fireships, and victuallers, and on the 10th instant made a descent of some thousands of men near the Cul de Sac, as their harbour is called, in the mouth of which the French sank a merchantman to hinder the fireships to burn their King's man-of-war which was in the bottom of the harbour. They made a gallant descent, but were smartly galled by the French, who were intrenched in the ambuscade; the Commander-in-Chief of the Dutch and a Lieutenant-Colonel were killed, and the Grave Van Stiron and another who succeeded, wounded; the Comte de Horne, who is allied to his Lordship and the Earl of Ossery, afterwards gained as far as the pallisadoes of a fort, but was obliged to retreat without any considerable damage. Begs his Lordship to be mindful of the two Companies who are so much behind hand in their pay, and hardly able longer to subsist without it. Mem. This letter was delivered to Lord Arlington by Mr. Locke the 5th Nov. 1674. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XCIV., 183.]
July 27.
Windsor.
1335. The King to Sir William Godolphin, Ambassador at Madrid. Whereas upon the many complaints transmitted to him by Sec. the Earl of Arlington, and represented here to the Marquis del Fresno, Ambassador Extraordinary from the Catholic King, of the many great injuries his Majesty's subjects have suffered in the West Indies from subjects of that Crown, satisfaction has not yet been made; and whereas Edmond Cooke, Master of the ship Virgin, and Thomas Jarvis, Richard Ashall, and William How, Merchants, and owners of the ship Thomas and Mary, of Virginia, have represented that notwithstanding Godolphin's long solicitations in that Court, and their frequent applications to said Ambassador here, they have not obtained any satisfaction for their losses, and having, in pursuance of an Order from the Council for Trade and Plantations, made out on oath in the High Court of Admiralty the barbarous usage they had received from the Spaniards in the West Indies, and the capture of their ships, with an estimate of the damage, as by an exemplification thereof will appear, have again besought letters of reprisal, his Majesty, considering how far he is warranted as well by the law of nations as by the 14th Article of the Treaty concluded at Madrid the 8/18 July 1670, to afford his subjects relief in the manner desired, yet unwilling to do anything that may not suit with the maintenance of perfect good correspondence with the Catholic King, has thought fit to refrain for some time from that severe though most justifiable way of proceeding; his Majesty's pleasure therefore is that informing himself at large from the bearers hereof, Edmond Cooke and Richard Ashall of the truth of said complaints, he in the most pressing manner represent the same to the Catholic Queen, demanding full and speedy reparation, which, if denied, must be attended with the said consequences which his Majesty cannot in justice deny to his subjects. 2 1/2 pp. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXXI., pp. 135 đ, 136 đ.]
July 29./Aug. 8. 1336. Extract out of the Register of the Resolutions of the States General. It having been proposed and represented in the Assembly that the King of Great Britain intended to send to Surinam, Ferdinand Gorges and Edward Cranfield to take account of the condition of the English inhabitants and adjust all matters concerning their departure thence according to the 5th Article of the late Treaty, and that their Lordships should grant the necessary passport for their free passage thither and return, it has been thought fit that the said passport be dispatched, and notice be given thereof to the Committees of the States of Zealand; with a request that they will take all care that the said 5th Article be punctually observed by the Governor of Surinam. Dutch, endorsed by Locke, "Surynam States Resolution, 8 Aug. 74," and English translation. Endorsed, "Brought to the Council 22d Septris 1674 by Mr. Secretary Williamson and read." [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXI., Nos. 53–54.]
July 29./Aug. 8. 1337. Passport from the States General for Ferdinand Gorges and Edward Cranfield above referred to. Dutch, in duplicate, and English translation. Endorsed, "Brought to the Council 22o Septr 1674 by Mr. Secretary Williamson and read." [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXI., Nos. 55., 56, 57.]
July 30.
Windsor.
1338. Warrant from the Duke of York to Sir Francis Winnington and Sir John Churchill, his Attorney and Solicitor-General. To prepare a grant for an annuity of 300l. a year to the Earl of Sterling, issuing out of the clear remainder of the revenue of New York after all public charges there are paid. Mem. by Sir J. Werden in the margin, The Earl of Sterling agreed that if by the Duke's favour he could obtain any employment or other satisfaction to the like value, that he would release the grant of this annuity. Printed in New York Documents, III., 225–226. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX., p. 14b.]