Edward VI
February 1547

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Institute of Historical Research

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William B. Turnbull (editor)

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1861

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2-5

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'Edward VI: February 1547', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Edward VI: 1547-1553 (1861), pp. 2-5. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70284 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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Contents

February 1547

Feb.
(probably the first week.)
4. Instructions to Sir Peter Meautys, one of the gentlemen of the Privy Chamber, sent as Ambassador Extraordinary to France, to notify the death of King Henry VIII. and the accession of King Edward VI. [Corrected throughout and indorsed by Secretary William Petre. Four pages and a half. Draft.]
Feb.
(probably the first week.)
5. Instructions to E[dward] B[ellingham], one of the gentlemen of the Privy Chamber, sent as Ambassador Extraordinary to the Emperor to notify the death of King Henry VIII. and the accession of King Edward VI. [Two pages. Draft]
Feb. 6.
Tower of London.
6. King Edward VI. to Christian King of Denmark. Credentials of Sir Richard Morysine sent as Ambassador after the death of King Henry VIII. [Latin. Broadside. Signed by the Earl of Hertford.]
Feb. 6.Draft of the preceding, autograph of Peter Vannes. [Two pages.]
Feb. 6.7. The Council to Sir Richard Morysine. Inform him of the death of King Henry VIII. on Friday se'nnight. His Majesty on his death-bed had, among things, charged them immediately after his decease to notify the same with all convenient speed to Morysine his Ambassador at the Court of Denmark, to the end that he might communicate the same to the King thereof, and request a continuance of their amity to his son and successor King Edward VI. Desire, if he has not left or be too distant to return when the letter reaches him, that he shall obey these instructions, and thereafter in like manner act towards the magistrates and burghmasters of Lubeck, Hamburg, and Bremen. John Dymock has advised them of some money due to his late Majesty; this Morysine shall take steps to procure and bring with him. [Five pages. Draft. Much injured by damp.]
Feb. 8.
Valenciennes.
8. Edward Carne "to the most noble Lord the Earl of Hertford, Governor of the King's Majesty's most excellent person during his minority, and to the Lords of his Majesty's most honourable Council." Has this day received their letter of the 1st instant by Mr. Bellingham, informing him of the death of the King, and of his present Majesty's arrival at the Tower and proclamation, which events had been notified to him by the President on the morning of the 6th, by desire of the Lady Regent, who had received letters very late on the previous night by a post from the Emperor's Ambassador. Expresses his regret for the late Sovereign, and consolation that he is succeeded by the present one, having such a noble and most prudent Council always to be about him in his minority. The President and Regent declare that the King shall always be well assured of the Emperor's amity. Mr. Bellingham declared his charge exceedingly well; immediately thereafter the writer delivered his new credentials, which were very agreeably received by the Regent. Mr. Bellingham has gone to the Emperor. The Queen of Hungary, wife of the King of the Romans, is dead. [One page and a half.]
Feb. 8.
Valenciennes.
9. Edward Carne and Edward Bellingham (one of the gentlemen of the Privy Chamber) to the same. Narrate their interview with the Lady Regent, when Bellingham delivered the instructions given to him by the Council relative to the death of the King and the accession of his successor. The Regent expressed her sorrow, and her desire for continued amity between the houses of England and Austria as heretofore; and, as Bellingham was proceeding to the Emperor, would not at that time detain him, but should send her reply to him on his return thither on his way homewards. [Two pages.]
Feb. 9.
Valenciennes.
10. Same to Sir William Paget. Sends two packets received from the Bishop of Westminster this morning. Gives an account of Bellingham's arrival and of their mutual proceedings (as exemplified in the foregoing letters), which he does at the request of Bellingham to show his diligence. In consequence of the King's death thinks that a renewal of the warrant of his diets will require to be made to the Treasurer of his Majesty's Chamber, and requests that the same may be done if it shall be considered necessary. [Two pages.]
Feb. 9.
Kolding.
11. Sir Richard Morysine to same. Begs he may be excused for writing such short letters. His man has gone yesterday towards England by post in waggon, and before him another. This is an evil posting country, and he cannot send away all his men if he will not be shamed.
P.S.—Since writing those few lines, the King's Secretary, who supped with him last night, came to dinner to him. Sees by him that the King will send no other than letters, thinking the amity already sufficiently established. Only waits for these letters; he would still remain if there were anything more to be done here. [Two pages. Mutilated and injured by damp.]
Feb. 12.
Brussels.
12. Edward Carne to same. Mentions the despatch of the Bishop of Westminster's packets, and of his own and Bellingham's letters on the 9th, which were sent by a merchant of Antwerp who left there yesterday before noon. It is reported that the Duke of Saxony is compelled to raise the siege of Lespes [Leipsic], wherein Duke Maurice is, in consequence of the great aid sent from the Emperor and the King of the Romans. The Lady Regent has sent for the Council to come to Valenciennes, where she intends to keep the exequies, some say of the Queen of Hungary, and some say both of her and the late King (Henry VIII.); but the Council endeavour to induce her to keep them when she comes to Bruges, which is said to be immediately on her departure from Valenciennes, and therefore the Council remain here till they hear from her again. She makes great preparations for the said exequies. [One page.]
Feb. 14.
La Muette.
13. Francis I., King of France, to King Edward VI. Condoling with him on the death of his father, and expressing his satisfaction at the re-appointment of Dr. Wotton as Ambassador Resident in France. [French. Broadside. Indorsed by Petre.]
Feb. 15.
La Muette.
14. Commission from King Francis I. to the Baron de la Garde, sent Ambassador Extraordinary to England, to enter into negotiations, conjointly with Mons. Odet de Selve, Ambassador Resident, for a defensive league with France. [French. Copy. One page and a half.]
Feb. 19.
Madrid.
15. The Prince of Spain to the King of England. Letter of credence in favour of Eustace Capuis, Ambassadorfrom the Emperor, respecting the seizure of a galeon belonging to Domingo de Landa. [Spanish. Broadside. Signed by the Prince, and countersigned by Pedro de los Conos, Secretary.]
Feb. 19.
Madrid.
16. Representation to the Judges and Justices of England by the Emperor Charles V. Concerning a galeon called the Cuerpo Sancto, belonging to Domingo de Landa, of Bilbao, laden with oil, wines, and other merchandise, exceeding in value 3,000 ducats, which on its voyage to London about three months ago had, while off the Cape of St. Vincent, on the coast of the King of Portugal, been violently captured by some Englishmen in a vessel of 150 tons; requiring restitution of the same, with all relative costs and damages. [Spanish. Broadside. Signed by the Prince of Spain, countersigned by Secretary Conos, and indorsed by the Members of the Council of Spain.]
Feb. 23.
Boulogne.
17. Sir Hugh Poulet to the Earl of Warwick. Thinks himself bound to apprise his Lordship of the lively activity displayed by the men-at-arms and other gentlemen of this town on Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday last, in celebrating his Majesty's coronation by tournays, &c., as fully set forth in the inclosed articles, wherein "Mr. Henry Dudley is not so much noted as his worthiness in these exercises hath notably deserved." [One page. Inclosure, four pages.]
Feb. 23.
Antwerp.
18. Sir Thomas Chamberlain to Sir William Paget. Sends a packet of letters from Mr. Mount, brought two days ago by one Qwyckelborogh, who said he had received them from a person at Cologne, in whose house they had been found "recklessly left upon bed," by whom so left unknown. Perceiving them to be of old date, thinks it right to mention this. In obedience to the Order of the Council, had, with the ready assistance of the merchants, set forth the King's coronation with all joy and gladness, as well as it could be devised. [One page.]
Feb. 23.
Hamburg.
19. Conrad Pfenyng to Secretary Sir William Paget. Expresses his pleasure in receiving Sir Richard Morysine, his Majesty's Envoy. Hopes he may have a safe return homewards, and refers to him for particulars of intelligence. [Latin. One page.]
Feb. 24.
Brussels.
20. Edward Carne to same. Waited upon President Schore on Mr. Bellingham's return from the Emperor, to know whether he had received any letter, or whether Mr. Bellingham should wait upon the Lady Regent for such. The President thinks it would be labour lost for Mr. Bellingham to go, as the Emperor himself has answered by him, and the Regent can give no other reply than that which she has given verbally. Besides, it is uncertain where she may be found, as to-day she keeps the exequies of the Queen of Hungary at Valenciennes, and to-morrow goes towards the frontiers. Sends a packet from the Bishop of Westminster, received since the arrival of Mr. Bellingham, who, having come from Germany, can inform him of the news there. The Duke of Saxony is said to be still in camp, with 30,000 foot and 6,000 horsemen well furnished, and the King of the Romans also in the country of Saxony on the other side, with what numbers he has not heard. It is said that Mons. de Gronyng is with a new army for the Emperor about Munster, towards the eastland. [Two pages.]
Feb. 28.
Antwerp.
21. Sir Thomas Chamberlain to same. Sends a packet from Mr. Mount. It is reported that the French King, the Bishop of Rome, and the Venetians are in league, and the Bishop nothing contented with the Emperor's proceedings in Germany. Also that Bohemia and Sweden are at dissension, and that the Turk comes fast on towards Christendom, and has taken 14,000 Christian slaves in Hungary. The French King is said to have a great power in readiness for England. [One page.]