Edward VI
July 1548

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Institute of Historical Research

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William B. Turnbull (editor)

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1861

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25

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'Edward VI: July 1548', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Edward VI: 1547-1553 (1861), pp. 25. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70294 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Contents

July 1548

July 1.
Brussels.
101. Sir Thomas Smith to Mr. Cecil, Master of the Requests to the Lord Protector's Grace. They arrived here on Friday night. The Queen having gone a hunting to Binche, could not speak with her, but hopes they shall on Tuesday or Wednesday. The Bishop of Westminster arrived shortly before them, and will be in England soon. All is quiet here, without any suspicion of war. The Emperor said to be still sacking in Germany, and to be very lusty. Marvels that none knew of the burning of Arde till they told it. Longs to hear of the Bishop of Winchester's summons, and how he demeaned himself therein. Begs Cecil to remember him when the answer of the park cometh. [One page. Printed by Tytler, with the exception of one paragraph, Vol. i., p. 107.]
July 8.
Brussels.
102. Same, Sir Edward Carne, and Sir Thomas Chamberlain to the Lord Protector. The Lady Regent arrived here from Binche yesterday. Had audience of her this afternoon. She is sensible of his Majesty's desire of amity with the Emperor, which is reciprocated. It may be that there was no evil meaning in the thing, but mistaken; and though what was done is thought in England to have been done justly, the contrary is thought here. Shall appoint parties to debate with them, and give them reason. The Duke of Arschot is to be married to the Princess Dowager of Orange, daughter to the Duke of Lorraine, this week. The Florentines are informed by letters from Lyons that the French there boast that their galleys had taken Rye and Dover, and even entered the Thames and besieged London; but that many of them were slain and the rest repulsed. The Spaniards had been expelled from Sienna by aid of the Prince de Saxe, who arrived with 19 galleys at Port Orbitello, beside Port Hercules. Andrew Doria, with 20 galleys, has sailed from Genoa against him. [Two pages.]
July 19.
Brussels.
103. Sir Thomas Smith to Sir William Paget, Comptroller of the Household. Cannot learn what they mean by keeping them here longer, as at every meeting all seems concluded. Imparts to him at great length his views as to the necessity for imposing restrictions in order to preserve the trade of the English merchants.