Edward VI
May 1549

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Institute of Historical Research

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William B. Turnbull (editor)

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1861

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32-36

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'Edward VI: May 1549', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Edward VI: 1547-1553 (1861), pp. 32-36. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70303 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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May 1549

May 3.142. William Dansell to the Lord Protector. Had received his letter yesterday and immediately forwarded the inclosure for Dymock to Hem. Sends by schedule (missing) a statement of the munitions purchased by him for the King's service. Details his negotiations for money with Lazarus Tucker and Erasmus Schetz, the former of whom is somewhat impracticable. [Two pages. Indorsed by Dansell. Original copy signed by Dansell.]
Eod. die.Duplicate of the preceding. [Two pages and a half.]
May 5.
Hamburg.
143. John Dymock to the Lord Protector and the Council. Has this day their letter of the 13th ult., the bearer having been fruitlessly detained at Brussels. Will do his best to procure the full number of 2,000 men, whom he will send by sea, having obtained the good will of the Lords of Hamburg to embark them within seven leagues of Hamburg, but they do not wish this to be known. Desires to know his Majesty's pleasure whether those sent by land shall remain at Boulogne and so on to Scotland, and whether the others shall go by ship to Berwick or Boulogne, because he hears that the French King will have to do with Boulogne this summer with a great company, only that the Emperor do let him of his pass. Brings with him a very good captain and a tall man as leader and governor of these men, in case anything should happen to Courtpening. Does not know what Courtpening means by allowing so many soldiers to come away daily, as they do; and those who come give such evil report of him, that all are loth to serve under him. Recommends that he and Mr. Brend should be written to. If his Majesty wants 300 horsemen well appointed to come by water, Anthony Rassow, Governor of one of Duke Ollof of Holstein's towns on the sea coast, will gladly serve on the same terms as Captain Hackford has, and asks three French crown on every horse till he arrives in England. Has paid Duke Otho of Lunenburg his half year's pension. [Two pages.]
May 6.
[Hamburg.]
144. Same to same. To the like effect, and almost in the same terms as the preceding letter. Courtpening much complained of, "for it is said that men there are more ordered like beasts than Christians, both in the scarcity of victuals and payment." The Duke of Holstein is named Hans, not Ollof. [Three pages, considerably injured.]
May 11.
Hamburg.
145. Same to same. Has received their letters of the 25th April. Because Sir Philip Hoby has only got passport for 500 men, Dymock has the good will of the Lords here to wink at his embarking his soldiers at Friburg, seven leagues hence. The name of the captain who is to accompany them is Walderdon. Hackford is well known here, and little esteemed but to be a great braggart. He has in his company under him the Earl of Ritburgh, whom Dymock knows very well to be a great mutineer; for he served before Boulogne with Eytel Wolff, and what ado he made there is not unknown to some of their Lordships. Has this morning been sent for to Lubeck, by one of the Lords there, because of the arrival at Holy-haven, eight leagues distant therefrom, of a large Scottish ship, with much munition and 80 men and a Lord, who is now in Lubeck, and intends to land all kind of munition for the wars. Wishes it were possible to disappoint him, both of his ship and his goods, with the help of the said Lords. [Two pages and a half.]
May 16.
Antwerp.
146. William Dansell to the Lord Protector. Incloses two packets, one from Sir Philip Hoby, the other from Dymock. Had bargained with Erasmus Schetz for money to pay off the claim of Lazarus Tucker, who now, while the money is being received, whether from malice to the other, a desire to serve the King, or regard to his own profit, offers to lend his Majesty, at 13 per cent. 100,000 Carolus guilders = 50,000 ducats of gold; and has written of this offer to his friend Bruno the inclosed letter (missing). Desires to know his Grace's pleasure thereon. Has this day paid Captain Charles Guevara 800 crowns of the sun = 253l. 6s. 8d. sterling, for which he has received sufficient securities. Is offered saltpetre for 46s. 8d. Flemish the hundred. Throckmorton and Hilliard have been here, and gone to Louvaine; since then have been to Sir Philip Hoby, at Brussels, and in a day or two, as they say, shall depart hence towards Calais. [Two pages.]
May 17.
Greenwich.
147. The Council to William Dansell. Expressing surprise that they had received no reply to their letter respecting the exchange and bargain of bullion with Lazarus Tucker; stating that prejudicial rumours relating to the transaction were prevalent in London, and desiring to know what he has done, or can do, towards answering the King's debt, due in September next. [One page. Copy.]
Eod. die.Two copies of the preceding. [Each of one page.]
May 17.
Antwerp.
148. William Dansell to Sir Thomas Smith, one of the King's Majesty's two principal Secretaries. Although Lazarus Tucker had positively refused to export any bullion from the Emperor's dominions, Dansell and a friend have purchased all the silver which he had, and at their own risk had it safely delivered in England. Offers to supply an honest quantity at 6s. the ounce fine, by which he will gain little or nothing, besides being exposed to great danger and adventure. Hears that M. de Lyere has charge to furnish 40,000 German footmen and 6,000 horsemen to set on those of Hamburg and Bremen. [One page.]
May 18.
Brussels.
149. Printed proclamation by the Emperor Charles V. against the rebels of Magdeburg. [German. Broadside.]
Translation of the preceding in Latin. [Three pages.]
[May 20?]
Greenwich.
150. Obligation by King Edward VI. to repay to Lazarus Tucker, of Antwerp, on 20th May 1550, the sum of 150,000 florins (each of the value of 20 stivers). [Latin. Three pages. Copy.]
May 25.
Greenwich.
151. Minute of Council to William Dansell. Inform him that they have bargained with John Cooke for 500 quintals of saltpetre, and 1,000 harquebuses, after the Italian sort. Direct him to try the harquebuses, and, if found good, to pay Cooke on their arrival in England, as certified by Sir Michael Stanhope's letter to Cooke. [One page.]
May 25.
Greenwich.
152. Minute from Sir Michael Stanhope to Cooke. According to his letter of the 18th has moved the Protector, who directs that payment for the saltpetre and harquebuses shall be made to him by Mr. Dansell. Likewise for the "Colen cliffs," according as his Grace has written for the demi-lances; "those which be of the old form will do no man service, no man here will wear them, and therefore it shall be but loss to send them." Farther, with reference to the provision of bullion. [One page.]
May 25.
Antwerp.
153. William Dansell to the Lord Protector. Is much grieved to find by the letter of his Grace, sanctioned by the other Lords of the Council, that his doings should have been taken in such ill part when he considered himself rather entitled to thanks. Recapitulates his dealings with Lazarus Tucker, as certified by his letter of the 3d inst., and enters into full explanations as to the supply of money and delivery of the bullion purchased by Thomas Gresham and him from Tucker for the advantage of the realm, in refutation of the rumour in London alluded to in the Council's letter of the 17th. Refers to his letter of the 17th. The prices of various kerseys, lead, and bell-metal suggested to be sent, if the money payable in September is not to remain at interest for another year. The prices asked by Cooke for the saltpetre and harquebuses are higher than those for which the same are offered to Dansell. [Seven pages.]
Eod. die.Copy of the preceding. [Seven pages.]
May 26.
Antwerp.
154. Same to Sir Thomas Smith. Sends copies of his letter to the Lord Protector of yesterday's date; of that censuring him from the Council, and of his reply thereto. Defends himself from the accusations made against him, and requests that his explanations may be made known to their Lordships. [Two pages.]
May 29.
Antwerp.
155. Same to same. Lazarus Tucker has had letters from Bruno to the effect that the Lord Protector and Council would bargain with him for money to be had at Frankfort, and to repay the same with tin, lead, and bell metal here. Tucker is willing to lend his Majesty 22,500l. or thereabouts at 12 per cent. Desires to know as to the money due in September. If tin can be had for 50 shillings, it might not be amiss to send some, as it sells for 52 here. The price for kerseys cannot be stated, as people will not purchase unless they see them, the qualities varying. [Two pages.]
[May 30 or 31.]
[Greenwich.]
156. [Sir Thomas Smith] to William Dansell. His Grace had asked why, if Dansell could supply goods cheaper than Cooke, had he not offered to do so before ? His Grace was scarcely pleased at the evil handling of the bullion by him and Thomas Gresham, so that the rumour of the great price was current before his Grace knew what was done. Urges careful management for his Majesty's interest, so that it may seem he is merely a factor lending. Knows that his credit is better than that of any other, and dares say his practice and acquaintance is as good as that of any other, so that Smith can make no excuse for him when objections are made. [One page. Draft.]
[May?]
(De Thou. i. 199.)
157. Last page of some foreign intelligence, sine nota. Ludovico L'Armi moreover writes that the Siennese will not receive within their walls 500 Spanish infantry sent for their protection. Didacus de Mendoza, formerly the Emperor's Ambassador at Venice, has set out for Rome to exercise his functions as envoy. He will stay some days in Sienna in order to settle affairs there by the Emperor's authority. The Emperor is endeavouring to send 5,000 foot from Spain to Italy, either designing or fearing war, or deeming Germany not yet sufficiently subdued. [Latin. Quarter of a page.]
[May?]
[Denmark.]
158. Sir John Borthwick to Sir Thomas Smith. Sends him a book called Saxo Grammaticus, who, considering his time, precels all his contemporaneans and conteraneans in Latin tongue; and because he mentions England and Denmark as two prosperous realms, and has their origin, he had intended to have presented to the Lord Protector for his Majesty. Seeing the time requires greater matters, he will not perturb his Grace, but if Smith thinks it worthy to be presented to his Lord's grace, desires him heartily to present the same. "For I have one quotidian fever which is clepit in French tongue faut d'argent, and remains in my living as testudo in concha, in prayers calling to our Master Christ, Da nobis, Domine, infunde nobis, Domine. But it is known that Christ is verity and was ever poor, and so shall sui sequaces be poor. Now I am come to presta quæsumus, and more in his danger nor ever I was; an my good Lord's grace supply me not, my sickness will encrease and come to the critical day." [One page.]
[May?]
[Denmark.]
159. Same to same. Has inquired at James Stewart's servant when his master was with Bertiewile [Berteville], but can learn nothing except that they dined together at Mr. Comptroller's table one Sunday. Knows nothing of his life since he came into England, but no man knows better what he is than his kinsman the Earl of Lennox. Must inform him that the King of Denmark's pursuivant has received one letter to the King his sovereign, but he laments and says he has brought letters twice to his Majesty and received nothing to help his expenses. Has given him to understand that neither the Lord Protector nor Smith knows thereof. Has inquired as to the two brothers Robert and Alexander Lockhart; they are honest gentlemen, and, as he believes, irreprehensible. His informant was the King's servant. [One page.]