Mary
August 1553

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Institute of Historical Research

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William B. Turnbull (editor)

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1861

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2-9

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'Mary: August 1553', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Mary: 1553-1558 (1861), pp. 2-9. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70398 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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August 1553

Aug. 5.
Venice.
4. Cornelio Della Croce to Francis Yaxley. Had written already to him; nevertheless, will not suffer present opportunity to pass without contributing his share of grief for the death of his Majesty, which is in truth a matter of sorrow to the whole of Italy, by reason of the good expectations that were entertained of so worthy a Prince. Makes some reflections upon misfortune. Desires to know if Yaxley is to remain where he is, because he will write to him regularly according to promise, and requests of him reciprocal communication of matters relating to France. Requests that his letters may be sent by medium of the Venetian Ambassador, because they will reach him safely, and he will employ the same mode of conveyance. Nothing here worthy of advertisement, except the accession of Queen Mary to the throne of England, which Yaxley knows better than he. The Emperor, by letters of the 23d, was well, and ordered his army to Durlach. Maurice died three days after the battle with Albert, as mentioned in letters from Vienna of the 21st and 26th, and from Augsburg of the 28th, of the wound which he received in that battle, after exhorting the Princes of Germany, showing them that to preserve the liberty of that nation he had received his death, and, to free it from tyranny, encouraged them to follow the road which he till then had done, and recommended that they should persuade his brother to do no less than die for liberty; he believed the League would create him head of the army, and if not him, then the Duke of Brunswick. They write from Vienna that it was generally reported that the Emperor had engaged Albert to go against France, but they did not say where it had arisen, so that nothing is certain; and they also write that, besides the multitude of dead that lay where the battle had taken place, up to the 21st there had been interred 7,200, and in the battle had fallen 11 German princes. King Maximilian on the 21st departed, accompanied by his sister, the wife of the King of Poland. Don Ferrante, since the remittance to him from Spain of 160,000 crowns, had begun to batter Tamburro with 5,000 Italians, intending to take the field with from 10,000 to 12,000 infantry, 5,000 Italians, 4,000 Germans, and about 3,000 Spaniards, with the design of interrupting the plan of the French, which is to besiege Vulpiano and Chierasco, and of bringing them aid, as they have not more than a month's provisions. Letters of the 28th from Alexandria state that when the 10 ensigns of French were about to scale the walls of Asti, it was discovered that the defenders, having knowledge of their intention, had retired. The Duke of Florence is arming, because the French are increasing at Sienna, and at present there are 7,000 infantry to go out and embark, no one knows where. [Italian. Three pages.] Inclosing,
4. I. Intelligence from Rome, July 29. The navy, by letters of the 19th from Messina, took Alicata in Sicily, sacking the place, with the capture of 600 souls, and found in a tower 42 Spaniards, sent from Africa; and having attempted Sacca, a neighbouring territory, was beaten off with the loss of one galley, and, it was believed, with the death of Capo Bey, sent by the Grand Seignor to advise Dragut; and having gone to Pantalarea, was by the weather forced to keep at sea, and it is not known whither it is gone. Lusignano was delivered to the Siennese, and Mons. de Thermes has summoned Signor Giordano and all the captains with their companies, intending to embark with 4,000 infantry, whither not known. This morning there has been a congregation of Cardinals, in which the recall of the Legates has been talked of, because they produce no results. The affairs of England were also discussed, and the sending of a Legate and Nuncio thither, in order to see if on this occasion it would be possible to gain over the island, and cause it to return to obedience of the Holy See and the ancient religion, but the arrival of Cardinal Pole was waited for before any resolutions should be passed. [Italian. Seventeen pages.]
Aug. 8.
Offpemont.
5. Privilege granted by Henry II., King of France, to Richard Godart, Magdalene Robin, and the other English merchants, to export goods from all parts of his dominions, on payment of the same dues as have been exacted during the last 40 years, notwithstanding the order of Council of 18th July last. [Notarial copy. French. Broadside.]
Aug. 11.
Calais.
6. Richard Blount, Master of the Ordnance at Calais, to the Council. Sends statement of the ordnance and munition delivered to Lord Grey, the King's lieutenant at Guisnes, by Sir Andrew Dudley, on 8th November 1552, and of the additional supplies ordered to be sent from the Tower of London in June last, which have not yet been received. If they should grant Lord Grey's recent demand, it will amount to a larger charge, and there will be scant housing for it, through which lack will grow great waste. Recent orders having been given either that all soldiers receiving weapons from the Queen's store shall answer to the Treasurer for them, or deliver them again in a serviceable state, as heretofore in Calais, requests that he may be allowed one man in extraordinary wages at Guisnes, and another in Calais, to attend to such, else he will be unable to serve her Majesty so well; having only one clerk allowed him, who cannot discharge the half of his other business and duties, and frequently being obliged to employ one or two more.
P.S.—Since writing has received their letter of the 5th inst., and has already furnished the 400 men in crew with weapons, and received bills from their captains for payment of the same to the Treasurer on their wages. Will attend to the rest of the letter with what expedition he may. [One page. Indorsed by Petre. Inclosed statement, eight pages.]
August 13.
Venice.
7. Peter Vannes to Queen Mary. It is impossible for language to express the joy with which her Majesty's accession fills his heart. He who from infancy to age had served, been honoured and rewarded by her illustrious father, and suffered so acutely the death of her brother, is now, as it appears to him a new man. If it be lawful so to use a sacred comparison, the stone which the builders rejected is now become the chief stone of the corner. Expresses at considerable length his thanks to God for this event, his wishes for her prosperity and his certainty of the benefits that will accrue to the nation under her reign. If such a base fellow as he can be taken into her service, will devote himself entirely thereto. [Latin. Two pages.]
August 15.
Strasburg.
8. Christopher Mount to the Council. Since the battle between Duke Maurice and the Marquis [Albert] the uncertain rumours prevent him writing anything assuredly. Sends translation of letter from Duke Maurice to the Bishop of Wurtzburg. The Duke, who has been interred at Dresden, has left only one child, a daughter, ten years of age. His brother Augustus as yet has only a daughter, the son which he had being dead. All hope there shall be better love and unity between John Frederic [old Elector of Saxony] than before. The former is presently at Gotha. The Marquis again gathers troops about Bremen, and is said to have given notice of early battle to the Duke of Brunswick. The Emperor has commanded both to keep peace and send all their soldiers to him. He has also exhorted the city of Nuremberg and the Bishop to peace. The King of the Romans has sent aid to the city of Nuremberg. His son, Maximilian, is in continual sickness and grief. [Two pages. Printed by Tytler, Vol. ii., p. 220.] Incloses,
8. I. Copy letter from Duke Maurice to the Bishop of Wurtzburg. [Latin. Three pages. No draft.]
August 16.
Compiegne.
9. Sir Anthony Sentleger, K.G., to Queen Mary. In his journey to the French Court, has been in all places very honourably intreated. Although it was very late when he arrived at Boulogne, yet the Captain Cenerepon [Senarpont] visited him and offered him lodging in the town, which he declined, intending as he did to leave early in the morning. That day, passing by Muttrell [Montreuil], M. D'Enghien, brother to M. de Vendôme, feasted him very highly, and sent meat to his lodging, with service in silver and all sort of plate. At Abbeville that evening, the Captain Villebon, being not well at ease, sent 20 or 30 gentleman to receive him ere he came to the town, and M. de Villandry, one of the Principal Secretaries of the Chamber, brought him an invitation from the Constable to dine next day at the camp, which was directly in his way towards Amiens. Thither next morning the Secretary accompanied him. The Constable received her Majesty's letter very joyously, and much rejoiced when informed that she took his former letters to the Lord Deputy of Calais in good part. The Constable retained him that day, and not only greatly feasted him but showed him over all the camp, where are about 20,000 infantry, well in order and well armed. The cavalry were not then there. In the evening he proceeded to Amiens, still accompanied by the Secretary till his arrival here, where the Court is. Last Sunday forenoon met the other Ambassadors. Next day the King sent to welcome him, and desired that he should repose himself, as his Majesty was to spend that day in hunting, but would receive him on the one following. Accordingly this day, he and his fellows were escorted to the Court by M. de Bonry, one of the Order, with seven or eight others. Was conducted by M. de Guise to the King's presence, delivered her Majesty's letter, communicated her towardness in observing the league and peace between the two countries, and declared the whole circumstance of the traitorous demeanour of the Duke of Northumberland and his accomplices. Expects to return to-day or to-morrow. Mentions the details of his progress, as he doubts not her Majesty will cause like honour to be shown to the Ambassadors from France, who are either now in England or on their way, and whom he left at Muttrell [Montreuil]. These are M. de Gye, of the Order, and the Bishop of Orleans, but the former was then very sick of the colic and the stone. His Majesty informed him that yesterday he had received intelligence of an encounter between the Imperialists and part of his army, in which the Duke of Arschot and other men of name had been taken prisoners and several slain, admitting similar casualties on his side. Her Majesty knows that they will not declare the truth of their loss, but he has heard that it was as great on the part of the French as on the other side. The engagement had not been a regular battle, but only the one foraying for the other with certain troops, wherein neither the Prince of Piedmont nor the Constable were present. Thinks, from his communication with the King and the Constable, that it would have been very well taken had a further commission been given by her Majesty for an entreaty of peace between the Emperor and the King, who said, appealing to the other three Ambassadors for confirmation, that he had ever been and would be ready to stand to any reasonable order in that behalf. Pickering, who has long served both honourably, painfully, and chargeably, is unable to depart and satisfy the claims against him, yet being anxious to return he will make shift for his speedy despatch, and take by exchange for his supply here. Certain sums for his diets and disbursements being still due, as shown by a schedule sent to Sir John Masone, he begs, as does Sentleger in his behalf, that at his return he may have the same to satisfy his creditors here, or otherwise he thinketh himself much dishonested. [Four pages.]
August.10. "Sir William Pickering's demands." Schedule referred to by Sir Anthony Sentleger in the preceding letter, checked by Cecil, who, calculating the relative value of French and English money, reports "the total demand of Sir William Pickering is 1,988l. 17s. 4d." [Three pages.]
August 16.
Compiegne.
11. Dr. Wotton, Sir William Pickering, and Sir Thomas Chaloner to Queen Mary. On Sunday last Sir Anthony Sentleger, K.G., arrived, bearing letters from her Majesty and the Council, recalling Pickering and Chaloner, and appointing Wotton Ambassador Resident at the French Court. They had waited upon his Majesty and notified these changes, receiving from him a very gentle answer, expressive of his satisfaction in the appointment of Wotton and his approval of the manner in which the others had discharged their duties. [Three pages.]
Aug. 17.
Compiegne.
12. Henry II., King of France, to Queen Mary. Expressing his satisfaction at the appointment of Dr. Wotton as Ambassador Resident, and his approval of the efficient discharge of their duties by Pickering and Chaloner. [French. One page. Signed by his Majesty, and countersigned by Bochetel. Broadside.]
Aug. 17.
Compiegne.
13. Same to same. Acknowledges receipt of her Majesty's letter by Sentleger, congratulates her on her accession, and accepts her professions of friendship. His sentiments of reciprocity will be conveyed to her Majesty by M. de Noailles, his Ambassador Resident, and by M. de Gye and the Bishop of Orleans, whom he has specially sent for that purpose. [French. Signed by his Majesty, and countersigned by Bochetel. Broadside.]
Aug. 17.
Brussels.
14. Mary, Queen Regent of Flanders, to same. A few days before his death the late King of England had signified his intention to recall Sir Thomas Chamberlain his Ambassador Resident here, and to substitute Sir Philip Hoby in that capacity. Chamberlain's return having been retarded by some private affairs, and the settlement of some proceedings before the Privy Council of the Emperor, he has requested her to explain the cause of delay to her Majesty. [French. Broadside. Indorsed by Petre.]
Aug. 18.
Camp at Hen.
15. The Constable Montmorency to same. Complimentary acknowledgment of her Majesty's letter of the 8th curt. conveyed to him by Sir Anthony Sentleger. [French. One page.]
Aug. 20.
Venice.
16. Peter Vannes to same. Reiterates the adulatory congratulations in his letter of the 13th. Although since his Majesty's death he has received no communication of events in England from the Council, they being better occupied with her service; yet such as he has had knowledge of by means of private friends he has not letted, openly and privately, to set forth to her honour, whose reputation here is so great that few men could believe unless they that do presently see, feel, and hear it. Will continue his habit of sending information of the occurrents here. Within the last few days the Turk's army, after long wandering here and there with some poor souls hurt, has set upon the island Elba, situate in the Tyrrhene sea between Tuscany, Genoa, and Corsica, a place of great importance and wealth belonging to the Duke of Florence, ten miles from Piombino, and lately well strengthened and fortified by the Duke, while the French gallies have gone to certain havens of Sienna, not far distant, to receive 4,500 foot under the guiding of M. de Thermes. Meantime, as they write from Rome on the 16th, the Turk's army set upon the principal haven, called Porto Ferraro, broke the chains, got the same and therewith two gallies and a galeon of the Duke of Florence. When the French gallies and soldiers join them it is thought they will assault and take all the fortresses there, because they may not be easily rescued and helped. The importance of Elba consists in its situation, by which the navigation between Genoa and Sicily may be greatly impeached; and if it is then gotten the French and Turks will set upon Corsica. To withdraw the French from Elba the Duke of Florence has set forth an army against the state of Sienna . . . . . The Cardinal of Ferrara, being at Sienna, is urged to be a mean with his best endeavour that the Turk's army may depart from Elba, or some agreement be taken betwixt the French King and the Siennese with the Duke of Florence. Beseeches most humbly and on his knees, to be received into her Majesty's precious favour and service. [Four pages. The last leaf mutilated.]
Aug. 22.
Brussels.
17. Mary, Queen Regent of Flanders, to Queen Mary. Commendatory of Sir Philip Hoby on his revocation. [French. Broadside. Indorsed by Petre.]
Eod. die.
Brussels.
18. Same to same. Had received by Sir Thomas Cheyne, her Treasurer, her Majesty's letter of the 6th inst., and heard from him the desire for mutual amity and good feeling expressed by her Majesty. Fully reciprocates these sentiments, and will do all in her power to maintain them; such also being the desire of the Emperor. [French. Broadside. Indorsed by Petre.]
August 24.
Guisnes.
19. Lord Grey to the Council. Having this day heard that a number of French were abroad in the Boulognois, sent half a score horse to reconnoitre, who on the way to Ardres, met 900 or 1,000 foot repairing to occupy that garrison in room of those who had left. His men spoke with the captain, who gave them very gentle words. He is an ancient gentleman and seems to be an old soldier, and but a stranger in these parts. The men have forgot his name, but hopes to be able to mention it in his next with further knowledge of the occasion of his coming thither. To-day there has arrived here from France, an Englishman named Collinson, lately serjeant to Windebank's band here, who having in a fray wounded a man, as it was supposed mortally, had fled to France, where he has served, but the man having recovered he is come home to make his peace. He reports that the French King is at an abbey two leagues from Amyns [Amiens] and that to Corbie have come 12,000 Swiss. Besides Amiens are encamped 16,000 French, and of the Rhinegrave's band, with 8,000 horse. These all intend without fail to enter the Emperor's country between Peronne and St. Quentin, and will march in two or three days. Also that the Emperor's army has retired from besides Orleans two leagues towards Arras, to refresh the men and horses, taking all the corn that they find on the ground and sending it threshed into Arras. Further that there is a secret talk in the French camp that peace will shortly be had between the Emperor and them, and that then the French will have a saying at England. [One page and a half.]
August 25.
dine in Friuli.
20. Count Ludovico Rangone to Queen Mary. Offers his condolence on the death of King Edward, her brother, and his congratulations on her Majesty's accession to the throne. Requests her to remember the long devotion of himself and his son Pallavicino to the crown of England. [Italian. One page.]
August 25.
Brussels.
21. The Bishop of Norwich [Thirlby], Sir Philip Hoby, Sir R. Morysine, and Sir Thomas Cheyne to Queen Mary. Their delay has been occasioned by the Regent feasting of them, to show how dearly her Majesty is loved by the Emperor and her Grace. Yesterday, the Feast of St. Bartholomew, they dined with her, and had such a dinner as they have seen few the like in all their lives. Greater carving and entertainment by her Grace to Sir Thomas Cheyne could not be devised. Narrates their ceremonial positions at table. Sends notice of this for fear the Emperor's Ambassador should have departed before her Majesty might have knowledge hereof. [One page and a half. Printed by Tytler, except last sentence, Vol. ii., p. 235.]
August 25.
Brussels.
22. The Emperor Charles V. to same. Congratulates her Majesty on her succession; all circumstances attending which he has learned by the Sieur de Cheyney, K.G., and Treasurer of her household; and expresses his satisfaction at the appointment of the Bishop of Norwich as Resident Ambassador. [French. Signed by the Emperor, and countersigned by Bavé. Broadside.]
August 25.
Brussels.
23. Same to same. Re-credentials of Sir Richard Morysine, revoked. [French. Signed by the Emperor, and countersigned by Bavé. Broadside.]
August 25.
Brussels.
24. Same to same. Re-credentials of Sir Philip Hoby, revoked. [French. Signed by the Emperor, and countersigned by Bavé. Broadside.]
August 26.
Brussels.
25. The Queen Regent of Flanders to same. Commendatory of Sir Richard Morysine, on being recalled from his embassy to the Emperor Charles V. [French. Broadside. Indorsed by Petre.]
Sept. 25.
Mariemont.
26. Same to same. In favour of the bearer, Robert Waldegrave, who has conducted himself well in her service, and has requested permission to be present at her Majesty's coronation. [French. Broadside. Indorsed by Petre.]
August 31.
Strasburg.
27. Christopher Mount to the Council. Duke Augustus, the brother of Maurice, has returned from Denmark to Saxony, and, it is said, intends to keep the Electorship and lands pertaining thereto as Maurice had done, but offers to John Frederick other lands and places for them. John Frederick has sent Ambassadors to the Emperor and the Kings of Denmark and the Romans. The Marquis of Brandenburg is in the city of Brunswick, and is supposed to be destitute of money and to be unable to do anything next year and less the next. The Duke of Brunswick is with his troops in the country of his cousin Eric, who is with the Marquis against Henry. During this month the Emperor has sent one Lazarus Schuendi to the Duke of Brunswick and to Augustus to make a league with them against the Marquis, but they are reported to have refused, and it is supposed the Emperor only intended thereby to get the men of war into his hands, as many know that before the overthrow there had been a privy intelligence between the Marquis and the Emperor. The Bishops of Bamberg and Wurtzburg have been besieging for more than a month a strong castle of the Marquis called Blassen berg: in one assault they lost upwards of 300 men, and have now raised the siege. The Emperor has prorogued the indict Diet till the 1st of October. [Two pages.]


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