Mary
May 1557

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Institute of Historical Research

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William B. Turnbull (editor)

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1861

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300-312

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'Mary: May 1557', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Mary: 1553-1558 (1861), pp. 300-312. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70445 Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


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Contents

May 1557

May 1.
Rome.
596. Intelligence from Rome. After the capture and destruction of Monte Fortino, Giulio Orsino went to Carpinetto, or, as some say, to Piglio, and Marc Antonio Colonna came to meet him with large reinforcements more of country-people than soldiers, whence he was forced to withdraw himself into Paliano with some disorder, having run the risk of losing not only men but artillery, and if he had not been assisted by the cavalry would have been in bad case; as far as can be seen, he does not intend to try another enterprise at present with the same troops, the Imperialists daily adding to their numbers in Anagni and in the other frontiers. The Duke of Paliano has not yet left. Marshal Strozzi has not yet departed for the Romagna, but will go soon; although it has been said by some just now that his departure would be uncertain. The Gascons leave for the camp, and at present are to join the army; the others who embarked in the French gallies at Civita Vecchia, and who are said not to exceed a thousand, wait orders from the Duke of Guise. The Italians who were to have gone with the Duke of Paliano are daily approaching by way of Reati. Captain Paolino came here, and has returned to Civita Vecchia, and it is said that Sig. Paolo Orsino will resign the Governorship of Perugia and go to Campo, and will be succeeded by Sig. Torquato Conte. It is said that many burdens will be laid on the whole of the States of the Church, and that one per cent. will be charged on real property, and it is still said that in the first Consistory they will proceed to confiscations, as has been often said. Hears for certain that Cardinal Caraffa has been to the castle and liberated the Cardinal of Perugia, and has taken him to kiss the feet of his Holiness. He has given security to the amount of 30,000 crowns not to leave Rome. It is reported that the Duke of Alva is at Sulmona, where he has levied a great mass of troops and cavalry for aid of the Abruzzo, and that the French are battering Civitella.
2. From Pesaro, of same date. A gentleman from the Duke of Guise has arrived in Pesaro, in order to obtain munitions and bread, and he says that the French army was before Civitella, which was defended by Count Santofiore, with 8,000 ensigns of infantry; that it was fortified and excellently munitioned, in a strong position, upon a craggy mountain, where the Imperialists had thought that artillery could not be planted, but that by a new method at his departure they had already drawn up six guns by ropes to a place 30 paces from the gate, and if rain had not come on would have brought up the rest, hoping by battery and sap to destroy its defences. That the Roman troops had joined the Duke of Soma and the Duke of Atri, to whom all these places had delivered their keys, and had agreed to give him the obedience of Atri, which was very well guarded by Imperialists, and these offered to give him 3,000 pioneers for the enterprise of Atri and Civitella. That those in Civitella by 300 at a time had twice sallied out and provoked a skirmish, where they were valorously repulsed by the French, who put them to the ground, and at length drove them back to the ramparts, many being left dead, wherefore the Duke of Guise had issued orders that no person should go out of the trenches under pain of death, in order to avoid a useless loss of men. In this engagement he lost, by a shot from the defenders, one of his best horses.
3. From Rimini, of same date. They have advices from Ancona that the prisoners, namely, the Governor, Lieutenant, and soldiers, were liberated without ransom, and that after the French camp had battered Civitella for some days the defenders conferred as to an agreement. [Italian. Two pages and a quarter.]
May 2.
Rome.
597. Sir Edward Carne to King Philip and Queen Mary. As the bearer, Mr. Pinnyng, leaves with diligence, and will probably arrive before the post that departed hence on the 24th ult., recapitulates the contents of his letter of that date. On the said 24th ult. the French gallies at Pontia returned to Civita Vecchia, the island, as they say, being too bare for them to tarry there. At Civita Vecchia they landed 1,500 French soldiers; next day the captain of the gallies came hither to the Pope, and his vessels, it is said, will return to Marseilles forthwith, leaving the soldiers behind them. It is likewise said that the Duke of Guise will not attempt to invade Naples, unless the Duke of Paliano, who is still at the Court here, accompanies him. The decree revoking the Legate is not yet out, and some think that the Pope will not be so hasty in enforcing it as he was in decreeing it. Hears that Cardinal Caraffa would gladly the Pope used moderation therein; and is minded, if he could spy a time to have his Holiness in a good mood, to move him thereof. Is advised by Cardinal Morone in no wise to move the Pope therein. Hears that a great man is on his way from France as Ambassador here, and that the Pope sends to France the Cardinal of Pisa, and with him the son of the Duke of Paliano, called the Marquis of Canea, who is said to be sent to be brought up in the French Court and to remain there as hostage, because the French here are not contented because the Pope will not deliver to them the holts of the Church. They would also have the Pope deprive his Majesty of the realm of Naples and give a new investiture of it to the French King, else they say they will not jeopard to enter into the said realm. As far as he can learn the Pope will do neither, since he thinks it not expedient for the Church or the quietness of Christendom. Whatever the French do attempt, understands that the Duke of Alva is in such readiness, that if they should venture there they are like to be met withal. It is also reported that Walfrancs [Villafranca], in Piedmont, is taken by the French; trusts it be not so. [Two pages and a half.]
May 6.
La Ferté Milon.
598. Dr. Wotton to Secretaries Sir John Bourne and Dr. Boxall. During the time Sir William Petre held office, was in the habit of troubling him with letters containing such matters as might or might not be considered worthy of her Majesty's attention, leaving it to Petre's discretion to make such use of them as he deemed fitting. The like fashion he will be glad to use with Boxall, trusting he will treat his communications as Petre did. The French King has commanded not only the Arrière-Ban but also the gentlemen of his household to be in readiness, whereby it is thought he will shortly be personally in the camp, which some suppose will be at Laon, others at Abbeville; but such secresy is maintained, even in the smallest things, that few can know them. It is thought that if Thomas Stafford takes any place in England, all the English here will be sent to him, besides other aid. Dudley is still at Court. The English here who sue for pardon are in perplexity; for fear of war they would fain go hence, but poverty prevents them all, save Sir N. Throckmorton who purposes to depart. Prays God the others of desperation forget not their duty ! News have arrived of the taking of Chierasco by assault; the Italians and landsknechts were slain; but the Spaniards withdrew to and kept a fort until assurance was given that their lives should be spared. Brissac writes that this victory is to be ascribed to the Vidame of Chartres, who behaved most valiantly. The Dauphin has come to Court, apparently well recovered. M. de Montmorency and the Duchess of Castres were married on Tuesday the 4th inst. either not esteeming or else not considering that their Nostrodamus in his prognostications said on this day should be made an unlucky marriage. They are so occupied about the war that few pastimes were made at the marriage. Both Tutty's and Crayer's bands are cassed, because it is said some of the former's band would have done him displeasure.
P.S.—The rumour of war between France and England is so prevalent, that it is said the Ambassadors of both countries have orders to depart. The Rhinegrave is said to have made up his band of 20 ensigns of landsknechts, and 500 horsemen of those who carry dags, called here pistolets, who are all together in Lorraine. The King leaves here on the 10th, whither knows not, but the Queen remains for a while. [Cipher, deciphered. Three pages.]
May 7.
La Ferté Milon.
599. Dr. Wotton to the Council. Communicates a letter from the Constable and the substance of his arguments with Testu, the Constable's Secretary, in reference to the seizure of some goods belonging to Bartholomew Compeigne and other merchants, not native but naturalized Englishmen, in a vessel of Flanders; whereby they will perceive that, contrary to the previous understanding that such cases were to be determined by the King's Privy Council, the French insist on the matter being remitted to the Admiralty, in which case sentence will pass against them, for they will follow the laws maritime. And although the English might appeal from it, yet that were a process of three or four years, and at the last to no profit; and although the King had not so remitted it, but caused it to be ended here in the Council, yet should the merchants have been never a whit the better thereby, seeing they take it that their law maritime is nothing derogated in this point. [Three pages.] Incloses,
599. I. Letter from the Constable. Villers-Cote-Retz, 6 May. [French. One page.]
May 7.
St. Peter's.
600. Pope Paul IV. to Queen Mary. Bull appointing John [Christopherson] to the bishopric of Chichester in room of George [Day] deceased. [Latin. Broadside on vellum.]
May 8.
Rome.
601. Sir Edward Carne to King Philip and Queen Mary. In the Consistory yesterday the provision of the church of Chichester passed according to the promise of his Holiness. It has been reported for the last five days, and is now believed certain, that the army of the Duke of Guise is now in Naples about Civitella, with which is joined all the Pope's army of horse and foot, both such as were with Antonio di Caraffa, otherwise called Marquis de Bello Monte, and those that were at the taking of Monte Fortino, as well as the men of war that were here also, except such as keep the garrison of Paliano and Velletri. Is informed, however, that Civitella is so strong, and so placed upon a mountain, that they cannot batter or assault it; that the Count de Santofiore is in it with 1,500 soldiers well appointed; and that it is well victualled and provided with all munitions, so that both their armies cannot hurt it. Indeed it is plainly said that the Duke of Guise is in despair thereof. Antonio di Caraffa arrived here on the 4th, having had a variance with the Duke of Guise about the placing of certain noblemen of France who are with the Duke, who gave him such words that Caraffa thought it should not stand with his honour to tarry there. This matter being declared to the Pope, he expressed such discontent with the Duke that Cardinal Morone showed Carne that if any Ambassador had commission from his Majesty to treat with the Pope he might have had a good time with him. Was also informed by Cardinal Morone that neither Antonio di Caraffa nor the Duke of Paliano will go to the Duke of Guise's camp; but if any do go, he thinks that Cardinal Caraffa shall. Likewise that the Pope has deferred the making out of the decree of the revocation of the Legate, and will have it proposed on the signature of the Inquisition, where are many Cardinals to see what is most meet to be done therein. Cardinal Morone therefore wished him to inform these Cardinals of the Inquisition how expedient it is to have the legateship continued in England, which he intends to do, as in so doing Morone has good hope that the "legacy" shall continue as it was. The Cardinal further showed him that the Pope's army has gone here and there for lack of wages, having had none since January last. Only four hundred at most of his troops remain in camp with the Duke of Guise. The Cardinal of Pusa [Perugia], brother of Ascanio della Cornia, has been liberated from St. Angelo, on sureties of 30,000 ducats not to leave the city without licence from the Pope. [Three pages and a quarter.]
May 8.
Rome.
602. Intelligence from Rome. Yesterday in Consistory the Pope incidentally showed much desire for peace, and displeasure that King Philip did not display greater compunction, and declared that he stands always with his arms open, and much to the same purpose, which give some hopes of good. The enterprise of Civitella turned out to be more difficult than was expected, especially it is said, as the Duke of Alva is in the field with a large number of troops and good cavalry near Civitella, and a good part of the infantry having departed, the forces of the Duke of Guise are weak in some points; however, the Duke of Paliano was to go thither to-morrow and provide what was necessary, and not only bring together the troops who are partly disbanded, but also raise others, if he shall judge it to be necessary. It is four days since Strozzi left privately with Montaigu only, it is not known what road he has taken, though some say that he has gone on board a frigate to visit some place.
Same day. Nothing new is known but that to-morrow or next day the Duke of Paliano goes to the camp, and will settle the slight difference which had arisen between the Duke of Guise and the Marquis of Montebello, who on that account had come away to Rome; on the other hand Mons. de Guise has commanded M. Sipier to give his account, from which Sipier understood that the enterprise of Civitella had turned out to be very difficult, but was not such as that its occupation need be despaired of, at least by sap. Count Santofiore is in the city, some say by choice, some by necessity. The bull of one per cent. is not yet published; it is believed that it will appear in a few days, and in the meanwhile these ministers do their best to provide as much money as they can. The report touching the convocation of the Cardinals seems to have subsided, and when it comes to pass it is thought that the ultramontane Cardinals will not be summoned. [Italian. One page and a quarter.]
Attached to the preceding is a printed "Relatione del Gran conflitto seguito contro trè poderosi Vascelli Corsari, e la presa della Capitana di quelli fatta dalle Galere della Sacra Religione di San Giovanni. Ad instanza di Gioseppe Elmi. In Roma. Con licenza de' Superiori." [4to. Four pages.]
May 11.
Dover.
603. Christiana, Duchess of Lorraine, to Queen Mary. Returns thanks to her Majesty for the attentions shown to her while in England, and recommends the gentlemen who now return from escorting her hither on her way home. [French. Holograph. Two pages.]
May 14.
La Ferté Milon.
604. Dr. Wotton to the Council. On the 7th had sent by one of his servants a letter containing the Constable's answer concerning the matter of Bartholomew Compeigne and other denizens of England. Within two or three days thereafter it was declared to the factors of these merchants, and to other nations who had goods in the ship taken, that the sentence given against them in the Admiral's Court was confirmed by the King and his Council, being conformable to their laws, which they intend to observe and keep. So the matter is ended, without further appeal. Understands that the Admiral with his friends made earnest suit in this matter against the merchants; in a manner threatening that neither he nor others would send ships to the sea unless the King maintained the maritime laws. Having obtained his purpose, the Admiral has returned to Picardy. The King has gone to Paris, but will be here again on Saturday, as there is some talk that a number of Swiss and Gascons are appointed to come and serve on this side; if this be true, the camp will be larger than he thought any should have been here this year. [Partly cipher, deciphered. One page and a half.]
May 11.
La Ferté Milon.
605. Same to Secretaries Sir John Bourne and Dr. Boxall. The person who gave him first knowledge of Thomas Stafford's enterprise upon Scarborough, has shown him a little plot which Ashton has desired to be drawn out. This plot contains Hampton, and over against that the Isle of Wight: then, following the coast, Poole, and beyond that another place, the name of which was so ill-written that he could not read it. Next Waynemouth [Weymouth], and then another place, also very ill written, but it seems to be Pontland, or Portland, or another like thereto, "and this place is a castle set on a hill or a rock somewhat far in the sea, not as in an island, but there is a narrow way that goeth from the land unto it;" and this is the very place which Asheton will have drawn and delivered to the French King, and intends to take. It were therefore well to have an eye to this place, for Asheton is a craftier fox than Thomas Stafford; and if henceforth any thing be taken as Scarborough was, it is probable that so many besides the English will be put into it that its recovery will not be so easy as that of Scarborough was. Dudley and one Layton are still at the Court, about some notable enterprise, as he hears, but matters are kept so secret that he can learn nothing. His informant thinks it is upon some plan towards Scotland. Prays God Berwick be well provided for. Dudley and his mates laugh merrily at Thomas Stafford's chance, and call him King of Scarborough: his chief councillor they say was Stowell, whom they call his Lord Treasurer, and say he must needs have good success who uses the advice of such councillors. Is credibly informed that Asheton earnestly makes shift to borrow money, probably wherewith to attempt something. Hears that a Scot who was in favour with the Duke of Northumberland is now in her Majesty's service, and communicates all that he can learn in England to Florence de Diaceto; if such there be, it were not amiss to have an eye to him. The Duke of Guise is said to have taken Civitella in the realm of Naples, and Brissac to be beating Asti with good hope to have it. The Ambassador of Ferrara is again sent in post to his master. [Cipher, deciphered. Two pages and a half.]
May 15.
Rome.
606. Sir Edward Carne to King Philip and Queen Mary. According to the advice of Cardinal Morone, as mentioned in his letter of the 8th, he informed all the Cardinals of the good proceedings and reformations made by Cardinal Pole in England, as well in clero as in populo, and of his having called a synod of the clergy, wherein many good ordinances had been passed and many more were in hand. These, if the legacy were revoked, would be stayed, which might produce very dangerous consequences in the realm unless such reformation were made; and he had desired them to weigh all this when the matter was moved among them, further pointing out the inconveniences likely to spring from his Grace's revocation. The Cardinals fully concurred, and said the circumstances rather called for the sending of a Legate, had none been there, than the revoking of him; recommending him to move his Holiness therein. Wherefore upon the 12th he waited upon the Pope on pretence of thanking him for his provision of the church at Chichester and commendations of her Majesty in the Consistory; when the Pope prevented him, saying he was glad of Carne's coming, and trusted that God had sent him, as on the previous day Cardinal Pacheco had shown him the good inclination of his Majesty to have peace with him and the Church, and that he had also received a letter from Cardinal Pole to the like effect. This, his Holiness said, he liked very well, and held up his hands beseeching Almighty God to continue his Majesty in that good mind; as for himself, he coveted nothing more, yea, though he shall sustain great damage thereby, he will win his Majesty if he can. The Pope denied his having refused to hear Francisco Pacheco or others from his Majesty, and was desirous that such an impression should be removed from his mind, requesting him to write to her Majesty thereof, and pray her to advertise the King that there was no lack on the part of his Holiness. Then referring to Pole's revocation, his Holiness stated that this had been done already, not to prejudice anything in England, but because it was not convenient that any Legate should be in any of the King's dominions, for which reason he had recalled his Nuncios from Naples, Spain, and elsewhere: yet for all that if her Majesty would write to him for a continuance of his Legate in England he should restore him to such authority as her Majesty should think expedient. Had besought his Holiness not to suffer the revocation to pass, since if it were once known abroad it should be a great comfort to the wicked and discomfort to the good, whereby many inconveniences might ensue. The Pope replied that what was done could not be undone. Said his Holiness had not gone so far in his decree but that he might moderate it and not extend it to England, which in all his proceedings he had showed he would have separate from his Majesty's realms, though now he set it as far forth as any of the others: wherefore urged reconsideration. The Pope to this observed that it could not stand with the Majesty of the place that he sat in to revoke any part of the decree solemnly given in full Consistory. After further argumentative remonstrance, which he took in good part, his Holiness said, he must needs do for England what he could, and as there was a congregation of the Inquisition next day, the matter should therein be proponed, when he would do his best, and willed Carne to resort to the Cardinal of St. Jacobo to inform him that he might propone it. Had seen the Cardinal previously, but nevertheless went again to show him the Pope's pleasure. The matter had occupied the whole time of the Congregation, and next morrow the conclusion was that the Pope himself should answer Carne. Had he not gone to him the decree would have issued, but this evening he had been with his Holiness to know what was to be done: the Pope was still obstinate and would not revoke the decree, yet was content to stay until her Majesty should write, and charged the Notary and his Secretary Beringo, not to intimate the recal without his special orders. Thus the matter is for the present stayed. There is jarring betwixt the Pope and the French, with whom he is nothing contented nor they with him. All the Italians whom he had in the French camp have left: the French handled them very ill and vilely, especially Signor Antonio di Caraffa, the Pope's nephew, so that it is thought his Holiness would turn the leaf if his Majesty had any one here to treat with him. On the 10th the Duke of Paliano left this for the Duke of Guise's camp, which is still at the siege of Civitella; it is said that they may lie long enough before the place as they cannot hurt it much with battery. It is said that there are 2,000 soldiers in the town under the Count of Santofiore, and many of the French are slain; but others say that it is in danger of being taken, because the French occupy a hill whence they beat sore into the town, and have withdrawn certain waters from and undermine it. Yet most think they will lose their labour, because of its great strength. The gallies of Marseilles arrived at Civita Vecchia six or seven days ago, bringing 12 more ensigns of French to reinforce their army, and he hears that they return to fetch more in room of those who have perished. Of these twelve ensigns the French Ambassador selected 300, whom he sent to the Duke of Guise well furnished; the rest he discharged, but all the rest who came have gone to the camp to such captains as will retain them to supply the loss of others. Hears that Antonio di Caraffa does not intend to return to the camp, and that the Duke of Alva was within 16 miles of the French with a great army of horse and foot; but what he does is not spoken of here for want of communication, as there is such strait keeping and dangerous passing. There are ill news from Piedmont, the French being reported to have taken Chierasco. Hears that if the French are not withstood in time, they will do much hurt in Italy. The Pope sets forth a bull for money, levying one per cent. on all the lands in the States of the Church, which it is thought will produce two or three millions if it be paid. [Fourteen pages.]
May 15.
Rome.
607. Intelligence from Rome and elsewhere. 1. From Rome, May 15. An opinion that there will be an agreement is current here, and Cardinal Pacheco has beeen closeted with the Pope and Cardinal Caraffa. The Duke of Paliano leaves for the army, and with him goes Marshal Strozzi, who, it is understood, will be soon here. A plot has been discovered at Paliano of some Calabrian soldiers, who left Anagni pretending to be unpaid and ill-treated; were received in Paliano and placed in these companies, and came to Rome with the knowledge and by order of Captain Pistolese, who is in Anagni. At the proper time they sent a countryman into Anagni, to learn when the Imperialists should present themselves there; he was not to return with the answer, but to place it outside in some spot where one of the soldiers should go and take it. The countryman did so, but it is said that, being seen by a lady, the letter came to the hands of the captain in Paliano, whereby the plot was discovered, and all the traitors, said to be 40 in number, were taken. These gentry say they desire to make a new expedition with 6,000 infantry, but it seems that they have some difficulty in finding leaders.
2. From Pesaro, of same date. Nothing is heard from Civitella, except that the bombardment was going on, and they were waiting to undermine it, but the continual rain for six days had been a great hindrance. The place being very strong, both in site and fortifications, it is doubtful whether it will be taken otherwise, and it will cost them dear. Everybody speaks of the prudence, valour, and humanity of the Duke of Guise, and the camp is abundantly supplied with everything. The Duke of Urbino sends five ensigns of his troops to the Duke of Ferrara, and there have gone at present more than 300 men.
3. From Rimini, of 17th May. Yesterday came a courier with news from the French camp that they had taken four ensigns of the Duke of Alva's horse. The Duke had come to aid Civitella. The particulars are not known.
4. From Ancona, of 15th May. By what was understood yesterday from one who came from the camp, the French still bombard Civitella, and those within defend themselves bravely. Yesterday the army was to have given a general assault, but by a post arrived this night it is understood that "andavano sopracedendo," and the post came to summon the two ensigns of infantry to proceed immediately to the camp. The Duke of Alva is 12 miles on this side of Civitella, coming to its aid with 18,000 infantry and 3,000 cavalry.
5. From some place, of same date. Advices have arrived that the Duke of Alva is 10 miles on this side of Civitella, with from 12,000 to 14,000 infantry and 2,000 cavalry, and had given orders to reconnoitre the French camp with 400 horse, whence they returned, after a smart skirmish, with slight loss. It is thought that the French will not take Civitella, because they are inferior in numbers, and the more so as it is understood that the Count di Populo is coming from the other side, by way of Aquila, with other 6,000 infantry and 1,000 horse. [Two pages. Italian.]
May 18.
Calais.
608. Lord Wentworth to Queen Mary. The countrymen fortify the bulwark on this side as actively as can be wished. Arrived here last Saturday. Attempts are likely to be made upon Renti. Has sent to watch the proceedings of the French by land and sea. Has sent supply of grain to Guisnes, which indeed was very necessary. [One page. Mutilated.]
May 21.
Mantua.
609. The Marquis of Pescara to same. Credentials of Maestro Giovanni Francisco Arrivabene, Envoy to her Majesty. [Half a page. Italian. Indorsed by Petre.]
Eod. die.
Mantua.
610. Margaret, Dowager Duchess of Mantua, to same. Credentials of the aforesaid Giovanni Francisco Arrivabene. [Italian. Half a page. Indorsed by Petre.]
May 22.
Mantua.
611. William, Duke of Mantua, to same. Credentials of the aforesaid Arrivabene. [Italian. Half a page. Indorsed by Petre.]
[1557.] May 22.
Rome.
612. Intelligence from Rome. It is as it were decided that there shall not be war; his Holiness is altogether averse from it, and has written to the King of Spain to show him sufficient reasons that it is for his benefit that they should not take to arms in Italy, but the important thing is to keep his Majesty from doing it himself, and from irritation availing himself of the opportunity of the Turkish fleet, seeing he is already resolved not to fail Duke Octavio, as is manifest by the provision of money which he has made in Italy, having ordered Duke Horatio to come to Parma with many nobles, and that a royal army shall be raised for the defence of Rome. Cornelio Bentivoglio has already arrived at Mirandola, and Pietro Strozzi on the 9th was at Lyons, expecting Duke Horatio with the Duke of Nemours, Marquis of Rocca, Mons. Sipier and others, who will all come into Italy in company with his Excellency, who on the 5th was married and will be General of the cavalry as Strozzi will be of the Italian infantry, and De Thermes Commanderin-Chief of the whole. It is sufficient that the Pope, who formerly was so resolved upon war, now inspired by the spirit of fear only waits to remedy it, and does not kindle the fire, but demonstrates it to be pernicious to all Christendom. Matters will be put out of doubt by the answer which his Holiness expects from the Emperor and the King of France, and which cannot be long of appearing. He has ordered Alessandro Vitelli to Bologna, so that the city may not remain without a Governor in these commotions, and sends the Cardinal of St. George to his legation of the Romagna. It is said that Cardinal Farnese is going to stay at Castello this summer with his sister, but has not yet wished to prorogue the term "del monito" of Duke Octavio, resolved to pronounce prout in cedula. Dragut has done some damage in Calabria, and it is believed goes to meet the Turkish fleet. [Italian. One page.]
1557. May 22.
Brussels.
613. Emanuel Philibert, Duke of Savoy, to Queen Mary. Recommending to her notice the bearer William Drury, whose service to their Majesties in the war is deserving of employment and remembrance. [French. One page. Indorsed by Petre.]
May 22.
Rome.
614. Sir Edward Carne to King Philip and Queen Mary. Since his letters of the 15th inst. there have been no occurrents, except that on the 18th the Pope called a Congregation at Rome of all the Cardinals, where the bull for the imposition of one per cent. on all the stablished goods under the Church, as well mediate as immediate, was passed. Advertised them in his last that this was in treaty. Hears of nothing yet done by the French in the war in these parts, except that a Marquis, brother to the Duke of Guise, was slain by Civitella with many others of the French. The Pope has sent out captains to levy 6,000 men out of hand, to be sent to the late-made Duke of Paliano, who is with the Duke of Guise in the camp. Some say here that the Duke will not permit him to leave it. Can hear of no soldiers the Pope has there besides the French. It is said here that the Duke of Guise has removed from the siege with his chief force, leaving 3,000 men in a strong defensible place to keep the siege, to stay, as men say here, the army of the Duke of Alva from rescuing Civitella. The Duke of Alva, it is also said, is near Atri on the Tronto. It is reported also that a plot got up by 32 gentlemen of Ferrara, by which they would have betrayed the city, has been disclosed. Ten or eleven of them have been taken and the city kept shut this fortnight, so that no man may go in or out. Incloses a chart of the plat of Civitella and of its siege. [Two pages.]
May 23.
Calais.
615. Lord Wentworth and the Council at Calais to Queen Mary. On circumspect consideration and view of the stores and munitions, they are found to be so defective and unserviceable that unless speedily repaired and put in better estate they will be utterly lost. The bearer, Mr. Highfield, Master of the Ordnance, will declare the full particulars. Entreat that immediate order may be given for supplement of the lacks. [One page. Printed by Lord Hardwicke, "Miscellaneous State Papers," Vol. i., p. 103.]
May 24.
Pampeluna.
616. The Duke of Alva (?) to Queen Mary. Sends his relative Juan de Mercado to pay his respects to her Majesty, being prevented from doing so in person. [Spanish. One page.]
May 25.
Brussels.
617. Emanuel Philibert, Duke of Savoy, to same. The bearer Gothart de Bochotz, Seigneur de Grenenbrocks and de Hermondt, has shown him that money is still due to him in England for service done to the late King Henry VIII., and in virtue of a certain report on the arbitration of the Commissioners of the Emperor and King Henry VIII., which should have been sent to her Majesty. The bearer has just returned from a legation to the King of Denmark, wherein he has acquitted himself very well. [French. One page.]
May 26.
[Westminster.]
618. King Philip and Queen Mary to Sir Edward Carne. Send by bearer the King's letters in a separate packet addressed to Cardinal Hequeca [Pacheco] and those of their Majesties', jointly directed to the Pope with another writing by their Bishops. As they have caused instructions to be drawn and sent to him by which he may at good length perceive what order they will have him to follow in delivering the same letters and in his other doings in that behalf, refer him to those instructions and desire him to follow them, unless in such accidents as could not be foreseen by their Majesties, in which case they refer him to Cardinal Morone and others mentioned in the said instructions. [Minute. Autograph of Petre. One page.]
May 28.
Calais.
619. Lord Wentworth to Queen Mary. Has perfect intelligence that at Newhaven, in Normandy, 16 sail are in full readiness for the sea, but where to be employed cannot with certainty learn. Orders are given to Dieppe to prepare all they can, and 20 ships are now being rigged there, which when ready are to go to Scotland with M. de Baudillon [Bourdillon], one of the Order and Lieutenant of Nemours. Lord Grange is presently at Dieppe, tarrying only the wind to pass in to Scotland. The French King expects the Rhinegrave to be at Verdun, in Lorraine, at the end of the month, with several thousand German foot and 2,000 horse, to serve, it is thought, upon these frontiers of Picardy. The King is in person in Champagne, and there assembles as great a force as he can, minding to be in the field before the middle of next month. Although he does all that in him lies to preserve the amity by friendly means, yet there is a great rumour among the French of a breach betwixt her Majesty and them. Thinks it very necessary that the men appointed hither, with money, provisions, and all requisite supplies, should be immediately sent over, as the number here are scant able to defend the pieces from a sudden attack. Her Majesty having freely bestowed upon him certain lands in Suffolk, which by reason of being ordered hither he could not go through, beseeches that some special friend in his absence may be permitted to put her in remembrance in his behalf. [One page.]
May 29.
[Westminster.]
620. King Philip and Queen Mary to Dr. Wotton. Recalling him from his legation in France, peace being ended. [One page.]
Draft of the preceding, indorsed May 26.
May 29.
[Westminster.]
621. Queen Mary to Henry II., King of France. Because of his long residence and advancing years, as well as for other respects which he shall declare to his Majesty, has thought good to assent to Dr. Wotton's petition to be recalled, and requests licence for his safe departure. [Minute. One page and a half.
May 29.
Calais.
622. Lord Wentworth to Queen Mary. All the men appointed from Suffolk, Norfolk, and Essex have arrived here to-day, with their captains and under captains; except one [company] that came from Essex which wanted a captain. One has been appointed here, and all are now officered by men of skill and knowledge, well trained in the service.
P.S.—Sir Thomas Knevet has not himself come, but this night is looked for by short seas. [Half a page.]


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