America and West Indies
July 1685

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Institute of Historical Research

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J. W. Fortescue (editor)

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1899

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61-71

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'America and West Indies: July 1685', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 12: 1685-1688 and Addenda 1653-1687 (1899), pp. 61-71. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70492 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


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Contents

July 1685

July 1.
Barbados.
263. Interrogatories of Sir John Witham to John Reid and his answers thereto, to the effect that Witham was too weak and ill to appear at Sessions at his trial at the end of 1684, and that Sir Richard Dutton, on being informed thereof, said only, "Let him and his securities look to that." Sworn before the Commissioners. Copy. 2½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 1.]
July 1.
Barbados.
264. Deposition of Ralph Lane in answer to Sir John Witham. (1.) That Sir John Witham agreed to take a negro from Mary Gough in payment of a debt. (2.) That he gave this evidence, supported by another witness, at Sir John Witham's trial, when Judge Henry Walrond said that if there were a hundred witnesses against the King's evidence they were not to be taken notice of. (3.) That he has never heard a good word of Mary Gough, but knows only that she swore that she had given a negro to Sir John as a bribe, which she had really paid him as a debt. Sworn before the Commissioners. 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 2.]
July 3.265. Minutes of Council of Barbados. The Commissioners for taking depositions presented their report. On the motion of Henry Walrond, the time for taking depositions was extended. The Committee of public accounts presented their report concerning Richard Bate. Order for payment of 422l. to him, and of 156l. to Edmund Clipsham for work on the fortifications. Richard Bate to assign to the Treasurer 5,837 lbs. of sugar due to him from Mr. William Boleman. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XI., pp. 612–614.]
July 3.
Barbados.
266. Extract from Minutes of Council of Barbados. The motion of Henry Walrond for extending the time for taking evidence in Sir John Witham's affair. Copy, certified by Edwyn Stede. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 3.]
July 4.
Boston.
267. Laurent van den Bosck to the Bishop of London. Your Lordship will remember that I had the happiness to receive Ordination from you as a minister in Carolina, where I remained two years. While there I wrote to you. My first letter told you of my miserable condition in Carolina, my second shewed the impossibility of my remaining there, since the French could not contribute to my subsistence, the third informed you of my arrival at Boston. This fourth will inform you of the outrages done me by the independents of Boston, and which I still endure daily because I am a Minister of the Church of England, and uphold its interests and liturgy. Because I married two Anglicans and baptised others who desired to be members of that Church they have done me every imaginable outrage short of prison, the lash, and banishment, with which they have threatened me. Mr. Mather and Mr. Moody are the cause of these disorders, but I have never given way to them. Still, being alone against so many, and perpetually threatened, I beg your protection. Could I preach in English I should undoubtedly make good progress with the Anglican Church here, but being able only to preach in French I try to gather a French congregation, though I see little prospect of success, owing to the small number of French inhabitants. I shall not return to London until driven to the last extremity. Holograph. 1½ pp. French. Endorsed. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 4.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
268. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor Joseph West. An abstract of the King's circular of 26 June (see No. 253). Signed, Tho. Amy, P. Colleton. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., p. 62.]
July 6.
Jamaica.
269. Lieutenant-Governor Molesworth to William Blathwayt. We have no certain news of affairs in the South Seas, but we conclude they go ill for the Spaniard. Four sloops sent by the factors for advice as to the Assiento have not returned, being probably detained lest they should bring news of the success of the privateers. Certainly there are so many reports of that success that all people of uncertain fortunes are strangely tempted to join them. Luckily we re-took and brought back two boats that ran away from Port Royal, but others have got clear away from other ports. The Spaniards have treated our fishermen in the South Seas very ill, taking sloops and maltreating the people. They took one sloop, designing, under English colours, to surprise the negroes and person of Captain Davis, on the north side of the Island, but being met by the canoes of the French privateer Michel, they sailed into a creek till the coast was clear and then left for Cuba. Our people, who were acting under compulsion as pilots, by preconcerted signal ran the sloop ashore, and all leaped overboard at the same time. They are since returned, and report that the Spaniards threaten to make a second attempt. One or two men, who missed the signal to leap overboard, they believe to have been killed by the Spaniards (see No. 218). The north side of the Island was so much alarmed that I ordered Captain Stanley to cruise there until the time when he is to seek for the wrecks. I had hired a sloop, manned by his men, to go with him. She is with him now, and will be very useful. Copy of his instructions is enclosed (see No. 251). We hear that Captain Chandler, a trader, has been cut off near Trinidad or Cuba. Five periagos silently surrounded the vessel, killed the captain as he came out of the cabin, and easily became masters of the ship. One man jumped overboard and escaped by swimming, who says that all the rest were put to the sword, but how he knows it I cannot apprehend. I hope that Sir Philip Howard comes out fully instructed as to these affairs, for I do not know whether I did well or ill before in sending vessels to clear these coasts of pirates. But whatever my inclination, I could give no orders for want of a new commission, and was obliged to tell the people so, who pressed me to do it again. The inconvenience for want of this commission is great. The Judges refuse to sit, the gaols are crowded, and the Marshal complains much of the expense and difficulty of securing the criminals. Pray let me know when I may expect Sir Philip Howard. The French fleet is supposed to have designs on Vera Cruz. The trade of Europe will suffer if the pirates in the South Seas be not speedily suppressed. Signed, Hender Molesworth. Read to the King Sept. 27, '85. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXXI., pp. 71–77.]
July 6.
Barbados.
270. Order of the Commissioners for taking evidence in Sir John Witham's case for the better compilation of the depositions. Signed, Henry Quintyne, John Hothersall, John Gibbes, Hen. St. John, Wm. Walley. 1 p. Endorsed. Recd. 9 Sept. 85. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 5.]
July 7.
Barbados.
271. The Clerk of Assembly of Barbados to William Blathwayt. Forwarding proceedings of the Assembly. I shall want some of your ruled paper, which we cannot get in this country. Signed, Ri. Cartwright. ½ p. Endorsed. Recd. 1 Oct. 85. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 6, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VII., p. 303.]
July 10.
Barbados.
272. Governor Cranfield to Lords of Trade and Plantations. I left New Hampshire on the 9th of June, and arrived here on the 7th of July, having appointed Captain Barefoot my deputy in my absence. I should have taken advantage of your leave to come here last winter had not all the shipping left for the West Indies before the permission reached me. Signed, Edw. Cranfield. ½ p. Endorsed. Recd. 1 Oct. 85. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 7, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXVII., p. 147.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
273. Order of the King in Council. Report of Lords of Trade and Plantations. We have consulted the Commissioners of Customs as to the Act of Barbados for commutation of the four and a half per cent. duty, and in consequence of their representations (see No. 231), we advise that the Act be disallowed. Dated 20 June 1685. Ordered accordingly. Signed, Wm. Bridgeman. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VII., pp. 301–302.]
July 13.
Barbados.
274. The Deputy-Governor and Council of Barbados to Lords of Trade and Plantations. Forwarding quarterly returns of the transactions of the Council and of imports. Signed, Edwyn Stede, John Peers, Tho. Walrond, Robert Davers, Tim. Thornhill. 1 p. Endorsed. Read 17 Oct. 1685. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 8, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VII., p. 303.]
July 13.275. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Order for payment of 40l. to John Whetstone for his attendance on the Commissioners for taking depositions. The Commissioners made a second report. Council adjourned to house of Mr. Stede, who took the oaths and signed the test. Sir Richard Dutton delivered his Commission, Instructions, and other public papers to Mr. Stede, and desired a caveat to be entered touching the land which was to be granted to Mary Ford, "His Excellency in a passion" telling Mr. Stede that he believed he wished to have the granting of it for himself. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol., pp. 615–618.]
July 15.276. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The letter of the Mayor of New York read (see No. 186). The Lords agreed in their report (see No. 283).
Mr. Randolph presented his articles against Rhode Island and Connecticut (see No. 279). Agreed to recommend the reference of these articles to the Attorney-General.
The members of the African Company attended, on the petition of Diego Maget. Sir Philip Howard to be instructed to favour the petition so far as he legally can. Colonel Molesworth's letters of 24 March and 13 April read (see Nos. 85, 123), Lord Howard of Effiugham's of 13 May (see No. 188), and Sir Richard Dutton's of 29 April (see No. 161).
Richard Wharton's petition for a grant of Pojebscot read. Petitioners ordered to prepare other heads of a grant for the same. Petition of William Vaughan read (see No. 280). The matter referred to Lord Sunderland. Mr. Cranfield's letter of 6 February read. Memorandum of letters despatched and received. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CVIII., pp. 162–169.]
[July 15.]277. Abstract of a Royal grant and confirmation of lands at Pojepscot, New England. A draft drawn up by Richard Wharton, embodying the gist of his previous proposals (see Nos. 155, 169). 2 pp. Endorsed. Read at Committee 15 July 1685. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 9.]
[July 15.]278. Address of the Proprietors and inhabitants of the Narragansett Country to the King. Congratulations, and information that, in spite of adverse circumstances, the proclamation of his accession was made with all possible solemnity. Signed, S. Bradstreet, J. Winthrop, Richard Smith, and seven more "on behalf of many others." 1 p. Endorsed. Recd. 15 July 1685. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 10.]
[July 15.]279. Petition of Edward Randolph to Lords of Trade and Plantations. I have drawn up several articles, pursuant to orders, impeaching the colonies of Rhode Island and Connecticut. I beg that the writs of Quo Warranto may be issued without delay, that the charters may be vacated, and the Colonies united under the King's Government. Signed, Ed. Randolph. Endorsed. Read July 15 1685. Annexed,
279. I. Articles of high misdemeanour exhibited against Rhode Island. (1.) They raise large sums on the inhabitants by fines, taxes, and arbitrary imprisonment, contrary to law, and deny appeals to the King. (2.) They make laws contrary to the laws of England. (3.) They deny the King's subjects the benefit of the laws of England. (4.) They keep no authentic copies of their laws, and suffer no inhabitant to take copies of them. (5.) They rase and cancel their laws without consent of the General Assembly. (6.) Their Governors and other officers, as well as juries and witnesses, are under no legal oaths. (7.) They violate the Acts of Trade and Navigation, and have taken from Francis Brinley the late King's commission to administer an oath to the Governor for the execution of these Acts. 1 p. Endorsed.
279. II. Articles of high misdemeanour against the Governor and Company of Connecticut. (1.) They make laws contrary to the laws of England. (2.) They impose fines on the inhabitants, and convert them to their own use. (3.) They enforce oaths of fidelity on the inhabitants, without administering the oaths of allegiance and supremacy. (4.) They deny the inhabitants the exercise of the Anglican religion, arbitrarily fining those who refuse to come to their congregational assemblies. (5.) Subjects of other Colonies cannot obtain justice in the Courts of Connecticut. (6.) They discourage and exclude from the Government all gentlemen of known loyalty. Proofs of the charges extracted from the law-books. Two long slips. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., Nos. 11, 11 I. II., and (enclosures only) Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXI., pp. 241–246.]
[July 15.]280. Memo. William Vaughan and others, merchants, of New Hampshire, petitioned the King, complaining that though they had licences, on paying the usual duties, to fish on the coast of Nova Scotia, their fishing vessels had been seized there and carried to France, to the loss of over 7,000l. to petitioners. The Lords on 15 July 1685 ordered the petition and depositions to be delivered to Lord Sunderland. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXVII., p. 149.]
[16 July ?]281. Lord Baltimore's answer to the letter of Nehemiah Blakiston (see No. 136). It is clear from the letter of the Governor of Virginia to the deputies of Maryland that George Talbot's escape from prison was due to the corruption of the guard, and not to any practices by anyone in Maryland. As soon as the deputies received notice, they took special care for Talbot's apprehension. Talbot was never publicly seen at his own plantation, but kept himself out in the mountains to the northward till at last he resolved to surrender to the deputies of Maryland, where he is now under a strong guard. Lord Baltimore is very confident that Blakiston's complaints of obstruction in the execution of his duty are groundless, since his lordship has long since ordered that masters of ships should apply to the King's Collector as well as to his own. This was so while Rousby was living, as several masters can avouch. After the murder of Rousby, the Deputies of Maryland did presume to appoint William Digges and Nicholas Sewall to be Collectors of the King's dues, until some successor could be appointed by the Commissioners of Customs; and this they conceived to be their duty in care for the King's revenue. Lord Baltimore cannot believe that Blakiston has been served with warrants and the like, and begs enquiry from those who have lately returned from Maryland. Perhaps Blakiston was arrested at the suit of one of his many creditors. Colonel William Digges is known to be a man of so much loyalty that he could not be capable of such things as Blakiston alleges of him. It would be well if Blakiston's loyalty were as sure. Nobody who knows Maryland can believe that the King's revenue suffers loss of several thousands annually. Mr. Rousby, who understood things as well as any man, rarely received more than a hundred pounds in any one year. It is strange therefore that Blakiston should have been the first to discover this loss. But Blakiston carefully says that he expects little tobacco this year, and accounts for this by saying that Lord Baltimore's officers threaten the masters of ships. But Lord Baltimore can prove that Blakiston has received several thousands of tobacco and paid it away to his creditors. He has therefore no other way of making up his accounts with the King this year than by pretending great obstruction from Lord Baltimore's officers. Blakiston's statements about Sewall are as untrue as the rest. He would not help Sewall to seize the Irish vessels, so Sewall was forced to proceed without him. This done, Blakiston sent Captain Allen to seize the vessel, and was disappointed to find the other officers still on board. The officers can defend themselves against Blakiston's statements, and Lord Baltimore begs that Blakiston may be forced to prosecute his charges. Signed, C. Baltemore. Copy 6 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 12.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
282. Order of the King in Council. That, as recommended by the Lords of Trade and Plantations, the articles drawn up by Edward Randolph against Rhode Island and Connecticut be referred to the Attorney-General, who will issue writs of Quo Warranto against both Colonies (see No. 279). [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXI., p. 246.]
July 17.283. Order of the King in Council. Report of Lords of Trade and Plantations. On the letter of the Mayor of New York (see No. 186), we recommend that the Attorney-General consider the several grants and proprieties of New Jersey and Delaware and enter writs of Quo Warranto against the proprietors, it being to the great and growing prejudice of the Plantations that such Governments be maintained without a nearer dependence on Your Majesty. Signed, Halifax, Rochester, Clarendon, Ormond, Beaufort. Ordered accordingly. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LII., pp. 102–103.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
284. Order of the King in Council. That a copy of Lord Baltimore's reply to the charges against his officers be sent to the Commissioners of Customs, and that they, together with Lord Baltimore, attend the King on the 24th inst. Signed, W. Bridgeman. Copy. ½ p. Endorsed. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 13.]
July 17.285. Minutes of Council of Barbados. The Lieutenant-Governor produced his Commission, and the members of Council were sworn. Proclamation for continuing commissions granted by Sir Richard Dutton. The Council desired the Lieutenant-Governor to regulate the practice, permitted by Sir R. Dutton, of judges acting as counsel in every court but their own. John Whetstone sworn in as Secretary. The Provost-Marshal took the oaths and signed the test. Adjourned to 4 August. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XI., pp. 619–625.]
July 17.
Stuart's-
town.
286. Lord Cardross to Robert Quarry. I have heard of the resolutions of the Grand Committee respecting myself, and find that the Council continue still in the apprehension that I have committed some high misdemeanour, and look upon my not appearing as a great contempt of their authority. I do not look upon myself as an English lawyer, and therefore shall not be positive in every notion I have taken of it, but my frequent converse in England with skilled lawyers made me think that the first paper that came from the Council in the nature of a warrant, and the way that it was communicated to me, was not legal in matter of procedure, and I found it proceeded on such a mistake that I concluded that on the least information the Council would turn the chace and notice what Dr. Woodward had done; whereby no doubt I should have been vindicated, and it would have appeared that my causing the apprehension of Dr. Woodward in such circumstances was no usurpation of magistracy, but a clear vindication of the authority of the Grand Council at Charlestown. When Mr. Griffith came last I was ill, as I still am, of fever and ague, and so could not answer them, nor can I hope to be fit to attend the meeting in August. As soon as my health permits I am fully resolved to wait on you, when I do not doubt that I shall satisfy you that I desire to uphold your authority. A petition signed by me and others several days ago will show you how much we desire to be part of the Government and subject to it. I never was nor wished be hostile to it, and I hope that this reply will satisfy you and the other gentlemen of the Grand Council so far that you will not trouble yourselves again to send for one who is very willing to come at the first opportunity. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXI., p. 135.]
July 17.
Stuart's-
town.
287. William Dunlop to Governor Robert Quarry. My congratulations on your promotion to be Governor. Lord Cardross has written a letter which he hopes will satisfy the Council. He is fully resolved to come down. I freely confess that I was astonished to hear that the Council had ordered a party to bring him down, sick or well; I think that the King and Council of England could allow him to recover his health first, whatever the exigence. We have signed an address to the Palatine's Court, wherein among other things we desire magistrates from you for this country, which are very necessary for us. There are a number of rascal fellows come here to the neighbouring Islands, who are not entertained by us, and certainly design to run away out of the Province. I give this information to shew here how we desire to be under your Government. Signed, Will. Dunlop. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXI., p. 136.]
July 18.
Barbados.
288. Edwyn Stede to the Earl of Sunderland. Sir Richard Dutton's method of administering the oaths to me and giving me my papers and instructions was unusual and, as it seems to me, unsuitable. Sir Richard visited me at my house on 10th instant, and after many reproaches and unkind sayings to me for my civility to Sir John Witham since the King's order for his release, he told me he intended to embark for England on the 13th, and that as it might not be convenient to me to go aboard at that time, he would come to my house with the Council, administer the oaths and deliver to me the papers. Accordingly, having kept the Council together all that day, at its usual place of meeting, for no matter of moment so far as the journals shew, he came to my house at four o'clock with the Council and about a hundred others. I expected that the room would be cleared for the Council to sit, but instead thereof Sir Richard, in the midst of all the crowd, told me that he was come to administer the oaths to me, which accordingly he did, but without any entry in the Council's books, though I have since caused a memorandum to be inserted, that it was done in the Council's hearing. The oath administered, Sir Richard was about going on board the frigate, when I asked him, with all respect, whether I took up the government from the time of his going on board or from the time of his sailing. To which, with an angry and furious tone and countenance, he replied scornfully, in the presence of all the multitude, that I must not expect to meddle with the government while he was about the Island, for that he intended to come ashore again, although I was in such haste to take up the government, and that he would prevent me until he sent me the seal. He did not send it to me till Thursday evening, he having been on board since the Monday before. I must mention another "unkind and reproachful carriage" of Sir Richard Dutton to me in the presence of the crowd, which he brought, as I conceive, to be a witness of his affronts and to lower me in their eyes. He publicly asked my opinion as to a grant which he had passed without reserving anything to the King, and which the Council had refused to pass until the Attorney-General had examined the title. I answered that, though I had been absent from the Council, I concurred with them, believing, as Receiver-General, that part of the land was the King's by escheat. Sir Richard, with great displeasure in his looks, replied that this was just what he expected from me, and that he would take good care that I made no grant of that land in his absence; seeming thereby (as I thought) to insinuate to the crowd that I had no power to act during his absence except according to his orders. I answered that I was sorry he should take my honest answer amiss, but that my clerk was at hand to enter his caveat or anything else that he thought fit at the Secretary's Office. He replied with reproach that I had nothing to do with the Secretary's Office, and that he would appoint a Secretary to act during his absence, which not being applauded by the crowd, he took me into another room, and there with many reproaches told me that he had enough against me in Sir John Witham's matter to call me to England also, since I had advised him as much as anyone against Sir John; and that though I had got my foot in the stirrup he would take care that I should not sit long in the saddle, nor be very easy while there. I answered that my advice had been not to try Sir John Witham till the King had heard of his misdoings and given his orders. This Sir Richard absolutely refused to do, saying that Sir John was appointed by his commission and was triable by him, and that he would do the same thing again to-morrow. I told him that I would not, as the proceeding was evidently displeasing to the King, and that I and the Council would not have done as much as we did if he had not ensnared us by withholding his Instructions, contrary to orders. He replied that I should be called home as well as he, and that he would be believed at Whitehall against all that I might say. I answered that I doubted not to prove myself a loyal and honest man. This led Sir Richard to complain of the favour shewn to Sir John Witham at Whitehall, which he was quite sure was unknown to the King; that he would complain to the King about it, and so forth. My commission was published the 17th, the day after Sir Richard sailed. Signed, Edwyn Stede. Three very closely written pages. Endorsed. Recd. and read 17 October 1685. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 14, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VII., pp. 303–308.]
July 20.289. Captain J. Davis to Lieutenant-Governor Molesworth. Many thanks for sending down the Bonito for our security. You are pleased to say that these Spaniards are not countenanced by any of the Spanish Governors. I assure you that this design was publicly known at Trinidad. Four of these rogues lived there, and the Lieutenant of the town provided them with necessaries to take the turtling-sloop, wherein they were to sail to Jamaica. The Spaniards themselves declared it. Now, as to the embezzlement of pirates' goods. I can tell you no more than you know already, and they do me great wrong who say that I know more. It is a story got up by those who wish to prove more than ever was known. Mr. Elletson sent me a threatening letter, saying that unless I gave an account of what I knew of Spurre's business he would complain of me to the Lords of Trade and Plantations. All I know is this. When Spurre's sloop came in I received express orders from Sir T. Lynch to deliver the goods to no one but to him, which was accordingly done. The broken gold was sealed up by Sir Thomas's order and given to me to be delivered to Judge White, which I did; and that is all I know. I have no idea of the value of the gold. Signed, J. Davis. Holograph. Three closely written pages. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 15.]
July 21.
Barbados.
290. Deputy-Governor Edwyn Stede to Lords of Trade and Plantations. I received many bitter, scurrilous reproaches from Sir Richard Dutton before his departure because I received Sir John Witham, after the King's order for his release, and gave him copies of such records as he needed from the Secretary's Office. I published my commission the day after Sir Richard sailed, and though he tried to insinuate that I could do nothing in his absence which he had not ordered or which he had prohibited, those that believe this will find out their mistake. Signed, Edwyn Stede. 2 pp. Endorsed. Recd. 1 October 1685. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 16, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VII., pp. 327–328.]
July 25.291. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. A clause as to appeals added to Sir Philip Howard's instructions. The King ordered that in future the oath of allegiance only should be enjoined to be administered by Governors, without mention of the oath of supremacy and the test. Henry Bysshe was brought up in custody and ordered to find bail. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CVIII., p. 170.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
292. William Blathwayt to Henry Guy. I enclose draft of instructions prepared by the Commissioners of Customs to the Governors of Plantations, to be revised, if the new Acts of Parliament concerning trade should render it necessary. Draft. ½ p. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 17, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XCVII., p. 148.]
[July 27.]293. Sir Richard Dutton to Edwyn Stede. I have strictly perused my instructions, whereby I am directed not to allow an appeal in any criminal cause, so if such a thing be offered to-day, you will absolutely reject it. I intend to dine with you to-day. Dated, 30 December 1684. Copy, certified by Jno. Whetstone, 27 July 1685. ½ p. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 18.]
July 29.294. Deposition of John Keith, physician, in reply to Sir John Witham, to the effect that he attended Sir John from May to December, 1684, and found his disorder very stubborn, being called in this Island "contagious bellyaike," often leading to loss of limbs and life. He was dangerously ill when he went to Grand Sessions Copy. 2½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 19.]
July 30.295. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor Joseph West. Warrant for the grant of 3,000 acres of land, gratis, to Jean Francois de Genillat, the first of the Swiss nation who has announced his intention of settling in Carolina. Signed, Craven, Tho. Amy, P. Colleton. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., p. 63.]
July 31.296. Warrant from the Earl of Rochester to the Commissioners of Customs granting rebate of ten per cent. to Merchants who pay the new duty on tobacco in ready money. Below. A second warrant authorising further rebate of four per cent. for waste and decay. 17 August 1685. Copies. The whole. 1½ pp. Endorsed. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 19 a.]
[July 31.]297. Petition of Barrakiah Arnall, late Master of the pink Hannah and Elizabeth. From ignorance petitioner neglected to carry a certificate with him from Boston to Antigua, in consequence of which he forfeited a bond of 1,000l. and suffered confiscation of the ship. Prays remission of the penalty. On the margin. Read in Council July 31, 1685. Also, a reference of the petition to Sir William Stapleton for his report. Signed, William Blathwayt. Annexed,
297. I. Certificate of Samuel Massey, Secretary, that he believes Barrakiah Arnall to have had no intention of defrauding the revenue. Dated, Custom House, Boston, 15 May 1685 1 p. Endorsed.
297. II. Certificate of the arrival of the Hannah and Elizabeth from Antigua. Signed, John Jacob. Boston 15 May 1685. Copy of the bond attached. 2 pp.
297. III. Certificate of the discharge of the Hannah and Elizabeth. Boston 25 May 1685, Signed S. Bradstreet, Governor; covering depositions of two seamen of the ship. 2 pp.
297. IV. Certificate as to the genuineness of No. II. 28 May, Signed, S. Bradstreet, Governor. Seal of New England attached. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., Nos. 20, 20 I.–IV.]
July 31.
Whitehall.
298. Copy of the Order in Council referring above papers to Sir William Stapleton. Signed, Wm. Bridgeman. 1 p. Endorsed, with a minute by Sir William Stapleton, that the petitioner is a fit object for the King's mercy. Holograph. Endorsed. Read 1, 3, 18, 26 August and 2 September 85. [Col. Papers, Vol. LVI., No. 21, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVII., pp. 191–192.]