America and West Indies
February 1697, 11-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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J. W. Fortescue (editor)

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1904

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358-367

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'America and West Indies: February 1697, 11-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 15: 1696-1697 (1904), pp. 358-367. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70883 Date accessed: 24 July 2014.


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Contents

February 1697

Feb. 11.704. Memorial of Sir Henry Ashurst and Edmund Harrison to Council of Trade and Plantations. (1) The answer of the Agents of New York (No. 691) agrees that the first five paragraphs of Mr. Harrison's memorial are true, and yet asks for proof of the proposed advantages, which are self-evident. (2) The 1st, 3rd and last paragraphs consent that a union of all the forces of the Continent under one head would be advantageous, but would have the same settled by Act of Parliament, which in design is fallacious, for it will only tend to delay and to create clamour in the Parliament about the people's rights. The writers while seeming to insist on these rights propose to take them away by Act of Parliament. (3) The Memorial owns the grants and privileges of the several Colonies and proposes that all advantages in their civil Government be inviolable, and therefore that the Generalissimo be continued during the war only. We need not reply to all the arguments on that point. (4) It is admitted that great benefit will arise from the union of all the forces under one head, but the answer takes no notice of the advantages of such union for removing the French entirely from that part of America. As to the refusal of the people to obey, some of these inhabitants affirm that they refused because they had been ill-used and because the power of the then Generalissimo had been unreasonably put in practice. (5) No objection is made as to New Hampshire. On the whole the opposition to the memorial is only as to uniting the Governments of New England and New York. There is a specious pretence of the distance between the two Colonies, which are not above 100 miles from New York territories to Albany, Connecticut lying between (sic); but this seems no argument of force, for posts come and go in a short space, so that the Governor may have fresh intelligence and give the necessary orders. (6) The 5th paragraph makes the emulation in trade the main argument against the union, whereas the memorial makes it strong for it, so that the people may be united in trade and be free in each other's countries, the want of which is of great prejudice to both. Indeed it might perhaps be proved that the want of the proposed union was the reason for the miscarriage of Sir William Phips's expedition, those of New York being jealous that, if Canada were conquered, their trade in furs would be diminished by the nearness of those of New England to the lakes where those furs are chiefly taken. The general advantage ought to be preferred; therefore the 5th paragraph aforesaid is an argument for union. (7) As to the prejudice to New York arising from the residence of the Governor at Boston, no doubt the Governor will choose his proper times for residing at both places, and besides he may always have a deputy there. (8) As to the 8th paragraph we answer that the Governor of New York was at first paid out of the Exchequer, and that afterwards his salary was assigned to him out of the King's revenues at New York; so that they have very little ground to suggest that the people pay the Governor. But indeed the whole answer agrees as to the advantage of a Generalissimo. It must be conceded that such a general must be at more care and pains and therefore at greater expense than any private Governor. Therefore the better to support him, the best expedient is the union of the Governments of New England, New York and New Hampshire. (9) These governments being in the King, who pays the Governors, the King is sole judge of the convenience of the proposed union and may do therein as to his Royal pleasure may seem meet. The rest of the answer, being only suggestions of no great weight, calls for no reply. Signed, Hen. Ashurst, Edm. Harrison. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 11 Feb. 1696–7. [Board of Trade. New England, 8. No. 69; and 36. pp. 130–132.]
Feb. 11.
London.
705. Memorial of the merchants of Bristol, trading to New-foundland, to Council of Trade and Plantations. Trinity and Conception Bays, with many commodious harbours, as well as Bonavista, still remain in the hands of the English, and about 700 Englishmen in them. Hearing that the French are sending ships of war thither, we beg that two fourth-rate frigates may be sent there with all imaginable speed, with one hundred soldiers, ten cannon and an engineer, all victualled for four months. We think that thus St. Johns could be retaken and the whole land thereby secured, but if the hundred soldiers cannot be sent, we beg that the ships may be despatched with the guns, the engineer and as many soldiers as can be got together. Even if the French get there first, we conceive that the men-of-war can be secured in safe harbours where the French cannot come at them. If they arrive before the French we think they may be able to secure the land until a greater force arrives from England. Signed, Solomon Merrett, Tho. Edwardes, John Cary. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 11 Feb. 1696–7. [Board of Trade. Newfoundland, 3. No. 45.]
Feb. 11.
Kensington.
706. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Upon the letters recently received from Governor Codrington, respecting John Palmer, we recommend that if he be displaced, Edward Parsons may be appointed Secretary of the Leeward Islands in his stead. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Tankerville, Ph. Meadows, Wm. Blathwayt, John Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 45. pp. 53–54.]
Feb. 11.
Kensington.
707. Order of the King in Council. That John Palmer be removed from being Secretary and Councillor of the Leeward Islands, and that Governor Codrington be informed accordingly. Signed, John Nicholas. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 16 Feb. 1696–7. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 5. No. 36; and 45. p. 60.]
Feb. 11.
Kensington.
708. Order of the King in Council. That Edward Parsons be appointed Secretary of the Leeward Islands. Copy. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 9 June, 1697. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 5. No. 37; and 45. pp. 69–70.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
709. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Having made further enquiry as to the behaviour of Nicholas Webb, we find no manner of cause to suspect him of disaffection to the Government, and that he has had for some time past good recommendations from persons of honour. The Proprietors of the Bahamas have consented to augment his salary, and we see no reason why he should not be approved as Governor. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Tankerville, Ph. Meadows, Wm. Blathwayt, Jno. Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. Proprieties, 25. pp. 50–51.]
Feb. 11.
Kensington.
710. Order of the King in Council. Approving the appointment of Nicholas Webb as Governor of the Bahama Islands. [Board of Trade. Proprieties, 25. pp. 82–83.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
711. Council of Trade and Plantations to the President and Council of Barbados. The King has appointed Mr. Heberlands to go as Engineer to Barbados in order to survey the place and encourage the planters in their defence. Having surveyed Barbados, its fortifications, ordnance and stores, he will proceed to the Leeward Islands and thence to Bermuda. We recommend him to your good offices. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Ph. Meadows, Wm. Blathwayt, John Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. p. 50.]
The like letter to Governor Codrington. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 45. p. 56.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
712. Council of Trade and Plantations to the President and Council of Barbados. Recommending to their good offices Mr. Talbot Edwards, who has been appointed to succeed another engineer in the Leeward Islands, but with orders to proceed first to Barbados and then to the Leeward Islands, returning again from time to time as occasion may require. Signed as the preceding. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. p. 51.]
The like letter to Governor Codrington. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 45. p. 55.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
713. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Goddard. The King has ordered an engineer to proceed to Bermuda to survey the place, encourage and direct the planters upon their better defence, and report the state of the forts and stores. The bearer hereof, Mr. Heberlands, is the engineer aforesaid, and is recommended to your good offices. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Ph. Meadows, Wm. Blathwayt, John Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 3. pp. 7–8.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
714. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Sir William Beeston. The bearer, Captain Lilly, has been appointed on our recommendation to visit Jamaica in order to report, as an able engineer, upon the forts and resources, defensive and offensive, of the island. We recommend him to you for such directions as you shall think proper to give him. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Ph. Meadows, Wm. Blathwayt, John Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 56. p. 72.]
Feb. 11.
Jamaica.
715. Governor Sir William Beeston to Council of Trade and Plantations. On the 6th inst. I received yours of 2 October and 23 November last, and duplicates of them on the 8th. On the 1st inst. a ship arriving from Bristol brought us the first news of Mons. Pointis's fleet, though from the French themselves I had advice of this fleet by way of Curaçoa and St. Thomas though it was said to be under Mons. D'Amblemont. I now suppose the latter to be Governor of Martinique, and Mons. Pointis to be in command of their ships. On receiving the news I at once sent advice to the Governors of Porto Bello and Havana, against one of which I guess the design to be directed. The President of St. Domingo had already been advised of it. The Southampton was to have gone home convoy to eighteen sail, richly laden, and would have sailed in one day more, but on this intelligence I retained her to help in the defence of the island; and the fleet, fearing to stay here longer lest the ships be spoiled, the masters of their own choice prefer to sail without convoy. The galleons are now taking in the plate and money at Porto Bello, and the New Spain fleet was lately at Havana; and I guess they are there still, which the French know as well as we and that we think their designs are on them. You say that you have several of my letters, so it is to little purpose to repeat that we are too weak to contend with a royal fleet and force, if they come hither, unless we had hope of relief timely to prevent them. Signed, Wm. Beeston. Holograph. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 3 May, 1697. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 8. No. 45; and 56. p. 91.]
Feb. 12.716. Memorial of William Penn. I complain of two laws passed in Maryland in 1695, one imposing an unprecedented and unwarrantable custom of 10 pounds per cent. upon all English goods shipped on vessels bound to Maryland consigned to Pennsylvania, denying us a free highway home. The other imposes fourpence a gallon on all beer imported from Pennsylvania into Maryland and through that province, for accommodation of those that take ship there for England. Upon both these accounts travelling chests are searched and rifled and, if the key be not there, broken open; and for passing this illegal and unneighbourly search they require from half a crown to ten shillings, of all which a speedy redress is necessary and much and greatly desired. Signed, Wm. Penn. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 12 Feb. 1696–7. [America and West Indies, 599. No. 29; and Proprieties, 25. pp. 51–52.]
Feb. 12.Memorandum of the receipt of the above. ¼ p. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 3. No. 10; and 9. p. 31.]
Feb. 12.717. Memorial of William Penn. Since the quotas are all dedicated to the command and preservation of New York as a frontier to the rest of the Colonies, according to the general letter I received from this Board, it seems in my opinion necessary that a clause be added, "in case there be no danger from the enemy there attending on any of the provinces when their quotas are called for by New York." I also further represent the minority of Pennsylvania, and that it is rated in the establishment much above its capacity, in proportion to other provinces; for we are but fourteen years old, and though we have given large marks of our industry and substance, being begun by men of estates, yet this ought not to be the rule of rating but the reason of sparing us, because we have never seen the repeated returns that New York, Maryland, Virginia, etc., have enjoyed, whose antiquity is so much greater, and so their ability, than ours. Else we pay not out of our gains, but in proportion to our greater and more expensive improvements, which I dare say is very far from the Board's intention. Signed, Wm. Penn. Holograph. 2 pp. Endorsed, Recd. 12 Feb. 1696–7. [America and West Indies, 599. No. 30; and Proprieties, 25. p. 52.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
718. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Governor and Council of Barbados. The King has sent a squadron to oppose the designs of the enemy in the West Indies, wherever they may be. We have laid before the King your application and those of your Agents for military stores; and he has ordered stores, an engineer and a master-gunner to be sent to you. You will send us from time to time an account of such stores as you have remaining, to be our guide in any future deliberations. We do not doubt that your Act for better securing the gunpowder-duty (which Act we have not yet received) will, with better husbandry, increase your supply of powder. We have to transmit to you the King's order that no pirates shall be entertained or sheltered in his dominions under the severest penalties. Mr. Talbot Edwards and Mr. Heberlands, engineers, go by this fleet; we have addressed you particular letters concerning them. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Tankerville, Ph. Meadows, Wm. Blathwayt, John Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. pp. 52–54.]
Feb. 12.719. William Popple to the President and Council of Barbados. Desiring their care in forwarding a packet enclosed to Bermuda. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. p. 54.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
720. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Goddard. The King having appointed us his Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, we require of you a list of your present Council, and a further list of the persons whom you think most suitable to fill any vacancies therein. The King for the security of all the Colonies is sending out a squadron to oppose the designs of the enemy in those parts. He is also sending an engineer to report as to the defence of Bermuda. Upon complaints that entertainment has been given to pirates in many of the Plantations, he has directed orders to be given to all Governors that no pirates be thus entertained, under the severest penalties. You will take care that these orders are complied with, and that any persons guilty of such misdemeanours be seized and punished. We defer answering for the present your letter of 30 July. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Tankerville, Ph. Meadows, Wm. Blathwayt, John Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 29. pp. 8–11.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
721. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Sir William Beeston. Yours of 22 July and 7 August to the late Committee, of 23 July to Mr. Blathwayt, and of 22 July and 18 September to the Duke of Shrewsbury have been received, together with the public papers and Acts transmitted with them. The King is sending out a squadron for the special protection of the West Indies, which we doubt not will be sufficient to that end. Application has been made to us for the confirmation of Mr. Lewis as Commissary, Muster-master and Judge Advocate, but as a difficulty has arisen about his giving security, we leave it to you to take such security and give him such orders as you think fit. We notice the complaints which you report from Jamaica about the disallowance of the Act against engrossing, but we find that this decision was taken upon very mature deliberation, and we send you the reasons of the late Committee for the decision, for the satisfaction of such as you may think fit to impart it to. There having been many complaints against pirates of late, the King has sent orders to all the Colonies that such persons shall be punished with the greatest severity. As regards impressment, the King has issued orders that in future commanders of ships of war, when in need of men, shall apply to the Governors of Colonies, and upon such application his Majesty requires Governors to take care that the ships be furnished with such men as are necessary. We hope that the effect of this in Jamaica will be suitable to expectation, and not only encourage such seamen as are with you to remain, but also such as have fled to return. A copy of the Order in Council is enclosed. The King has also given orders for the return of five Jamaica men pressed for H.M.S. Swan, and for the Agents, if possible, to find them out. But whether they are found or not, we hope that you will improve this example of the King's goodness for the satisfaction of the inhabitants. The King has also ordered £500 to be paid from the Exchequer towards paying for the transportation of such number of industrious poor people as may be willing to go to Jamaica. Here again the King's goodness is apparent, though the Agents, as it seems, have been less successful than they expected. Further, the fleet is to take one hundred supernumerary seamen for the Southampton and Reserve, so as to take away the necessity of impressing. Lastly, Captain Lilly, another engineer, goes by this ship to advise as to the defence of the island. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Tankerville, Ph. Meadows, Wm. Blathwayt, John Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 56. pp. 73–77.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
722. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Codrington. The King is sending out a squadron to oppose the designs of the enemy in the West Indies. We are preparing a representation to the King in the case of John Palmer. The Acts mentioned in our former letter have been approved; those since received from the Agents are under consideration. The King has issued an order vesting the power of impressment of seamen wholly in the Governors of Colonies, to whom Captains of his ships will apply when they require men. The King has given orders that no pirates shall be sheltered or entertained in the Colonies under the severest penalties. We send you herewith our letter as to the Island of Tertholen, with copies of the papers that have passed concerning it. You will see that it is less the value of the island itself that we have in view than the pernicious consequence it may be of to the Leeward Islands, if in the possession of strangers. Mr. Talbot Edwards and Mr. Heberlands sail by this fleet. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Tankerville, Ph. Meadows, Wm. Blathwayt, John Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 45. pp. 57–59.]
Feb. 12.723. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Nevis. Governor Codrington was present. The Assembly sent up its message of the 5th, as to the addition of Assistants to the Monthly Courts and the restoration of the former powers of the Lieutenant-Governor, by an unanimous vote. The Council assented to a proposal of the Assembly that, though the Act for the articles of war is passed for six months, the law shall be stopped for three months only, and that this three months shall not be pleadable under the Statute of Limitation.
Feb. 13.The Committee appointed to draw up bills suggested that the whole Council and Assembly should give in their views as to a bill for settlement of titles land. In answer to the Assembly the Council gave its opinion that the Governor and Council can call upon the Assembly to prepare Acts for their approbation. The Council consented to prolong the old Act for punishment of negroes for three months. The Act for registering of deeds was passed, also that for regulation of elections, but could not be engrossed in time to be signed by the Governor before his departure. Bill for limitation of actions read and debated. Act for articles of war passed and Signed by the Governor. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 64. pp. 409–411.]
Feb. 13.
Whitehall.
724. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Fletcher. A letter recommending Henry Brabant, the engineer appointed for the fortification and defence of New York, to his protection and assistance. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Tankerville, Phil. Meadows, John Pollexfen, John Locke, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. New York, 52. p. 79.]
Feb. 13.
Whitehall.
725. William Popple to William Thornburgh. Forwarding the petition of Thomas Bulkley (see No. 681) for the answer of the Proprietors of the Bahama Islands thereto. [Board of Trade. Proprieties, 25. p. 53.]
Feb. 13.
Whitehall.
726. William Popple to Henry Greenhill. Enclosing packets for the Governors of Barbados, Jamaica and the Leeward Islands, to be carried by the men-of-war proceeding thither. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 34. p. 103.]
Feb. 15.
H.M. Yard.
near
Portsmouth.
727. Henry Greenhill to William Popple. I have received the packets for the Governors of Jamaica and the Leeward Islands and the President and Council of Barbados, which shall be duly delivered to the commanders of the King's ships bound to these islands. In future please pay the postage or let me know to whom I shall charge the same, for it has cost me five shillings and four pence. Signed, Henry Greenhill. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 17 Feb. 1696–7. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 4. No. 31; and 34. p. 104.]
[Feb. 15.]
Bermuda.
728. A collection of papers relating to the case of Isaac Richier.
Governor John Goddard to the King. On the 3rd August, 1696, Isaac Richier sent a duplicate of your Order in Council of 19 December, 1695, and the Council and I sent him a bond to be signed by himself and others, his security to me. Copy of the bond is annexed. At the same time Richier sent to me another bond, said to be signed by himself and his security, to Nicholas Trott, under whose suit he still lies in prison under execution conditioned for him to prosecute his appeal from that suit to the King. After reading the Order in Council and the bonds, the Council was of opinion that the bond entered into by Richier to me, about the matters in difference between us, was not according to the said order, which prescribed that security should be given by him before restitution were made to him. The Council then decided that he must first give security, after which I should make restitution and do my part, which I declared myself ready to do. I then ordered the Secretary to draw up a new bond, shew it to Richier for his approbation and then engross it fairly. I also ordered a commission to be drawn up under the public seal of the Island for examining witnesses and taking depositions, and that a tender should be made to Richier to name his three Commissioners, after which I should name mine, and the business would proceed without obstruction. With the bond given by Richier to Nicholas Trott, the Council conceived that they had nothing to do. The bond and the form of the commission were accordingly drafted and handed to Richier for perusal. On the 18th of September the King's Order in Council was again read in Council, when the Council, having decided that both bond and commission were in accordance therewith, sent messengers to Richier to know his answer about the bond and the names of the Commissioners whom he wished to name; and he was desired to return his full answer in writing before the first Monday in October. On the 5th October Richier sent to the Council a long letter relating chiefly to the matters in difference between him and Mr. Trott, but he added that after consultation with his security he thought his first bond to comply with the Order in Council. The Council, however, decided that it did not so comply, and, as regarded his difference with Mr. Trott, referred him to a previous opinion of theirs given in August 1695, that it could give no relief. Three messengers were then sent again to Mr. Richier to demand his positive answer about the bond offered him by the Council, to which he replied that he could not at present get his security. I then sent a message to say that if he could give any one person with himself of the value of a share of land I would accept them, and would also restore all his goods or the value of them. Richier then asked for more time.
The Council met again on 14 October, 1696, when a letter was read from Richier signifying his difficulty in procuring security. Thereupon the Council resolved that the letter in no way complied with the Order in Council; but since Richier expressed himself as willing to comply with anything that was reasonably required, I sent him word that I would restore him his goods on his entering into bond to submit the matter in difference to the arbitration of two impartial persons, the one chosen by me, the other by himself, and a form of the bond required was drafted and sent to him. With this Richier seemed very willing to comply and desired time to read the bond, but he afterwards informed me by letter that he would not do it because he thought the bond first offered by him and his security was in compliance with the King's Order in Council, expressly contrary to the opinion of the Council many times given. Upon all this I conceive that I have given all due obedience to the Order in Council, for I have always been willing to restore to Richier his goods, or their value, upon his giving security to stand by your Majesty's determination in all matters of difference between us. But as to discharging him from prison, he is imprisoned upon execution at the suit of Nicholas Trott, sen., who recovered £1,246 from him by an action at law and only took out execution against him because he refused to give Trott security to prosecute his appeal to the King in Council. I am advised too that I have no power to discharge him from gaol, and that if I did so I should expose myself to be sued. I beg your Majesty therefore to accept this my obedience, for I am sure that you did not intend to lay on me a command which it is not in my power to obey, namely to discharge one who is in prison at the suit of another person. 3 large pages. Annexed,
728. I. Declaration of the Council of Bermuda, 3 August, 1696, that the bond offered by Isaac Richier does not comply with the Order in Council of 19 December, 1695, since he claims restitution of his goods before giving security. 1½ large pages.
728. II. Copy of the bond offered by Isaac Richier and rejected by the Council of Bermuda. 1 p.
728. III. Copy of the bond offered by Isaac Richier in reference to his lawsuit with Nicholas Trott. 1 p.
728. IV. Forms of the commission and bond offered by Governor Goddard to Isaac Richier. 1½ pp.
728. V. Order of the Council of Bermuda for offering the aforesaid bond and commission to Isaac Richier. 18 September, 1696. ½ p.
728. VI. Declaration of the Council of Bermuda that it is not in their power to admit Richier to bail or to give him any relief from his imprisonment at the suit of Nicholas Trott. 5 October, 1696. 1 p.
728. VII. Memorial of Isaac Richier to Governor Goddard, 4 October, 1696. A long dissertation on the reasonableness of his own offers and demands and the irregularity of the Council's proceedings, more particularly of the outlawry upon which he lies imprisoned. 3 pp.
728. VIII. Extracts from Minutes of Council of Bermuda, 5 October, 1696. Giving the report of Isaac Richier's answer as to the bond and commission offered to him by the Council, and Governor Goddard's offer thereupon to submit the matter in difference between them to arbitration.
728. IX. Copy of a letter from Isaac Richier to Governor Goddard, 12 October, 1696. Declaring his readiness to do anything reasonable to accommodate the differences between them.
728. X. Copy of a bond of arbitration offered to Isaac Richier by Governor Goddard. 1 p.
728. XI. Letter from Isaac Richier to Governor Goddard, 23 October, 1696. Giving his reasons for refusing to sign the bond of arbitration. 1 p.
728. XII. Copy of Sir John Hawles's opinion against admitting Richier to appeal upon the outlawry and executions upon which he was imprisoned.
728. XIII. Declaration of Stephen Crow, Sheriff of Bermuda, that Richier's detention in prison is upon Nicholas Trott's action and not Governor Goddard's. Made before the Council of Bermuda, 16 November, 1696. 1 p.
728. XIV. Oath of the Secretary of Bermuda to the authenticity of all the foregoing documents. ¼ p.
728. XV. List of the foregoing documents. Endorsed, Recd. 13th. Read, 15 Feb. 1696–7. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 3. Nos. 6, 6 I.–XV.; and (list of papers only) 29. pp. 12–14.]
Feb. 15.729. Journal of Council of Trade and Plantations. The answer to the Committees of the House of Lords was signed. Mr. Randolph asked for a copy of the Attorney and Solicitor General's report upon the grant of the three lower counties (Newcastle, Kent and Suffolk) to Mr. Penn; which was ordered to be supplied to him.
Several papers from Bermuda received, and Governor Goddard's letter of 17 November last read.
Order for the heads of a Charter of the Company for working Copper-mines, etc., to be sent to Mr. Webb.