America and West Indies
March 1697, 16-20

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

J. W. Fortescue (editor)

Year published

1904

Pages

399-406

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: March 1697, 16-20', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 15: 1696-1697 (1904), pp. 399-406. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70890 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

March 1697

March 16.
Whitehall.
804. Duke of Shrewsbury to Council of Trade and Plantations. The King has appointed the Earl of Bellomont to be Governor of New York, Massachusetts and New Hampshire, and to be Captain-General, during the war, of all the forces both there and in Connecticut, Rhode Island and the Jerseys. You will prepare his commissions and instructions. Signed, Shrewsbury. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 17 March, 1696–7. [Board of Trade. New England, 8. No. 75; and 36. p. 143.]
March 16.805. Petition of the Mayor and principal merchants of Plymouth to Council of Trade and Plantations. The season for sending ships on fishing voyages to Newfoundland is already advanced, and as the enemy destroyed all the stages, boats and warehouses last year, new ones must be built before the fishermen can go to sea again, which will occupy a considerable time after their arrival. If the enemy arrive there before the English ships, the difficulty and danger of recovering the lost harbours will be extraordinary. We beg therefore for the hastening of the forces designed to Newfoundland. Signed, John Munyon, mayor, and by forty more. Large sheet. Endorsed, Recd. 16, Read, 17 March, 1696–7. [Board of Trade. Newfoundland, 3. No. 60.]
March 16.
Whitehall.
806. William Popple to the Secretaries of the Admiralty. The Council of Trade has given orders for the merchantmen from Poole and Weymouth to join the Newfoundland squadron at Spit head, and those from Exeter, Topsham and Dartmouth to await the squadron at Plymouth; but the Council think that a frigate should be sent to escort them thither, and that in this manner Plymouth shall be the rendezvous for the squadron and the merchant-ships that are to sail with it. The Bideford and Barnstaple merchants press earnestly for the despatch of the convoy appointed for the fishing ships from the Bristol Channel, that if possible she shall be at Milford by the 25th instant, and that the Captain may have orders to wait forty-eight hours at Waterford while they take in provisions. Please lay this before the Admiralty. [Board of Trade. Newfoundland, 25. pp. 96–97.]
March 16.
Whitehall.
807. William Popple to Richard Usticke and the Mayors of Bristol, Exeter, Plymouth, Dartmouth, Weymouth, Barnstaple and Poole. The Newfoundland expedition will very shortly be ready to sail. H.M.S. Crown is ordered from Plymouth to Milford to convoy fishing ships direct to Newfoundland from the Bristol Channel. The Council will move that she be detained at Waterford, as desired. The Council desires to know how provisions now rule at Waterford and whether any of these ships (if there were occasion) can take in provisions, and in what quantities, for the expedition. [Board of Trade. Newfoundland, 25. pp. 97–98.]
March 16.
Admiralty
Office.
808. J. Burchett to William Popple. With reference to yours of 15th I have already given you an answer in mine of the 11th. The three ships proposed to go first, as being the most ready, are the Seaford which is in the Downs, and the Chatham and Sheerness, which are ordered from the Nore to the Downs. The Lords of the Admiralty are still of opinion that the three said ships should first proceed, if the merchants cannot be prevailed with to stay till the others are victualled, which at this time is very uncertain, considering the scarcity of money to purchase provisions, they having reported the same to the King in reply to his Order in Council on the petitions of the merchants of Barbados and the Leeward Islands, wherein they prayed for separate convoy for their ships bound thither. All possible despatch will be used in getting the other four vessels ready to proceed. Signed, J. Burchett. 1¼ pp. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 4. No. 41; and 34. pp. 123–124.]
March 16.809. Minutes of Council of Maryland. Order for no ships to be cleared till they have given security to call upon the Commodore in Virginia. Proclamation for a day of thanksgiving, and for legal proceedings against certain persons to be stopped, in honour of the King's happy return from Flanders. The Governor took the oath prescribed by the Act for preventing frauds. Orders for the naval officers to give security according to the said Act. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 13. pp. 241–245.]
March 17.810. Estimate of the cost of the accommodation and treatment of two Indian prisoners and their interpreter (see No. 787).
Suit of clothes for the Captain about£900
" " for the other "700
" " for the interpreter "500
Linen for shirts, cravats, etc. "900
Three hats "150
Two swords and belts "150
Stockings, two pair each "1100
Shoes, " " - "1110
Two periwigs "300
Lodging, diet, etc., at about £3 per week for six weeks3000
Three passages2400
Sea-beds and other necessaries1200
Incidents1000
Total£114110
1 p. Endorsed, 17 March, 1696–7. [Board of Trade. New York, 7. No. 15; and 52. pp. 89–90; and Plantations General, 4. p. 125.]
March 17.811. Memoranda of the receipt on 17 March of the Order in Council of 25 February, for placing the Indian prisoners under the charge of the New York Agents; and of William Nicolls's estimate of the cost of their accommodation. Each ¼ p. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 4. Nos. 42, 43.]
March 17.
Whitehall.
812. J. Tucker to William Popple. Mr. Secretary Trumbull having laid before the King the Council of Trade's representation of 4 March, with the list of officers chosen from the Admiralty Courts, Mr. Penn desired that the same persons that serve Pennsylvania should serve also the three lower counties, being under the same Government and upon the same river and bay. The King, thinking this reasonable, desired the representation to be returned to you, that the Council of Trade may hear and consider Mr. Penn's reasons. Signed, J. Tucker. ¾ p. Inscribed, the Representation was returned to Mr. Sec. Trumbull on 25 March. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 19 March, 1696–7. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 4. No. 44; and 34. pp. 126–127.]
March 17.813. Edward Randolph to William Popple. In my list of persons to be officers of the Admiralty Courts in America, which was presented to the Council of Trade on 13 July last, I mentioned Thomas Newton to be Attorney-General of Massachusetts. In my last paper I also recommended him to be Advocate also, not knowing then any person better qualified. But having since met Mr. Benjamin Lynde, of the Inner Temple, a barrister of good estate, born in the country and very able and willing to serve the King in that station, I recommend him as preferable to Mr. Newton, who is no barrister and not so capable to discharge the trust. Signed, E. Randolph. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 19 March, 1696–7. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 4. No. 45; and 34. pp. 127–128.]
March 17.
Whitehall.
814. William Popple to John Sansom. Forwarding copy of Thomas Bulkley's petition (see No. 681) for the Commissioners of Customs to enquire into the matters therein concerning them. [Board of Trade. Proprieties, 25. pp. 24–25.]
March 17.
Whitehall.
815. Council of Trade and Plantations to Secretary Trumbull. Forwarding a draft letter to the Governor of New England relating to the expedition to Newfoundland for the King's approval, and pressing for its early dispatch. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Ph. Meadows, Wm. Blathwayt, Jno. Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. New England, 36. p. 144.]
March 17.
Whitehall.
816. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. We have considered an Act of Jamaica to invest Henry Lowe with the estate of Sir Francis Watson, deceased, and having ascertained that neither the Attorney-General nor Sir Francis Watson's creditors object to it, we recommend that it be confirmed. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Ph. Meadows, Wm. Blathwayt, John Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 56. pp. 80–81.]
March 17.817. Minutes of Council of War at Jamaica. In view of the departure of the enemy to leeward it was ordered that the soldiers may disperse to their homes, but be ready none the less to march immediately upon the first alarm. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 79. p. 59.]
March 17.818. Journal of General Assembly of Massachusetts. Adjourned till to-morrow, few Representatives being present.
March 18.Again adjourned for the same reason.
March 19.The Lieutenant-Governor recommended to the Representatives the state of the Treasury and the necessity for providing for defence of the province both by sea and land. The Treasurer gave in a report shewing the Province to be near £7,000 in debt, which was sent down to the Representatives. Bill for incorporation of Harvard College read and debated.
March 20.A vote received from the Representatives proposing a security to any who should advance money to the Treasury. [Board of Trade. New England, 48. pp. 123–125.]
March 18.
Admiralty
Office.
819. J. Burchett to William Popple. Yours of the 16th has been laid before the Admiralty, and orders will be given about convoying the ships to Newfoundland accordingly. Memorandum of above letter. Recd. Read, 19 March. [Board of Trade. Newfoundland, 25. p. 98; and 3. No. 61.]
March 18.820. Address of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament to the King. Calling attention to the past abuses and frauds in the Plantation Trade, owing in part to the connivance of the Governors of the Proprietary Colonies, and suggesting a special order to bring them to a better sense of their duty, that the Proprietors be required to give security for due execution of the Acts of Trade and Navigation by their Deputy-Governors, and that the Governors of Rhode Island and Connecticut shall give the like security. Copy. Signed, Math. Johnson, Cler. Parliamentor. 1½ pp. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 26 March, 1697. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 4. No. 46; and 34. pp. 135–137.]
March 18.
St. Swithen's
Lane.
821. Gilbert Heathcote to William Popple. Mr. Yellowton tells me he has eighty men ready and willing to go to Jamaica who would be of great service to the island. We could get sixty or seventy of them transported in the merchantmen bound to Jamaica if we could have money to pay the masters of the ships £8 a head to buy them provisions, and then the man-of-war that is going thither might be ordered to carry twenty men. The difficulty is how to get this money for the masters. I as a particular merchant cannot raise it, and when I speak to the rest they talk of their losses. I see no hope that this business can be done unless by the Government. Signed, Gilbert Heathcote. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 19 March, 1697. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 8. No. 50; and 56. p. 81.]
March 18.822. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Commissioners for Sick and Wounded. We forward an estimate prepared by the New York Agents of the expense of entertaining two Indians (see No. 810). We think it sufficient that you pay them for the present £50 in part of what may be requisite for that service. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Jno. Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. New York, 52. pp. 90–91; and Plantations General, 34. p. 126.]
March 18.
Kensington.
823. The King to Lieutenant-Governor Stoughton. We are sending a squadron of ships with land forces under command of Colonel John Gibsone for the recovery of Newfoundland and the re-establishment of our trade and fishery. Seeing how greatly New England is concerned therein, we expect and think fit that you give all possible assistance to the undertaking, sending such ships and land forces as may be spared to join the expedition between Cape Race and Bonavista, and particularly supplying victuals and provisions, for which we have taken care that due payment shall be made. In general do everything that may conduce to the success of the expedition or may be desired by the Commander-in-Chief. Countersigned, Wm. Trumbull. [Board of Trade. New England, 36. pp. 148–149; and Newfoundland, 25. pp. 100–101.]
March 18.
Jamaica.
824. Extract from a letter of Sir William Beeston to William Blathwayt. On the 11th inst. the sloop that I had ordered abroad to watch Mons. Pointis's motions saw his fleet sail out of Leogane and kept not far from them. On Friday they were all under Cape Tiburon, twenty-six sail, when the sloop left them, being chased by three of them. She arrived here on the 13th, and I expected the fleet to come in sight every moment, but on the afternoon of the 14th, two men came down from the hills of St. Andrews and reported that they had seen them on the evening of the 13th far off at sea, to southward of Port Royal, and had counted nineteen sail. This put an end to my apprehensions for them; I concluded them to be gone to Porto Bello, where they will find the galleons and the plate aboard, unless it has been landed on my advice of this fleet. The Spaniards will have a hard task to secure them, for the place is so weak and the ships very ill manned. I found by the sloop which I sent to watch the fleet, that there was a great dispute between Mons. Pointis and Mons. Ducasse, insomuch that Pointis told Ducasse that if he were to command in this design, he would give the King of France such another account as he gave of his (Ducasse's) expedition against Jamaica. The privateers also mutinied and would not go with them because they would not let them have a commander of their own, saying they would otherwise be served as they were at Jamaica—they to fight and the great only to take away the money from them. On this there was a quarrel and some men killed, which caused about seven hundred of the privateers to desert and go to the Isle des Vaches. Although the French have not fallen upon us yet, the collecting and maintaining of the people from the out-parts, and the providing fire-ships and other great charges to defend the place will undo us quite in a short time; for besides our inability to suffer such charges, the calling of people so far from their habitations, the keeping them from their employments, and in the meantime leaving their wives and children to the insults of the negroes without any to guard them, makes them very weary of the place. The mean people, who are the strength, get away, as they find opportunity, to the Northern plantations, where they hope to live more quietly; and the better sort are discouraged, for, no supply of goods coming from England, all goods are excessive dear. Yet the laws are so hard on us that we must not be supplied by the Dutch our neighbours, where we could have what we wanted at easy rates. No ships come to buy or carry away our produce, yet we must not sell it to strangers nor send it anywhere but to England—thus people complain, and this makes them think themselves to be but a sort of slaves, and all that they labour and hazard for to be but precarious. Unless some speedy measures be taken, this place must come to nothing. I have often said so before, but doubt I shall not be believed until too late. I hope you will impart this to the Council of Trade, for if I write to them I can say no more, nor should I have written so often as I have on this subject, did I not think it my duty as the King's Governor. I cannot but admire greatly that the King of Spain (who is so jealous of his mistress, the West Indies, that he would fain believe hardly another nation has seen her) should suffer her to be ruffled by the French, fleet after fleet, and yet take no more care for her preservation. If the French now get the galleons and plate, it will be a blow that all Europe will feel, and which I fear will encourage the war on the one side and discourage it on the other. We have no sign nor news of the fleet which we were told should sail at the end of December. All our despatches are so delayed that they come too late; for when the steed is stolen, it is of little purpose to shut the stable door. Copy. 2 pp. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 7 June, 1697. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 8. No. 47; and 56. pp. 102–105.]
March 19.825. Minutes of Council of Barbados. The two men-of-war came in with intelligence that they had seen and been chased by four vessels, one of about seventy and two of about twenty guns, but that no colours were shewn. The sloop from Martinique reported sixteen sail, of which one pennant, at Fort St. Pierre. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 65. p. 198.]
March 19.
Bideford.
826. Richard Usticke to Council of Trade and Plantations. In answer to Mr. Popple's letter of 16th inst. I find from the merchants that the price of provisions at Waterford is as follows:— beef, 17s. per barrel (quarter) from 1cwt. 3qu. 14lb. to 2cwt. per barrel; pork, about 10s. per cwt. fresh, salt and cask plentiful; butter about 24s. per cwt.; good cheese from 14s. to 16s. per cwt.; candles 4s. per dozen; no bread to be had on any terms, being taken up for merchant-ships. Signed, Richd. Usticke. P.S.—Our ships may take on public freight from 40 to 50 barrels of beef and no more, for they all carry cargoes of salt. ¾ p. Endorsed Recd. Read, 22 March, 1696–7. [Board of Trade. Newfoundland, 6. No. 62.]
March 19.827. Sir Henry Ashurst to Council of Trade and Plantations. Asking that two memorials sent in by him as Agent for Massachusetts may be taken into consideration, now that a Governor has been appointed to go thither. Signed, Hen. Ashurst. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. Read, 19 March, 1696–7. [Board of Trade. New England, 8. No. 76.]
March 19.
Whitehall.
828. William Popple to Gilbert Heathcote. In reply to your letter of yesterday as to the transportation of tradesmen to Jamaica, the Council of Trade recommend, as the most expeditious course, that an order be given upon the Commissary at Jamaica (who has money remitted from hence in his hands) to pay the cost of their passage on their arrival or to meet such bills as may be drawn for the advance of money here. If you or any other merchant will advance the money on these terms the business may be done, in which case the Council recommends it to your care. You mention the price of passages at £8 a head. £6 has been the usual rate on like occasions, but the Council thinks that £7 may be allowed in this case. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 56. p. 82.]
March 19.
Whitehall.
829. William Popple to the Secretary of the Custom House. Mr. Randolph has proposed that Mr. Benjamin Lynde be substituted for Mr. Thomas Newton as Attorney-General and Advocate for Massachusetts and New Hampshire. The Council of Trade desire the opinion of the Commissioners of Customs thereupon. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 34. p. 128.]
March 19.
Whitehall.
830. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Trumbull. Mr. Nelson, who has been long conversant in the Northern parts of America, suggests to us that it may not be difficult to intercept at the mouth of the river of Canada the fleet that-sails thither early in the spring from Rochelle. We communicate this to you for the King's information. Signed, J. Bridgewater, Ph. Meadows, Wm. Blathwayt, Jno. Pollexfen, Abr. Hill. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 34. p. 129.]
March 20.
Transport
Office.
831. Estimate of provisions for 100 sick soldiers for 240 days for a voyage to Newfoundland. 71½ cwt. of rice at 35s.; 36 cwt. French barley at 18s.; 36 cwt. currants at 40s.; 18 cwt. prunes at 20s.; 31lb. cinnamon at 7s.; 31lb. mace at 22s.; 31lb. nutmeg at 8s. 6d.; 6½ cwt. sugar at 38s.; 20lb. pepper at 16s.; 184 bushels oatmeal at 5s.; 100 cradles [cots] at 7s. each; 100 beds, pillows and rugs at 7s.; Chirurgeons 2s. 6d. for every man. Total, £537 16s. 8d. 1 p. [Board of Trade. Newfoundland, 3. No. 63.]
[Mar. 20.]832. Invoice of medicines, at ready money prices from the Apothecary. Total, £178 12s. 4d. 3 pp. [Board of Trade. Newfoundland, 3. No. 64.]
March 20.833. Invoice of utensils necessary with the medicines. Rough estimate of cost, £34. 1 p. Endorsed, Sent to Mr. Sec. Trumbull, 20 March, 1696–7. [Board of Trade. Newfoundland, 3. No. 65.]
March 20.
Admiralty.
834. Secretary of the Admiralty to William Popple. Forwarding extract of a letter from the Commissioners of the Navy at Plymouth, respecting a vessel hired to sail express to New England. Signed, J. Burchett. ¼ p. Enclosed,
834. I. Extract from a letter of the Commissioners of the Navy at Plymouth, 18 March, 1697. I have hired the best ship I could find to carry packets to New England, called the Mary de Grace. She was a French privateer, about forty tons and six men, and a very prime sailer, having made several voyages by running without convoy. She may be ready in five days. [Board of Trade. New England, 8. Nos. 77, 77 I.; and 36. pp. 144–145.]
March 20.
Whitehall.
835. William Popple to Henry Greenhill. I have received yours of 15th and 25th ult., and thank you for your trouble. As to postage, I am to inform you that I shall be accountable to you for the first packet as well as for any others of the like nature in future. I now again send you three packets to be sent by the men-of-war to Barbados, Jamaica, and the Leeward Islands. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 34. p. 130.]