Elizabeth
April 1559, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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Joseph Stevenson (editor)

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1863

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210-222

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'Elizabeth: April 1559, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Elizabeth, Volume 1: 1558-1559 (1863), pp. 210-222. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=71738 Date accessed: 24 October 2014.


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April 1559, 11-20

April 11.
B. M. Harl. 353. 167 b.
517. Proceedings of Privy Council.
Westminster, 11 April 1559.—Present: the Lords Great Seal; the Earls of Derby and Bedford; Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Comptroller, Mr. Vice-Chamberlain, Mr. Secretary, Mr. Cave, Mr. Mason.
A letter to Thomas Mildmay, Esq., Sheriff of Essex, signifying that it cannot but seem very strange that one Harleston, late captain of the Rysebank, being indicted of high treason, and being (as the Lords are informed) come over and presently remaining in Essex, is suffered to go at liberty. He is therefore commanded in the Queen's name to cause search to be made for him, and to apprehend him and send him hither under safe custody.
April 11.
R. O. 27 V. 119.
518. Another copy of the same.
Modern transcript.
April 11.
R. O. 27 VI. 75.
519. Another copy of the same.
Modern transcript.
April 12.
R. O.
520. Mundt to the Queen.
1. The Estates are now discussing such treaties as have been propounded at Worms amongst the collocutors, but nothing was finally determined there. The commissaries Johannis Frederici, Duke of Saxony, wished that all the commissaries of the Protestants should condemn all those which did not hold and follow Luther's opinion concerning the sacrament, to which the other commissaries and collocutors would not agree, alleging that they were not come for that purpose, but to dispute with their adversaries. Hereupon the commissaries Johannis Frederici returned home again. The Catholici upon this occasion taken refused to commune further with the Protestants, saying that they did not agree amongst themselves, and that now all were not present. Hereupon arose so many disputations and contentions that this colloquium did come to no effect.
2. Nothing is done as yet in causa religionis. It is thought that little will be concluded in this article here, but that the accord made about religion in comitiis A.D. 1555 shall be observed still. The Protestants did condemn in that colloquium the Anabaptists and declared their own faith in a writing.
3. The Papists are late to come to an open reasoning in religion, but cast in all manner of objections to let this communication. It is supposed that if they were assured of their bishoprics and livings they would not contend so much. They are now afraid that the Duke of Cleve will reform his churches and establish the true religion, as is affirmed by many credible persons.
4. Has heard in time past that Maximilian should not only favour the Gospel, but maintain and profess the true doctrine. A nobleman, who has been with him of late, assured the writer that when Maximilian's father, the Emperor, with threatenings commanded him to leave this doctrine and put away his preacher, he answered that rather than he will leave the right doctrine and return to idolatry, or put away his preacher without a cause, he will leave all and go where he may serve God with a quiet conscience. He has also written to a Prince in Germany that he will rather leave and lose all than forsake the true doctrine. The Emperor's second son is in all points, both of body and mind, [and] in religion, like his father; and if the Emperor might conveniently, he would the second son make greater than the elder.
5. There is hope that the Bishops of Magunts and Coln will come to a modesty in religion; great persecutions they do not, nor do they hinder other estates from making alterations in religion in such countries as are under their spiritual jurisdiction. If the Duke of Cleve should receive the Gospel in his countries, the diocese of Coln would follow shortly, and that hazard to be deprived of the bishopric, as Hermannus episcopus Coloniensis was, "is now taken up."
6. The Duke of Brunswick, Henricus, (who was reported to have been dead,) is lame and paraliticus; his son Julius favours the Gospel and is married now of late to the daughter of the Elector of Brandenburg, so that now the whole of Saxony professes the Gospel, princes and cities.
7. Primarius et secundarius clerus in the bishopric of Breem have made a reformation among themselves, permitting marriage to the priests and communion sub utraque specie. Archiepiscopus Magdeburgensis, (Electoris Brandenburgensis filius) suffers his priests to do what they will; he is not above twenty years old.
8. The Diet now consults upon an answer to be given to the French Ambassadors. The Emperor has signified to the States that he has required of the King of Spain to comprehend Metz and other places in the agreement, which the French King detains from the Empire, that they might be restored, the occasion of such detention being expired by Charles' death. After much suit and labour made by King Philip, nothing can be obtained. The French King answered that this demand appertains to the Empire.
9. The Venetians are afraid of this conjunction and affinity between these great Kings, who, if they join their power together, would make much ado. The King of Spain bears small love to the Germans. The French King would fain possess all the lands lying towards France upon the Rhine, so that it might be limes Galliæ. "How well we agree amongst ourselves is manifest."
10. The French King has now of late sent an Ambassador, named Guinaldus, to the new Palatine at Heidelberg, whereupon the Ambassadors remaining here have sent a gentleman likewise to him.
11. All the cantons of the Schwitsers have sent Ambassadors here to obtain confirmation of their old liberties. It is not unlikely that Geneva and Berne shall have to do with the Duke of Savoy for such land as they have of the duchy of Savoy.—Augusta, 12 April 1559. Signed.
Orig. Hol., with armorial seal. Add. Endd. Pp. 4.
April 12.
R. O.
521. Mundt to Cecil.
1. Since his coming to Augusta (on 9th March) has written every week to the Queen, and has sent his letters by the ordinary post hence, to an English merchant dwelling at Antwerp.
The Princes have not yet come, and it is doubtful when they will come. The Emperor has sent into Austria for his hounds, hunters, &c., and belike is not minded to depart from hence a great while. He will overcome with his patience and tarrying all excusations and impediments of the Princes. If he should depart without the Princes, his reputation would be greatly diminished. The Bishops and other commissaries shall find these delays pleasant and profitable, when they shall make their accounts. The Emperor might by good law demand of the Princes all such expenses as he sustains by their negligent tarrying. This realizes the saying of Philip of Macedon; "Miserum regis esse conditionem, qui pro asinorum pastura res suas attemperare cogatur."—Augusta, 12 April 1559. Signed.
Orig. Hol., with armorial seal. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
April 12.
R. O.
522. Sir H. Percy to Sir F. Parry and Cecil.
Was never before so much deceived as in his last letters to them, for as yet the Dowager of Scotland is not departed, but very sore sick and in such danger as life is despaired of. Of late there has been a convention at Stirling where she lies, at which was appearance of contention amongst the chief noblemen there assembled for matters of religion. On the Queen's side there remained steadfast only M. Docell, M. Rubei, and some other French gentlemen, who are at this present all there attending, saving Capt. Galyarde that keeps the charge at Aymouth. Yet the matter is pacified for the time. The Duke being sent for thither, it is agreed amongst them, for the avoiding of all dangers, that if God shall call the Dowager, the governance shall be with the said Duke, M. Docell, and M. Rubei, jointly, until the King and Queen Dauphins shall have otherwise directed the same.
Yesterday, by command of the Earl of Northumberland, he met the Lord Hume and the Laird of Cessforde, Wardens of Scotland, for the redress of attemptates, for which he refers to the letters of the Earl to the Council.—Norham Castle, 12 April 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
April 13.
B.M. Harl. 353. 168.
523. Proceedings of Privy Council.
Westminster, 13 April 1559.—Present: the Lord Great Seal, the Earls of Bedford and Pembroke; Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Comptroller, Mr. Vice-Chamberlain, Mr. Secretary; Mr. Cave, Mr. Masone.
A letter to the Lieutenant of the Tower, with the body of one Harleston, late captain of Risebank, whom he is willed to keep in ward without conference with any until he be examined.
A letter to the Mayor and Jurates of Rye, signifying unto them that it is not meant otherwise by the conclusion of the peace, but that such French prisoners as have been taken and remain in that town, should pay their ransoms to their takers notwithstanding the peace, which they are willed to declare unto them; and upon the payment of their ransoms to set them at liberty.
April 13.
R. O. 27 V. 120.
524. Another copy of the same.
Modern transcript.
April 13.
R. O. 27 VI. 77.
525. Another copy of the same.
Modern transcript.
April 14.
R. O.
526. Sir R. Lee to Cecil.
Has good occasion to write to the Privy Council touching the state of his charge here, but looks for the speedy coming of the Earl of Bedford to whom he can better express his meaning than he can by letters. Prays him to further his Lordship's coming, till which he must stay some part of his doings, which were more necessary to be now in hand. Thanks him for remembering his suit for his son-in-law, and for his commendations sent in Sir James Crofts' letter.— Berwick, 14 April 1559. Signed, with seal.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
April 14.
R. O.
527. Croft to Cecil.
Has this day received the Queen's letter enclosing the proclamation for the peace. The Master of the Household of the Regent of Scotland passed through this town yesterday, whereby the slackness of the posts may appear. Will appoint with the ministers of the borders as to the proclamation. Of the two bands of horsemen will cass a certain number. Thanks him for his letters about the entertainment, and explains his wishes about the same. In his opinion the numbers of the footmen in this town are not to be abated. Mr. Somerset (who lay at Wark) is a towardly young gentleman, but Captain Reede (who lay at Norham) is one of the sufficientest men to govern an ensign that we have. These things will doubtless be ordained by my Lord of Bedford and the other Commissioners. As the soldiers to be cassed are yet unpaid, and therefore not discharged, it were better for the Queen to borrow money on interest than that these men should remain in wages.—Berwick, 14 April 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
April 14.
R. O.
528. War between Scotland and the Low Countries.
"D'Assonville's allegation for the King of Spain why the King may not make war between Scotland and his Low Countries."
Philip's Legate, having been requested by the Lords of the Council of England to state in writing the reasons (advanced by him verbally on the previous day,) why his master would not feel inclined to join in a war against the Scots, presents the present paper to their Lordships.
Although Philip will not shrink from declaring war against Scotland should such a measure be for the interest of England, (for this realm, which he had by dower, is no less dear to him than those which he has by inheritance), yet he thinks that the Queen should be made aware that after a late conference in his secret Council in the Low Countries in which this question was discussed, he had been requested not to involve his subjects in this dispute without urgent necessity. This request was based upon the following reasons:—
1. The distance of Scotland from the Low Countries would prevent the latter from being able effectually to attack the former, especially during the continuance of a war with France.
2. The notorious poverty of the Scots would make the balance of the chances of war in their favour; whereas success would be unproductive to the Low Countries. The war of 1544, undertaken by the Emperor at the instigation of Henry VIII., is proof of this; during the progress of which the Scotch, though frequently defeated, gained upon the whole infinitely more than they lost.
3. The geographical position of Scotland opposite Denmark enables the small vessels of the Scotch to intercept, without difficulty, the ships which trade from the northern seas to the Low Countries. The trade of the Netherlands would thus speedily be ruined.
4. The herring fishing off the coast of Scotland (so important for the greater part of Friesland, Holland, Zealand, and Flanders) would be annibilated; or, if carried on, would require the protection of an armed fleet. This convoy could not at present be given, all the shipping being engaged in the war with France.
5. It is better to concentrate all the energies of Spain and England against France, the originator of these disturbances, and the power upon which Scotland chiefly depends. A declaration of war with Scotland would divide the forces and cramp the energies of Spain by reducing her commerce and consequently her revenues.
6. If it be objected that the commerce of England will suffer by reason of her shipping being intercepted by the Scots, the King of Spain answers that he will take care that this do not occur in the ports of Zealand, which he can easily accomplish by preventing the arrival there of Scottish ships of war.
These reasons induce Philip to conclude against proclaiming war against Scotland, a step which would be detrimental not only to his own interests but also to those of England. Their wisdom is to concentrate their forces against France. He urges the Queen to give these reasons her earnest consideration. Having done so, if she still considers war with Scotland to be necessary, he is prepared to encounter any inconvenience, however great, rather than desert her, as he has long ago determined to do whatever shall seem to her to be good, just, and honourable. Still, however, if open war can be avoided, he will rejoice, for this he is convinced it will be for their mutual advantage.
Should she determine upon war, the delay of at least one month is necessary, to enable him to recall his ships for the protection of the coasts of Holland, Friesland, and Zealand. The fishing now begun will then have been finished, and time will be afforded for the return of his merchants now trading abroad.
Copy. Endd.: 14 April 1559. Lat. Pp. 7.
[April 15.]
B. M. Reg. 13 B. 1. 7.
529. The Queen to the Emperor Ferdinand.
Learns by his letters of March 29 that he is pleased with the reception given to his letters and his Ambassador the Count von Heffensteyn, and repeats that both the one and the other were most acceptable to her. She is gratified that he so kindly interprets her meaning, and has not forgotten the terms of friendship on which her father, brother, and sister stood towards him and his house. Will study to perpetuate the same.
Orig. Letterbook. Lat. P. 1.
[April 15.]
B. M. Sloane, 4144. 7.
530. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
[April 15.]
B. M. Reg. 13 B. 1. 7 b.
531. The Queen to the Duke of Holstein.
Has received his letters addressed to her late sister, Queen Mary, whose death had occurred before the arrival of his messenger. These letters mention his intention to select some port within his dominions fit for the importation and exportation of merchandise, and the extension of commerce between their two realms. The project has her concurrence, and she has so informed his messenger. In furtherance of the same object she now sends her servant, Armigill Wade, who will further inform him of her intentions in this matter, and for whom she asks credit.
Copy. Letterbook. Lat. P. 1.
[April 15.]
B. M. Sloane, 4144. 7 b.
532. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
April 15.
B. M. Ms. Reg. 13 B. 1. 5.
533. The Queen to Sebastian, King of Portugal.
Has received with the greatest pleasure his letters dated 26 Jan., delivered to her by John Pereira, his servant. Thanks him for the kindness which they express, which she will be happy to reciprocate.—Westminster, 15 April 1559.
Letterbook. Lat. P. 1.
April 15.
B. M. Nero, B. 1. 85.
534. Another copy of the above.
April 15.
B. M. Sloane, 4144. 5 b.
535. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
April 15.
B. M. Ms. Reg. 13 B. 1. 5.
536. The Queen to Catherine, Queen of Portugal.
John Pereira, the servant of the King of Portugal, has presented to the writer the letters, dated at Lisbon 26 Jan., addressed to her by the Queen of Portugal. The messenger and the letters were most welcome, and she listened to the one and read the other with the utmost satisfaction, since they both expressed so much kindness. She, for her part, will take advantage of every opportunity of testifying her friendship.—Westminster, 15 April 1559.
Letterbook. Lat. P. 1.
April 15.
B. M. Sloane, 4144. 6.
537. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
April 15.
B. M. Harl. 353. 169 b.
538. Proceedings of Privy Council.
Westminster, 15 April 1559.—Present: the Lord Great Seal; the Earls of Shrewsbury, Derby, and Pembroke; the Lords Admiral and Chamberlain; Mr. Comptroller, Mr. ViceChamberlain, Mr. Secretary; Mr. Mason.
A letter to the Lord Dacres to take the musters of Captain Tuttey's band, and so to discharge so many of them as he can with such money as he has gotten for that purpose, according as he was written unto before; which, upon the coming of the Queen's treasure northward, shall be repaid him; and to send Captain Tuttye himself to Sir James Crofts to Berwick, at whose and the Treasurer's hands he shall receive that is due to him.
April 15.
R. O. 27 V. 124.
539. Another copy of the same.
Modern transcript.
April 15.
R. O. 27 VI. 80.
540. Another copy of the same.
Modern transcript.
April 15.
B. M. Harl. 36. 75.
541. Embassy to the Duke of Holst.
"Instructions given to Armigill Wade, Esq., being sent to the Duke of Holst by the Queen, dated 15 April 1559."
1. He shall repair to Holsatia, and at his arrival at Hewsen, and afterwards at Kiel lying upon the east seas of the said dukedom of Holsatia, shall cause William Earle, servant to Sir William Garret, Alderman of London, to procure him access to the Duke. This obtained, he shall commune with him or his Council in the matter of traffic for the resort of the English merchants into his countries, conferring with him upon the aptness and commodities of the ports to which they may resort with their wares, what privileges shall be granted them, taking care not to bind her to any conclusion.
2. He shall learn, by the secretest and indirectest way that he can devise, what doings, liberties and privileges, they have, or had, in the countries of Sweden, Denmark, and Holstein, in what state and times they stand there this day, herein groping the Duke, (tanquam aliud agens) so as to feel whether he would be induced to break through them, and so handle the business as to provoke him to use them in such sort as has been done here, declaring to him the reasonable offers made unto them, which they do not accept or embrace.
3. He shall further learn by the means aforesaid how the Stades seem to take their handling, and what rumours they spread there touching their discontentation, or what they may or do practise, secretly or openly, for the stay or courage of our determinations here against them.
4. By the means aforesaid he shall learn of what religion the Duke is, and if he is of the religion of the Protestants he may introduce matters of communication of religion; declaring that, by the goodness of God and her, this realm embraces the religion set forth in the Confession of Augusta, agreeable to that which the King of Denmark, Sweden, and other Princes of Germany receive; and that the Duke not abhorring from the same, it were meet that there were between England and him some further intelligence for the maintenance of the said Confession and for the repressing of the attempts of the Stades for the recovery of the said liberties. In all these things he shall use himself so warily as it may seem these things pass from himself; giving as it were some inkling of hope, but so as in nowise to charge and tie the Queen.
5. In the meantime he shall cause Wm. Earle to bargain for a mass of bullion in dollar and fine silver, proceeding in the same bargain himself under, or up to 100,000l., not exceeding 8 per cent. interest for the whole. In the handling hereof he shall not show that he is her minister, nor produce her warrant to treat herein unless the cause be urgent.
Copy. Pp. 5.
April 15.
B. M. Addit. 5935. 198.
542. Another copy of the above. Signed by the Queen and subscribed by Cecil.
Modern transcript. Pp. 4.
April 16.
R. O.
543. D'Oysel to Sir James Croftes.
The Queen Regent of Scotland has ordered that the peace lately established be published on Monday next, being the market day of Edinburgh. Arrangement should be made for a general publication of the same on the borders. Requests to know whether the subjects of the King, his master, may pass through England into Scotland (either by post or otherwise) as they were wont to do before the last war; which was to them that passed in post with a letter of supplication of the Queen Regent, or one of himself, directed to the Captain of Berwick, or to the Warden of the Border, to obtain a commission "to that fyne;" and to them that passed journey riding, without any other ceremony but to show unto the Captain or Warden aforesaid the colour and number of their horses, and to take certificate thereof, to serve them at their passage of the sea.
P. S.—Since the above was written has received Crofts' letters directed to Capt. Gaillart, dated 14th inst. Will cooperate with him as to the publication of the peace. Prays to be recommended to Sir Henry Percy.—Strivelin [Stirling], 13 April 1559. Signed: Cleutin.
Orig. Add. Endd.: Mr. D'Osell to Sir James Croftes. Pp. 2.
April 18.
R. O.
544. Sir Edward Carne to the Queen.
In his letter of the 1st inst. had informed her how the Pope's Council charged him, on the Pope's behalf, not to depart from Rome without the special licence of His Holiness. Having had neither answer, nor permission to have audience, he hereupon had desired Cardinal Trani, the chief of the Council, to let him have that charge in writing, which he obtained subscribed and sealed by the Pope, the copy of which he now sends. Has been commanded by the Pope to take charge of the English hospital here, with the profits thereof to his necessary use. Though it is but a small thing, the charge thereof deducted, yet he will in no wise meddle with it otherwise than shall stand with her pleasure. Might have proceeded better had he known her pleasure to return in time "herehence."
There be post upon post sent hither, as well from France as Flanders, of the peace concluded; and two Ambassadors, one from France, the other from Spain, are looked for daily, sent to treat with the Pope upon matters agreed between the said Kings concerning religion. Upon their arrival the Pope will send two Legates, one to the French King, the other to the King of Spain, for reformation of religion. The King of Spain goes to Paris to marry the French King's daughter, and "therehence" straight to Spain. In the mean season the Dauphin shall lie in Brabant as hostage. The dispensation which the French King has sent for, for the marriage of his sister with the Duke of Savoy, is sent hence already.—Rome, 18 April 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
April 18.
B. M. Calig. E. V. 71.
545. Abstract of the above.
April 18.
B. M. Harl. 353. 170 b.
546. Proceedings of Privy Council.
Westminster, 18 April 1559.—Present: the Lord Great Seal; the Earls of Shrewsbury and Pembroke; the Lords Admiral and Chamberlain; Mr. Comptroller, Mr. ViceChamberlain, Mr. Secretary; Mr. Cave, Mr. Mason, Mr. Sackevill.
A letter to the Treasurer of Berwick, to make no further allowance unto Sir John Brend, muster master, (having been much of late absent from his charge,) than the sum of 20s. per diem only for his whole allowance from the 18th of December last until the 16th of this present inclusive; from which day forwards until his return hither again he is willed to pay him his accustomed allowance he had before.
A letter to the Earl of Westmoreland, to give order to William Hussey to deliver to Mr. Bowes, Marshal of Berwick, a prisoner in his custody named Captain Haye, a Scotchman, son to the Earl of Arrell, whom he makes claim unto, taking first bonds of the said Mr. Bowes to make answer to all such persons as shall make claim to the said prisoner hereafter.
A letter also, for the same purpose, to the said William Hussey.
April 18.
R. O. 27 V. 126.
547. Another copy of the preceding.
Modern transcript.
April 18.
R. O. 27 VI. 83.
548. Another copy of the same.
Modern transcript.
April [18.]
R. O. Forbes, 1. 82.
549. Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.
Ratification by Henry II. of the Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.—Fontainbleau, [blank] April 1559. Signed: Henricus,—De l'Aubespine.
Orig.
[April 18.]
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 218.
550. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
April 18.
R. O. Forbes, 1. 83.
551. Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.
Ratification by Francis, King of Scotland, and Dauphin of France, of the treaty of Cateau Cambresis.—Fontainbleau, 18 April 1559. Signed: Franciscus,—Aubelin.
Orig. on vellum, with the seal of Henry II. Lat.
April 18.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 220.
552. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
April 18.
R. O. Fœd. xv. 516.
553. Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.
Ratification by Francis and Mary, King and Queen of Scotland, of the Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.—Fontainbleau, 18 April 1559. Signed: Franciscus, Maria,—Aubelin. With seal.
Orig. Lat. Endd. by Cecil. Pp. 8.
April 19.
R. O.
554. Mundt to the Queen.
The States and Commissaries here have consulted a good while upon an answer to be given to the French Ambassadors; the Electors, Princes, and cities, each apart. Certain burgesses of Metz having made a lamentable complaint to the States against the French King of the shameful occupying of Metz against his promise and letters, hereupon certain delegates have been sent to the Ambassadors to ask if they have mandatum to treat upon Metz and other places detained by their master from the Empire. They have answered, No. Hears that an answer will be given to them as soon as certain Princes shall arrive. This week the Marquis of Baden, Dux Gemini-pontis, and the Duke of Wirtemburg shall be here; and as soon as certain others shall have arrived, the answer shall be given to the effect that the Empire will be glad to have the French King's amity, and asking him to restore such lands and cities as he has detained from the Empire.
This day, "about nine hours," the Commissaries of the Duke of Wirtemburg (to whom he had already done his message, as he had stated in his letters of the 5th inst.) declared to him the Duke's answer, thanking the Queen for her goodwill, and expressing his joy that she, who has been now many years well affected towards the true religion, has been called to restore it as her father and brother had done before; not doubting that she will set forth and plant the true religion, like as she has received and restored them again who for religion's sake have been compelled to leave their native country and friends.
The Duke has been informed by Paulus Vergerius that she is minded to institute and restore religion juxta Confessionem Augustanam, which is a singular pleasure to him, that she intends to follow the sincere doctrine of this Confession, and that he will pray God to give her constancy in this holy work, and he will not intermit to praise such a noble act by other Princes and Estates Augustanæ Confessionis. All this the writer promised to communicate with the Queen.— Augusta, 19 April 1559. Signed.
Orig. Hol., with armorial seal. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
April 19.
R. O.
555. Mundt to Cecil.
Has written to the Queen on 5th inst., about his communications with sundry Commissaries. Wishes that their masters would send their friendly letters to the Queen, so that the love and amity that was between them and Henry VIII. and Edward VI. might be renewed, for which he finds the Commissaries willing and much inclined. But his letter of credit being general and directed to no Prince or Estate in special, and no mention made in it of credence to be given to him, is not effective. The Elector Palatine and the Duke of Wirtemburg dwell not very far hence; if he had letters of credit to them they would be earnest to commend and promote this honest occasion by all the rest of the Protestants, when they see and know well enough that great authority and advancement may come to themselves to maintain and defend their doctrine, the latter in diverse ways.
The French King has sent by his Ambassadors to every one of the Electors a favourable letter "to offer with fair words and magnificial promises."
After he had written these letters, the answer of the Duke of Wirtemburg had been declared to him by his Commissaries. Since his coming here in the beginning of March has written every week to the Queen through a merchant out of England, dwelling at Antwerp, Nicolas Whelar.— Augsburg, 19 April 1559. Signed.
April 19.P. S.—News be here that the post sent from hence eight days past is "destrest," and he with the letters carried away.
Orig. Hol., with armorial seal. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
April 20.
B.M. Harl. 353. 171.
556. Proceedings of Privy Council.
Westminster, 20th April 1559.—Present: the Lord Great Seal; the Earls of Shrewsbury and Pembroke; the Lords Admiral and Chamberlain; Mr. Comptroller, Mr. Vice-Chamberlain, Mr. Secretary; Mr. Mason.
A letter to Sir John Tempest to suffer one Captain Culleine, a Scotchman (who was heretofore committed to his custody by the Earl of Westmoreland, in the late time of his lieutenancy in the North), to go to the town of Berwick and there remain until he shall have satisfied his taker for his ransom, whose prisoner soever he be adjudged, of whom there is already by order of this board a bond taken for that purpose to the Queen's use by Mr. Bowes, the Marshal of Berwick.
A letter to Sir George Conyers, Knt., having in his custody (by the said Earl's commandment) another Scottish prisoner, named George Heiborne, requiring him to deliver the said Heyborne into the hands of Rowland Forster, who claims him for his prisoner; taking first a bond of him to the Queen's use that he shall at all times hereafter satisfy his taker that shall fortune to challenge or make any claim to the said prisoner.
A letter to Sir James Crofts touching certain requests made here by Abingdon, surveyor of the victuals at Berwick, according to a note thereof remaining in the Council chest.
April 20.
R.O. 27 V. 127.
557. Another copy of the same.
Modern transcript.
April 20.
R. O. 27 V. 86.
558. Another copy of the same.
Modern transcript.