Elizabeth
May 1559, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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Joseph Stevenson (editor)

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1863

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247-265

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'Elizabeth: May 1559, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Elizabeth, Volume 1: 1558-1559 (1863), pp. 247-265. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=71741 Date accessed: 22 July 2014.


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May 1559, 11-20

May 11.
R.O.
652. Lord W. Howard to Cecil.
Has arrived this morning at Dover, but is detained there by the illness of Dr. Wotton, "who is entered into an ague and this day took pills." He is old and weak. No intelligence of "Mr. Frogmertone" [Throckmorton] has yet reached him. May chance to tarry longer at Dover than he would do. Having been informed that there is no lodging at Calais for either man nor horse, is determined to go to Boulogne, to which place he has already despatched Chester, the herald, to make provision. Trusts he shall have answer from thence to-morrow. Has received the counterfeit money, and will not fail to speak of it.—Dover, 11 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add., with seal. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 11.
R.O.
653. Sir John Brende to Cecil.
What he has done concerning the charges committed to him will appear by his letters to the Lords. The establishment of this town now remains to be considered. In the devising of it, though he has sustained great envy and been sore discouraged, yet, by the advice of Sir James Croft and Sir Richard Lee, he sets his hands again to the draft and form of the new establishment, which is much altered from what it was before, because it is not to pass in the same form. It will both diminish the charges and leave this town in good guard, being now of such moment; but in what time or how soon he dare not well affirm. The charges for so many men should not be diminished, as a less number will not suffice. It is much more sure walking in other men's steps than to be the first to beat the path.—Berwick, 11 May. Signed.
Orig., with seal. Add. Endd. by Cecil: 11 May 1559. Pp. 3.
May 11.
R. O.
654. Sir John Brende to the Lords of the Council.
Sends two schedules, the 1st, of all debts owing by the Queen to the garrisons in the north till the 3rd May, and the 2nd, the monthly charge of the said garrisons as they were appointed to remain after the "cassment" of the rest, so that by both the debts and charges appear. Divers of the countrymen have been out of wage these two months, and most of the soldiers remaining here are unpaid for five months. Sir Richard Lee has made an estimate of the monthly charge of works, and how long they are unpaid. If money be sent to pay the old debts to the garrisons and four months' pay to the works, with some overplus for the discharge of the sick, and to pay the taskers, they will want no more for a long time. There remain only the numbers in wages which they appointed, saving twenty-five horsemen to the keeper of Tinedale, and 100 men more to Capt. Rede to remain in Wark until Sir Ralph Grey receive it again, as he did before, or some other. The superfluous numbers being cassed, the best chosen out to remain, the debts owing and the charge partly brought to some certainty, he had no further cause for tarrying, but stayed looking for the coming of my Lord of Bedford.—Berwick, 11 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. by Cecil. Pp. 2.
May 11.
R. O. Forbes, 1. 88.
655. Throckmorton to Cecil.
On arriving at Canterbury finds that Dr. Wotton is troubled with a tertian ague, whereof he has had two fits, which has detained him here. Since, by reason of his age, the dangerous time of the year, and through his own conceit, as he himself terms it, de anno climacterico, he may happen not to have soon recovery, some other meet man who is acquainted with the treaty of Cambray should be substituted. His letter sent from Sittingbourne should be remembered. Repeats his request for instructions how to behave on the delivery of the letter to the King and Queen Dauphins.—Canterbury, 11 May 1559. Signed.
Orig., with armorial seal. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 11.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 229.
656. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 11.
B. M. Harl. 353. 179.
657. Proceedings of Privy Council.
Westminster, 11 May 1559.—Present: the Lords Great Seal, Treasurer, and Admiral; Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Comptroller; Mr. Vice-Chamberlain, Mr. Secretary; Mr. Cave, Mr. Mason, Mr. Sackevill.
Whereas in the time of the late Queen, during the wars, certain impositions were put upon such wines grown in France as should be brought into this realm, viz., at the first 26s. 8d. of every tun, and shortly after the sum of 40s., and after that four marks; it was this day resolved by the Lords that each of the same imposts be called upon and answered to the Queen's use for such wines as, after the appointing of the said imposts and before the end of the wars, have been brought into the realm, according to the rate as the impost was at the time of lading the same wines.
May 11.
R.O. 27 V. 146.
658. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 11.
R.O. 27 VI. 109.
659. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 11.
R. O.
660. Henry II. to Dr. Wotton.
The bearer of this letter, the Seigneur de Noailles, gentleman of his chamber and chamberlain of his children, has been despatched to welcome him.—Paris, 11 May 1559. Signed: Henry,—De l'Aubespine.
Orig. Add.: Mons. Wotton. Fr. Pp. 2.
May 11.661. Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.
Commission by Henry II. to François de Montmorency and François Despeaulx, Sieur de Vielleville, to receive from the Queen the ratification, by oath, of the treaty of Cateau Cambresis.—Paris, 11 May 1559. Signed, with seal appended.
Orig. on vellum. Endd. by Cecil. Lat.
May 12.
R. O.
662. Henry II. to the Queen.
Acknowledges the receipt of letters by M. de la Marque and thanks her for her good friendship. Accredits the bearers, M. de Montmorency, Governor of the Isle of France, and M. de Vielleville, Lieutenant-General of Metz, whom he sends to assist at the oath of the treaty of peace between their two Majesties.—Paris, 12 May 1559. Signed: Henry,—De l'Aubespine.
Orig. Add., with seal. Endd. by Cecil. Fr. Broadside.
May 12.
R.O.
663. Henry II. to the Queen.
Appoints M. de Noailles to be his Ambassador to England, and hopes that this will give her satisfaction.—Paris, 12 May 1559. Signed: Henry,—De l'Aubespine.
Orig. Add., with seal. Endd. by Cecil: By Sir G. Howard. Fr. Broadside.
May 12.
R. O.
664. Henry II. to the Queen.
Acknowledges the receipt of her letters by the present bearer Sir George de Houuard, and who has also presented her ratification of the treaty made between them.—Paris, 12 May 1559. Signed: Henry,—De l'Aubespine.
Orig. Add., with seal. Endd. by Cecil. Fr. Broadside.
May 12.
B. M. Vesp. F. iii. 82.
665. Francis and Mary to the Queen.
King Henry II. being about to send the Sieur de Montmorency and the Sieur de Vielleville, Knights of his Order, to assist at the oath of the treaty of peace between their two Majesties, the said personages are hereby intrusted with similar powers for the writers. They express their desire for the continuance of the peace.—Paris, 12 May 1559. Signed: Francoys, Marie,—De Grantrye.
Orig. Add. Endd. by Cecil. Broadside. Fr.
May 12.
R. O.
666. Francis and Mary to the Queen.
Commission by Francis and Mary, King and Queen of Scotland, authorizing Francis Montmorency to take the oath for ratification of the treaty of Cateau Cambresis as far as it relates to themselves.—Paris, 12 May 1559. Signed: Franciscus, Maria;—De Grantrye.
Orig. on vellum. With seal in white wax. Endd. by Cecil. Lat.
May 12.
R. O.
667. Montmorency to the Queen.
Begs her to receive the bearer his son in his place to offer her, on his part, all the service that he would perform, as the King considers his presence necessary for executing the treaties.—Paris, 12 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add., with armorial seal. Endd, by Cecil. Fr. Pp. 2.
May 12.
R. O.
668. Bishop Tunstall to the Queen.
This day has received her commission addressed to the Earl of Northumberland, Lord Dacre, Sir James Crofte and himself, to conclude a peace with the Scots, which he has sent to the Earl in order that a meeting be fixed in all haste. As the date is lacking in the commission, he requests that a new one be sent before their meeting.
Their instructions state that they may meet before the 28th inst. to begin the treaty, but as the last article of the treaty with France (dated 2 April) states that within two months the Queen must as well conclude as treat, he has written to the Earl to hurry on the meeting.
The Isle of Lundy being excluded in the treaty on the part of England, and the lordship of Lorn on that of Scotland, he requests further instructions, these being without precedent. The men who best know her chronicles should be consulted herein, lest unawares she gives away part of her crown
May 12.The Commissioners will have much to do to agree with the Scots where they shall meet. "In our last meeting at Carlisle, our first meeting was in the midst of the river, between us both; for the Scots do regard their honour as much as any other King doth." Will not fail, God granting him health, to be at the said meeting.—Auckland, 12 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 12.
R. O.
669. Throckmorton to Cecil.
The Lord Chamberlain minds to embark on the morrow and to descend at Boulogne. Mr. Wotton and he are driven to defer their passage until Monday morning, because no convenient order is given at Boulogne to receive them all at once, so are compelled to tarry here till my Lord is gone from hence. Trusts Mr. Wotton will be able to perform the journey. They hear nothing of the French Ambassador's repair into England.—Dover, 12 May 1559.
P. S.—Your son is in good health and can travel well. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 12.
B. M. Harl. 353. 179.
670. Proceedings of Privy Council.
Westminster, 12 May 1559.—Present: the Lord Great Seal, the Earl of Bedford; the Lord Admiral; Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Comptroller, Mr. Vice-Chamberlain, Mr. Secretary; Mr. Cave, Mr. Mason, Mr. Sackevill.
A letter to the Earl of Northumberland of thanks for his advertisements, promising him a new commission of Oyer and Terminer to be sent him with all convenient speed, and requiring him to keep Nynnian Menvile still in ward, for that his offences be here unknown, and to signify hither such particularities as he is to be charged withal; to the end such further order may be written unto him as the said Menvile's case shall seem to require.
May 12.
R.O. 27 V. 147.
671. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 12.
R.O. 27 VI. f. 111.
672. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 12.
R. O.
673. Sir Richard Lee to the Council.
Sends herewith an estimate of the monthly charge of the fortifications here and how long they are unpaid. Prays them to send money to pay the same, and that there remain always an overplus for the taskers and the sick, which will be great furtherance to the work and a great saving when the sick are discharged as they become diseased. They are very soon decayed by reason of their victuals, being fed for the more part with herrings.—Berwick, 12 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. by Cecil. Pp. 2.
May 13.
R.O.
674. The Earl of Northumberland to Croftes.
Has received the Queen's commission directed to the Bishop of Durham, Lord Dacre, Sir James, and himself, and forwards a copy of the same enclosed. Is removing presently to Alnwick, and lacks both paper and time, but will send the commission and articles of the treaty to-morrow. Hopes Sir James will come hither that they may confer together. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd.: Delivered at Warkworth, 13 May at 11 of the clock in the forenoon. Pp. 2.
May 14.
R.O.
675. Wotton to Cecil.
Arrived at Canterbury on Sunday, 7th inst., and sat on Monday and Tuesday all the afternoon in Chapter, whereby he took great cold, as also he did in the boat in the cold morning tide, which he took to go to Dover, from London, whereby he had an ague. This unlooked-for, but not undeserved chance, abashed him sore. Was afraid, because the second fit should incidere in primum diem anni climaterici magni, but had hope, because morbi verni solent esse breves. On the Wednesday was not clearly void of an ague, though not so hot as the first was. On the Thursday he used a clister, the operation whereof was good; and that notwithstanding, he had a fit again on the Friday, but determined to ride to Dover, to see how he should be able to travel, and so did, and found himself better than he looked for after his travel. On Saturday he escaped the fit, and the bitterness was past. So now thanks God he is meetly well for one of his years, and, nevertheless, remains troubled still with a good great cough, gathered by the cold taken by him in the times and places aforesaid.
To-morrow Sir Nicholas Throgmerton and he intend to take their passage to Boulogne. The Lord Chamberlain passed over yesterday, Malyn carried him over. Sends a letter which his Lordship received on the sea and sent to them. Wonders they hear nothing of Sir George Howard. Cecil's son is well "and hitherto can well enough away with the travail of this journey." Mary, "trajectus crastinus elementi barbari," as Plautus calleth it, will somewhat better try him.
The Lord Chamberlain will tarry for them at Abbeville or Amiens, for Boulogne and Monstreville are not "logeable," especially "Base Bouloyn," appointed for them, (High Boulogne being reserved for the French,) which is infected with the plague. His nephew, the Sheriff of Kent, came hither with him.
When the Lords of the Council would have him take the Secretary's office in King Edward's time, he told them he could neither see, nor write nor speak English. This triduana febricula has somewhat yet impaired his hand. When Cecil is weary of the Secretary's office Wotton were perchance called to it again. Desires to be remembered to Lady Cecil. —Dover, 14 May, "being the 42 day of the sixty days appointed for the giving of the oath and ratification."
Orig. Hol. Add. Endd. by Cecil: 14 May 1559. Pp. 3.
May 14.
R.O. Forbes, 1. 89.
676. Cecil to Throckmorton.
Has moved the Queen whether she shall give him any instructions for his direction towards the Dauphins of Scotland beside his letters of credit; but must understand that seeing he is resident with the French King, he can have no permanent charge with the Dauphin, but as occasions shall rise of matter for Scotland he will have particular directions in writing. His letter to them is but to give him credit hereafter in anything he shall have to do with them. He shall say that he had express charge to do any service that may continue the amity now begun. He shall show good countenance to the family of Guise, and entertain friendship with them if they desire it; if otherwise, he may dissemble the same as he shall see meetest. "It is best to know them, and without knowledge, if any harm be meant, it is to be learned thence, and therein may ye have most help of the Scots."
Copy. Endd.: 14 May 1559. Pp. 2.
May 14.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 230.
677. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 14.
B. M. Add. 5756. 121.
678. Traffic with Scotland.
Allowance to Richard Jugge and John [Caw]ode, printers to the Queen, for printing "500 proclamations of the Act of Parliament to revive a Statute made 23 Hen. VIII., touching the conveying of horses, mares, and geldings into Scotland, delivered 14 May 1559, 22s. 6d."
Endd. Pp. 2.
May 15.
R.O.
679. The Queen to Anne, Countess of Oldenborch.
Requests that she would cause to be paid to John Story, an English merchant, (to whom she had lately afforded hospitality) or to his attorney, Thomas Tomson, also an English merchant, 300 dollars due to him by certain citizens of Embden, her subjects, payment of which they had hitherto avoided.—Westminster, 15 May, 1 Eliz.
Copy, with the style in Cecil's hand: Carissimæ ac pietate insigni principi filiæ de Oldenborch et Frisiæ Orientalis comitissæ.
Lat. Pp. 2.
May 15.
R.O.
680. The Queen Dowager of Scotland to the Queen.
Requests a passport for George Hopper, a merchant of Edinburgh, to import into England, in a ship of 100 tons, any lawful merchandise.—Stirling, 15 May 1559. Signed: Zour gud sustur and allya, Marie R.
Orig. Add. Endd. Broadside.
May 15.
Hatfield House. Haynes, p. 211.
681. The Earl of Northumberland to the Queen Regent of Scotland.
Has received from his Sovereign a commission directed to the Bishop of Durham, Lord Dacres, Sir James Croftes, and himself, giving them power to meet with the Orators of the King and Queen Dauphins of Scotland, to conclude certain articles contained in the treaty of Cameryke [Cateau Cambresis] in April last. Requests that the time and place of meeting may be appointed before the 28th inst., and desires her answer by the bearer, as well as the names of those appointed, and the place of meeting.—Alnwick, 15th May 1559.
From a minute.
May 15.
R.O.
682. The Earl of Northumberland to Croftes.
Sends herewith a copy of his letters to the Queen Dowager of Scotland. If Sir James thinks that any thing more convenient should be added, let him stay the said letters until he has signified the same to the Earl, if not, let him send them by Berwick, the herald.
P.S.—Hopes the meeting will be where they may have lodging at night, but fears the Dowager will appoint it at the Riding Burne, "where there will be great unquietness for us." Thinks it good to move the Dowager that it may be at the Ladykirk, or at Norhamkirk, or else at Foulden; or the Bonnewood, if it may be treated abroad in the fields. To have it at Ryden Burne is most for their ease, and most readiest to overthrow my Lord of Durham.—Alnwick, 15th May. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd.: 15 May 1559. Pp. 2.
May 15.
R.O. Forbes, 1. 90.
683. Throckmorton [to Cecil].
The bearer, Richard Harryson passed into France in the war time to obtain intelligence, the Lord Admiral being privy to his going. It seems by his report that the French mind nothing but triumphs and despatch of their men of war. He is able to inform him particularly of the late tumult at Poictiers, and how the Gospel is liberally and publicly preached in that town, and also at Caen in Normandy. Has learned from a Burgonian that about the 20th of this present (sic) the Dukes of Savoy, of Alva, and D'Arcos, the Prince of Orange, and Rugomas depart from Brussels to the French Court, and the Count of Feria will depart very shortly [from] England to conduct the French King's daughter, Madam Elizabeth, into Spain. He says also that King Philip still retains in wages all the Spaniards and certain extraordinary bands of horsemen, and as yet does not depart the Low Countries. Says further, that Don Carolo shall reside in the Low Countries after his father's coming into Spain, and Signor Reynard Damonte shall be Philip's Ambassador at the French Court.
Wishes to know the Queen's pleasure regarding the precedence of the Ambassadors of Spain and England. Mr. Wotton last being in the French Court, Reynard was Ambassador from Charles the Emperor as well as from our King Philip, so there was no controversy. Prays him of this matter, and of his instructions to the King and Queen Dauphin, to advertise him speedily.
P. S.—The bearer met Knokks [Knox] at Dieppe, who delivered to him letters "directed into you;" but the man having heard of his former fond assertions desired to be rid of their carriage, whereupon Knokks assured him "that he would write nothing unmete for you to receive, unmete for him to write, neither for him to carry." Are the 2,000 Almains at Newhaven now mustered and paid, returned home or retained? Suspects if they be stayed in France it is meant to send them to Scotland.—Dover, 15 May 1559. (fn. 1) Signed.
Orig. Hol. Pp. 2.
May 15.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 231.
684. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 15.
R.O. Forbes, 1. 91.
685. Throckmorton to Cecil.
1. Mr. Wotton and he, this day took shipping at Dover at 10, and arrived here at 4. Will have to wait for the arrival of their horses, whereof they left part behind, not having convenient shipping for them. Met here Sir George Howard in his return, who, having missed the Lord Chamberlain by the way, says it will be six days before M. de Montmorency and the rest will be here. As the Lord Chamberlain sent word to him at Dover from hence that yesternight the French Commissioners would have been at Boulogne, sent Mr. Killigrew to Calais to M. le Vidame of Chartres, to learn more certainty of these matters, who likewise met with them at their arrival here.
2. Mr. Dive, this bearer, informs him of the "cassing" of the French King's soldiers, hence it is thought the French mean peace, as yet there is none other appearance. It is conjectured they have some enterprise towards Scotland; though there is no certainty of provision that way. The bearer will declare more.
3. Is certainly informed that 50,000 persons in Gascoigne, Guienne, Anjou, Poictiers, Normandy, and Maine have subscribed to a confession in religion conformable to that of Geneva, which they mind shortly to exhibit to the King. There be of them persons of good haviour. After they have delivered their confession to the King, the spirituality of France will endeavour to procure the King to their utter subversion, for which cause the spirituality are so glad of peace in order to have so good an occasion to work their feat. But if any repressing or subversion of their religion be meant, these men mind to resist to the death. But as the spirituality of France takes this time as propice for the subversion of religion, so the Queen has the like for the setting forth the same.
4. The French King lately having overmuch exercised himself at tennis and other pastimes was driven into a disease called Vertigo, wherewith he has been heretofore used to be troubled, and was in great danger, but is now well recovered again, and remains at Paris. The Duke of Savoy repairs into France to be married; the Duke of Alva, the Duke of Argus (who has married the sister of the Conte de Feria), and the Prince of Orange are in commission for ratifying the treaty on King Philip's part. After which the Conte de Feria shall conduct the French King's daughter, fianced to Philip, into Spain. The Duke, with the Commissioners, are expected in France about the last of this present.
5. King Philip keeps a good part of his men of war still, it is said for the placing of the Duchess of Lorraine and her next heir in Denmark, of which she is taken to be the right heir after the death of the old King, who deceased in prison. The Vidame has intelligence that Philip, at his departure into Spain, minds to leave the Duke of Parma his Regent in the Low Countries, and has also written to him [Throckmorton] that he quits his charge at Calais in three or four days, and is succeeded by M. de Loches, who is now Governor of Maryburg.
6. Besides M. de Montmorency, there comes over one of the younger sons of the Constable, for whom he wishes some especial entertainment and convenient present, as also for the rest of the Commissioners, at his departure. It may serve the Queen to some other purpose a great deal more than the value of the present given.
7. There came a Frenchman with Sir George Howard, who is as fine a practiser as any in France, who desires especially to pass over with him into England, and will soon be there. Sir George has been warned of him by one of Throckmorton's train. The colour of the Frenchman's coming over is a matter in the Admiralty and to buy some English geldings for the Admiral. Advises Cecil that his haunt may be watched. Cannot learn his name, but thinks Brian Phitz-William can inform him, who should be asked.
8. Begs him to befriend Mr. Dive, the bearer, who, by his long imprisonment in France, has been brought to great hindrance and a great deal more charge than he can bear; and to use some good means to Montmorency and the rest that come over, to ease his ransom, which is now increased to 1,000 crowns more. Mr. Dive will give him two scotcheons set out for the King and Queen Dauphins of Scotland in Paris, not unlike those he lately received from the north.—Boulogne, 15 May 1559, at 9 of the clock at night. Signed.
Orig. Pp. 4.
May 15.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 233.
686. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 15.
Throckmorton Papers, A. S. No. 2. Forbes, 1. 94.
687. Thomas to Thomas Wotton.
They [Wotton and Throkmorton] landed at Boulogne this Monday, about 4 in the afternoon. Found my Lord Chamberlain gone, and Sir George Howard returned to this town; he passes over this tide in the barque of Boulogne. He says that the French gentlemen will scarce be here this week, as he will declare if he come to Dover; yet, though he [Sir George] says this, the writer begs Wotton not to be certain of it. Indeed, seeing their harbingers are not yet come hither, and no speaking of their coming, it is not like they can be here [Boulogne] for four or five days, and then must have time for embarking themselves and horses. Have got a note of their names here enclosed. Among them is one Torey, one of the Constable's youngest sons. Thinks that the Count de Tende is the old Count's son; and Strozzy son to Pierre Strozzy, and Senarpont, son of the Captain of this town. As for Captain Cipierre, he [Wotton] knows him very well. It is said Montmorency has his household and thirty gentlemen; but since George Howard says that the whole number of gentlemen does not exceed forty, therefore they think some of those named in the bill are comprehended in those thirty. They would make their numbers great, partly for honour; but chiefly to have carts enough for all, they say they are the more. By this bill it appears they would expect twenty carts.—Boulogne, Monday evening, 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add.: To Thomas Wotton, Esq., High Sheriff of Kent; this be delivered at Dover.
May 15.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 238.
688. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 15.
Throckmorton Papers, A. S. No. 3. Forbes, 1. 95.
689. French Hostages in England.
Names of the Lords and gentlemen who accompany M. de Montmorency into England, consisting of M. de Vielleville, and the Ambassador, M. de Candalle, the Marquis de Nesle, the Marquis de Tran, and M. de Nantoullet. Thirty-three others are also mentioned.
Orig. Fr.
May 15.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 239.
690. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 16.
R.O.
691. The Queen to the Emperor Ferdinand.
Has received from Count Helfenstein his letters of the 28th of April. His good will is more acceptable to her than his mode of expressing it. (fn. 2) She prefers a single life, and many know that she is determined to continue in it. Reciprocates, nevertheless, the friendship he expresses.—Westm., 16 May 1559.
Fair copy, corrected. Endd. Lat. Broadside.
May 16.
R. O. 171 B.
692. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 16.
R.O.
693. The Queen to the Bishop of Durham.
Has received his letters of the 12th, and in reply, to remedy the former commission, now sends a new one, dated certainly and under her Great Seal. Desires him to proceed with speed. If the Commissioners cannot conclude the matter within the time limited, they may prorogue it, and so observe the treaty well enough. As regards the suggested omission of the Isle of Lundy and lordship of Lorne, she will not alter the ancient order of treaties. Prays him so to proceed that the articles left in suspense may be fully perfected before the 28th inst. The Scots will use expedition, as the treaty is more to their advantage than that of the English.
Corrected draft. Endd. by Cecil: 16 May 1559. Pp. 3.
May 16.
B. M. C alig. B. ix. 55.
694. The Earl of Northumberland [to Sir James Croftes?].
Sends enclosed the copies of the commissions and the two treaties of peace, so that he has all touching the letters that come at this time. Requires his advice therein, and asks where shall be the convenient place to meet, Berwick, Norham, or Carlisle ? Should he inquire in his letter to the Queen Dowager of Scotland at which of these places the meeting should be? He will be ready accordingly.—Alnwick, 16 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. P. 1.
May 17.
R.O.
695. Philip II. to the Queen.
Credence for the Baron de Rebenstain, Counsellor of Philip's uncle, the Emperor, who, along with the Count de Feria, (or, if he is absent, with the Bishop of Aquila,) is authorized to treat on certain affairs affecting the Emperor and himself.—Brussels, 17 May 1559. Signed: Philippus,— G. Perezius.
Orig. Add. Endd. Lat. Broadside.
May 17.
R. O. 171. B.
696. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 17.
R.O.
697. Mundt to the Queen.
This Diet is agreed that the Cardinal of Augusta and the Duke of Wirtemburg as Ambassadors shall be sent to the French King, but the Duke is not willing to go with the Cardinal. The host gathered in Saxony, about Hamburgh, in the name of the Duke of Holstein, Adolf, is for the young Duke of Lorraine to obtain Sweden, of which kingdom the King is evil beloved in his own country. After the King of Sweden is expelled Denmark will be the next to come to a like end. 300,000 florins "be made" in this town for the same war, and it is known that at Lyons 100,000 crowns are taken for the Duke of Lorraine, and a much greater sum promised by certain merchants to be paid for this end. So it is feared that the sons of John Frederick and Augustus, Elector, will not long live in peace together. These practices are framed by the French and Spanish Kings by reason of affinity; so the French King favoured the Dukes of Saxony, who served him in the past wars, and therefore he will help them to come to the electorate again.
The Protestants have made a request to the Emperor that it may be free and frank for every man to accept and profess the Gospel, and that for this profession neither layman nor clerks shall lose anything from their former livings; that if a priest or canon of the high colleges or cathedral churches give himself to this religion he shall not lose his prebend or benefice, for if they be deprived of their livings the just and right doctrine is defaced and condemned. Against this request the Papists do spurn and kick; saying, if a clerk might have a wife and his benefice, then no clerks or few would be unmarried. And if a Bishop should marry with a great man's daughter, his children would succeed to the bishopric and not suffer themselves to be put out, so bishoprics and benefices shall come to nothing shortly.
The Princes Protestants and all the Estates Augustanæ Confessionis will promise and be bound in optima forma that all fundationes ecclesiasticorum beneficiorum, and chiefly of the high and cathedral churches, shall remain by the churches, and shall be given per liberam capituli electionem as before, and that no alteration shall be attempted, and to maintain and uphold the old order and custom "in conferendis beneficiis, canonicatibus," &c., and promise hereunto all their power and help. The Protestants have given in writing sundry gravamina, which they sustain a camera imperiali et aliis episcoporum ordinariis. They may make their complaints, but be not likely to obtain redress or relief, as the Emperor favours nothing less than this religion, and will not do contrary to his large promises made to the Pope, and if he do grant anything it shall be holden till he obtain his purpose. He now alleges that the peace made with the Turks is not assured nor durable, because this Soliman is very old; and therefore he [the Emperor] requires now money to fortify certain places and passages in Hungary and Austria; but much money has been given for this end. Much time and money is spent here in vain; the Emperor minds to tarry hereabout this winter.—Augusta, 17 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Hol. Add., with armorial seal. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 17.
R.O.
698. Mundt to Cecil
On the 10th inst. sent Cecil the answer of the Duke of Saxony. Sends now a letter to the Queen, with a sealed letter to her from the Landgrave, which he [Mundt] has translated out of a copy sent to him. Cecil may cause some other to translate the same likewise.
Cecil has doubtless good particulars of the men of war gathered in Saxony, which is likely to bring great inconveniences. If the French King and Philip occupy the same seas, the one before Scotland, and the other mare Belgicum, all the Hanse were undone, and such merchandise as come out of Denmark, Sweden, Prussia, Livonia, Norway, Iceland, &c., must only pass by their hands, and no men should have place there but Selandi and Hollandi. The Emperor Charles had long studied to bring this thing to pass by the oppression of Magdeburg and Breme, but if it be now brought to pass the whole of Saxony and Germany shall smart.
This Diet will continue long, for the Emperor neither dare nor will grant one thing to the Protestants in order not to offend the Pope; and the Protestants cannot "deserere neque prævaricari in causa bona," and so they shall live "in discordia et diffidentia donec Deus pacis author nostri misereatur." —Augusta, 17 May 1559.
Orig. Hol. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
[May 17.]
B. M. Reg. 13. B. 1. 8.
699. The Queen to the King of Spain.
Has received his letters dated from Brussels, 8 May, in which he informs her of his intention to recall the Count De Feria from her Court and to substitute the Bishop of Aquila, and asks her to receive the latter with the same favour she had extended to the former. Praises the desire, prudence, and anxiety of the Count to promote a good understanding between the two realms and his personal dignity and integrity. Is sorry to lose him, but glad to think that his presence will be useful to Philip. The Count will inform him of her earnest desire and resolute intention towards the continuance of a firm peace between their two realms. Nothing shall weaken her friendship towards him.
Has known the Bishop of Aquila, and believes that he will preserve the confidence reposed in him by his master. All his efforts, doubtless, will be directed towards the preservation of the affection which she wishes to preserve with Philip.
Copy. Letterbook. Lat. Pp. 3.
B.M. Sloane, 4144. 8 b.700. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 18.
R.O.
701. The Queen Regent of Scotland to the Queen.
Requests a safe conduct for James Loch, indweller in Leith, to pass into England and thence to the parts beyond the sea. —Stirling, 18 May, 1 and 17 Francis and Mary. Signed: [y]our gud sester ant allye, Marie R.
Orig. Add. Broadside.
May 18.
R.O.
702. Sir R. Lee to the Council.
Writes again for money for the relief of the labourers, the necessity growing greater daily, by reason of the men being poor and barely set forth, and have been here for two months and a half without money, so as they have neither shirts nor shoes, or money to buy fresh meat when sick, nor to bring them home when discharged. It grieves him to see the multitude exclaim daily of their wants, especially as the works are in such forwardness, and in so good an order. Sir John Brende, who is ready to depart, will inform them of the same.—Berwick, 18 May 1559. Signed.
On the back: Delivered at Berwick, 19 May, at 7 o'clock before noon. Received at Belford the . . of May at vi. of . . clock at afternoon.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 18.
R.O. Forbes, 1. 96.
703. Throgmorton to Cecil.
Mr. Wotton and he arrived at Monstreuil yesterday; and immediately afterwards came De Montmorency, whom they visited at his lodging, and did him the Queen's commendations. He prayed them to tarry supper with him. This evening arrived at Abbeville; where they met Mr. Florence, who served Henry VIII. in his wars, and Edward VI. in an ambassade to the King of Denmark, and is recommended by the Constable to M. de Montmorency, to conduct him with others to England. Florence says, certain money is due to him for his service to Henry VIII., and for his embassy to Denmark. Hopes Cecil will bear him his favour. The other gentleman, Mr. Melvin, who departs from the Court there into Scotland, and is also liked well by the Constable, desires, after he has seen the Queen, to have a passport for his passage into Scotland, from whence he returns to France with the Queen Dowager, who is supposed to pass through England. Begs Cecil to give them both good words and his favour, as he, [Throckmorton] may by them further the Queen's service during his abode here, and to furnish Melvin with a word or two in a letter for his better usage by the way to Scotland.
The Marquis de Bœuf's going into Scotland is stayed for a time, but will take place at the Queen Dowager's arrival in France. He takes with him both men of conduct and some of war; it is thought his stay will not be long.
They met at Monstreuil, (besides M. de Montmorency) MM. de Vielleville and Noailles, with the Constable's younger son, M. de Thorey, and divers others, who demanded for their train 300 horses. Because the hostages came not with M. Montmorency he took occasion to press De Noailles therewithal; who said they were in aredines, and would come in post and meet with the rest at embarking. He met this day the Marquis de Neille and his carriages going to Boulogne; the rest will be here to-night.—Abeville, 18 May 1559, at 10 o'clock at night. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd., with armorial seal. Pp. 2.
May 18.
B.M. Sloane, 4134. 241.
704. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 19.
R.O. Forbes, 1. 98.
705. Throckmorton to Cecil.
Wotton and he arrived this 19th of May at Amiens, where they found the Lord Chamberlain and his train, to whom they were conducted by Noailles's elder brother, who shall be resident in England, to the Lord Chamberlain's lodging. He informed them that Nantoillet, one of the hostages in the treaty, (and who next to De Candall, the chiefest and best of them,) had lately a mishap which would detain him. One M. de Cleremont, lieutenant to the Admiral, having married his [Nantoillet's] mother, at which Nantoillet declared his misliking with some extremity, Cleremont gave Nantoillet a box on the ear, whereupon he took himself so dishonoured that he said he could not go for an hostage till he were revenged, and so begged the King to dismiss him from that charge, which is granted, and so he remains at home. No other is appointed in his place, and as the two Marquises are almost bankrupt, and Nantoillet equivalent to them both, therefore doubts the supplying of the place with so good a one. As Cavalcanti arrived here this evening in post thought it his part to advertise Cecil through him hereof; begs for instructions, as are best for the Queen's behalf in this matter. Recommends Cavalcanti, this bearer, for some recompence or pension, as his chiefest care has been for the Queen's honour in this late treaty.
P.S.—They will have arrived at Paris by the 23rd; M. de Noailles has been appointed to conduct him thither.—Amiens, 19 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 19.
B.M. Sloane, 4134. 244.
706. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 19.
R.O.
707. Killigrew to Cecil.
Recommends the bearer to him, whom he hopes he will encourage to use for the Queen the services which he employed for King Edward, and to continue that good will which he bore her before she came to the royal estate. There is in the same company a Scottish gentleman, James Melvin, uncle to William Kirkcaudy, who deserves some courteous words, being desirous to help forward by all his power that work which Cecil so earnestly seeks to establish and confirm to God's glory.—Abbeville, 19 May 1559. Signed: Henry Kyllygrew.
Orig. Hol. Add., with seal. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 19.
R.O.
708. Sir Richard Lee to Cecil.
Having received, at his coming down, of Sir Wm. Dansell 2,600l. to be delivered to Sir Wm. Ingleby, Treasurer of Berwick, and 727l. 15s. for the impresting of workmen for the fortifications here, all of which he has paid and delivered, as required, (of which the acquittance of Ingleby will be produced,) requests that the warrants formerly given him and which still remain in the hands of Sir Wm. Dansell, may be cancelled. Requests that his servant, the bearer, may have Cecil's furtherance in such suits as may happen to come before him. Has written to the Council by Sir John Brende for licence to come home, and hopes his request will be granted.
P.S.—Asks Cecil to let him have twenty tons of stone of his new quarry, for which he will pay as he does for the same at Cleyffe, whence he has his stone.—Berwick, 19 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 19.
R.O.
709. Croftes to the Privy Council.
Has received their letters of the 29th April, delivered by John Abington, surveyor of victuals here, concerning sundry requests made by Abington to them. As they propose that Abington should leave his charge at the end of summer to some skilful person here, advertises them there is no person sufficient for the office. Advises that they should send some person chosen by themselves speedily to receive the "remain" which Abington has, and to have some seasonable time of continuance before his [Abington's] discharge to be more meet to exercise the office. Finds no one dwelling here about desirous to meddle with so great a burthen.— Berwick, 19 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd., with armorial seal. Pp. 2.
May 19.
R.O.
710. Croftes to the Privy Council.
Has had intelligence yesterday out of Scotland of a great dissension arising out of two causes.
1. "Since the arrival of Knox, a great number of the nobility, with a multitude of others, repaired to the said Knox to Dundee, where he and others doth continually preach. Whereupon the Regent commanded these preachers to appear before her at Stirling, and they, being accompanied with a train of 5,000 or 6,000 persons, the Regent dismissed the appearance, putting the preachers to the horn and commanding the nobility to appear before her at Edinburgh. After this commandment the companies retired, and part of them going to S. John's Town [Perth] have there expulsed friars and others out of two religious houses. The Abbot of Cowper, brother of the Earl of Argyll, hath refused his habit, and taken upon him secular weed. Of these doings the Earl of Argyll, the Earl Marshal, the Earl Arrelle, the Earl of Clyncarne, with diverse other noblemen, are parties; and the Earl of Huntly, who was late with the Dowager, is now gone from her to this company. And these Lords and the rest sent one named the Laird of Dunne to the Regent, offering that they will appear before her without any company but their household servants; and if it shall please her, they will bring the preachers to dispute with the clergy for the matters of religion which is in question. And the Dowager, taking displeasure with the messenger, commanded him out of her sight, whereupon he gat him to horse and departed with speed; which if he had not done she intended to have stayed him; but missing the apprehending of him, she caused him to be put to the horn."
2. "While these things were in doing, about two days past certain of the French bands appointed to be about Kinghorn to take victuals upon credit, for that they have been of a long time without pay, the country and they have fallen at variance, and of the French there is slain about seven or eight score persons." The French bands on this side of the Firth are sent over with speed, so that out of 300 French who lately were in Aymouth, 200 have been sent away. He does not know whether they go to oppress those that accompany the preachers or to revenge the slaughter, as the messenger of this town, who went with the Earl of Northumberland's letters into Scotland to the Regent to have the names of such Commissioners as should treat of the Articles between both the realms, and to agree upon a place of meeting, has not returned. Thinks therefore that these variances do continue.—Berwick, 19 May 1559. Signed.
Orig., with armorial seal. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 19.
R.O.
711. John Abington to the Privy Council.
Has delivered their letters to Sir James Crofts, who says that there is no man here fit to take his [the writer's] place; asks, therefore, that some of his fellows be sent hither from the Court.
Has received here of the bargains which he made for corn; in wheat 1,897 qrs. 7 bz., in malt 2,477½ qrs., and in oats 609½ qrs; in all 4,984 qrs. 6 bz., amounting to 2,313l. 14s. 10d. There remains unpaid 670l. 1s. 7d., which the purveyors call for earnestly, and would gladly take occasion to give over the rest of their complement for want of the same. As yet there is undelivered in wheat and malt 3,955 qrs. 2 bz., for which he requests them to write to the Treasurer to prest him 1,000l. There is owing now for victuals which he has delivered to the captains and labourers here above 4,000l.—Berwick, 19 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add., with seal. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 19.
R. O.
712. Provisions for Berwick.
"Provision bought by John Abington and sent to Berwick," in the counties of Suffolk and Norfolk and at London, consisting of white and red herrings, wheat, cheese, butter, hops, barrelled meal, stockfish, bay salt, and bacon.
Endd. by Cecil: Provisions by Abington. Pp. 2.
[May 20.]
R.O.
713. The Queen's Debts in Antwerp.
"A note of three bonds" for money received 20 May 1559, due severally to Lazarus Tucker, Paulus van Dalle, and Christopher Prewen, merchants of Antwerp, payable on 10 and 20 Nov. 1559.
Endd. by Cecil: 1559, a note of three bonds. Pp. 2.
May 20.
B. M. Cal. B. ix. 40.
714. Treaty of Upsetlington.
Commission appointing Thomas, Earl of Northumberland, Warden of the East and Middle Marches, Cuthbert, Bishop of Durham, Wm. Lord Dacres and Greystock, Warden of the West Marches, and Sir James Croftes, Captain of Berwick, to treat with the Ambassadors of the King and Queen of Scotland respecting a peace, according to the provisions of the treaty of Cateau Cambresis.—Westminster [blank], May 1559.
Draft, corrected by Cecil, and endd. by him: 20 May 1559. Pp. 6.
May 20.
B. M. Cal. B. ix. 104.
715. Another copy of the above.
Copy. Pp. 3.
May 20.
B. M. Cal. B. x. 9.
716. Another copy of the above.
Cotton's transcript. Pp. 2.

Footnotes

1 Originally dated 14 May. The Postcript is written with a different pen.
2 Here the following passage is cancelled, "Etenim quam gratum nobis existit tam longe ab isto genere nos semper abfuisse, plurimi sane noverunt," and in its place is substituted "Etenim quam gratum nobis extiterit solute ab isto genere libereque vixisse, atque in ea qua nunc sumus vitæ ratione semper etiam perseverasse, haud pauci sane noverunt."