America and West Indies
November 1722

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Cecil Headlam (editor)

Year published

1934

Pages

158-177

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: November 1722', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 33: 1722-1723 (1934), pp. 158-177. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72007 Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

November 1722

Nov. 1.
Whitehall.
325. Same to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Reply to 28th Sept. Refer to their opinion upon the continuing of the rice of Carolina amongst the enumerated commodities given in their General Report upon the state of the Plantations. [C.O. 5, 400. pp. 151, 152.]
[Nov. 2.]326. Mr. West to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Has no objection to 4 Acts of Mountserrat (v. No. 289). Signed, Richd. West. Endorsed, Recd. 2nd, Read 14th Nov., 1722. 1 ½ pp. [C.O. 152, 14. ff. 168, 168v, 169v.]
[Nov. 2.]327. Same to Same. Has no objection to 5 Acts of St. Christophers. Signed, Richd. West. Endorsed, Recd. 2nd Nov. Read 7th Feb., 1722/3. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 14. ff. 174, 175v.]
Nov. 3.
Boston.
328. Mr. Cumings to Mr. Popple. I condole with you, ye death of your worthy Father etc. Congratulates upon succession and refers to enclosure. Continues: Ther is annually imported here 200,000 yards, of calicoes, and muslins, ye drawback of which will amount to a considerable sume etc. I noat, that my letter gave ye first account, to their Lordships of ye insurrection of the Indians, with whome wee shall never live in peace, untill they are intirly subdued, because of the French missionaries etc. The Eastern countrys, if they were well setled, and protected, would be of great service to the Crown, both in ye Fishery and raising of Naval Stores, that country being very fitt for ye planting of hemp, and never can be setled, without regular troops. Our Fishery this year from Christmas, to Michalmas, amounts to 60,000 quintalls, exported to Europe, and from Canso 30,000 quintalls, besides the fish for ye West Indies, and Wine Islands, which is considerable. Asks for promotion, if his scheme is accepted etc. Signed, Archd. Cumings. Endorsed, Recd. 17th Dec., 1722, Read 26th Nov., 1723. 2 pp. Enclosed,
328. i. Same to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Scheme for maintaining 5 or 6000 regular troops in America for protection against French and Indians and raising of hemp, without any charge to Great Brittain, and the raising of a fund, for the better support of Governours, and Officers, of the Crown, in the Plantations. (i) Drawbacks upon foreign linnens, callicoes, tea, coffee, paper and fruits exported to the Plantations to be taken off. (ii) That ye Stamp duties be expended (sic) to the Plantations, which will raise about £30,000 annually, proclamation money, and will not be found, as any hardship, it being for their own security. (iii) A duty of £5 per 100 gallons of rum imported to the Continent may raise £25,000 annualy etc. (iv-vii) Other excise duties etc. proposed. (viii) Whereas great tracts of land are ingrossed in the hands of rich men, and growing in value daily, tho' unimproved, but never taxed for the support of Government, trade being loaded with burdens, and most of the members of the Assemblies on the Continent, being countrymen, are averse to the taxing of land, if any Act of Parliament could be obtained, to lay a duty of 6 pence pr. acre, annually on all unimproved lands, it would be a means to dispose of small farmes to be improved by others, which is a great grievance in ye Plantations, and would raise £20,000 annually etc. (ix) A grant of 40 acres to be allowed every soldier etc. Signed, Archd. Cumings. Same endorsement. 1 ¾ pp. [C.O. 323, 8. Nos. 43, 43. i.]
Nov. 6.
London.
329. Messrs. Huske, Sharp and Bolam, Inhabitants and Traders of New Hampshire, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. H.M. interest has been very much prejudiced by the neglect of Mr. Robt. Armstrong, who is both Collector of Customs and Deputy Surveyor of H.M. woods, by illegal trade as well as the unexampled destruction of H.M. woods, and the constant exportation of mast trees fit for H.M. Navy and all sorts of timber fit for the building of ships in Spain etc. Conscious of his known disaffection to the Goverment, he opposes H.M. loyall honest trading subjects by extorting extravagant sums from them for their clearance from that Port; and giving all desireable encouragement to Commanders of ships bound for Spain, besides seizing and clearing prohibited goods; after receiving a share. He is guilty of perjury, as appears by the Records etc. Signed, Ellis Huske, Richd. Sharp, Geo. Bolam. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 7th Nov., 1722. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 868. ff. 314, 315v.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
330. Lord Carteret to Governor Hart. Mr. Knight late Secretary of the Leeward Islands having obtained the King's leave to surrender that Office and H.M. having been pleased at my request to grant the same to Mr. Wavel Smith, I shall take it as a favour of you, that you do shew him all due countenance etc. Signed, Carteret. [C.O. 324, 34. p. 215.]
Nov. 7.
Whitehall.
331. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Carteret. Having receiv'd a representation from several merchants and commanders of vessels concern'd in the Fishery at Canço (v. 1st Aug.), relating to the hazards they lie expos'd to from the insults of the French and Indians there, and of ye imminent danger there is that this valuable Fishery may fall into the hands of the French; enclose copies and refer to representations of 10th and 25th May and 26th Sept. last etc. [C.O. 218, 2. pp. 29, 30.]
Nov. 8.
London.
332. Petition of Thomas Curphey, Clerk, Minister of the Isle of Providence, and Henry White, master of the ship Hanover of Providence, in behalf of themselves and the other inhabitants of the Bahama Islands. Pray that a proper Seal may be sent over to the Governor, they being much impeded for want thereof, certificates and vouchers from thence not being allowed to be authentick in Doctors Commons and other Courts etc. Signed, Henry White. Endorsed, Recd. Read 9th Nov., 1722. ¾ p. [C.O. 23, 1. No. 46.]
Nov. 9.
Whitehall.
333. Order of Committee of Council. Referring enclosed petition to the Council of Trade and Plantations, who are to consult with the West India merchants and report thereon etc. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. Read Nov. 13th, 1722. 1 ¼ pp. Enclosed,
333. i. Petition, from the ship's companies of the Morning Star ship and Good Fortune brigantine, 14th June, 1722, to Governor Sir Nicholas Lawes. Taken at sundry times by Bartholomew Roberts, the then Capt. of the above-said vessells with another ship, petitioners were forced by him to serve as pirates, until on 18th April, 1721, they ran away from him with above ships in hopes of obtaining H.M. pardon etc. Signed, in the form of two round robins. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 323, 8. Nos. 32, 32. i.]
Nov. 9.
Whitehall.
334. Order of Committee of Council. Referring report upon Col. Moody's petition, 29th Aug., to the Treasury etc. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 30th May, 1723. 1 ¼ pp. [C.O. 194, 7. ff. 175, 175v., 176v.]
Nov. 12.
Threadneedle
Street.
335. Thomas Tryon to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Sir Charles Cox desires to be heard on behalf of his brother against a petition by the widow of John Frere of Barbados for the President's salary for such time as he was in possession of the Presidentship, when he illegally and arbitrarily withheld the administration from Samuel Cox, etc. Signed, Thos. Tryon. Endorsed, Recd. 12th Nov., 1722, Read 29th March, 1723. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 17. ff. 286, 287v.]
[Nov. 12.]336. Separate Returns of the Fishery of Newfoundland, 1722, at Petty Harbour, St. Johns, Quidividi, Torbay, Trepassy, Bay of Bulls, Placentia, St. Maries, Ferriland, Carboneer, Old Parlekin, Bay de Verds, Bonavista and Trinity. Signed, by the several Fishing Admirals. Endorsed, Recd. 12th Nov., 1722, Read 13th March, 1722/3. 12 pp. [C.O. 194, 7. ff. 87, 88, 88v., 89, 90, 91, 92, 93–94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 98v.]
[Nov. 12.]337. Replies to Heads of Enquiry relating to the Fishery and Trade of Newfoundland. (v. 12th April.) The Admirals [? of the ports adjacent to St. John's.—Ed.] answer. (3) Ships do frequently throw out their small ballast in the ports of Bonavista, Trinity, Bay de Verds and Carboneir but not their press stones or stone ballast. (4) In the ports of Bonavista, bay de Verds and several other places Northward of St. John's they are obliged to take down their stages to preserve them from being carried away by the sea and ice in the winter season; they build and repair their stages flakes etc. with wood fetched out of the woods and not otherwise. (5) For some years past there have not been a sufficient number of fishing ships, to employ the shipps rooms, in the ports of Bonavist, Old Parlekin, Bay de Verds, Trinity, Carbonier and other places to the N'ward of St. Johns where shipps used to fish. (6) Several stages are possessed by the inhabitants of Bonavista, and bay deverds, occasion'd by the small number of ships comeing to fish there not being sufficient to imploy the roomes. (vii) Several of the inhabitants do and have possessed ships rooms for several years past occasion'd by the small number of ships arriving yearly. (8) The by-boat-keepers doe not meddle with or possess themselves of any stages, etc. belonging to the fishing ships. (9) The byboatkeepers and fishing ships have brought over a sufficient number of fresh men etc. (10) There is not a sufficient number brought for or imployed by the inhabitants. (11) They do not know of any person that has cut out or defaced the mark of any boat trainfat etc. (11–13) There is no waste of the woods, etc. (14) The Admirals do keep journals of the number of ships and preserve peace etc. (15) and determine complaints to the best of their judgment. (16) The people seace from labour on the Lords Day. (17) They know not of any strangers or aliens not residing in Great Britain or Ireland that resort to Newfoundland to catch baite or to fish or trade, other then some traders from New England. (19) The inhabitants are chiefly subsisted from England and Ireland having in Bonavista Old Parlequin and bay of Conception only about 163 head of black cattle, 70 sheep and 230 swine, they receive some of their live cattle from New England, and also some bread, flower and pork salted. (20) They are wholly supply'd with tackle and manufactures from England. (21) They generally give from £15 to £17 for the season to a boats' master, to a midshipman £12, to a foreshipman £8 to £10, and pay them generally in bills or fish. (22) £100. (23) None. (24) Cutting fuel and ship's timber etc., catching furrs, killing seal and making oil of their fat. (25) Several are employed during the winter in killing beavor fox and martin for the fur, they have no trade with the Islander Indians. (26) The fishermen are not annoyed by the inhabitants buildings. (27) No. (28) The flake room generally allowed for one boat is 40 yds. in depth x 20 yds. in front, generally extended in length from the water side up into the land. (29) They do not know. (30) From England and Ireland, and no other place. (31) None, except such as have cleared from England and called in those parts for salt. (32, 33) The Admirals do not know of any such practice. (34) This custom is wholly disuse(d). (35) None, except salt. (37) Of Plantation goods imported directly from thence they know only of 6207 galls. rum, 3413 galls. molasses, and 2400 lb. sugar, and that only for the use of fishermen and inhabitants and not to be exported. (38) Very seldom any New England ships come amongst them but go all to St. Johns. (39) There are no taverns or publick houses for entertainment. (4) The inhabitants frequently trust their servants, but rarely to a greater value then their wages. (41) 40s. out and 30s. home, paid in bills or fish. (42) The Admirals know of no such complaints. (43) No. (46) The Admirals will take what care they can to prevent all ill practices in cureing the fish and know not of any abuse of late other then badness of the seasons so that could not dry them sufficiently, they generally use 10 sometimes 11 hhds. of salt to 100 quintalls of fish, their fish taken by the vessells on the banks is generally good this year, as is also their shore fish. (49) The French have not fished at Petit Nore neither do the French on the N.E. end of the Island [to] fur in the winter, but some of the Canada Indians have for some years past came thither to catch fur and have traded with our people. (51) George Skeffington informs that the salmon has been obstructed by the Islander Indians killing some of his men, breaking down his damms, takeing away some of his netts, and robbing him of his provisions, and other necessarys, this happen'd to him last summer, and several times before, but has not met with any obstruction from them this year. Endorsed as preceding. 37 pp. [C.O. 194, 7. ff. 99–113v., 114v–116, 117, 120v.]
[Nov. 12.]338. Replies to same from the Admiral at St. Johns. To same effect as preceding, except, (No. 21). Wages paid by the inhabitants to their servants according as they can agree, and their payment is generally in strong liquors. (23) Many of the inhabitants keep no fishery at all; but to what boats are kept by them they allow 6 men to each boat, but cannot afford their fish so cheap as the by-boats. (28) As much room as will spread eighty quintals of fish at one time is allowed for one boats room. (33) The boatkeepers here generally hire room of the planters. (34) The Admiral's men are all on wages. (38) The New England men bring great quantitys of rum, sugar, mollasses, tobacco, bread flower and other provisions, which they sell to the fishing ships and inhabitants at reasonable rates for fish, which they sell to the sack ships for Bills of Exchange. (39) The major part of the inhabitants in St. John's keep publick houses, very much to the prejudice of the Fishery; the crews are trusted on their own credit; many of them must be left behind if their masters did not redeem them. (40) It is very often so. (41) 50s. (42) It is a great prejudice to the fishery. (44) Knowne of none. Endorsed as preceding. 35 pp. [C.O. 194, 7. ff. 121–135v., 136v., 137v., 139, 146v.]
[Nov. 12]339. (a) Replies to same, from the Admiral at Placentia. To same effect as No. i, except (No. 10). The inhabitants employ such numbers of green men as the Act directs. (19) They have beef and mutton from New England. (24) furring and repairing fishing tackle. (28) Here is all beech. (34) The Admiral's men are on a quarter part shares, the maintenance of the ship will come to £1000. (35–38) None. (39) There are 8 houses of entertainment, very much to the damage of the Fishery; the crews are trusted on their own credit, a great many must be left behind if the masters did not redeem them. (41) £4. (42) It is almost the ruin of the Fishery. (44) Knows of none.
(b) Scheme of Fishery of Placentia, St. Mary's, Trepassy, Aug. 1722. Endorsed as preceding. 40 pp. [C.O. 194, 7. ff. 147–164v., 166, 167, 168, 169, 172v.]
Nov. 13.340. Messrs. Huske, Sharp & Bolam to the Council of Trade Plantations. Repeat charges against Mr. Armstrong (v. 6th and 16th Nov.), which they can fully prove etc. Signed, Ellis Huske, Geo. Bolam, Richd. Sharp. Endorsed, Recd. Read Nov. 13, 1722. 1 p. Enclosed,
340. i. Deposition of James Stutley of the sloop Endeavour from Cales etc. July 9th, 1721. Robert Armstrong, Collector, seized from on board the said vessel, which he released, having a particular part of it himself, etc. Signed, John Davis for James Stutley etc. 2 pp. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Huske). Read 13th Nov., 1722. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 868. ff. 327, 328v.–330.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
341. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Upon petition of Messrs. Curfey & White (Nov. 8). Recommend H.M. to order a public seal for the Bahama Islands. [C.O. 24, 1. p. 70.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
342. Mr. Popple to Mr. Attorney General. Presses for reply to 14th June. [C.O. 5, 996. p. 118.]
Nov. 15.
Custom ho.,
London.
343. Mr. Carkesse to Mr. Popple. Encloses following, as the said Act "may be very prejudicial to the trade of this Kingdom" etc. Signed, Cha. Carkesse. Endorsed, Recd. 15th Nov., 1722. Read 4th July, 1723. Addressed, ¾ p. Enclosed,
343. i. Col. Rhett to H.M. Commissioners of Customs. S. Carolina, 16th Aug., 1722. Refers to repeal of Act laying 10 p.c. upon all English manufactures, 1718. Continues: Notwithstanding, in Dec. 1720, this Governmt. past another law of the same mischievous character wch. laid five p.c. in lieu of ten. This law is more repugnant to the laws of Great Britain than the other because it is an imposition and purely points at H.M. subjects residing in Great Britain, for the persons residing in this Province are wholly exempted from paying the sd. 5 p.c. H.E. has given his sanction to several other laws of more dangerous consequence, against which the merchants in London have exhibited their complaints to the Board of Trade, etc. Signed, Wm. Rhett. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 268, 269, 269v., 271v.]
Nov. 16.
London.
344. Mr. Huske to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Presents Articles v. Robert Armstrong (v. 6th and 13th Nov. (1) Being ready to sail with the Lancaster laden with timber for Gt. Britain, I was stopped a month because I would not comply with his unreasonable demands, wch. was the same as he extorted from Capt. Bolum. (2) He seized and cleared prohibited goods etc. as 6th Nov. (3) He suffered great numbers of mast trees to be cut into logs by Benjamin Wentworth, nephew to the Lt. Governor, between Oct. 1721 and Feb. 1722. (4) He has suffered Capt. Archabell Mackphredris and Capt. Henery Sherbon who are near relation to Col. Wentworth, to load wth. masts and oak timber for Cales in Spain and has been their practice this seven year. Signed, Ellis Huske. Endorsed, Recd. Read 16th Nov., 1722. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 868. ff. 331, 332v.]
Nov. 16.
London.
345. Mr. Sharpe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In obedience to your Lordships reference I have reconsidered the above charge, and cannot recede in the least etc. Amplifies charges. Armstrong is a noted Irish Jacobite and said he it was a shame that we must be governed by Germans etc. Signed, Richd. Sharpe. Endorsed as preceding. 1 ¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 868. ff. 333, 334, 334v.]
Nov. 16.
London.
346. George Bolam to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Mr. Armstrong stopped the True Brittain, laden with timber for London, of wch. I was then Master, and insisted on £40 beyond the stated fees before he would clear me. I paid £20 etc. Signed, Geo. Bolam. Endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 868. ff. 335, 335v.]
Nov. 16.
Secrys. Office
in Boston,
N. England.
347. Mr. Willard to Mr. Popple. Encloses following Continues: I have been delay'd in preparing the copies of the last half year's transactions of the Government by a publick affair on the frontiers on which the Governor and Council were pleased to employ me etc. Congratulates him on succession to his father etc. Asks to be supplied with paper from the Board, as Mr. Addington was, "the rather because I found it difficult to get my Stationer's Bill allow'd, tho' it never amounts to £8 sterl. in a year." Signed, Joseph Willard. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd Jan., Read 4th July, 1723. 1 ½ pp. Enclosed,
347. i. Account of powder expended and stores remaining at Fort William and Mary, New Castle, N.H., May 28th, 1721–1722. Signed, Jno. Wentworth. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd Jan., 1722/3. 4 pp.
347. ii. Account of stores of war expended and remaining at Castle William, Boston, June 1721–1722. Same endorsement. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 868. ff. 352, 352v., 353v.–355v., 356v.–358, 359v.]
Nov. 17.
Boston.
348. Mr. Cumings to [?Mr. Popple]. Refers to Scheme, v. Nov. 3rd. Continues: No news of our Indians of late our troops are still att the Eastward but no execution done the Indians being retired and wee suppose to Quebeck the Fishery suffered above 20,000 pound this last year by the Indian warr etc. The export of Navall Stores to Great Brittain since Christmas to this day is, tarr 14404 barrels, pitch 2586, turpentine 4530, oyl 4284. I think wee decrease in the export not near so much as formerly, and I am afraid the late Act of Parliament obleidging the people to make ther tarr of green trees will be a prejudice to the making the quantities of tarr as usuall, for they must goe further into the woods at double the expense etc. Continues: There is another thing that is a burden to trade in the plantations especially in the West Indies the extravagant fees att the Custome houses etc. Proposes that the fees established for the Port of London should be extended to the Plantations etc. Signed, Archd. Cumings. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd Jan. Read 26th Nov., 1723. 1 ½ pp. [C.O. 323, 8. No. 44.]
Nov. 21.
New York.
349. Governor Burnet to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I now send your lordships all the propositions made to the Indians at Albany by the Governors of Virginia and Pensylvania as well as my own, with the several answers of the Indians: which I hope have laid such a foundation for a good understanding between the several Provinces in their management with the Indians, as will make them look upon us as a much more powerfull people than the French of Canada, while they see us united in our proceedings, whereas the frequent occasions they have had to observe that the Provinces acted upon separate interests, have been ye chief cause of their unsteadiness, and of their fearing the French more than us. The Governour of Virginia having the year before complained to me that the five Nations made frequent inroads into that Province, contrary to their ancient Treatys made at Albany with Ld. Howard of Effingham Governour of Virginia forty years ago, I did then propose that they should not exceed certain bounds in their huntings or warlike expeditions to the Southward, so as to keep clear of Virginia, to which proposal the Indians did consent, but expected that the Government of Virginia should send them some person of distinction to renew the Covenant Chain, as they call it, that is, to give them a fine present to refresh their memorys. Upon my acquainting Col. Spotswood with this, he did at last prevail with the Assembly in Virginia to provide for the necessary charge of this Embassy and accordingly came himself to treat with them on this view, first obtaining my approbation with that of the Council of New York, for every single point he proposed. And this is the subject matter of his two days propositions to the Indians and of their answers, in wch. they perfectly agreed to what he proposed etc. Refers to enclosures. The Governour of Pensylvania found it necessary to give these Indians a meeting upon an unfortunate accident, of an Indian of the Five Nations being killed in Pensylvania by a Christian, for whose death he had not sufficient evidence, the offender continued a prisoner till the Indians desired his enlargement, and declared themselves satisfied etc. I had likewise received a proposal some time ago from the Government of Boston, that they might send Deputys to treat with the five Nations, in order to engage them against the Eastern Indians, but finding a great averseness in the Council of this Province, that their Deputys should treat with the Five Nations, unless the particulars were first regulated with the Government here, and the Governmt. of New England not agreeing to send Commissioners to treat with us previously upon the Heads to be proposed to the Indians, I found no way but to take this matter wholly upon myself, and I accordingly proposed to the Indians the very terms desired by the Governour of Boston, and have effected the interposition of the Five Nations, by Messengers now gone from them to Boston, and from thence to the Eastern Indians; for which I have the thanks of Governour Shute, for making this affair succeed, when he had little reason to expect it, from the indiscretion of some persons sent to Albany, who attempted to treat with the five Nations of Indians, without the knowledge of this Government, which had raised the jealousy here to that degree, that I had no small difficulty to bring the Council to agree wth. me in that affair, which however I did at last, And this is the main matter that is new in my Treaty with the Indians of the five Nations. I did also enforce what I had recommended to them ye year before, to avoid all dependance on Canada, and hearkning to their emissarys, and to encourage the trade from hence with the far Nations, which has had good success last year, and is in a fair way to increase, there being now a constant Company resident on the Lake Ontorio, and who have in presence of ye French of Niagara sold goods by our Indians hands for half the value that ye French use to extort, by which they are likely to loose grounds to us in that trade every year. In my last Speech I did in the presence of the two other Governours take notice of the present strong union and good intelligence there is between all the Provinces, which shewed itself in their acting in concert in every thing, and that they look'd on themselves as concerned equally in what was done to any one of them; and so renewed the old Covenant in behalf of the whole British interest, etc. Refers to enclosure and to his propositions to the river Indians, as we call them, "who live interspersed among the inhabitants, and are not so numerous or warlike as the five Nations and much more under command" etc. Continues:—When I was at Albany, I expected to have fix'd the Palatines in their new Settlement which I had obtained of the Indians for them, at a very easy purchase, but I found them very much divided into parties, and the cunningest among them fomenting their divisions on purpose that the greatest number might leave the Province, and then ye great tract of land lately purchased, would make so many considerable estates to the few familys that should remain. And with this view they told me that they found the land was far short of what the Indians had represented it to them and that not above twenty familys could subsist there, which I shewed them was a meer pretence, by nameing a tract where 130 familys live and flourish, which by their own confession was less and no better soil than theirs, however since I found it was their humour to undervalue what had been done for them, I thought it best to wait till they should of themselves be forward to settle this new tract, rather than shew too much earnestness in pressing them to it. But as about sixty familys of them desired to be in a distinct tract from the rest, and were those who have been all along most hearty for the Government, I have given them leave to purchase land of the Indians, between ye present English Settlements near Fort Hunter and part of Canada, on a Creek called Canada Creek, where they will be still more immediately a barrier against the sudden incursions of the French, who made this their road when they last attacked and burn'd ye frontier town called Schenectady. The other Palatines have since my return to New York, sent some of their body, to desire a warrant of survey for ye new tract already purchased; which convinces me that I had done right, in not being too earnest in that affair when I was at Albany. And indeed in my dealings with those people I find very little gratitude for favours done them, and particularly that those who were best taken care of, and settled on good lands by my Predecessor, are the most apt to misrepresent him; and this is managed by a few cunning persons among them, that lead the rest as they please, who are for the generality a laborious and honest, but a headstrong ignorant people. I have now sent your Lordships one private Act for the sale of some houses and lands, belonging to Gilbert Livingston etc. Hopes the Board will speedily recommend it for confirmation, "as all the partys concerned, have consented to this Act, and it is the only way the debt to the Province can be paid by this Gilbert Livingston, who was late Farmer of the Excise." I will send by next opportunity the other acts passed this session at New York etc. Set out, N.Y. Col. Docs. V. 655, and on the Palatines, Doc. Hist. N.Y. III, 428. Signed, W. Burnet. Endorsed, Recd. 4th, Read 10th Jan., 1722/3. 8 pp. Enclosed,
349. i. Conference between Governor Burnet and the Five Nations, and the River and Skaghhook Indians. Albany, Aug. 27–14th Sept., 1722. Set out, N.Y. Col. Docs. V. pp. 657–669.
349. ii. Conference between Governor Spotswood and the Five Nations. Albany, Aug. 29–12th Sept., 1722. Set out, N.Y. Col. Docs. V. pp. 669–677.
349. iii. Conference between the Governor of Pennsylvania and the Five Nations. Albany, Sept. 7th-10th, 1722. Set out, N.Y. Col. Docs. V. pp. 677–681. The whole endorsed as covering letter, 62 pp. [C.O. 5, 1053. ff. 84v., 86–98v., 99v.–102v., 103v.–105v., 106v.–109v., 110v.–120v., 121v.]
Nov. 22.
Whitehall.
350. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Enclose complaints against Mr. Armstrong as Collector of the Customs, N.H., as Depty. Surveyor of the Woods in America, and as being highly disaffected to H.M. person and Government etc. Refer to former letters of 6th Feb, and 22nd Oct. 1719, and 10th May last, "concerning the great necessity of sending a proper person to America, to take care of H. M. woods there." [C.O. 5, 915. pp. 355, 356.]
Nov. 23.
Bermuda.
351. Lt. Governor Hope to Mr. Balaguier. Acknowledges letter of June 27th etc. Refers to letter to Lord Carteret etc. Continues: I had the Assembly twice together, they were very willing to have made me a present but what they offer'd in the manner my instruction requires was so small that I did not think it worth while of accepting, for I don't doubt but I shall bring them to my own terms before it long; in the mean time you must put my Lord in mind to get the 5 p.c. act passed for three years only that I may get some time to put things in order which I find in very great confusion besides the Treasurys being in debt. I have got a vote in favour of Prevereau to whom I refer you and desire you will take care he don't take Pitt: in short its poor play here but I shall do all for him I can etc. I have sollicited my Lord in favours of the Capn. as you call him: for there is nothing here in my power to do for him so that if his Lordp. shoud think fitt to have compassion etc., His name is John Aytoune and he would be very glad to be a Lieut. etc. Signed, John Hope. Endorsed, Rd. June 27th. N.S. Holograph. Marked, Private. 2 pp. [C.O. 37, 26. No. 21.]
Nov. 23.
Charles City
and Port,
South
Carolina.
352. Governor Nicholson to Lord Carteret. Recommends to his Lordship's patronage Mr. Arthur Middleton, who fears he may have been misrepresented as an opposer of his lordship's interest. Concludes: I shall as I have endeavoured to do your Lordship all the service I have been capable of. Signed, Fr. Nicholson. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 387. No. 34.]
Nov. 23.
Bermuda.
353. Lt. Governor Hope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have had no opportunity of answering your Lordsps. letter of the 14th of June till now. Refers to enclosures, and sends proceedings of the Assembly 25th Sept.–15th Nov. etc. Continues:—I shall leave to your Lordsps. to judge by the description of the country, how far the merits of their petition is reasonable, and only presume to inform your Lordsps. that it will require some time before that this country can be brought to raise money for the support of the Government, by other ways and means etc., the inhabitants being so poor, and the country producing nothing that will bear being tax'd. I must therefore join so far with the sollicitations of the country, as to beg of your Lordsps. that the 5 pr. cent. Act in question may be pass'd with the amendment, for the term of three years instead of 21 years, which I find is the greatest objection your Lordsps. have against that Act, that the Government here may be in some measure supported; and that I may have a little time to put things in some better order, than at present they are. The Treasury is considerably in debt; How that has happen'd, will appear by the publick accounts, when put in such order as they may be pass'd, which has not been done for these four years before. Inclos'd is likewise two bills pass'd the Assembly very requisite for the good of this country, the one, to prevent the destruction of palmetto trees, and prevent fraud in the measure of platt in these Islands; and the other, for renewing the Act for the greater encouragement of planting Indian corn etc. Having according to my Instructions, made inquiry into the shares of land and slaves, belonging to the Governor and other Ministers, I do find the same shares of land so enjoy'd as in the Company's time, still in the possession of the Governor etc. But as for the slaves, there are none of them, that does appear but four: All the rest to the number of twenty, having been dispos'd of by the Governor and Council: so that the want of them, has been supplied from time to time, at the publick expence. Refers to enclosed list of persons qualified for Councillors and recommends Thos. Parsons to succeed Col. Smith etc. Continues:—I must now beg leave to take notice of to your Lordships some few particulars with regard to the Constitution of this little Colony. The Court of Chancery consists of the Governor and Council, where every thing is determin'd by the plurality of votes: How far that may be consistent with the design of a Court of Equity in a place like this (where it is scarce possible that any cause can come before them, but all the judges must be ingaged by relation or alliance, to one of the parties or other) I leave to your Lordsps. to judge. But this Court is establish'd by an Act of Assembly. It is the custom here for the Assembly (after being conven'd and qualified according to law) to administer to one another an oath of secrecy, for which I can find no manner of authority, and is of very bad consequence. The Assembly have likewise taken upon them in passing of money bills, to nominate the person who is to receive the same; and have been allow'd to recommend a Treasurer. This I find directly opposite to the 40th Article of my Instructions etc. Signed, John Hope. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 26th April, 1723. Duplicate. Original not received. 4 pp. Enclosed,
353. i. Address of the Governor, Council and Assembly of Bermuda to the King. Pray that Act to supply the deficiency of several funds etc. may be confirmed, it being no way prejudicial to the trade of Great Britain or the Plantations, "but is of great advantage to your Majty.'s poor subjects, and do's conduce to the support of the Government here by the present administration whereof we are very happy." Signed, by the Governor, Council (11) and Assembly, Tho. Parsons, Speaker and 26 others. Endorsed, Recd. 26th April. Copy. 2 ½ pp.
353. ii. A Description of Bermuda etc. (i) Geographical. (ii) These Islands are some hundreds in number, but not above 20 inhabited. (iii) The largest, called the Main Island, is divided into eight tribes or parishes, very well inhabited; the houses lying so near, that the whole country looks like one continu'd village etc. Description of St. Georges and St. David's, and (v) Castle Harbour. (vi) Climate. (vii) The lying of the fields in this country, seems very much to resemble the waves of a tumbling sea. In most of the bottoms there are ponds, but they are all salt, save one, which by its nature bears the names of Brackish Pond: there is but little fresh water upon these Islands that is good, or can be made use of; but that defect is always supply'd from the Heavens by frequent shower's, which the inhabitants are at great care to preserve in cisterns, made for that purpose. (ix) About 30 or 40 years ago, these Islands abounded with several sorts of fruits, as oranges, lemons, dates, mulberries, pappaus, plantanes etc. and pine-apples in particular in such quantities that they loaded their sloops with them but now there's little but the remembrance of them left.
All those trees and plants having been destroy'd by blasts and mill-dews; any of them that remain, seldom bear any fruit. At that time it yeilded also considerable quantitys of good tobacco, which was of great advantage, but that likewise has fail'd, being for several years successively, eat up by the worm while green the utmost care to prevent it, having no effect: so that now there is little or none made in these Islands. (x) The soil of its self is fertile, light, and thin, in most places not above four inches to the rock. Indian-corn, potatoes, cabbages, and onions, is what is now chiefly planted, as suffering least from the vermine, which for these many years past, has been in such infinite numbers, and of different kinds, that everything has been eat up as soon as it came above the ground. (xi) The inhabitants live chiefly on fish etc., which they are very dextrious in catching, so that many of their outward-bound sloops trust to the success of their fishing, for their sea provisions. (xii) The only thing these Islands subsist by are the cedar and palmetto trees. (xiii) Of the cedar they build their sloops and fishing-boats; and of the palmetto leaves they make a sort of ware called platt; as likewise cables for their sloops, and ropes for other uses. (xiv) There is almost always 50 or 60 sloops belonging to these Islands; all of them sail out in ballast, the country produceing nothing fit for exportation, save cabbages and onions, of which there may be to the value of £1000 worth per annum exported: most of them sail for the salt islands, where they take in salt for Virginia, Philadelphia, New York etc., and there exchange it for provisions. Others are employ'd in carrying goods upon freight, from one Collony to another. What money by these means is brought into this place, is generally drain'd away by strangers that import dry goods. (xv) These dry goods are imported by a sort of merchants that retail them out at 100 pr. cent. advance for ready money; and if they accept of the platt in payment, they advance 50 pr. ct. more, tho' this platt is really better than ready money; for when it is carried to England, it yeilds as much sterline, as it costs here of current money, which is 50 pr. ct. worse than sterline etc. (xvii) The platt or palmetto ware is only in demand at London, where about £15000 worth may be vended every year. How long it may be in demand is uncertain, and how this place will subsist if it fails, is not to be foreseen. (xviii) The number of inhabitants is 1770 white people, and they generally reckon 3 women for one man upon the Island; vast numbers of men being carried away by ship-wreck. (xix) The Militia at present is 1091 fighting men. They are modell'd into a regiment of two battalions, and into one troop of horse etc. Generally speaking, there is about a half of these inrolled men, at sea; and in fair weather, the whole inhabitants are almost all out at fishing; some of them four or five leagues from the shoar. (xx) The natives are a well-look't people, English countenances, but of a browner complexion; tall, lean, strong-limb'd and well proportion'd. They are good seamen, and but too hardy: all of them can swim, and tho' their fishing boats are often overset by violent gusts of wind; yet it rarely happens that any of them are lost. (xxi) The number of Blacks is 3514, which is too many by one half; there being no manner of work to employ them in advantagiously. But the inhabitants have a pride in keeping of them; nobody will sell a negroe here, that has been born in his family, but upon the last extremety: so that they multiply prodigiously. No slaves in the West Indies are us'd so well as the negro's are here, which however has one good effect, in relation to the strength'ning of this place; for these negroes are all sensible of the happy situation they are in, and are fitt to be trusted with arms, if this place should happen to be atta ck'd. The y are strong well bodyed fellows, and well fed, and certainly would behave themselves well upon occasion. Most of them are good divers, of which this country has had the experience, to their advantage upon the wrecks. In the infancy of this Settlement, a great deal of ambergreese was found amongst these Islands; and certainly there still is, of that valuable commodity frequently found; But they are now become expert in concealing of it, and disposing of it to strangers etc. (xxii) The fishing upon the wrecks, was the first thing that put this country in tollerable circumstances, and enabled them, to provide themselves with very good houses, tollerably furnish'd. But now gold and silver is as little to be seen, as if these occasions had never happen'd. (xxiii) The inhabitants are very neat and clean in their houses, there being great conveniences everywhere for building: For upon all rising ground they find stone within four inches of the surface, which is of such a nature, that it is easiely cut with hatchets, and hand-sawes; and is so poreous, that water thrown upon it, runs through it immediately. Of this stone they make the walls of their houses, and (by cutting of it thinn) very good covering for the roof; for after it has been twice or thrice white-wash'd with lime, (which is here very good) and some time exposed to the air, there grows such a scurf upon it, that no weather can penetrate. (xxiv) The Government and (xxv) the Courts described. (xxvi) Officers, Provost Marshal, by patent, and a Collector of Customs, who has no salary etc. (xxvii and xxviii) The duty upon ships call'd powder-money, and the rent of Crown lands is receiv'd by the Provost Marshal, for which he has 5 p.c. (xxix) The whole publick Revenue never amounted to £900. (xxx) This little Colony, if consider'd in regard to trade, is of very little consequence to the interest of Great Britain; But in regard to its situation, and reputed strength, is of very great consequence in times of war: For all ships homeward bound from the West Indies to Europe must pass within 20 or 30 leagues etc., and as the harbours are very capable of receiving ships of war, and privateers, it is very obvious, the advantage this place may be of to the trade of Great Britain, when at war with France or Spain; and the great disadvantage it wou'd be of, shou'd it happen to fall into the hand of either of these Nations. (xxxi) There are 90 guns in bad enough order mounted, in the forts and at places most accessible by ships or boats; and an Independant Company of 49 men, the greatest security of the Island; for notwithstanding the number of able-bodied men inroll'd (upon a late alarm of a pyrate's being upon the coast) there cou'd not 20 of the Militia be brought together at the Town of St. Georges: for in fair weather all hands are out a fishing. (xxxii) March, April, May, the coasts of these Islands are always frequented by grampus's, which the inhabitants erroneously call whales etc. (xxxiii) There is no sea-chart by which a vessel unacquainted can with safety come near the shoar etc. Signed and endorsed as covering letter. 12 pp.
353. iii. Petition and Remonstrance of the Governor, Council and Assembly of Bermuda to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Nov. 20, 1722. Pray for the confirmation of the Act to supply the deficiency of funds etc., the sums arising thence, though not exceeding £200 pr. annum being of great benefit to the Island, in no ways detrimental to the trade of Great Britain or the other Plantations etc. By reason of the present low circumstances of the people, Petitioners cannot fall on any other more unexceptionable way to finish the Governor's house and answer the other purposes of the Act etc. Signed, by the Governor, Council (11), Speaker (Tho. Parsons) and 26 other members of Assembly. Endorsed, as preceding. 1 large p.
353. iv. List of persons qualified to supply vacancies in the Council. (i) Capt. Thomas Parsons, Speaker, and one of the most considerable traders here. (ii) Capt. Daniel Tucker, Commander of Queen's Fort, J.P., and of an old family in this country. (iii) Leonard White, junr., son to a Councillor etc. (iv) John Darrell, one of the judges, respected for honesty and integrity. (v) Perient Trott, Justice, very much respected. (vi) Capt. Thomas Smith, Commander of the Town Company, a considerable trader and a good estate. Signed, John Hope. Endorsed as covering letter. 1 p. [C.O. 37, 10. Nos. 37, 37. i-iv and (abstract of letter, with notes for reply), 37, 24. p. 12.].
Nov. 25.
Bermuda.
354. Lt. Governor Hope to Lord Carteret. Refers to enclosures and copies of Acts and proceedings of Assembly sent to Board of Trade, "it having been the custom here for the Clerk of the Assembly to send but one copy," etc. Signed, John Hope. Endorsed, Rd. June 7th, 1723. 2 pp. Enclosed,
354. i-v. Copies of Nos. 353, 353 i-iv. [C.O. 37, 26. Nos. 22, 22, i-iii, 23.]
Nov. 27.
Whitehall.
355. Mr. Popple to Robert Dundas, Lord Advocate of Scotland. Reply to 4th Sept. Asks for true copy of Sir W. Alexander's grant; the £13 due for sd. copy are ordered to be paid etc. [C.O. 218, 2. p. 31.]
Nov. 28.
Whitehall.
356. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Shute. Having received information that John Wentworth, Mark Hunckins, Archd. McPhedris, Geo. Jefferys and Henry Sherborn Esqrs., five of the Council of N. Hampshire, are chiefly concerned in the trade of carrying masts and other timber to Spain from that Province and have thereby greatly contributed to the destruction of H.M. Woods, contrary to their duty and to the laws in force for the preservation thereof; we desire you would examine particularly into this affair, and lett us know the true state of it by the first opportunity. Upon this occasion, we must remind you of your 8th Instruction, which you have for some time neglected, whereby you are directed to send over to us lists of persons qualified to supply vacancies that may happen in the Council, and we cannot help taking notice that you ought before now, to have informed us that you had appointed Henry Sherborn to be one of H.M. Council in New Hampshire. [C.O. 5, 915. p. 357.]
Nov. 28.357. Mr. West to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reports in favour of Act of Jamaica for vesting lands in trustees for the use of George Reid etc. Signed, Richd. West. Endorsed, Recd. 28th, Read 30th Nov., 1722. 1 ½ pp. Enclosed,
357. i. Deposition of James Campbell, member of Assembly of Jamaica in 1721. Deponent never heard any objection to above Act etc. 17th Nov., 1722. Signed, James Campbell. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 14. ff. 163–164, 166v.]
Nov. 28.
Whitehall.
358. Lord Carteret to Governor Nicholson. Encloses duplicate of 6th Sept., 1721. Continues:—The Spanish Minister represents that the grievances complained of are not yet redressed, and that the Governor of Florida reports that you had received no orders etc. You are punctually to follow the orders contained therein, concerning which I hope to receive a satisfactory account from you by the first opportunity. Signed, Carteret. Annexed,
358. i. Duplicate of 6th Sept., 1721. [C.O. 324, 34. pp. 208, 209.]
Nov. 29.
St. James's.
359. Order of King in Council. Repealing Act of Antigua for laying a duty on goods imported etc. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 30th May, 1723. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 14. ff. 191, 191v., 192v.]
Nov. 29.
St. James's.
360. Order of King in Council. Confirming two Acts of St. Christophers for laying duties on sugar exported etc. and for settling £2000 pr. ann. on Governor Hart etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 2 ½ pp. [C.O. 152, 14. ff. 193–194v.]
Nov. 29.
St. James's.
361. Order of King in Council. Approving draft of Instructions relating to the Acts of Trade and Navigation for the Duke of Montagu, Proprietor of Sta. Lucia and St. Vincent's. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 30th May, 1723. 1 ¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1266. ff. 123, 123v., 124v.]
Nov. 29.
St. James's.
362. Order of King in Council. Confirming 9 Acts of Barbados, 1714–1720. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 30th May, 1723. 4 ½ pp. [C.O. 28, 17. ff. 290–292, 293v.]
Nov. 29.
St. James's.
363. Order of King in Council. Repealing two Acts of Barbados, 1720, (a) For depriving William Gordon, Rector of St. Michael's, of his benefice, and (b) for the better regulating the power of Vestries etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 2 ½ pp. [C.O. 28, 17. ff. 294–295v.]
Nov. 29.
St. James's.
364. Order of King in Council. H.M. Chief Engraver of Seales is to prepare a proper Seale for the Bahama Islands etc. Signed, and endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 23, 1. No. 48.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
365. Mr. Popple to Mr. West. Desires his opinion in point of law upon six Acts of Carolina passed June, 1722. [C.O. 5, 400. p. 153.]
[? Dec. 1.]366. Mr. Willard to Mr. Popple. Refers to letter of Nov. 16. Sends Journal of Assembly for Sessions of 30th May and Aug. 8th, 1722, with Acts then passed, and Minutes of Council for six months ending Augt., and Treasurer's accounts for the last year etc. Signed, Josiah Willard. Endorsed, Recd. 1st Feb., Read 4th July, 1723. Addressed. ¾ p. Enclosed.
366. i. Accounts of Revenue by Jeremiah Allen, Treasurer, of the Massachusetts Bay, 31st May, 1721–1722. Total Receipts, £96,847 8s. 8 ½ d. Signed, Jer. Allen. Endorsed, Recd. 1st Feb. 1722/3. 33 pp. [C.O. 5, 868. ff. 360, 361, 361v., 363–379v.]