America and West Indies
March 1723

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1934

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221-238

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'America and West Indies: March 1723', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 33: 1722-1723 (1934), pp. 221-238. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72011 Date accessed: 23 July 2014.


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Contents

March 1723

March 1.
New
Providence.
452. Governor Phenney to Lord Carteret. Acknowledges letter of 26th May etc. Continues:—The miscarriage of several letters I have sent home with material papers either thro' the misfortune or ill conduct of the messengers obliges me to send the bearer etc. Recommends for a short audience Capt. Barker, H.M. Engineer, who will deliver drafts of the fortifications necessary for the defence of the place etc. Repeats part of March 2nd. Signed, G. Phenney. 2 pp. Enclosed,
452. i. ii. iii. Duplicate of Nos. 455. i., ii., vii.
452. iv. Sketch of Nassau Harbour and Fort. Coloured. 1 large p.
452. v. Duplicate of No. 455. ix.
452. vi. Sketch of the Church at Nassau "as now a building." 1 p.
452. vii. Duplicate of No. 455. xi.
452. viii. Duplicate of No. 455. viii. [C.O. 23, 13. ff. 93–104, 103a, 104a, 105a., 105–126].
March 1.
New
Providence.
453. Governor Phenney to Lord Carteret. Duplicate of preceding letter. Enclosed,
453. i. Address of the Justices and Grand Jury at the Quarter Sessions held at Nassau, 29 Aug. 1722, to Governor Phenney. Express their great satisfaction under his Government. "We do most heartily wish we had the power answerable to our zeal to assist your Excellency in what is most absolute and necessary for the security and promotion of this Settlement. It is with all becoming concern that we are sencible of our loyalty and capacity being misrepresented in England, otherwise we might justly flatter ourselves His Majesty out of his known goodness would have answered the late address of us his most loyal tho' unfortunate subjects and servants wherein we pray'd his Royal leave to grant us an Assembly, for when we behold the ruinous condition of the Fort we cannot enough regrett our want of an Assembly as the only adjunct to help your Excellency to repair the fortifications and other unavoidable contingencys of the Government." Pray H.E. to interceed for them to that end. 24 signatures. 1 p.
453. ii. Jacob Rowe to [?]. New Providence, 20th Feb. 1722/3. Describes his operations and plans for working on wrecks in the Gulf of Florida etc. "This opportunity is by Governor Phenney's Lady (one of the best of women) the Governor is a very complete Gentleman" etc. Signed, Jacob Rowe. Endorsed, R. 25: June. 3 ½ pp.
453. iii. Address of the Governour, Council and principal inhabitants of New Providence to the King. Congratulate H.M. on safe arrival and return thanks to him as the glorious assertor of the Protestant Faith and British Liberty etc. Signed, G. Phenney and 27 others. Endorsed, R. 25th Sept. Parchment. 1 p.
453. iv. Address of Same to Same. Renew former requests for leave to constitute an Assembly, "that this Government may be put on an equal establishment with the rest of your Majesty's Colonys in America" etc. This will effectually enable us to proceed with more expedition in the fortifications necessary to secure this place, and by this means we shall also see the number of inhabitants increase etc. Signed, G. Phenney, and 56 others. Parchment. 1 large p.
453. v. Address of the Governor, Commission Officers of the Garrison and the officers of the three Companys of Militia on the Island of New Providence to the King. Congratulate H.M. upon the happy discovery "of the horrid conspiracy against your sacred person and Government. We are surpriz'd to find that humane creatures can be so infatuated to endeavor to change order into confusion, liberty into slavery, and religion into bigotry and superstition" etc. Nassau. 1st March, 1722/3. Signed, G. Phenney and 13 others. Parchment. 1 large p. [C.O. 23, 13. ff. 81, 81v., 82, 83–85v., 87–88, 89v., 90, 91, 92.]
March 1.454. Mr. Yonge to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Replies to Mr. Rhett's charges v. 14th Feb. and asks for a short day to be appointed for the hearing etc. Signed, Fra. Yonge. Endorsed, Recd. 1st March, Read 10th July, 1722/3. 5 ¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 280–282v., 283v.]
March 2.
N.
Providence.
455. Governor Phenney to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I do myself the honor to enclose several papers for your Lordships' inspection, with a draft of the harbour and the designd Church, which (the materials being arriv'd) will with God's blessing be soon compleated. Refers to enclosed accounts of excise and tonage duties, "in which I did all my endeavour to be a good husband. I am forct to struggle with a great many difficultys in great measure for want of an Assembly which the people here impatient have again addrest H.M. for." Refers to enclosed trials of pirates etc. Continues:—The people of Catt Island have lately quitted that remote place having been so often plunder'd and disturb'd, and now are settled partly on Islathera, others on Harbour Island and Providence. These latter came here but two days ago, and intend imediately to begin a plantation. Captain Barker H.M. Engineer will deliver your Lordships drafts of the forts and hornwork necessary for the defence of the place, and how far we have proceeded. I am designing to open a way into the center of the Island where I don't doubt finding good land for planting. Our present sett of people being mostly seafaring men have not any great notions that way. I have letters from several people of credit and substance that they will speedily come and settle here, and dont in the least question the encrease of our numbers when our fortifications are perfected, and especially if we have an Assembly. P.S. The misfortune of a limekiln not being regularly burnt has retarded our work on the King Bastion, but I shall set fire to one this week of about 7,000 bushels, which will enable us to finish it with all possible expedition. Signed, G. Phenney. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 14th June, 1723. 1 ⅓ pp. Enclosed,
455. i. Governor of Havana to Governor Phenney. In reply to following, thanks him for having done justice to the pirates etc. Signed, Grego. Guazo Calderon. Copy. Spanish. 2 pp.
455. ii. Governor Phenney to Governor of Havana. N. Providence. 11th Dec. 1722. Informs him of execution of some of Augustine Blanco's crew, and asks that justice be done upon that pirate. Asks for return of two inhabitants of the Bahama Islands, whom Augustine forced to go with him etc. Signed, George Phenney. Copy. 1 p.
455. iii. Same to Same. 11th Dec. 1722. Sends an Agent to lay before H.E. the case of the sloop Hester that was seized by two Spanish vessels from the Havana etc. Signed, George Phenney. Copy. ½p. Nos. i.–iii. Endorsed, Recd. 13th June, 1723.
455. iv. Minutes of Council of the Bahama Islands, 14th Feb. 1723. The Council requested H.E. to apply the money received on account of fines and forfeitures to clearing the publick debts, "not doubting that H.M. will graciously contribute such sums at least as are levied in this Government towards defraying the publick contingencys therof." H.E. consented to send home their request and an account of the fines and forfeitures and meantime to make use of the money as desired, "and if demanded from the Treasury in England, the Board can only be accountable." Copy. 1 p.
455. v. Minutes of Council, 24th Feb., 1723, relating to the condemnation of the brigantine Hanover, formerly Commerce, etc. Copy. 2 pp.
455. vi. Minutes of Council, [—] March, 1723. Mr. Corrington is declared to be an imposter, and his place in Council ordered to be filled etc. Copy. 1 p. Nos. iv–vi endorsed, Recd. 13th June, 1723.
455. vii. Description of the Bahama Islands. Harbours, fortifications, numbers, militia, soil etc. as in Governor Phenney's letters supra. Concludes:—On the shores of these Islands are often found quantitys of ambergrease, one piece taken up last year weighed 166 lb., and some amber. Spermaceti come in the winter, and seils to breed, each of which affords about 20 galls. of oil, which is exported to Jamaica etc. for the use of their mills. The Hawks Bill Turtle is often catcht, which has the fine shell so much used in England.
On Exuma and several other Islands large quantitys of salt are naturally made every year sufficent to supply all H.M. Plantations. Our present inhabitants being mostly seafaring men, the trade chiefly consists in cutting the dye woods, which with the salt, oyl, turtle and turtle shell and fruits are exported to the neighbouring Colonys, for which sometimes the vessels belonging to No. America bring in barter several comoditys, etc. Want of an Assembly discourages the encrease of people etc. Endorsed as preceding. 3 pp.
455. viii. State of the Fort Nassau, 12th Nov., 1721; of repairs done since; and work and repairs needed now. Same endorsement. 2 large pp.
455. ix. Account of Stores of War brought by Governors Rogers and Phenney and of what remains, Feb.28, 1723. Signed, John Allen, Gunner, George Phenney. Same endorsement. Copy. 3 pp.
455. x. Account of receipts and expenses for Fort Nassau, Nov. 1721–Feb. 1723. Total, £975. 6. Signed, George Phenney, W. Fairfax, Richard Thomson, Natell. Taylor, J. Cookes, Tho. Ockold, J. Howell. Same endorsement. 16 pp.
455. xi. (a) Trials of 11 Spanish pirates, crew of Augustino Blanco, 11th Oct. 1722. Five were hung and six, including one Englishman, reprieved. 18 ½ pp.
455. xi. (b) Trials of five pirates who ran away with a boat from New Providence etc. in Aug. 2., 1722. They were condemned to be hanged, but were pardoned at the desire of the Council, Alexr. Wyat the chief having brought advise formerly of the Spaniards invasion, enabling the Colony to put themselves into a posture of defence. 18 ¼ pp. The whole endorsed, Recd. 10th July, 1723, with a duplicate of covering letter. [C.O. 23, 1. Nos. 49, 49. i–xi.]
March 2.
Jamaica.
456. Governor the Duke of Portland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The hurry of business just after my arivall has prevented, what my inclinations would fain have led me to to have done, which was to write to yr. Lordsps. as soon as possible to return you thanks for all favours before I left England, and to desire the continuance of yr. friendship and countenance in the dispatch of what I may desire of yr. Lordships for H.M. service. I must owne that the condition I found every thing in here, was very discouraging, the hurrican which they have had, having blown down most of the houses, and damag'd the plantations prodigiously, the people have hardly as yett recover'd theire fright nor theire sickness, which they gott by colds after the storm, by having lost theire houses, and by being expos'd to prodigious rains for some time, which finish'd the spoyling of all things they try'd to gett or save out of the remains of theire habitations, butt hope that time will bring all that to rights again; I wish I could give yr. Lordsps. a better and more satisfactory account of the Government, every thing has been to much and sadly neglected, the Revenue is in the uttmost disordre, justice every where neglected, and every thing that relates to the publick slighted; I have ever since my arrivall done all I could, to redress all abusses, and by the succes I have already mett with, flatter my self that in some short time every thing will be upon a better foot; I call'd the Assembly together as soon as possibly I could, that every boddy might know, the desire I had of having every thing well settel'd, and also that I might see and try the disposition people were in; as to the Publick, and my self they have answer'd my expectations, I hope itt will meet with yr. approbation, and that those laws will be confirm'd att Home particularly since by the best information I can gett, there is, under a good regulation a full and ample provision made for the Revenue. As for Coll. Du Bourgay, I am sorry to say it has not been in my power to obtain for him what he might have expected, I have try'd all manner of ways, and could not push itt further without distracting all affairs, and putting everything in the greatest confusion, and that without any hopes of succeeding. As he is returning to England, I leave to him to represent every thing himself, and also to inform yr Lordsps. of severall particulars, which he will much better explain, then I can do in writting etc. I must say to yr Lordsps. that this Island deserves more care and attention, and is of greater consequence then is generally thought, nothing shall be wanting in me to the best of my jugement and power what I desire is yr. assistance, and that you would be persuaded no boddy can be with greater sincerity and esteem then I am My Lords, Yr Lordsps. most obedient humble servt. Signed, Portland, Endorsed, Recd. 29th April, Read 1st May, 1723. 3 pp. Holograph. 3pp. [C.O. 137, 14. ff. 188–189v.]
March 2.
St. Jago de
la Vega.
457. Governor the Duke of Portland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. To prevent any reflections that might be cast on me, for not having literally conformd to my Instructions I have thought proper to send over the true reasons for my proceedings therein, which I hope will have their due weight, and meet with your Lordships' approbation etc. Signed, Portland. Subscribed,
457. i. Governor the Duke of Portland's Reasons for passing some Acts of Jamaica. (a) The People were very willing to make their laws perpetual, and to make in the like manner a full and ample provision for the Revenue, and it was thought adviseable in this disposition to consent to the passing the Act drawn by them, without running the hazard of trusting to their continueing in the same mind, till a draught of such Revenue Act, could be transmitted to England, for the approbation of the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, it being impossible for one to answer for a number of people, who have formerly given too many proofs of their inconstancy. (b) As to the Law which makes a further provision for my salary, it was attempted to have a clause inserted, that it should not be in force, till H.M. pleasure was known, but they haveing no precedent of that kind, were unwilling to make one particularly, in an Act wherein they intended a favour, and a complement etc. Signed, Portland. Endorsed, Recd. 29th April, Read 1st May, 1723. 1 ¼ p. [C.O. 137, 14. ff. 190, 190v., 191v.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
458. Lord Carteret to Governor Worsley. I desire the favour of you to assist Mr. Morgan etc. Signed, Carteret. Annexed,
458. i. Henry Morgan desires a letter of recommendation to Mr. Worsley to countenance justice and despatch in his recovery of money for a plantation in Barbados sold by him some years since, the purchaser and Mr. Morgan's agent having both died soon after the sale etc. [C.O. 324, 34. p. 222]
March 5.
Whitehall.
459. Lord Carteret to Governor Hart. The Portuguese owners of a vessel taken by a pirate in Sept. 1719 and seized at Antego, having made out their claim to that ship and goods, they are to be delivered to Christopher Stoodley their Agent at Antegoa etc. Signed, Carteret. [C.O. 324, 34. pp. 223, 224.]
March 7.
St. James's.
460. H.M. Warrant for a patent granting to Patrick Crauford the office of Provost Marshall of the Leeward Islands, and revoking the patent of Henry Douglass. Countersigned, Carteret. Copy. [C.O. 324, 34. pp. 224, 225].
March 7.
Admty
Office.
461. Mr. Burchett to Mr Popple. H.M.S. Dover, Deptford and Solebay being designed convoy to Newfoundland this year, and Captain Cayley, Commander of the Dover, being Commadore, enquires for Instructions and Heads of Enquiry for him etc. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 13th March, 1722/3. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 7. ff. 85, 86 v.]
[March 7.]462. Memorandum of warrants appointing Provost Marshalls of Barbados, 1714–1723. 1 ½ pp. [C.O. 28, 39. No. 12.]
March 8.
Auditor's
Office.
463. Representation of William Dalrymple, Receiver General, and John Ashley Depty. Surveyor and Auditor General, of H.M. Revenues in Barbados, to Governor Worsley. Complain (i) that the Custom house Officers at Barbados make seizures, prosecute and sometimes discharge them, without acquainting them; and (ii, iii.) commit other irregularities tending to fraud and corruption. Signed, William Dalrymple, John Ashley. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 39. No. 13.]
March 8.
Whitehall.
464. Order of Committee of Council. Referring report upon petition of pirates (v. Nov. 9, 1722) to Attorney and Solicitor General. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 20th Aug., Read 2nd Oct. 1723. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 8. No. 41]
March 15.
Whitehall.
465. Mr. Popple to Governor Shute. Asks for copy of his licence to come over from New England, in order to its being entered in the books of the Office. [C.O. 5, 915. p. 358]
March 18.
Province of
N. Hampshire.
466. Lt. Governor Wentworth to the Council of Trade and and Plantations. This being the first opertunity that has hapned from hence since Governour Shute embarqd. for Great Brittain, where I hope he is arived in safety, I tho't it my duty to let your Lordships know that I have received H.M. Royall Instructions, from my Governour, for the better executing my office etc. Continues:—We have had little or nothing hapned since Governour Shute went home for Great Brittain, but shall at the end of our May Sessions transmit what has accurd etc. As to the affair of Surveyer Generall of H.M. Woods, I have heretofore given my opinion etc. We have had a verry open winter, so that the millmen had not an opertunity of destroying many pine-trees this season. I shall do everything in my power to prevent the cutting or destroying of them. Signed, J. Wentworth. Endorsed, Recd. 1st May, Read 4th July, 1723. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 868. ff. 380, 380v., 381v.]
March 19.
Whitehall.
467. A. Popple to Mr. Burchett. In reply to 7th March, encloses usual Heads of Enquiry for the Commodore of the Newfoundland Convoy, (v. 6th April, 1720), and Scheme of Fishery. [C.O. 195, 7. pp. 88–91.]
March 19.
Middle
Temple.
468. Mr. Dummer to Mr Popple. The Assembly of Connecticut disallowed the boundary line agreed to in 1703, for the reason that the Rhode Island Commissioners were not fully impowered, which defect the Government of Rhode Island would have made good afterwards by a post act. Signed, Jer. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. Read 19th March, 1722/3. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1266. ff. 117, 118v.]
March 19.469. Mr. Burrington to Mr. Popple. Offers Mr Nicholas Vincent and Dennis Bond as securities in £500: etc. (v. 26th Feb.). Signed, Geo. Burrington. Endorsed, Recd. 19th, Read 21st March, 1722/3. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1266. ff. 120, 120v.]
March 20.
Bermuda.
470. Lt. Governor Hope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses proceedings and Acts of the last Session of Assembly. (i) An Act to prevent any person for having of netts etc" is of no manner of consequence, but as the people are very desirous of it, I must recommend it to your Lordsps. (ii) An Act for making an addition to the salary of Governor Hope: as it relates to myself I can say but little for it, but that I hope your Lordships won't think it too much, nor the present either which they have made me, considering the polite way they have chose to do it. I shall only desire your Lordships to observe that there is but very little money to be got here, if the Governor keeps up to his Instructions, for they wou'd have provided much better for me in their own way, and they have told me it is their intention so to do. But whether I am to accept their presents or not your Lordships only can determine. (iii) An Act for lessening the number of the Assembly and registering the Acts, is what I must intreat your Lordsps. to get confirm'd as one of the best improvements the Constitution of this little Colony is capable of receiving. The Assembly now consists of 36 representatives, paid by a parochial tax. It is scarce possible to get as many men upon the Island at one time who are really capable of understanding what publick business means, so that it has been and is very often obstructed (especially in the afternoons): besides, the manner of paying them is a heavy burthen upon the poorer sort of people, who really are able to bear none. Whereas this new Act reduces the number to 18, which will always be the better sort of people, and the charge is brought upon the publick. I hope your Lordships will at present forgive my not explaining the rest of the particulars contain'd in the proceedings of the Assembly, for I am now prepareing copys of the publick accts. to be transmitted by the next vessel, when it will be much more proper because of their relating to one another. Begs for dispatch in confirming above Acts etc. Signed, John Hope. Endorsed, Recd. 1st May, Read 25th June, 1723. 2 ½ pp. [C.O. 37, 10. No. 39; and (abstract, with notes for reply) 37, 24. p. 14.]
March 20.
Bermuda.
471. Lt. Governor Hope to Lord Carteret. Duplicate of preceding. [C.O. 37, 28. No. 16.]
March 21.
Whitehall.
472. A. Popple to Mr. Lowndes. Encloses following. Concludes: My Lords Commrs. for Trade and Plantations observing that the Deputy Governors have not regarded that Instruction which directs them to give bond to H.M. that they will not during their continuance in their Government trade as merchants for themselves, or as factors for others in any goods etc., have therefore thought fit to insert this Instruction in the bond inclosed, etc. Set out, N.C. Col. Rec. II. 480. Enclosed,
472. i. Draft of bond for sureties for Lt. Governor Burrington for due observance of the Acts of Trade. [C.O. 5, 1293. pp. 276–280.]
March 21.
Whitehall.
473. Mr. Popple to Mr. West. I am to desire your opinion in point of law upon enclosed Act [of New Jersey] for vesting the lands late the estate of Robert Burnet etc., and to remind you of the several references from the Board now lying before you, and to desire you would dispatch your report thereupon out of hand. [C.O. 5, 996. p. 121.]
March 21.
Whitehall.
474. Same to Mr. Attorney and Mr. Solicitor General. Presses for reply to 14th of Feb. [C.O. 5, 996. p. 122.]
[Mar. 21.]475. Petition of London Merchants trading to Placentia to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Complain of trade carried on by Officers of Garrisons in Newfoundland, and more particularly by Saml. Gledhill, Lt. Governour of Fort Frederick in Placentia, who for several years last past, and particularly the last year carryed on the fishing trade and other the employ attending the same in all its branches, having employ'd severall ships of his own and on his particular account freighted with goods from thence to foreign parts. The power being chiefly vested in him prevents petitioners and other traders from obtaining their just debts. Petitioners are by these proceedings highly injur'd prejudic'd and damnify'd etc. Pray for relief. Signed, Saml. Baker, Solomon Merrett and 10 others. Endorsed, Recd. Read 21st March, 1722/3. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 7. ff. 173, 173v.]
[Mar. 21.]476. Petition of Mayor and Merchants of Poole to Same. Similar to preceding. Signed, Timo. Spurrier, Mayor, and 56 others. Same endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 7. ff. 174, 174v.]
March 22.
Whitehall.
477. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Committee of the Privy Council. Summarize case of boundary dispute between Connecticut and Rhode Island (v. 19th Jan. 1722), and suggest that the two Colonies should voluntarily submit themselves to H.M. immediate Government and be annexed to New Hampshire. (v. A.P.C. III. pp. 10, 11.) Annexed,
477. i. Map showing the western boundary line between Connecticut and Rhode Island according to the Charter of Rhode Island. Cf. The map reproduced A.P.C.III. Appendix V. [C.O. 5, 1293. pp. 280–296. A.]
March 22.
Whitehall.
478. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords of the Admiralty. Governor Philips having represented to us the advantage it would be to the Fishery of that place, if one of the men of war appointed for the Newfoundland convoy this year, were directed to cruise between Canço and Cape Sables, that Fishery having been last year interrupted and in danger of being broke up, by the rumour of the pyrates being on the coast etc., we give your Lordps. this information, that you may give the necessary orders before the ships sail. [C.O. 218, 2. pp. 32, 33.]
March 22.
Whitehall.
479. Order of Committee of Council. Referring to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury report, memorial and paper of reasons relating to the remitting of quit rents etc. in the two new frontier counties of Virginia. Signed, Jas. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 20th Aug., Read 2nd Oct., 1723. 1 ¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 1319. No. 25.]
March 23.
Admiralty
Office.
480. Lords of the Admiralty to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to 22nd. We have sent orders to the Comander in Chief of the Newfoundland convoy to appoint one of the ships of war sent thither, to cruize between Canso, and Cape Sables, for protecting the Fishery there, at such times as it may be conveniently done, with regard to the security of the Fishery at Newfoundland in general. Signed, Jo. Cokburne, W. Chetwynd, Jno. Norris. Endorsed, Recd., Read 23rd March, 1722/3. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 4. ff. 180, 181v.]
March 23.
St. James's.
481. H.M. Warrant appointing William Seabrook Clerk of the Markets at Antegoa etc. Signed, Carteret. Memd. in margin that this warrant was not executed. Copy. [C.O. 324, 35. pp. 9, 10.]
March 24.
St. James's.
482. H.M. Warrant appointing Major Richard Holmes to the Council of St. Christopher's in the room of Geo. Lyddell decd. Countersigned, Carteret. Copy. [C.O. 324, 34. p. 228.]
March 25.
Barbados.
Winchelsea.
483. Capt. Orme to [?Mr. Burchett]. Honble. Sir, Be pleased to acquaint their Lordships, upon my arrival at Barbados 6th Dec., we had a flying report, that the French design'd to oppose a settlement we were going to make on St. Lucia, but it was believ'd rather to spring from envy of some there, who were enemies to this design, than matter of fact. The 15th following I sail'd to the aforesaid Island, in company with the vessels which came out with me, the day after we anchor'd in a bay called Pigeon Island Bay, but that not being thought a proper place for settling, we resolv'd next morning to sail more to Leeward. Whilst lying here, there came in a sloop, the master whereof told me he came from Martineco, and that he had got a copy of the extract of the King of France's orders to the Chevalier de Fuguier etc. to this purpose, that whereas the Islands of Sta. Lucia, and St. Vincents, were about to be settled by the English, to whom they belong'd not, the former belonging to the Crown of France, and the latter left in possession of the Caribbeans, he is therefore to intimate to the English, so soon as they should begin to settle upon Sta. Lucia, that they should depart thence in fifteen days, which if they did not, he was to oblige them thence by force of arms, but without plundering, or effusion of blood if possible. Dated Versailles Sept. 21st., 1722. The Governour and Officers belonging to the Island still believed this to be false, and that it was only a stratagem used by the French, to hinder the English from settling, as that would be very hurtfull to their trade and island. Next morning we sail'd about two leagues to leeward, where is a commodious and safe harbour called the Pettite Carnash; the north side of this, the Governour and Officers, pitch'd upon for building a fortification; accordingly they went ashoar, and after clearing away the trees and bushes, they hoisted the Union Flagg, and apply'd themselves to raise defences for their preservation. On 22nd Dec. came in H.M.S. Hector, as also a French sloop from Martineco, having on board two Officers from the General in that place, to notify the King of France's orders, and to warn the English to depart in fifteen days. On 25th Dec. there was a sloop sent to St. Vincents, with one of his Grace's Officers, to notify to the Indians, mallato's, and negro's on that Island his Grace's Declaration in favour of them, wherein was profferr'd them the same immunities and privileges as free-born subjects of Great Britain, in case they would submit themselves to the Duke's Government; And that they would give their assistance, in the defence of either of the two Islands, in case they should be attack'd, and when the Governour of the said Islands shall demand it: The said Officer returned some days after, but his embassy tended little to the satisfaction, or encouragement of this new Colony. On 28th Dec., I heard there was several French landed in Shock Bay, about a league and half to windward were we lay. That afternoon I sent my Lieutent. to know the truth thereof, who brought me an account that he see about 100 men in arms, and that they said they were going against the Pirates. The day after there was a more strict demand of their design, which their Commanding Officer said was against the Pirates, and that they were fitted out at Martineco to that purpose, but whilst at sea their ship sprung a leak, and carried away a topmast, that they put in here to cut wood, and search for the runaway negroes, and to remain here till their ship was refitted at Martineco, and returned here to them, showing a Commission from their General for the same. Notwithstanding these pretences, their design was too plain to be deceiv'd and we was not ignorant, their drift was only to land a sufficient number of men, to oblige the English to abandon the Island, so soon as the fifteen days was expired. I weigh'd from the Carnash, and anchor'd in Shock Bay, and wrote a letter to the Commanding Officer, that I was not to be deceived in his design, and assured him, I would for the future endeavour to prevent his communication with Martineco, and his having a further supply thence. I gave chace, and endeavour'd to speak with every vessel I see, particularly with some French sloops, whom I believ'd to have soldiers aboard to land on this Island, but they upon seeing me, went back to Martineco, which answer'd my purpose, not having any other design, than to frighten them, my orders not warranting me to proceed any further. The 3rd Jan., 1723, I spoke with a sloop belonging to Barbado's, which came from Martineco, the Master whereof told me, that at his departure from that Island, which was the day before, he was advised by some merchants there, he had left that place, least he should have been seiz'd in their harbour; that there was fifteen sail of sloops, each having an hundred men aboard, ready to sail for St. Lucia, and one had a white flag hoisted at her masthead. I immediately sail'd for the Petite Carnish, to inform the Governour and others thereof; the news was a great discouragement to the Colony, whose number was not above one hundred and twenty, and a great many of these mutinous, and ready to desert upon the first opportunity, as did about thirty of them a little time after. The Governour and Council petition'd Capt. Brand and I, to lend them an hundred men as a reinforcement, but that being impracticable to be done, without endangering H.M. ships, we deny'd it, however proffering all the service and assistance in our power. The French landed about 1600 men, under the command of the Marquess de Champigny Governour of Martineco; the vastness of their number, left the English no hopes of maintaining their Colony, so that they now thought only of making an honble, retreat, and began to dismount the great guns, which were plac'd on a hill above the main fort, and settlement, least the French should surprize them and use these guns against themselves, and ships that lay in the harbour. The Governour and Council sent to the Marquiss de Champigny, that he would send an officer to treat with them, which was accordingly done, and Articles drawn up and mutually sign'd, which I have here sent you inclosed. Before the fifteen days were expired Captain Brown came in here. At the expiration of the seven days, according to agreement in the Articles, we left the Island, I having in company a sloop belonging to the Duke of Montague, sail'd with the Lt. Governour to St. Vincents, to try what was possible to be done with respect to the settlement of that Island. Capt. Brand, in the Hector, being bound for Antegoa, where was the Duke's Agent, took in his company the ships having the Governour and people belonging to St. Lucia. When I arriv'd at St. Vincents, I endeavour'd to come to an anchor, but the Island is so ill accommodated for this purpose that almost everywhere there is fifty fathom waterwithin a cable's length of the shoar; so I brought to at a distance, and the Lt. Governour went in my boat to go ashoar and invite the Indians to come off and treat with him. At first they took us to be a pirate, and had a party of men lying in the woods ready in case they should be attacked. But not being a great number of Indians at this place, we sail'd more to Leeward, where I found one day where I could anchor. I sent ashoar here to have some water, where was a great number of Indians, arm'd with bows and arrows, knives, sticks etc. who refused to let me have water unless I paid for it. The reason was some French had been with them, and infus'd into their heads, that the English came now only as spy's to view their Island, and that their design was in the end only to trick them and destroy them; and further, that if they enter'd into any Articles with the English, or accepted of any presents from them, the French would come, and carry them all away captives to Martineco. The Lt. Governour us'd all means to have one of thei r Chiefs come off and treat with him, which there did, but to little purpose, and refus'd to accept of some presents he proffer'd him, least the French should know of it. The settlement of this Island cannot easily be effected, without procuring the inhabitants to be our friends, which in my opinion will be very hard to do, since they are so intimate and well acquainted with the French, that most of them speak that language, and a great many of them have been baptized in the Catholick Faith. On board of my ship one of them repeated their creed in French, and some part of their Liturgy in Latin. But granting this impediment remov'd, there being no commodious harbours in this Island, renders it scarce deserving of a settlement. From St. Vincents I sail'd for Martineco, to demand the English desertors according to agreement. The General said he would deliver what of them could be found; but seem'd indifferent whither they were found or not; I left there his Grace's sloop with the Lt. Governour of St. Lucia, to take them on board, and sail'd for Barbado's, intending to accompany the store ship with the Duke's people, which then we heard were arrived there; but at my coming to Barbado's, I found she was already sail'd for Antegoa where I followed soon after, and I carried with me several of his Grace's people which belong'd to that ship but were left behind. As often as any of the ships belonging to his Grace come here, I shall come up to convoy them down; when that service is over shall cruize about the Leeward Islands till their Lordships' further commands. I should have sent you this advice sooner but never before had an opportunity. Signed, Hy. Orme. Copy. 8 pp. [C.O. 28, 44. ff. 31–34v.]
March 25.484. Petty expences of the Board of Trade from Dec. 25, 1722–March 25th, 1723. v. Journal of Council. 5 pp. [C.O. 388, 78. ff. 53, 54, 57, 58, 61, 62.]
March 26.
London.
485. Declaration of Nicholas Martin, merchant, of St. John's, that Lt. Govr. Gledhill purchased goods from the supercargo of the Prosperity to the value of £300 etc. Signed, Nichos. Martin. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Samuel Baker) 29th March, Read 4th July, 1723. 2 ½ pp. [C.O. 194, 7. ff. 180–181v.]
March 26.
Barbados.
486. Governor Worsley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I arrived here the 19th of January last, when I summoned the Council, in which I was sworen etc. Continues: I find great abuses have crept into the Trade an illegal one having been carried on from several parts hither, but especially from Martinico, I shall use my utmost indeavours to redress this grievance; I have already caused some sloops to be seized, and condemned, and, I am told, there has been more seizures since my arrival then has been made for several years before. To prevent the sloops from running their goods on shoar, as they may in several parts to leeward of this Island, I ordered one of the sloops, that had been seized and condemned, to be man'd by six white men, who do likewise row in the Custom house Officers' boat, instead of blacks, who cannot do that service so well, in that upon any seizure they are not allowed to be witnesses, the expence will not be much to H.M. besides the maintaining the third part of the sloop, the other two parts being at my expence and the Custom house Officer that seized her, we having equal shares with H.M. in her; this I have done with the sole view of H.M.'s, and the publick good, for she will be in the nature of a guarda costa, and when any ship, or vessel lay hovering upon the coast, as is usual, for several days together, to find an opportunity of running their goods in some creek, or bay in the night time, this sloop will be able to attend them, which an open boat, that the Custom house Officers were allowed before, could not do. Mr. Dalrymple, H.M. Casual Receiver, has made objections to this, in that he can't allow of H.M. share in this sloop to be thus disposed of, without H.M. consent, and has made a complaint to me upon this head, and others against the Custom house Officers, which the latter, I think, have answered very fully; but as I have not time to get copys drawn of them before the ship that carries this sails, I must defer it till the next opportunity, and I have let Mr. Dalrymple know, that if he can't give his consent for the employing H.M. share in this sloop, he may, at any time, send to the Custom house Officer for H.M. part of the money she was appraised at. Nothing but the absolute necessity there was of having something of this nature, could have induced me to have done it, and it has already had some good effects: But if there was a sloop of ten, or twelve guns with twenty men allowed of, and to be solely under this Government's orders, to visit all ships or vessels that come upon this coast, as the French have at Martinico, I dare venture to say I would prevent all illegal trade here. Nor can I think of any other method that can do it. One of the unlawful branches of the trade, that has been carried on here, as I am informed (tho' 'tis very difficult to learn the truth from people whose interest it is to conceal it) has been from Holland, and Ostend by British ships, who load there Indian commoditys, and forbidden European goods, and clear out afterwards from some port in England, or Ireland, for the Plantations. Another abuse, is, from the Northern Colonys, whence several vessels trade directly for Martinico, and supply the French with lumber, horses, and other commoditys necessary for their sugar-works, without which they could not make so great a quantity of suggar as they do: And in return these vessels take the French mollasses, which otherwise would be flung away; And, I am told, there is now in New York, no less than sixteen distilling houses set up, which are wholly supplyed with mollasses from Martinico. The consequence of this must be the ruin of this Colony, if not timely prevented. Hence Martinico is grown extreamly populous, and rich within these few years; and whenever they want provisions, or any of our commodities, they encourage our vessels to carry it to them, and when their want is supply'd they seize all that come upon their coasts, at no time allowing any of o ur manufactures to be imported. Monsieur Champigny, Governour of Martinico, lately sent hither a French-man, under pretence of seeing this Island, but I having cauzed him to be seized, with his papers, I found he had an order, from the said Champigny, to buy here 800 barrils of flower, but was restrained from trading in any other commodity. I am informed by a master of a sloop, lately arrived from Martinico, that there was there two French men of war one of 26 guns, the other of 14, and a sloop, all lately arrived from France. The Assembly, by the power given them in my 28th Instruction, of setling what they should think proper upon me, has past an Act, allowing me £6000 sterling per annum, which Act, with the Minutes of Council, and Assembly I cannot send to your Lordships by this ship, in that the Clerks of the Secretary's Office had copyed them according to the old form without a margent, in which they are, according to my Instructions, to be abstracted; therefore I have ordered them to be copied over again, and hope in a week's time to have an opportunity of sending them. Signed, Hen. Worsley. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 12th June, 1723. 8 pp. [C.O. 28, 17. ff. 296–299v., 300v.]
March 26.
Barbados.
487. Same to Lord Carteret. Announces arrival etc. as preceding. Continues: Tho' I found this country in a very distracted condition, I have hopes their animosities against each other will in a little time cease, and that they will turn their thoughts towards the good of the publick more than the party quarrels have of late allowed them to do, which has almost ruined the Island; for this Governments debts do amount to near £40,000. The fortifications have been intirely neglected, and are much out of repair, besides the want of guns, cariages, small arms etc. of which I hope to be able by the next opportunity to send your Lordship a particular state. Continues as preceding with regard to illegal trade and the Act of Assembly, adding:—I shall not trouble your Lordship with any account of the disappointment the Duke of Montagu's people met with at Sta. Lucia, and off their being forced off of that Island, for as it happen'd before my arrival, I know nothing but by hearsay, except a letter I received from Monsr. de pas Feuquiere, Governor of the French Windward Islands, with a copy of Mr. Uring's letter to him, and of his answer, of which I have inclosed to your Lordship copys, as also of my answer to Monsieur de pas Feuquiere. Signed, Hen. Worsley. Endorsed, Rd. June 7th, Rd. at Hanover, 27th N.S., 1723. 10 pp. [C.O. 28, 44. ff. 25–29v., 30v.]
[Mar. 26.]488. Petition of John Burnet, merchant, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Asks for report to H.M. upon Act of New Jersey for vesting the estate of Robert Burnet in trustees etc. Endorsed, Recd. 26th, Read 27th (?) March, 1722/3. ¾p. [C.O. 5, 972. ff. 68, 74v.]
March 27.
Whitehall.
489. Lord Carteret to Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Mr. Ayon having represented his services etc. when Governor Parke was murdered, and losses thereby, and that he was five years attending the prosecution of the persons tryed for that murder, being allowed only 5s. a day for his subsistance etc., and is thereby very much reduced in circumstances, H.M. is pleased to grant him a pension of £100 a year etc. Signed, Carteret. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 40. No. 3.]
March 29.
Whitehall.
490. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords of the Committee of the Privy Council. In reply to 1st Feb., enclose following draught to be laid before H.M.: "We are of opinion that an Instruction to this purpose should be sent to all Governors to whom the same has not yet been given." Annexed,
490. i. H.M. Additional Instruction to Governor Shute. It is Our Will and pleasure that you do not give your assent to any private Act until proof be made before you in Council (and enter'd in the Council Books) that publick notification was made of the parties intention to apply for such Act in the several Parish Churches where the premises in question lye, for three Sundays at least, successively before any such Act shall be brought into the Assembly; And further you shall take care that for the future you do not pass any private Act without a clause inserted therein suspending the execution of such Act until Our Royal approbation shall be had thereof. Mem. A like Instruction was sent to Governors Burnet, Lord Orkney, Genl. Nicholson, Lord Baltemore, and Sir Wm. Keith, Depty. Govr. of Pennsylvania. [C.O. 324, 11. pp. 6–9.]
[Mar. 29.]491. (a) Extract of letters from Peter Signac, merchant in Placentia, to Samuel Baker merchant in London, Sept. 1720, and 1721. Our Governour trades much and does us a great deal of wrong etc.
(b) Copy of Bill of Exchange for £100 alleged to have been drawn by Lt. Governor Gledhill, Jan. 1720, for purchase of Madeira wines etc. Signed, Samuel Baker. Certified by Richard Wise, Not. Pub. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Baker) 29th March, Read 4th July, 1723. 2 ¾ pp. [C.O. 194, 7. ff. 178–179v.]
March 30.
St. James's.
492. H.M. Warrant to Governor Phenny authorizing the use of a new Seal of silver (described) for the Bahama Islands. Concludes: In case the sd. Seal cannot be got ready so soon as there will be occasion to make use thereof, We have ordered impressions in lead to be made of that side only on which are our arms and titles etc. Countersigned, Carteret. Copy. [C.O. 324, 34. pp. 229, 230.]
March 31.
N.
Providence.
493. Governor Phenney to Col. Martin Bladen. Mr. Fairfax observing that the offices of Judge of the Admiralty and Collector of the Customs were inconsistent with each other when united in one person etc., is willing to surrender the aforesaid office. Asks for his favor in getting the King's sign manual for him to have a patent as Secretary of the Island. The cause of the brigantine lately seized was much prolonged because Mr. Fairfax, who seized it, could not properly be judge thereof, so was obliged to prosecute in the Court of Common Pleas etc. Signed, G. Phenney. Endorsed, Recd., Read (from Col. Bladen) 28th June, 1723. 1 p. [C.O. 23, 1. No. 51].