America and West Indies
May 1723

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1934

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251-271

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'America and West Indies: May 1723', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 33: 1722-1723 (1934), pp. 251-271. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72013 Date accessed: 29 August 2014.


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Contents

May 1723

May 1.
Whitehall.
518. A. Popple to Mr. Attorney and Mr. Sollicitor General. Encloses Acts of Jamaica, 1722, (i) for making H.M. Revenue perpetual, and augmenting the same, and continuing and declaring what laws are in force in this Island, and (ii) for the more effectual preventing of frauds and abuses in collecting H.M. Revenue. The Council of Trade and Plantations thereupon desire your opinion in point of law as soon as possibly you can. [C.O. 138, 16. p 437.]
May 1.
London.
519. Traders to Bermuda to [?Mr. Popple]. Pray to be heard against the Act of Bermuda to supply the deficiency of several funds, laying a duty of 5 p.c. on the sales of all merchandize belonging to any person not inhabiting the said Island etc. Signed, John Blackwood, John East, Jno. Askew, Ed. Jones. Endorsed, Recd. 1st May, Read 14th Nov., 1723. 1 p. [C.O. 37, 10. No. 48.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
520. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Recommend Thomas Parsons for the Council of Bermuda in place of Col. Smith for reasons quoted from Lt. Govr. Hope. [C.O. 38, 7. pp. 470, 471.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
521. Lord Carteret to the Governor of the Bahama Islands. Your several letters to the 24th Dec. last have been laid before the King, who is pleased to approve of your services for the security and quiet of the Islands under your Governmt. H.M. has, at your request, been pleased to order a Great Seal for the use of the Bahama Islands, to appoint a Chief Justice for the same, and to sign a Commission for a Chaplain to the Independent Company under your command. It may be hoped that, when the Parliament meets again, something more may be done for your support and encouragement. In the mean time you will continue to transmit to me such accounts as you judge proper for H.M. service. Signed, Carteret. [C.O. 324, 34. pp. 232, 233.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
522. Same to Governor Hart. This letter will be delivered to you by Mr. Smith, Secretary of the Leeward Islands. I recommend him to you as a person for whom I have a regard, and desire that you will give him all due encouragement, particularly that you will put him into the possession of all the branches of his office upon the same foot as Mr. Hedges, or any former Secretaries enjoyed the same, it being H.M. pleasure, that you do not suffer the dismembring of any of the branches of the said Office, and that if any have been, you should cause the same to be restored to the said Mr. Smith. Signed, Carteret. [C.O. 324, 35. p. 1.]
May 7.
Admiralty
Office.
523. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. 7th May, Read 12th June, 1723. 1 p. Enclosed,
523. i. Extract of letter from Lt. Governor Wentworth to Mr. Burchett. 15th March, 1723. Abstract. Awaits instructions from the Admiralty as to the estate of one George Nayler of Great Britain, pedlar, who died intestate at Exeter, N.H., in Jan. Has caused his effects, £49 N.E. money, to be seized as an escheat to H.M. in case no heir appear within two years, the time generally given in matters that depend on an answer over sea etc. 1 ½ pp. [C.O. 5, 868. ff. 346, 347, 347v., 349v.]
May 8.
St. James's.
524. H.M. Warrants for admitting Abraham Van Horn to the Council of New York, in the room of Abraham Depeyster who is a lunatick, and William Provoost in the room of John Johnston, Esq., who without H.M. leave resided two years in another Province. Countersigned, Carteret. Copies. [C.O. 324, 34. pp. 233, 234.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
525. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Enclose Office accounts from Michaelmas, 1722 to Lady Day, 1723. There was then six months due to our Secretary and other officers etc. Accounts annexed. [C.O. 389, 37. pp. 226–229.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
526. Mr. Popple to Mr. West. Encloses 5 Acts of Bermuda, 1722, for his opinion in point of law. [C.O. 38, 7. pp. 471, 472.]
May 15.
New York.
527. Governor Burnet to Lord Carteret. Announces death of Col. Weems, Captain of one of the four Independant Companys etc. Continues: I have given a Commission to the bearer, Capt. Lancaster Symes (v. enclosure) till H.M. pleasure be known. I am encouraged by your Lordship's generous protection in the like case, in favour of Capt. Holland etc. Asks that the Lieutenancy thus vacated may be confirmed to Lt. Edmund Blood. Urges their long services in these remote parts and refers to Brigadier Hunter for further recommendation of them. Signed, W. Burnet. Endorsed, Rd. Aug. 8th (N.S.). 2 ¼ pp. Enclosed,
527. i. Capt. Symes' Commission as above. 13th May, 1723. Signed, W. Burnet. Parchment. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1085. Nos. 31, 32.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
528. Lord Carteret to Govr. Hart. Encloses following Concludes: It is H.M. pleasure that you use your endeavours that Capt. Lucas may do speedy justice to Mr. Hoskins; which if he refuse to do, you are to transmit hither an account thereof etc. Signed, Carteret. Annexed,
528. i. Memorial of Edmund Hoskins of Gray's Inn Esq., to Lord Carteret. George Lucas, Capt. of a Company at Antegoa, acted as his Agent in the disposal of some goods, clothing etc. in 1718 etc., but has only remitted a small part of the proceeds and given no satisfactory account of the remainder etc. He has often heard in Antego and from merchants in London that £100 worth of such goods sold there by wholesale usually produce £250 of their money, which returned to England makes £167, and by retail, £300 Antegoa money etc. 6 pp. [C.O. 324, 34. pp. 235–241.]
May 16.
Virga.
529. Lt. Governor Drysdale to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The General Assembly, which mett on the 9th current, having now under deliberation those affairs of the Govermt. which will cheifly deserve your Ldspps. attention, I am unwilling to spend your time now, with any relation of matters of less moment, because I hope, some time next month to bee able, together with the laws and journalls of this Session, to transmitt a very full account of the state of the country etc. Refers to enclosure. Continues:—I hope the Addresses (Encl. No. ii.) will serve to demonstrate the present harmony in ye Govermt. The pleasure I have therein is much the greater that an opportunity is thereby given mee, of improving this favourable disposition of the people to advancing H.M. service, and the true interest of the Colony: I judge it part of my duty to inform your Ldspps. of an affair, that is at present the common theme of peoples discourses, and employs their thoughts, Coll. Spotswood's iron workes; he has brought itt to that perfection that he now sells by publick auction att Wmsburgh. backs and frames for chymnies, potts, doggs, frying, stewing, and baking panns. Some of these utensils are sett up at 2d. per pound, others at 3d. per pound, and so rise in their price as people's inclinations or wants encourage them to bidd etc. Upon the resignation of Mr. Carter, I have with the advice of the Councell, appointed Mr. Peter Leheup Sollicitor of the affairs of this colony, to whom I intreat your Ldpps. favour etc. Signed, Hugh Drysdale. Endorsed, Recd. 28th July, Read 12th Nov., 1723. Holograph. 2 ¾ pp. Enclosed,
529. i. Speech of Lt. Governor Drysdale to the Council and House of Burgesses of Virginia, 10th May, 1723. Recommends raising of funds, severer laws against insurrection of slaves, putting the militia in a better posture and remedying "the languishing condition of the tobacco trade, almost destroyed by the gross frauds and abuses that are lately crept into it." etc. Endorsed, Recd. 28th July, 1723. Copy. 3 ½ pp.
529. ii. (a) Address of the Council of Virginia to Lt. Governor Drysdale. Returns thanks for Speech and express satisfaction with his "mild and just administration" etc. Signed, Edmd. Jennings, President.
(b) Address of the House of Burgesses to Lt. Governor Drysdale. To same effect. Express abhorrence of the "wicked and traitorous attempts to dethrone the best of Kings" etc. Signed, John Holloway, Speaker. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 2 ½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1319. Nos. 26, 26. i., ii.]
May 16.
Boston, New
England.
530. Thomas [?Moore] to [?Lord Carteret]. According to your Lo. pasport given me last summer to discover all things new and strange in H.M. Plantations, I came first to this country, where I have discovered and sent home many things, and more still ready, but the strangest of all is that I am come into a country pleasant delightful healthful fruitful in itself, nothing wanting but order œconomy Government and husbandry, so that 'tis the reverse of all countrys under heaven, we are all husbandmen yet we want bread, drink and flesh, no wheat rye barley oats pease or beans, but all our cornes come to us from New York Virginia etc., and when we have the meal cannot make good bread, but have it brought into us already baked. Ale and beer we can make none tho' we had the barley, but boyle molasses spruce firr and bran together to make us drink, cyder sometimes comes in to help us according as the year hitts etc. Our flesh like carrion for want of feeding, there being no other provender or pasture but rancid sowre stuff, never renued since the days of Adam, nor any hay but what spontaneously arrises etc., no straw to litter our cattel, so that most of them dye for hunger and cold, but keep ourselves warm enough with cloaths from England that will never be paid for, good fireing and store of rum to drink which makes us speak treason by wholesale. We are all merchants yet have no tradeing nor one staple comodity in the whole country, whereas we might have many to countervail the price of our necessarys from England, our credite being broke there, nothing but the ready penny will doe, wherefore we thriftily prick up a shilling here and there to send home for tawdry silks long wigs hoopt pettycoats etc. nay our beloved silver spoons salts and cupps are now goeng to pot to procure us butterfly apparell, the town of Leeds in Yorkshire and many other of our creditors gapeing greedily mean while for their money etc., but all goods consigned or trusted to us are our owne, and as they have too much faith in crediting us, so we love to teach them hope etc. Those who are but probationers in deceit among us say plainly, that if all the country and whole effects therein were sold, would scarsely pay one quarter of our debts, which yearly grow upon us. I have not seen gold silver or copper money since I came hither but what I brought along with me, nor never expect to doe, unless things be better mannaged, H.M. draw back money upon pitch and tarr brought hither from Carolina at secondhand, being all or most of our trade, our fishing monopolized into the hands of a few, turns only to their benefite and no general advantage, and tradeing in beaver furr cutt off because of our wrangling warr with the Indians, the greater sort of us still sending powder and shot to the salvages, to murther ourselves, lodging it in hollow trees well knowen to the natives, where also they remitt beaver skins in requital a hundred times the value, and because no body sees it or dare discover it, won't hear that any body does it, this gain is so sweet as we can never hope for peace with them, unless things be built on another foundation. We are all soldiers sons of Mars and military men, and yet suffer a few sorry wretches with blankets about their shoulders, twenty thirty or forty in a company at most to hurrycane and perplex us, our army of eleven or twelve hundred sent out against them, at £80,000 charge upon a general review scarsely mustering 300 etc., all the rest having discharges foreloss [=? furloughs. Ed.] or passports for 20 10 or 5 pounds a man, or what can be got so to make the officers' pot boyle. Captains and subalterns being sutlers feed our men with stinking flesh rotten fish vapid and spoiled rum, so as when pay day comes, all is eat up nothing 's due to them etc. Hence whole companys desert to the enemy at a time. Proclamations we have promiseing great rewards, to such as apprehend them, but none for apprehending such as have compelled them to take such extravagant measures, but herein tho' we have not the foresight of men, we are as wise as the children, whose common saying is let me alone and I'le let you alone, don't tell on me and I'le not tell on you. We are all Divines yet have no Religion only we are careful in keeping the Lords day and punish severely swearing and cursing, so to get fees to the Justices that and five pounds for each bastard chyld being the best part of their incomes, but as to lying and threating that's a profitable art, not a word of that etc. We are all lawyers, yet have neither Justice or prudence, 4000 writts or sutes in one year is our ordinary quantum of seed, sowen in this litigious Province, for next years crop of strife and wrangling etc. We are all mechanicks yet have no mechanical trades among us, tenpence for grinding a razor twopence a sheet of ordinary writeing paper, ten shillings for a litle hatchet of a shilling price, ten shillings a day for a mason cooper or carpenter's work etc., every guinea being worth in their bills 54 or 55 shillings, which having no bank stock fund or credit to sustain them, must goe out at last like the snuff of an exhausted candle. We are all seamen and travelers, yet bring home nothing but secondhand goods, as logwood from the Spaniards at dear rates, pitch and furr from Carolina meerly for benefite of the drawback, and yet may have enough here if we would work it to serve the whole world. Iron and hemp also we bring from abroad, and yet are full of iron mines exceeding good by report of those who have tryed it, and hemp the best in the universe, if we had anybody to raise it. We are all politicians yet have no will to forbear speaking of treason, of which I have heard more here in one day, than in all my life before, such as H.M. has no business in this country, he is our nominal King, but has not one foot of ground among us, neither he or his deputys or Governours have anything to do here the Country is ours not his, weel try his title by Law preserving the masting pines, he sets the broad arrow upon, the property being ours so also are the masting, and if we can sell them to others for more money we are at liberty, notwithstanding the two Acts of Parliament investing those masting trees, as we have nothing to doe with their country so they have nothing to doe with ours, and weel have a fair tryal for it, we have a Charter giveing us right to all, why was it not excepted in our Charter. The King or his Governour has no power to doe us either good or hurt, all the Governour's right is only to negative Councelors not to chuze or authorize them, to name persons to be Justices, and not to instale them, and infinite more such stuff. The high flying Tories having also got in among us blow the coal, aggravating every thing to the worst, giveing false and wrong turns to all H.M. affaires, and when they want matter of calumny and destraction, forge lyes and untruths among us by the dozen, therby disposeing the mynds of this perverted people to any thing they think will best sute with their inclinations, and make the waters muddy. Yet still H.M. shall be heartily prayed for by us, as our titular King, but we ourselves must have the uncontroulable power, to act despoticaly as we please, and to mend the matter delude H.M. with sham addresses, pretending loyalty, false accounts of affaires by our Agents, blindfolding the Comissioners of Trade, with chimeras instead of realitys, telling every thing but the truth, so that the true state of this country has never been yet knowen to H.M. or his Ministers, but all huddled upon secrecy and juggle. No wonder then the disease is become desperate, since the sickness was never yet knowen, seeing their phrenzie running so high as to deny H.M.'s right here, what wonder then hi s Governour is called blockhead, and has dead dogs and cats throwen into his coach. As to all which, I referr you to Governor Schute etc. Their barbarous dealing with the Indians has hardned their hearts to an inflexible hatred, by burning many of them in a barn alive, inviteing them to dinner and imprisoning shipping and transporting them prisoners to other countrys where they were sold slaves, makeing them drunk with rum, and then eliciteing from them conveyances, and deeds of their estates which now they maintain by armys and violence. Such doeings has entangled on us and our posterity perpetual warrs, which no leagues peace or treatys will ever be able to conciliate. Besides allthis ten men here are said to have ten million acres of waste ground, scraped together viis et modis to sell out by retale to the highest bidders, at extravagant rates, the ground being good, but situation near the enemys, this one gap or vacancy, tho' there were no more, is a sufficient inlett for them to make their ravages upon us at pleasure. And if ground be given to any at a smal price or for nothing theyr sent out to the wilderness, to take and inhabit grounds claimed by the Indians, and so have their throats cut, those desart places might easily been filled up, if our British subjects had not been warned out of our parishes, except they found baile to save them free of any charges, whereas their labour in husbandry fishing mechanical employments etc. was baile sufficient, but all our subjects are here accounted forreigners and scarcrows, no labour regarded but that of negroes, whom and their posterity they can keep as slaves for ever, they rarely failing to requite us by debauching our women, and brutifying English nature, besides the jambon and bacon colour therby induced, but all is well 'tis our owne which English men are not. My Lord sure the ship of this Government has sprung so many leaks, your Lorp. as a Mr. Carpenter, ought to stop 'em, and I as your mate have made good pluggs for your to drive in etc. Proposes several "pluggs" for this purpose including (i) The discovery of a right of the Crown worth £200,000 sterling yearly, which will save the country £80,000 a year. (ii) Drawbacks to be abolished. (iii) Credit to be restored by a sinking fund. (iv) The monopoly of the fishery by a few hands to be stopped. (v) An enquiry to be held into the grants of lands etc. (vi) The Governor's salary not to hang at the purse strings of the country, whereby he is forced to wink at H.M. damage etc. (vii) All lands kept for sale at high rates to be taxed at 6d. an acre yearly. (viii) £19,000 silver taken from pirates hanged here to be accounted for. (ix) £500 charity sent over to print books for the Indians to be accounted for, being never bestowed. (x) That two rate books for taxes should be no longer kept, a double tax book for the English and another single tax book for the natives. (xi) Our Selectmen by warning the british subjects out of the country have forced many of them to turn pyrates, and left the country uncultivated etc. (xii) That our wool may be no more carryed from Nantucket and other places to Cape Briton, to be thence transported to France. (xiii) That numbers of H.M. masting pine trees, cut into boards etc. be accounted for, the country being full of them. (xiv) That English Lords and Gentlemen may have estates in this country not to sell to others but to cultivate by their tennants etc., the more stakes, the better the hedge etc. I can find here profitable labour for all the vagrants and destitute people in Great Britain etc. Asks for remittance. Continues:—My Lord, you know the Indians have entirely taken the whole country of Mayne from us, also the country of Piscataway is loosing apart, and this very country is in great danger, because so many negro slaves are kept here, as almost every week set the town of Boston on fire, and ready to joyne with any enemy so as to purchases their freedom, and yet their masters will rather be burnt in their beds by them than suffer English servants to come hither to work, obligeing all Mrs. of ships to carry them back again upon their owne charge, or else they must not trade in this country etc. Asks for "a speedy answer, directed for me in Newbury Street Boston together with some mark of authority on the outside so to deterr them from breaking it open, the which if they do and come to know that I have given your Lorp. this short hint of things, I am a dead man etc. I complained of their treasonable speeches to the Governour and Judges, who told me twas the comon dialect of the country, which they were glad to suffer for fear of their resentment etc. Those who think to suppress all this by soldiers sent among the [m are] all wrong, as being both an expensive and inefectual remedy, but I shall show your Lordship at meeting how to cure it for ever etc. His scheme will result in a rent, as above, coming home to the King yearly from all the Colonies etc. Continues:—As to Nova Scotia, Governor Philips has murthered all by giveing grants to the French and Indians confederated together to live at discretion, denying H.M. authority, and comitting what outrages they please against all such as have not money to grease his fist, extortions, violence bribes, and such a sea of gainful inhumanity as no mans wife shall be free of stupration, or anything he has accounted his owne without paying him contribution, the poor garrison starved for want of food, and so naked their bare buttocks are to be seen. About 150 such miserable wretches is all we have within a poor hovel of sticks and posts drove into the ground etc., to defend us from the French and Indians, of whom we account 9000 in the country, and only 5 or 6 of them acknowledge King George etc. Six sheets of his nefarious tricks, relating to the French and Indians, are ready to be presented to H.M., which I anticipate by this short hint, that country will be quickly lost if not prevented, with all our Newfoundland fishing depending thereupon etc. Reverts to his scheme. How miserably is H.M. and Ministry imposed on with an account of Annopolis being a strong and fine place etc. The French and Indians have power enough to take it in an hours time, as not being able to repell anything but musquet shot. I have discovered mines of several sorts which on tryal are very good, but dare not medle with any ore for fear of the General Court which presently enhances all to itself and gives it away to whom they please, and when so can neither use it themselves nor suffer those that can, except they work under them not as partners but as servants, for day wages and so discoverys are utterly discouraged. I brought over with me a great colection of fine seeds from Italy Germany France Holand and our owne English also, thinking to raise some staple comodity here such as rhubarb liquorice saffron indico etc. so to ease H.M. of their drawbacks and they to help themselves, but after many offers of this both in publick and private, it could not be accepted, nor any ground allowed me to sow them in, unless I bought it, so that all my seeds for want of sowing are lost etc. I brought also an engyn plough hither by help whereof any healthy man may plow two acres of land a day etc., but this also they take no notice off, careing for nothing but how every one may get 5 or 6 myles of ground to his owne share, yet for want of hands cannot labour above 50 or 60 acres a year, the rest only tenanted by wolves, bears, skunks, rattlesnakes etc. So that as they have succeeded to the Indian country they have succeeded to their idleness and lazyness also. We never sow the same ground two years together but still burn whole woods for next year's crop of Indian corn which is all we have and eats like sawdust, and saves us the hard labour of threshing which we like not and provendar for cattel, we designe not, all the roots of our trees being left in the ground, we plow out and in among them etc. Dunging of ground we regard not, having as much to breake up afresh every year as will hold us these thousand years, lopping and pruning of trees we abhorr, sowing of clover lentils trefoyle etc. we call needless whims and conceits. The winter we should spend in threshing we frugaly bestow in drinking and smoaking our owne tobacco of which our ground gives us two crops a year, and if any man offers to drink H.M. health we call it Popry and him a Papist, and we sing a requiem to ourselves for the death of K[ing George ?] etc. P.S. Asks for a patent for a tin mine he has discovered at Annopolis and a grant of land to make some improvements in raising hemp etc. Asks to be made H.M. Mineral Master or Ranger of woods, to save him from broken bones etc. I hear a sadd account of Col. Vetch etc. Signed, Tho. M[ ]. Endorsed, R. in Jan. 1723/4; by Dr. Sherrard. 4 closely written pp. Edges worn. [C.O. 5, 898. No. 31].
May 16.
Whitehall.
531. Lord Carteret to Governor of the Leeward Islands. Upon the petition of Peter Soulegre, it is H.M. pleasure that he continue in the quiet enjoyment of the plantation in the late French part of St. Christophers, as ordered 25th June, 1718, till H.M. shall come to a resolution, how to dispose of that part etc. Concludes:—In case you have given any grant to dispossess him, you are to recall the same etc. Signed, Carteret. [C.O. 324, 35. pp. 2, 3.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
532. Same to Same. Similar order as to the plantation of Peter Soulegre and Peter Salvetat, described. [C.O. 324, 35. pp. 4, 5.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
533. Lord Carteret to the Council of Trade and Plantations. You are to report with all convenient speed upon the Laws lately passed in Jamaica, with regard to the Revenue there etc. Signed, Carteret. Endorsed, Recd. Read 21st May., 1723. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 14. ff. 192, 193v.]
May 20.
Boston.
534. Mr. Willard to Mr. Popple. Encloses Acts and Journals of Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay from 15th Nov., 1722, and Minutes of Council, Aug., 1722–Feb., 1723, etc. Signed, Josiah Willard. Endorsed, Recd. 25th July, 1723. Read 23rd July, 1724. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 869. ff. 25, 26v.]
May 21.535. Mr. Attorney and Mr. Solicitor General to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Report upon Acts of Jamaica for making H.M. Revenue perpetual etc. and for the more effectual preventing of frauds etc. Set out, A.P.C. III. pp. 46–48. Signed, Rob. Raymond, P. Yorke. Endorsed, Recd. Read 22nd May, 1723. 3 1/2 pp. [C.O. 137, 14. ff. 194–195v., 197v.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
536. A. Popple to Mr. Attorney and Mr. Sollicitor General. Presses for reply to 1st May, "my Lords Commissioners having receiv'd H.M. orders to hasten their report upon the Jamaica Acts for setling a Revenue" etc. [C.O. 138, 16. p. 438.]
May 22.
Whitehall.
537. Same to Mr. West. Encloses Acts of Jamaica, 1721 and 1722, for his opinion thereupon in point of law. Titles given. [C.O. 138, 16. pp. 439–442.]
May 22.
Boston.
538. Lt. Governor Dummer to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Has ordered sessional papers to be sent etc. Continues:—I have received advice that five English prisoners taken the last summer uppon Kennebeck River were carri'd to Canada, and some to Quebec etc., where they are now detain'd prisoners which I looke uppon to bee such a countenance and encouragement given to the salvages in their rebellion as I thought it necessary to acquaint your Lordships with, and that wee should have a much nearer prospect of reduceing those rebells did not the French (at least underhand) sustaine them etc. Signed, Wm. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. 14th Aug., 1723, Read 23rd July, 1724. Holograph. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 869. ff. 31, 31v., 32v.]
[May 22]539. Merchants and traders to S. Carolina to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Against the rights, libertys and properties of the British subjects, paper money was first introducted in 1702 by stamping £6000 tenderable by law in payment of debts. The provision that had been made by Act of Assembly for the sinking of them, was faithlessly broke through, and instead of sinking those bills they made more, and afterwards broke the Acts by which they were also ordered to be sunk, increasing the bills from 6000 to 20,000 all tenderable by law in payment of debts, though unprovided for, or that could be depended upon. In 1712 they added £36000 more, which they called a Bank Act whereof £32000 was to be let out at interest to the planters to pay for every £100, £150 in 12 years at the rate of 12 1/2 p.c.p. annum. By these despotick and unwarrantable proceedings the British merchants and traders who had given the planters large credits to stock themselves with negroes etc., lost immediately full half of their debts etc. The merchants made application to the Board of Trade and the Lords Proprietors and after long delay, obtained a peremtory order to the Governor and Council to have the evils of those laws remedied. But the Assembly, having found the sweet of the cheat, would do nothing to remedy it, but went further on in their frauds. In 1715 they stampt £30,000 more to carry on the Indian warr chiefly occasioned by the consequences of the paper money, notwithstanding that the merchants offered to lend them money to be paid by tax of the produce of the country at a price certain, yet they refused those offers which would have kept the standing paper money in some repute. They again made £5000 more and instead of sinking them in June, 1716, they broke through the publick faith of that Act and continued over and above the former bills the currency of these last £35,000 and enacted £15,000 more to be made. And altho' they pretended to raise taxes amounting to £95,000 to be paid in 3 years, to pay off the bills, yett they broke through that act and no bills were sunk by it. Upon the repeated complaints of the merchants, the Lords Proprietors sent Robert Johnson Esqr. Governor, from whom they took security to observe their orders, knowing by wofull experience that hardly any man can withstand the temptations which such people can lay in the way of a Governor to obtain the passing such money bills into acts, and their orders were positive to him to have the paper money sunk by a tax lykely after the laudable example of the Queen and Councill to the Governour of Barbados. Yet the orders of the Lords and the endeavours of the Governor proved as fruitless, for altho' a new Assembly was called and an Act was made in 1717, to sink £54,000 of the standing bills in two years, wherein the preamble declares "that it is found by experience that the multiplicity and encrease of the bills of credit hath been the cause of the ruine of the trade and the great evil of the Province" etc., yet that Act was also broke through and repealed, as was also that which followed 1719 to give 3 years longer time for the sinking £30,000 thereof, and finding that the Governor and Council would consent to no Act for altering the last, they took yt. opportunity to overset the Lords Proprietors Government. Which done, they past a new Act 1720 to enable all persons to pay their debts in rice at 40s. pr. 100 lb., pitch at 40s. pr. barril, which is about 4 times the true value and six times more than it can clear in England, moreover they passed two Acts instead of sinking, for making more bills in the first £15,000 and the second £19,000, which they called rice bills and therein valued at 30s. pr. 100 lb., 1/2 more then it was to be by their own act in March 1722, but finding by the discredit of the bills that they could get 40s. for their rice, they a month before the time apointed for paying off the tax past another Act for giveing liberty to pay the tax in paper money. Now the bills paid in pursuance to that law ought to have been cancelled as the Act directs, but instead of that the Commissioners that received them kept them untoucht and by an Act past since the arrivall of General Nicholson they are issued out again and made current. The British merchants and other fair traders in and out of Carolina, cannot but with grief and great submission express their disappointment in the reasonable hope they had that General Nicholson went empowered to oblige the planters to put in execution the good acts they had made, and particularly that which required all the paper money to be sunk in March 1722. But instead of that they found to their sorrow that he hath suffered them to pass an Act which not only repeals it, but also gives 20 years more time for sinking the paper money now current by £4000 pr. annum, and what passeth all understanding and must needs convince all the world that, that sett of people are not to be satisfyed with the greatest lenity and unparaleld condecendency of that Generall, they are now endeavouring to pass an Act for the stamping of £120,000 more paper money against which above 30 of the most substancial merchants factors and traders of the Province haveing made an humble Representation and Memorial to the Governor Councill and Assembly, on the behalfe of the British merchants, themselves and others in the Province etc., they all of them were taken into custody and denyed the protection of the law and appeal to the Governor and Council, voted the Memoriall falce, scandalous and destructive to the true interest of the Province, a base reflection on preceeding Parliamentary proceedings, and a high indignity to the present Generall Assembly, imposeing upon them the necessity of petitioning and confessing pretended offence, and begging to be put at liberty paying near £1200 fees, which hardships and despotick proceedings affect the British merchants the more in that it is for their sake that this stand, and last effort was made to preserve their right and properties, which if pass'd uncomplained of; and disregarded the contagion is great, and will spread into all other Colonies, and no oppertunities will be wanting to oppress and defraud the British subjects of their just debts etc. Signed, Stephen Godin, John Lynch, John Lloyd, and 7 others. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd., Read 24th May, 1723. 6 pp. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 244–246v., 247v.]
May 23.
Charles City
and Port.
So. Carolina.
540. Governor Nicholson to Lord Carteret. According to my duty I writt to your Lordp. ye 29th of April last and sent duplicates thereof one or both of which I hope in God your Lordp. will receive and that James Kinloch Esq. one of the Members of H.M. Honble. Council will have ye honour of waiting on your Lordp. severall papers etc. Mr. Yonge is to present to your Lordp. what he receives from the Comittee of Correspondence etc. I thank God there hath been a very good trade here in genll. and in particular in skins which I take to be very beneficial to Great Brittain because they are purchased with woolen and other Brittish manufactures and ye skins are like-wise very advantageous to the trade thereof. We have not only had a greater number of ships and vessels but much more in point of tonage than ever was in this country before. We have but seven ships now left three brigantines and a sloop some of which will sail in eight or ten days and the rest by midsumer etc. This is designed by the Revd. Mr. Comissary Bull a clergyman who hath an extraordinary good character in all respects therefore his going from hence is generally lamented etc. with whom goes Mr. Edward Brailsford merch. of a very fair charrecter etc. They can give your Lordp. a full and just accot. of all affairs in this country. I hope your Lordp. will be so good as to get H.M. royall lycence to goe for Great Brittain so that when I gett to London I may have the great honour of paying my most humble duty to your Lordp. etc. Signed, Fr. Nicholson. 1 1/2 pp. [C.O. 5, 387. No. 37.]
May 23.
Charles City
and Port.
So. Carolina.
541. Same to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Repeats substance of preceding. Signed, Fr. Nicholson. Endorsed, Recd. 8th Aug., 1723, Read 29th Oct., 1724. 1 1/4 pp. [C.O. 5, 359. ff. 41, 41v. 42v.; and (abstract) 5, 406. p. 5.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
542. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Carteret. Enclose following to be laid before H.M.
542. i. Same to the King. We have considered the Act of Jamaica to augment the salary of his Grace the Duke of Portland, and think it our duty to represent to your Majesty, that his Grace was by [your Majesty's] Instructions directed to insert a clause in such Act to suspend it's taking effect till your Majesty's Royal pleasure should be known thereupon, which clause is omitted in this Act; But as your Majesty has been graciously pleas'd to allow the Governors of Barbados, the Leeward Islands and Bermuda, to pass bills for the increase of their salary without this restriction, provided no burthens were thereby laid on the Trade and Navigation of this Kingdom, we humbly submit whether your Majesty may not be graciously pleas'd to confirm the said Act.
542. ii. Same to the King. We have consider'd two Acts of Jamaica (i) for the making H.M. Revenue perpetual etc. and (ii) for the more effectual preventing of frauds and abuses in collecting H.M. Revenue. The first of these Acts containing matters of a very extraordinary nature in point of law, we have taken the opinion of your Majesty's Attorney and Sollicitor General (annexed). We are humbly of opinion as well for the reasons mention'd in their report, as because the clause requir'd by your Majesty's Instructions to prevent its taking effect until your Majesty's pleasure there-upon should be known, is not inserted, that the same is not fit to receive your Majesty's approbation; Besides we think it our duty to observe to your Majesty upon this occasion, that the Revenue formerly granted to your Majesty, which is continued by this Act and the additional Revenue intended to be hereby granted to your Majesty, according to the best information we can get will fall very far short of the necessary expences of your Majesty's Government in Jamaica communibus annis. And as the other Act hath reference in many places to this, in case your Majesty should disapprove the Revenue Act, we humbly offer, your Majesty would likewise be pleas'd to disallow of the Act for the more effectual preventing of frauds etc. [C.O. 138, 16. pp. 442–446.]
[May 24]543. Memorial from Merchants trading to H.M. Plantations to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Urge necessity of sending some person well skilled in raising and manufacturing Naval Stores to instruct the inhabitants of New England New York and the Jerseys, who are very little acquainted with the proper methods of sowing or curing hemp or preparing trees for tar etc. 20 signatures. Endorsed, Recd. Read 24th May, 1723. 2 pp. [C.O. 323, 8. No. 39.]
May 24.544. Richard Shelton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In behalf of the major part of the inhabitants of Charles Town, repeats and emphasises objections to Act for the better Government of Charles Town. The inhabitants over 16 years of age number 291, of which 51, who are called alarm men and are only to bear arms in time of imminent danger, and 17, who live out of the limits of the town on a place called the Neck, are excepted from all duties. The Mayor and officers of the New Corporation number 36. Of the remaining 187 inhabitants, 120 are petitioners against the Act, etc. Such was the secret manner of obtaining this Act that Major Blakeway, who gave it to the engrossing Clerk, entreated him to do it with all secrecy and expedition, because if it came to the knowledge of the townspeople, they would petition against it etc. French Protestants, almost 1/5th. of the inhabitants, subject to all burdens, are excluded from ever being freemen by this Act. There is a multiplicity of Courts already etc. Before H.M. assent could possibly be obtained to this Act, the new Corporation summoned a jury without notice, though by the law all juries are to be drawn by balloting and have 20 days notice, and when they objected, adjourned the Court and ordered 11 of them into custody. The Court sitting in the afternoon the Jurors were brought there in couples like malefactors and fined £20 a piece, tho' by their by-law then lately made the fine was no more than £5. The Court proceeded to make up the Grand Jury. by a Tales de circumstantibus, a method contrary to Law etc. Endorsed, Recd. Read 24th May, 1723. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 241–242v., 243v.]
May 26.
St. James's.
545. Order of King in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Robert Hales. Endorsed, Recd. 29th Feb., Read 4th March, 1723/4. 1 p. Enclosed,
545. i. Petition of Isaac Miranda and Fernando da Costa to the King in Council. 52 casks of indigo belonging to petitioners, shipped on board the Nassau bound from Jamaica to Bristol, and cleared by the Custom House and Naval Officers there, were seized by order of the Governor and sold by William Norris, the Naval Officer, pretending the same to be French, 10th March, 1717. Pray that satisfaction may be made to them, as in the case of similar Jamaica merchants (v. 4th May, 1721 etc.). Copy. 3 pp.
545. ii. Deposition of Thomas Elbridge, Master of the Nassau. Confirms preceding. 5th Sept., 1709. Signed, Thomas Elbridge. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 14. ff. 267, 269–270, 271v., 272v.]
May 26.
St. James's.
546. Order of King in Council. Appointing Thomas Parsons to the Council of Bermuda. Signed, Jas. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 20th Aug., Read 2nd Oct., 1723. 1 p. [C.O. 37, 10. No. 43.]
May 27.547. Copy of H.M. Commission for Robert Jennings to be Chaplain of the Independent Company at New York. Countersigned, J. Addison. 17th Sept. 1717. 1 p. On back,
547. i. The like Commission is desired for the Rev. James Orem, Mr. Jennings having resigned upon my inducting him to the living of Rye, N.Y. etc. Signed, W. Burnet. 1/4 p. [C.O. 5, 1085. Nos. 33, 33. i.]
May 27.
Kensington.
548. H.M. warrant appointing Thomas Parsons to be of the Council of Bermuda. Countersigned, Carteret. Copy. [C.O. 324, 35. p. 7.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
549. Lord Carteret to Governor Hart. The bearer of this letter is sent to Antegoa by the Earl of Denbigh, who has a claim upon the effects and estate of Mr. Douglas formerly Governor of the Leeward Islands, who has withdrawn himself into Flanders to avoid payment of his just debts. H.M. directs you to shew all due countenance to this person etc. Signed, Carteret. [C.O. 324, 35. pp. 8; and (duplicate) 10.]
May 29.
New York.
550. Governor Burnet to Lord Carteret. I hope it will not be unacceptable to your Lordship, to receive the enclosed Minute of Council, by which this Government has approved the Treaty desired by the Government of Boston with the Five Nations of Indians belonging to this Province, in order to have their assistance in the war against the Eastern Indians; which I have had no small difficulty from first to last to bring to bear, in so unanimous a manner as now is effected: The particular Articles appear in the Minute of Council, and I hope it will have your Lordship's approbation, which will give me the greatest satisfaction imaginable. I have the honour of a letter from your Lordship of 16th Jan., signifying H.M. pleasure that I should recommend to the Assembly of the Jerseys to provide for the arrears of salary due to Coll. Ingolsby and Mr. Pinhorn, which I will not fail to do at their next meeting which will be in Oct. next. Represents hardship of the Independant Companyes in being obliged to contribute out of their pay to the maintenance of Chelsea Hospital, and yet the Directors have constantly denied receiving any old or disabled men from hence etc. Never any but one single person was received by Chelsea Hospital from these forces, and that with a positive refusal, if more should be sent. Encloses Address, "in which the Council and Assembly have joined with me, and which I have transmitted to Brigadier Hunter, who will attend your Lordship to desire the honour of being introduced to H.M. by your Lordship, that he may present it in the name of this Province, which I may say is entirely loyall," etc. Signed, W. Burnet. Endorsed, R. 6 Sept. Rd. at Hanover the 28th N.S. 3 3/4 pp. [C.O. 5, 1085. Nos. 34, 34. i; and (duplicate) 34. i.]
May 29.
New York.
551. Governor Burnet to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Hopes for approval of enclosures etc. Continues:—The Assembly here are but just met, so that I cannot yet give your Lordships any particular account of their proceedings, but I have hopes that they will provide for the services I have recommended to them. I shall be very happy if your Lordships favourable intentions to me in recommending the two pr. cent. Act for H.M. approbation prove successfull, notwithstanding all the oppositions made to it, which I am very hopefull to hear, when the great affairs of the Nation will permit the little concerns of the Province to come before a Committee of Council, in which I have great expectations from the powerfull recommendation your Lordships have given to H.M., in favour of the Act. Signed, W. Burnet. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd July, Read 23rd Oct., 1723. 1 3/4 pp. Enclosed,
551. i. Speech of Governor Burnet to the Assembly of New York. 14th May, 1723. Printed. 2 pp.
551. ii. Votes of Assembly of New York, 15th and 16th May, 1723. Printed. 2 pp.
551. iii. Address of the Governor, Council and Representatives of New York to the King. (May, 1723). We assure your Majesty, that no part of your Dominions can boast of a more universal spirit of loyalty and affection for your most sacred person, nor of more zeal and resolution to defend your Majesties Government with our lives and fortunes etc. We have heard with the utmost indignation, that your Majesties noted clemency has emboldened persons who bear the highest titles of honour, to venture on a new rebellion, and that your pious endeavours to unite Protestants, have moved a Prelate, professing the reformed Religion, to betray his own Church into the hands of Papists, and on the other hand we have been highly overjoyed to find your Majesties virtues so justly admired, and your noble and successfull measures for composing the differences and establishing the Peace of Europe, so gratefully acknowledged by Foreign Princes, that no motives of zeal for their own Religion, could engage them, even to be neutral, when they had discovered wicked designs against their common Benefactor etc. We should be blind, not to discern a watchfull eye of Divine Providence, that presides over your Councils etc. Return thanks to Allmighty God, and pray that he will ever bless this happy Establishment, to which under Him we owe the enjoyment of all that can bee dear and valuable to a free people etc. Offer to H.M. "these unfeigned sentiments of hearts, full of duty and gratitude to the best of Kings" etc. Copy. 4 pp. Nos. i–iii endorsed as covering letter.
551. iv. Minutes of Council of New York, 28th Feb., 1723, relating to negotiations of Government of the Massachusetts Bay with the Five Nations. Endorsed as covering letter. 2 1/2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1053. ff. 136, 136v., 137v.–141v., 142v.–144v.]
May 29.
New York.
552. Governor Burnet to Mr. Popple. Acknowledges letter of 25th (?) Feb. etc. Hopes soon to have an account of the fate of the 2 p.c. Act. Encloses accounts of the Naval Officer of New York, Sept. 1722–March, 1723, and of Jersey July 26, 1722–March, 1723, etc. Signed, W. Burnet. Endorsed as preceding. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1053. ff. 145, 146v.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
553. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Lt. Governor Burrington having given the usual security, enclose following.
553. i. Draught of the usual Instructions to the Lords Proprietors of North Carolina relating to the Acts of Trade and Navigation. Signed, (the King having gone for Germany) by the Lords Justices. Whitehall, 9th July, 1723. [C.O. 5, 1293. pp. 297–335.]
[May 30]554. Abstract of the tax list at Charles Town. Endorsed, Recd. from Mr. Shelton, Read 30th May, 1723. 1 1/4 pp. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 248, 248v., 249v.]
[May 30]555. Petition of the major part of the Inhabitants of Charles Town to the House of Assembly (1722?), S. Carolina. Beg for repeal of the Act for the good Government of Charles Town. 112 signatures. Endorsed as preceding. 1 large folded p. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 250, 250v.]
[May 30]556. Similar petition to the Governor, Council and Assembly of S. Carolina. 123 signatures. Endorsed as preceding. 3pp. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 251–252v.]
[May 30]557. Deposition of Samuel Eveleigh, Oct. 19, 1722. Robert Humes, attorney, confirmed the story of what Major Wm. Blakeway said to him about engrossing the bill for the good government of Charles Town (v. May 24th). Signed, Sam. Eveleigh. Endorsed as preceding. 1/2 p. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 253, 253v.]
[May 30]558. Muster-roll of Capt. Garratt Vanvelsie's company, 5th Aug., 1722. 100 men. 24 Alarm men (v. 24th May). Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 254–255v.]
[May 30]559. Copy of Muster roll of Capt. Lucas Stotenburgh's Company. Charles City, 4th Aug., 1722. 139 men. 27 Alarm men (v. 24th May). Signed as preceding. Copy. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 256–257v.]
[May 30]560. Warrant for the attachment of Eleazer Allen to appear before the Mayor and Aldermen of Charles City to answer for contempt of Court etc. Signed, Tho. Hepworth, Dept. Recorder. 3rd Oct. 1722. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 258, 258v.]
[May 30]561. Warrant of distress on the goods of Samuel Eveleigh for fine for refusing to serve on the Grand Jury etc. (v. 24th May) 10th Oct. 1722. Signed and endorsed as preceding. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 259, 259v.]
[May 30]
London.
562. Mr. Yonge to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to Mr. Shelton's Memorial (v. Jan. 15, 24th May). The Act was past after Mr. Lloyd, Agent for S. Carolina, had obtained Lord Carteret's assent, as instructed in Sept. 1721. It was therefore no great secret, not being past till June, 1722, and it lay 6 months upon the table of the lower House of Assembly. It was introduced by five Representatives of Charles Town etc. The whole complaint is a cavill stirred up by some designing persons, angry that they were not placed in the Magistracy etc. Only such French Protestants are excluded from being Freemen as are not naturalized. Denies that there is a multiplicity of Courts. If they have acted wrongly, it does not affect the Act: those who think themselves injured can have there remedy at law. Concludes: The toll in Charles Town so much complained off, is not above 4d. sterling for a bullock etc., in lieu of which the people are fedd with good and wholesome provissions, instead of carrion and the worst of meals, and a reasonable price weekly ascertained for them, which cou'd have been done no other way. Prays that directions for amending the Act, if thought necessary, may be sent to the Governor, rather than that it be repealed etc. Signed, Fra. Yonge. Endorsed, Recd., Read 30th May, 1723. 5 1/2 pp. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 260–262v, 263v.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
563. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. In reply to request of 31st Dec. last, transmits copies of Acts of S. Carolina, for the good government of Charles Town, and for ascertaining publick officers' fees. [C.O. 5, 400. p. 163.]
May 31.
St. James's.
564. Petition of Merchants and others trading to and concerned in S. Carolina to the King. Notwithstanding the Orders and Governor's Instructions relating to paper money, the Assembly still encrease the number of their bills of credit, so that they now amount to £120,000. They have also laid an illegall duty upon all British manufactures etc. (v. C.S.P. 1722, Nov. 15), all which arbitrary proceedings do manifestly tend to the inexpressible loss of petitioners, and must end in the intire ruin of the trade of the Plantations etc. Pray for orders that the currency of the additional paper money may be forbidden, and the rest sunk by degrees according to the several Acts of Assembly, that no duties be laid on any British manufactory, and that petitioners be paid their debts in the commodities of the country etc. Signed, John Lloyd, Sam. Buck, Steph. Godin and 32 others. On margin,
564. i. Reference of preceding to the Council of Trade and Plantations. St. James's. 31st May, 1723. Signed, Carteret. The whole endorsed, Recd. 5th June, Read 10th July, 1723. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 358. ff. 284, 284v.]
[May 31]565. Mr. Newman to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Requests that Col. John Plaistead and John Frost may be recommended for the Council of New Hampshire, in place of Peter Weare and Nicholas Gilman, who refuse to qualify themselves etc. They are persons of interest in that Province and known loyalty etc. Signed, Henry Newman. Endorsed, Recd. 31st May, Read 12th June, 1723. 3/4 p. [C.O. 5, 868. ff. 350, 351v.]