America and West Indies
May 1727, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

Year published

1936

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286-295

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'America and West Indies: May 1727, 16-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 35: 1726-1727 (1936), pp. 286-295. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72349 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


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May 1727, 16–31

May 16.555. Petition of London merchants trading to, and some of the inhabitants of Bermuda now in London to Lord Townshend. The Governor, John Hope, having by his oppressive methods practised for several years past very greatly injured the trade and welfare of the said islands, hath occasioned several complaints to be exhibited against his administration. But he still continues to impede the lawfull and usual course of trade, to cause the inhabitants to be illegally imprisoned etc., so that several have been obliged to depart to avoid his arbitrary and illegal severities. The said complaints (by having been long since depending) are become very expensive to petitioners and ruinous to the inhabitants etc. Pray for relief. Without signature or endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 37, 26. No. 38.]
May 17.556. Mr. Fane to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Has no objection to Act of Antigua laying a powder duty on vessels trading thither. Signed, Fran. Fane. Endorsed, Recd. 31st May, Read 1st June, 1727. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 15. ff. 349, 350v.]
May 17.
St. James's
557. H M. sign manual approving the election of six new Fellows of St. Paul's College at Bermuda to make up the number of nine etc. Countersigned, Holles Newcastle. Copy. [C.O. 324, 35. pp. 329, 330.]
May 17.
St. James's.
558. HM. Warrant granting leave of absence for six months' to the Governor of Bermuda. Countersigned, Holles Newcastle. Copy. [C.O. 324, 35. pp. 332, 333.]
May 19.
Boston.
559. Mr. Willard to Mr. Popple. Encloses Minutes of Council of the Massachusetts Bay, Aug.—Feb. last, and of Assembly, for sessions in Aug. and Nov., with Acts passed in November Session. Signed, Josiah Willard. Endorsed, Recd. 30th June, Read 5th July, 1727. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 869. ff. 452, 453v.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
560. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Newcastle. Enclose extracts of Col. Hart's letter, 5th March, and affidavits relating to "the Spaniards having seized several English vessels trading at Sta. Crux, an island belonging to that Government, as also an account of the cargoe of a Spanish ship stranded at Barbuda, being retain'd at Antegoa." Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
560. i. Extract of Governor Hart's letter, 5th March, 1727.
560. ii–vi. Copies of depositions, 5th March, encl. i–v.
560. vii–xii. Copies of April 10 encl. i–vi.
560. xiii. Extract of Governor Hart's letter April 10th, 1727.
560. xiv–xv. Copies of April 10 encl. vii, viii. [C.O. 152, 40. Nos. 19, 19 i–xv; and (without enclosures) 153, 14. p. 233.]
May 22.
St. James's.
561. H.M. Warrant to Attorney and Solicitor General to prepare a bill appointing Bryan Wheelock Clerk of the Markets in Jamaica. Countersigned, Holies Newcastle. Copy. [C.O. 324, 35. pp. 333, 334.]
May 24.562. Extract of a letter from a Merchant in S. Carolina to a Merchant in London. I suppose you'l have an account of the tumult there is amongst the people here, especialy in our Northern parishes, which is now grown to that height, that its to be wished it don't turn to an insurrection or at least a desertion of many of those people to Cape Fear (some already being gone much in debt) where they think their creditors can't reach them etc. Refers to their Representation, v. 6th May. Continues:—The ground of all is, to be relived in paying their debts by a tender law: under these circumstances it would be well we had a King's Government established and a Governor sent over immediately to awe matters, with particular instructions to have Cape Fear ascertain'd in this Governmt., for if that it is allowed to be a place of refuge for debtors, those of ability as well as insolvent, will fly there but indeed all well wishers to this Frontier Province (especialy at a time when there are so great apprehensions of warr) ought to use their utmost endeavours to prevent anything being obtain'd that will encourage yt. Settlement, which (from this Province) is now promoted chiefly by Mr. Moor who has hopes or rather assurances from some now at home to have it a Government independant from this or No. Carolina: I only here hint to you the fatal consequences that will attend this Government on this account and to lett you know the apprehensions of the country in generall under the desertion of many of its inhabitants. We hear there is to be another generall meeting of those men in a few days on being disappointed by the President and Councill last week, the chief of which was to call the Assembly. Endorsed, given in by Governor Nicholson (to the Duke of Newcastle's Office). Copy. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 387. No. 75.]
May 25.563. Governor Philipps to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Being informed that the state of affaires in the province of Nova Scotia lyes at this time under your Lordships consideration in order to report the same to H.M. Councill; it is to be hoped that the happy juncture is at hand for putting that country into a posture of security and way of settlement, toward which no time ought to be lost, everything there wearing the face of ruin and decay, and allmost every countenance despaire. Refers to former Memorials and again recommends repair of the fort of Annapolis Royal, "there being now breeches in the ramparts sufficiently wide for 50 men to enter abreast" and the settlement or riddance of the French inhabitants. Continues: —As downright force cannot be proper to secure their allegiance, nor the Governmt. in a condition to enforce their departure, it is my humble opinion that two barracks be erected at the head of the Bay, the one at Minas for two companys, the other at Chignecto for fifty soldiers, so scittuated as to countenance the settling of naturall born subjects near to those French (who in time may teach them their duty) and allso to be a check to theire behaviour, and theire traffick and correspondence with the neighbouring French Colonys, which they now carry on at pleasure, and is the chief means of theire disafection and impudent contempt of and independance on the Government; it is proposed that those barracks be things of little expence only ditchd about and picketed. Canso is at present the place of most consequence in regard to the Fishery etc. Recommends the building of a fort there. The temporary lodgings of the four companies built five years ago are now so rotten that the garrison will hardly be able to subsist there over next winter etc. Recommends the refitting of the vessel built for the protection and communications of the Province, which has been laid up for four years for want of orders and an establishment. To settle the country, proposes that every recruit sent over should carry his wife and after 3 or 4 years service be set free and given land, the Government to pay charges of transportation. The restrictions in the Governor's Instructions relating to grants of land now require amendment. The quantity of land stipulated therein for Adventurers is not sufficient incouragement by one halfe. The reservation of timber for H.M. use may be sufficiently secured by other methods then putting a barr to all grants till such lands shall be survey'd and sett apart, which may postpone any settlement there for yeares to come etc. Signed, R. Philipps. Endorsed, Recd. 26th May, Read 2nd June, 1727. 3 pp. [C.O. 217, 4. ff. 373–374v.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
564. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Representation upon Petitions of merchants and traders to Jamaica and of South Sea Company, 10th Dec., 1724 [v. A. P. C. III. pp. 72, 73], upon both which petitions we should have long since made our Repn., but that we waited for further information from Jamaica. We have been several times attended by the parties etc. In 1717, upon a former complaint by the South Sea Company your Majesty was pleased to give an Instruction to Sir N. Lawes, not to give his assent to any law that should lay a duty on the re-exportation of negroes brought into the said Island for refreshment only; and much less on such as only touch there, without landing; however the Assembly were to be at liberty to lay such tax on the negroes of that Island bought there, as they should think fit; But this Instruction having been sent directly to Jamaica by one of your Majesty's principal Secrys. of State, and as we were not appriz'd thereof, it was omitted, in those which we prepared for His Grace the Duke of Portland. Upon perusal of several Acts passed since that time we do observe that they have not been strictly conformable to the tenor of the said Instn. and that the said Instruction was in some particulars deficient; wherefore we have prepar'd another for the same purpose, which we shall humbly lay before your Majesty, with the other Instructions which we are preparing for Major Genl. Hunter. The South Sea Company complain, that they have paid duties for slaves landed for refreshment only, and for whole ships cargos for having only sold some part of such cargos in the Island; that they have been charged with duties in general for slaves exported, and that the duty laid upon flower is a great burthen upon trade. As to what concerns the duty on negroes, brought into Jamaica, or landed there only for refreshment; we shall make full provision in the said Instn., and shall likewise take care, by the said Instn., for the future that the whole cargo of any ship loaden with negroes, shall not be charg'd with duties, because some part of the said cargo only, shall have been sold in the Island. But as to what relates to the sum of money said to have been collected on negroes exported in general; as it does not yet appear to us, whether that mony was collected upon negroes landed for refreshment only, or whether the same was paid for negroes bought in the Island; we would humbly propose, that yor. Majty.'s Govr. may be directed to enquire into this matter upon his arrival there, and to report a true state thereof to your Majesty. As to the Acts complain'd of, altho' some of them may not have been strictly conformable to the intention of your Majtys. Instruction, we cannot say that they were directly opposite to it, and the money raised by those Acts, which were annual, has been already collected and applied to the support of your Majesty's Government there. It is observeable that the prayer of the Companys petition runs in general terms, desiring that "for the future the Assembly may be restrained from passing any Acts for laying duties on the importation and exportation of negroes and flower to and from the said Island on account of the Assiento," whereby they would be exempted even from the duty laid upon slaves, by them bought in the Island of Jamaica, which is directly contrary to the design of your Majesty's former Instn., and would be likewise highly unreasonable, because the buying of slaves in Jamaica by the South Sea Company, makes the price of negroes much dearer to the inhabitants, which will be in time a great load upon the sugar trade, wherein we are already outdone by some of our neighbours. As to what concerns the duty upon flower, we conceive there can be no pretence to exempt the Compa. or private merchts. from the payment thereof, in as much as this would lay the Island under great difficulties and inequalities of trade, especially at a time, when they are necessarily obliged to pay several other taxes and duties for the support of your Majesty's Govt. there. [C.O. 138, 17. pp. 136–145.]
May 31.
St. James's.
565. Order of King in Council. Appointing Cornelius van Horn to be Councillor of New Jersey, as proposed 23rd Feb. Signed, Robert Hales. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 13th Sept., 1727. l ½ pp. [C.O. 5, 972. ff. 136, 187v.]
May 31.
St. James's.
566. Order of King in Council. Approving draught of Instructions to Lord Baltimore, relating to Acts of Trade and Navigation etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1 ¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 1267. ff. 1, lv., 2v.]
May 31.
St. James's.
567. Order of King in Council. Appointing William Dandridge to the Council of Virginia, as proposed 22nd March. Same signature and endorsement. 1 1/3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1320. ff. 141, 14lv., 142v.]
May 31.
St. James's.
568. Order of King in Council. Appointing John Custis to the Council of Virginia, as proposed 29th March. Same signature and endorsement. 1 1/3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1320. ff. 143, 143v., 144v.]
May 31.
St.
Christophers.
569. Genl. Mathew to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to 28th Feb., and Address of Assembly for account of money given him for building a fortification etc. Permit me to lay before you a detail of that affair, and without any remark of my own on this behaviour to me etc. Mr. Meure had had long since my answer to this Address, if it had not been kept so private, that I had not the least notice of it, till about a fortnight before Mr. Popple's letter came to me, by one from Mr. Meure. Nor can I meet a Gentleman in the Island was privy to it, except the very few concerned. Even some of the Members of that Assembly that made this Address never saw it, as they now assure me ; and the whole Assembly consists but of twelve members, of these seven are a house, and of these four are a majority. This Island has been very many years without a prison. Summes of money had been rais'd from year to year by the Legislature for building one ; and still 'twas lavish'd and misapply'd. Till in 1720 I offer'd voluntarily to take the trouble upon me of directing the building one, and the island voted £1,000 for that purpose. I follow'd it close, finish'd it with great speed for £763 13s. 9d. and returnd to the island the remainder and had not one single shilling for my pains or trouble. My accounts are entered among the Minutes of Council, doubtless long since in your Lordships' office etc. The island at that time renew'd again an old resolution long since taken of fortifying Brimston Hill, and which like the others about a prison had all been as abortive. This I voluntarily undertook for them at their request, and they gave £1,500 to expend for that service, which I went upon, expended that money, and render'd an account as candid and as disinterested as the former etc. Refers to transcript in the Minutes of Council. Upon this I was honour'd with votes of thanks and fine compliments, and as I had then been their Lt. Govr. about six years, and never had had the least present from this island, and as they had then settled £2,000 a year on General Hart, he prevaild on them to make me a present of £1,000, that is almost £700 sterl., for the services they said I had renderd to them etc. 7th June, 1722. This £1,000 was to be paid me somehow, some time or other, vizt., £500 from a desperate debt due to the island, and not paid them to this day. But they since took this upon themselves, and paid it me out of the Treasury two years after, the other £500 was to be out of the next tax should happen to be raisd. What I had done hitherto was agreable enough to them, and they were so well pleasd, that they movd to me whether I would go on with the fortifications on the hill and finish them, which I readily undertook, but I made this objection. Mr. Treasurer of those days (one Woodrope whose caracter any Master of a ship trading hither, or St. Christophers merchant on the Exchange can inform your Lordships of) was of so bad a credit, that I had been hardly put to it heretofore to get the tradesmen I had employ'd paid by him, and they would not go on, if to be paid by him, but at extravagant rates, I therefore insisted the money from the Planters should come directly into my own hands, and that I would take all the trouble upon me gratis. Mr. Woodrope should still have his 5 p.c. for receiving it. I ask'd nothing, he had it, and I had nothing of it. They are ungenerous enough in their Address to say I undertook for a particular gratuity. I assure your Lordships, I am superior to the mercenary terms they so ungratefully put this circumstance upon, and I pray your Lordships will call upon them to prove a truth for this reflection upon me. Recounts his benefactions to the country, in placing the skill acquired at one siege and two defences at its service, and building a house on the hill fit for the Lt. Genl. to live in and entertainment of the gentlemen of the island who came to see the works, so that his private fortune was not increased by one farthing by the £1,000 present. In response to a request by the Council and Assembly, on the 24th Feb. 1724 he submitted his accounts to the Council, and they were approved by the Governor and Council. He went immediately afterwards with the General's leave to Antego, and took it for granted they would have gone on course to the Assembly. In his absence some buisy people animated General Hart against him, and the beginning of Oct. 1725 he was peremptorily summoned by H. E. to repair in eight days to St. Christophers. He was informed that his accounts had been kept in the hands of the Clerk of the Council, but now the new Assembly demanded them and called him to appear before them and produce his vouchers, which he could not do as, in his hurry and not aware of this attack, he had left them at Antego. No objection has been taken to any article in his accounts. Upon this they addressed H. E., charging him with evading, for not delivering the papers he had by him, and desired H. E. to order him peremptorily to attend them with these vouchers. At next meeting of Council, he gave his reasons for not obeying, "and then governed myself in part on the Assembly's arrogating to themselves a power I found your Lordships had condemned, 16th March, 1711." Continues:—He then used me with great severity of speech, that I was forced to go out of Council. At that time I received letters from my friends at home to reconcile myself with General Hart. He had received some to the same purpose from his. The Council interposed, and on 4th March, 1726, at a Members of the Council's I was invited to meet H. E. I did, everything of anger passt was to be forgot, and I obtained leave to go to Antego. Hereon the complaints of the Assembly's behaviour to me which I had sent to be laid before H.M. were very honestly dropd by Mr. Meure. Yet the Address of the Assembly was dated two days after. That very day I went to Antego, and sent my vouchers to a Member of Council, and 18th May they were laid before the Assembly, whose address was sent hence the November following complaining they had them not, and about three months after the expiration of the very Assembly that made the Address. Explains that he found on his return in August that the Assembly had done nothing, and though he pressed for the examination, they expired without completing it. The new Assembly appointed a Committee, whom he met at their request. Several delays were made on their part, and at last "for want of other matter they picked a quarrel with me for having my clerk present as I had had quietly heretofore, and treated me with ill manners enough, but I bore all, and they broke up, resolving to do nothing if my Clerk attended me. And I have never heard any more of the matter since" etc. Concludes:—I am sure you will prescribe a remedy against those that sent home an Address three months after an Assembly expired, and who when they sent it, knew the vouchers it asked for were many months before in their custody. If your Lordships enquire who sent it, to whom, and with what directions, and it should appear that 'twas Mr. Butler as a Speaker of an Assembly no longer in being, then your Lordships will be judges what persons are made use of to injure me. P.S. I have discovered a circumstance somewhat extraordinary. This address was signed, I can't tell how or where. But there was no meeting of the Assembly the day it is dated vizt. 6th March, and yt. day happens to have been a Sunday. This is strange cookery. And Mr. Speaker must have been pretty familiar and free with the House. This is somewhat of a sort with his indictment at Hicks's Hall, whence we owe the blessings of his being among us. Signed, William Mathew. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read 19th Oct., 1727. 13 1/8 pp. [C.O. 152, 16. ff. 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 29v., 32, 33, 34, 35.]
May 31.
St.
Christophers.
570. Same to Mr. Popple. Has given instructions to Mr. Meure, his correspondent, for reply as preceding. "I must entreat your introducing him with it to my Lords" etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 16. ff. 30, 31v.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
571. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Refer to letter of 22nd Feb., and ask that directions may be given, "that this wall may be rebuilt before the season of the year be too far advanced." [C.O. 389, 37. pp. 272, 273.]
May 31.572. Petition of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the King. Petitioners by the accounts they have received from Carolina, being sensible of the great disorder, the inhabitants are in, and the great difficultys they labour under, Doe most humbly intreat your Majesty, that you will be most graciously pleased to take the unhappy condition of that Province into your Royall consideration in order to settle it upon a sure and lasting foundation. And that your Petitioners may give your Majestie the most convincing proof of their sincere desire and intention to contribute as much as in them lyes toward so good and desirable an end, They are willing to surrender, and they doe most humbly pray your Majestie to accept and take into your immediate Royal consideration the supreme soverainty of the sd. Province of Carolina. Not doubting but your Majesty according to your usual goodness and justice will cause effectual measures to be taken for preserving to your Petitioners all their legal rights and properties. Signed, Beaufort, Craven, Ja. Bertie, J. Colleton, H. Bertie, Jo. Tyrrel. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 181.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
573. Duke of Newcastle to Mr. Walpole. Referring apparently to following, concludes:— "H.M. would have you upon this occasion do my Lord Duke all the service you can, being desirous to have this affair adjusted as soon as possible to mutual satisfaction, both for the sake of his Grace's particular interest, and of the service it may be to both nations." No signature. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 253, 1. No. 32.]
[? May].
Thursday
night,
6 a'clok.
574. Duke of Montagu to [? Duke of Newcastle]. I beg your Grace will take the trouble to reed the inclos'd and consider it thoroughly, and I am shure you will find it so much for the advantage of the King and the Publick that I think from that alone I might have little reason to doubt of sucseeding in what I propose, but I have still a stronger reason to hope for it which is that it is cheefly in your Grace's province etc. What is proposed is intierly consistant with the Acts of Trade and Navigation of England and with those of France, and is no more then inforseing in respect to the island of Sta. Lucia, the Treaty (of Neutrality) made in 1686 (which stil subsists) etc. Continues: —The two Crowns joining in makeing it practicable for the Mareshal d' Etree and myselfe to injoie halfe of what has been granted to each of us intier, and what has cost each of us so much mony, without att the same tyme either Crown parting with the least of their pretenstions they claime to the Island, to the other. By which all disputes which might heere after hapen between the two Nations upon this subject will be prevented—The island will be secured from being wholy possess'd by the French which otherwaise will unavoidably hapen some time or other, which will be of the worst consequence to the English Plantations—The English nation will be posses'd of the best harbour in the West Indies, and so scituated as to comand every ship that is bound from Europe to the Bay of Mexico—the Revenue of the Crown and the Nation will be considerably increasd, from what may be judged from the Barbados trade, which att the lowest computation brings in 50,000 a year to the Crown, and 100,000 to the Nation—Besides the putting an end to the clandestine trade caried on, and which will continue to be so, between the English and French att Sta. Lucia, as long as the Island remains uninhabited— it will be one means of convincing the world that the frendship between England and France is senceere and lykely to last, and will oblige a very considerable person in France as much as it will, your Grace's obedient and most humbly servant, Signed, Montagu. Without date or endorsement. Holograph. 1 ½ pp. Enclosed,
574. i. Duke of Montagu to the King. Submits following. Signed, Montagu. Without date or endorsement. Holograph. French. 2 pp.
574. ii. Same to Same. Sketches events 1719—1723 relating to Sta. Lucia and the agreement arrived at that the island should not be settled by either nation until their rights were decided. It is at present a rendezvous for French and English vessels which meet there to carry on illegal trade. Maréchal d' Estrées and petitioner have come to an agreement, having each an equal right to the island by virtue of their grants by their respective Sovereigns, to share it equally between them, with the consent and protection of the two Crowns. M. d' Estrées is shortly to have an interview with Mr. Walpole. Prays that instructions may be sent to him on that head. No date or endorsement. French. Holograph. 2 pp.
574. iii. Same to Same. Proposal for joint grant of Sta. Lucia by the two Crowns to the Duke of Montagu and M. d' Estrées as preceding. Without date or endorsement. 1 ¾ pp.
574. iv. Proposed Articles of agreement between the two Crowns for grant of Sta. Lucia as in preceding. Without date, signature or endorsement. 2 pp.
574. v. Proposed articles of agreement between Duke of Montagu and M. d' Estrées for the division of Sta. Lucia etc. Without date, signature or endorsement. l ½ pp. [C.O. 253,1. Nos. 31, 31 i–iv.]
May [ ].
Whitehall.
575. Draught of a Circular Letter to Governors of the Plantations. The King of Spain having actually begun hostilities against H.M. by the siege which has for some time been carried on against Gibraltar, and by seizing our merchants ships and effects, etc. H.M. etc. has therefore ordered that the King of Spain and his subjects should be treated as enemies etc. Memorandum in margin of "persons wrote to on the last rupture with Spain." Endorsed, Not sent. 1 ½ pp. [C.O. 28, 44. No. 110.]