America and West Indies
June 1728, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

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1937

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129-143

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'America and West Indies: June 1728, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 36: 1728-1729 (1937), pp. 129-143. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72450 Date accessed: 26 July 2014.


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Contents

June 1728, 11-20

June 12.
St. James's.
264. Order of King in Council. Repealing Act of St. Christophers repealing an Act for settling £2000 on Governor Hart etc., in accordance with the report of the Council of Trade (v. A.P.C. III, 147). Signed, Temple Stanyan. Endorsed, Recd. 19th Oct., Read 20th Nov., 1728. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 16. ff. 359, 359v., 360v.]
June 12.
St. James's.
265. Order of King in Council. Confirming Act of St. Christophers, against covenous and fraudulent conveyances, the Committee of the Council to whom it and the representation upon it were referred having heard Counsel for both parties, and reporting that the main objection is the loss of a small casual profit to the petitioner against it, and agreeing in opinion with the Lords Commissioners for Trade, that the same ought not to stand in competition with so great and general a good, as in all probability will result to the inhabitants and commerce of St. Christophers from this Act. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 2⅓ pp. [C.O. 152, 16. ff. 361–362v.]
June 12.
St. James's.
266. Order of King in Council. Approving drafts of Instructions for Lt. Governor Pitt and appointing Councillors proposed etc. Sisned, Temple Stanyan. Endorsed, Recd. 19th Oct., Read 20th Nov., 1728. 1⅓rd pp. [C.O. 37, 12. ff. 31, 31v., 34v.; and 5, 193. ff. 601, 601v.]
June 12.
St. James's.
267. Order of King in Council. Approving draughts of Additional Instructions for the Governors of New Hampshire, the Massachusets Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York and New Jersey, directing them to be aiding and assisting to H.M. Surveyor Generall of the Woods and his deputies etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 8. No. 96; and 5, 194. f. 411.]
June 12.
St. James's.
268. Copies of above Instructions to Governor of New Hampshire and Governor and Company of Rhode I. [C.O. 5, 194. ff. 412, 416.]
June 12.
St. James's.
269. Order of King in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Temple Stanyan. Endorsed, Recd., Read 14th June, 1728. 1 p. Enclosed,
1728.269. i. Petition of Francis Whitworth to the King. There is no salary attached to the offices of Secretary of Barbados, Secretary to the Governor, Secretary to the Governor and Council and Clerk of the several Courts, to which offices petitioner was appointed in 1718. He is at very great and constant expence in providing an office and stationary ware, and clerks to make copies of Minutes and Acts. There is due to him from the Public for fees from 2nd April 1719 to 1st March, 1726, £1333. 12. 6. Prays H.M. to recommend to the Government of the said Island payment thereof. Signed, Frans. Whitworth. Copy. 1½ pp.
269. ii. Account of F. Whitworth as preceding. Signed, Frans. Whitworth. Copy. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 28, 19. ff. 184,185–186v., 189v.]
June 12.
St. James's.
270. Order of King in Council. Referring to Committee representation of 10th Nov. 1726 on the Bahama Islands. Signed, Temple Stanyan. Endorsed, Recd. 19th Oct., Read 20th Novr., 1728. ¾ p. [C.O. 23, 2. ff 178, 179v.]
June 12.
St. James's.
271. Order of King in Council. The representation of the Board of Trade upon Col. Philipps' memorial is referred to a Committee of the Privy Council. Signed, Temple Stanyan. Endorsed, Recd. 19th Oct., Read 20th Nov., 1728. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 5. ff. 93, 94v.]
June 12.
St. James's.
272. Order of King in Council. Referring to a Committee of the Privy Council the petition of Duke of Montagu for a grant of Tobago etc. and the report of the Council of Trade thereon. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 20. ff. 64, 65v.]
June 12.
St. James's.
273. Order of King in Council. Approving draught of Instructions for Governors for the alteration in the prayers for the Royal Family etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 8. No. 94.]
June 12.
St. James's.
274. Order of King in Council. Approving new Seals for Massachusets Bay, New Hampshire, New Jersey and the Bermuda Islands, and ordering warrants to be prepared for Governors to use them and return the old ones. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 16th July, 1728. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 870. ff. 117, 118v.]
June 12.
St. James's.
275. Order of King in Council. Referring representation on petition of John Elliot to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, "to do therein for the petitioner as to their Lordships shall seem proper." Signed, Temple Stanyan. Endorsed, Recd. 19th Oct., Read 20th Nov., 1728. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 870. ff. 125,126v.]
[June 12.]
1728.
276. Memorial of loss and damage (£2611. 18. 9) sustained by Thomas Rudge of Portsmouth, owner of the Killmiston and part cargo, and John Govan of London and the estate of John Cawood, deed., South Carolina, and Samuel Hawling, owners of part cargo (deerskins and rice), captured by a Spanish privateer, July, 1727, in her voyage from Charles Town to London. No signature or endorsement. 1 p. Enclosed,
276. i, ii. Accounts of above goods. Signed, John Govan. Endorsed, Recd. 12th June, 1728. 2 pp.
276. iii. Memorandum of vouchers. [C.O. 388, 27. Nos. 67, 67. i–iii.]
[June 12.]277. Memorandum of vouchers, mislaid, for the losses of the William and Cord of New England. Slip. [C.O. 388, 27. No. 68.]
[Juue 13.]278. Memorial of loss and damage (£64. 4. 2) sustained by Joseph Judge, of ye Pyde-Bull without Temple Barr, for goods consigned by him to John Osborne and Company merchants at Boston, on board the Anne brigantine, Thomas Jenkins master, and captured 17th May, 1727 by a Spanish ship, in her voyage from London to Boston. No signature, date or endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 388. 27. No. 69.]
[June 13.]279. Invoices of goods shipped on board the Anne (v. preceding) the property of and consigned to Capt. Gilbert Bant (£44. 18. 2), Andrew Faneuill (£257. 3. 8), Thomas Fitch, (£402. 10), John and James Alford (£181. 19. 2). 5 pp. [C.O. 388, 27. Nos. 70–74.]
[June 13.]280. Accounts of goods shipped on board the Anne (v. preceding) belonging to Parkin and Stilwell, Ironmongers, in Foster Lane (£160. 10. 10); and of goods consigned to Samuel Banister of Boston (£354. 10); Thomas Clement of Boston, (£282 16 1¼); Joshua Winslow, merchant, Boston (£154). 6 pp. [C.O. 388, 27. Nos. 75–78.]
June 13.
Charles
Town,
So. Carolina.
281. President Middleton to the Duke of Newcastle. I am sorry we are obliged soe often to represent to the Government the difficulty we labour under, from the new scituation of St. Augustine to this place, who without any regard to peace or warr, doe continually annoy our southern frontiers. The hostility s they commit upon us may be rather termed robbery murders and pyracys, they acting the part of bandittis, more then soldiers, theire cheife aim being to murder and plunder. Wee formerly complained of their receiveing and harbouring all our runaway negroes, but since that they have found out a new way of sending our own slaves against us, to rob and plunder us; They are continually fitting out partys of Indians from St. Augustine to murder our white people, rob our plantations and carry off our slaves, soe that wee are not only at a vast expence in guarding our southern frontiers, but the inhabitants are continually allarmed, and have noe leizure to looke after theire crops. The Indians they send against us are sent out in small partys headed by two three or more Spaniards and sometimes joined with negroes, and all the mischeife they doe, is on a sudden, and by surprize: and the moment they have done it, they retire againe to St. Augustine, and then fit out againe, so that our plantations, being all scattering, before any men can be got together, the robbers are fled, and nobody can tell how soon it may be, or where they intend to make theire next attempt: This trade they have followed these twenty yeares, and is a very greate discouragement to the settlers of our southern frontiers to be always obliged to hold the plough in one hand, and the sword in the other. I shall not now repeat the representations formerly made on this score, but confine myself to what has happened of late. In August 1726, the Governor of St. Augustine fitted out a small party of Cussuba Indians from thence, who came upon Trenches Island (within ten miles of Port Royall) murdered and plundered one Richard Dawson and his wife. In Sept. 1726 they fitted out a small party of Yamasee Indians, abt. seven in number, who entring the house of Mr. John Edwards on Combahee River (within six miles of Port Royall) and haveing murdered him, they tooke away all his household goods and four negroes and carryed them to Augustine, where they were seen by several of our people, who were afterwards carryed there prisoners themselves. In June last, the Governour of St. Augustine, fitted out a party of Indians, who comeing into the settlemts. on the back of Port Royall, they first murderd., and then plunderd, one William Lavy and John Sparkes, spareing the lives of their wives, but told them there was a large party both of Indians and Spaniards fitting out from St. Augustine who had received orders from the Governour to spare noebody. On the 23rd or 24th of July last one Capt. Smalwood as he was going up to his tradeing house at the forks at Alatamaha neare H.M. Garrison in his perriaugua with four others namely John Annesley, Charles Smith, Joseph Abbot and John Hutchinson were sett upon by 34 Indians that came from Augustine, 26 whereof were Yamasees, who have sheltered themselves under that Castle for several yeares past, and murdered and scalped all the five persons abovementioned, and then robb'd them of all they had on board, to the value of £300; After this they broke open the store and tooke from thence 3000 deerskins, besides Indian tradeing goods. At the same time they tooke three others prisoners, one John Gray and William Gray and one Beans, and carryed them to St. Augustine where they were all imprisoned by the Governour for several months; The Governour of St. Augustine received these Indians with a great deale of pleasure and satisfaction, and paid them for the scalps of those they had murthered. Whilst the Grays remained prisoners at St. Augustine the Governour fitted out about 48 Indians more, headed by two Spaniards. The Indians informed the said Grays that theire orders were to kill and destroy all the white persons they could and take what negroes they could, that the Governour of Augustine had promised 'em 30 peeces of eight pr. head for every white man's scalp and 100 for every live negroe etc. These were supposed to be the party of Indians that soone after murthered one Henry Mushoe and Hezekiah Wood within the body of the settlement of this Province, and carryed off ten slaves; At the same time the Indians set upon Mushoe and Wood, the Indians (out of respect to Wood) would have saved his life, but a Spaniard tooke up a billet of wood and knock'd out his braines; These were pursued by a party of 15 of our men, under Capt. John Bull, who retooke all the said negroes and plunder, killed six Indians and one Spaniard they found the next day and wounded many more of the Indians, who dyed in their returne, soe that but few of them arrived at St. Augustine and we lost one white man in the engagement; The Governour of Augustine seemed extreemly troubled at this repulse made by Capt. Bull and to prevent the Yamasees from being discouraged, he sent up to the Creeks to joyne 'em and made another attempt. On 26th Sept. last the Governour of Augustine fitted out two perriauguas manned with six of our runaway slaves and the rest Indians who came upon Trench Island and set upon the house of one Alexander Dawson, where they killed and carryed away four children and four men and women. The Indians would have murtherd them all, for the sake of the scalps, but this time the negroes would not agree to it, and the Spaniards themselves told Dawson, when he, together with some of the rest, were carryed prisoners into St. Augustine, that the Governour had agreed with the Indians to give them 30 peices of eight for each white man's scalp and a hundred peices of eight for each negroe. It seems the Governour of St. Augustine makes merchandize of our slaves, and ships them off to the Havanah for his own profit, as we are told by the Spaniards themselves at Augustine. In January last was twelvemonth, they also surprized one of the souldiers of H.M. garrsion at Alatamaha, and carryed him prisoner to St. Augustine. About 15th July last a Spanish Capt. with five souldiers came up to our Creeks and made presents to the Indians, and perswaded them to tye all our Indian traders and packhorse men, and carry them to St. Augustine but the Indians refused. About 20th Oct. last, the Governour of St. Augustine fitted out a schooner mann'd with Spaniards and our own runaway slaves to steal other slaves, and rob our plantations along the coast, who entring North Edisto river surprized the plantation of one David Ferguson, plunderd it, and carryed away seven slaves. When this was complained of to the Governour of St. Augustine, he pretended they were pirates and had no authority for it, when at the same time we had several prisoners at Augustine who saw the said schooner fitted out by the Governour's orders. By reason of these continual depredations and robberys committed on the Southern frontiers, the inhabitants are continually allarmed, and the companyes forced to be kept under arms almost perpetually, their plantations run to wreck, and the people (tired out with fatigue) were all about to desert the most valuable part of the country. At the same time our merchantmen were daily taken off our harbours, by vessells fitted out from the Havanah; Upon these emergencys I called the Assembly together the 27th of August last and upon mature advice with my Council, wee agreed to form a party of 100 white men and about 100 Indians to goe and cut off these Yamasees etc., and sent them under the command of Col. John Palmer. Coll. Palmer on his march was informed that they had sheltered themselves in an Indian towne neare the Castle of St. Augustine. Coll. Palmer by secret marches in the night arrived undiscovered on 9th March. He fell upon the Indians at breake of day, and killed about thirty, and tooke about fourteen prisoners and wounded several more, but offered noe injury to the Spaniards, altho' it was in theire power to have cut off theire whole towne (lying without theire garrison). For I had given express orders not to molest any of the Spaniards, but we think it an extreem hardship that the Spaniards should daily head the Indians and our hands be tyed up. I earnestly entreat your Grace that we may have some special Instruction on this behalf. Our party set fire to an Indian towne and plunderd an Indian Church, and tho' we offered noe injury to the Spaniards, they fired all theire cannon on our men from theire Castle walls for three days successively. There was another expedition intended to be formed of 300 men to be sent against the lower Creek Indians, who were too buisy in joyning the Yamasees in some of these incursions. But the Creeks being brought to reason by our Agent, that expedition fell to the ground, which saved several thousand pounds expence. Much about the same time I was obliged to fit out a sloope under the command of Capt. Thomas Mount joy mannd with 90 men to protect our coast from the Spaniards who tooke our vessells off our harbour daily. Indeed I could not tell but that they were Spanish pirates at first, for I was not under any apprehensions of a warr between the two Crowns at that time. Inclosed is the Commission and Instructions I gave to the Commander. All these matters were carryed on by the unanimous consent of H.M. Council and the Lower House of Assembly and agreable to H.M. 95th Instruction. But when the moneys come to be raised, the Assembly according to their wonted custom, would agree to raise no moneys, but what should come out of the bills which by law and H.M. Instructions were to be burnt or sunck, soe that I was under this fatall dilemma of letting the people be destroyed etc. unless I did consent etc. Wherefore I hope your Grace will hold me excused for consenting to a thing sore against my inclination and which I could not possibly avoid. Inclosed I send your Grace an attested copy of the resolve of the Lower House wherein they declare that they would do it in noe other manner whatsoever, then out of the fund for sincking these bills; However I tooke care to continue the sincking fund by the same Expedition Law, as soone as these charges were defrayed, and which are now at an end; Since the Spaniards have been soe unjust as to misrepresent theire affaires by theire expresses to the Havanah, that they were beseiged by the English with several thousand men, I am apprehensive they will make some use of it at home; But I assure your Grace there were noe more then 100 white men and 100 Indians, as will appeare by the muster rolls, and that we offerd no hostility to the Spaniards, tho' it was in our power to have done what we pleased, and tho' at the same time in our sight they threw 30 men into an Indian fort to prevent our attacking it. Wee beg therefore your Grace will obtain peremptory orders from the Court of Spaine to theire Govr. at St. Augustine to cease these hostilityes, and in case they continue 'em, wee may have leave from H.M. to doe ourselves justice, for if our hands be soe strictly tyed up, this country will be inevitably lost to the Crown of Great Britain. Signed, Ar. Middleton. Endorsed, R. Sept. 3rd. 4½ pp. Enclosed,
281. i. Act of S. Carolina for carrying on several Expeditions against our Indian and other enemies, 1727. Copy. Signed, Char. Hart, Secry. 2½ pp.
281. ii. Journal and correspondence of Col. Charlesworth Glover, Major David Durham, Commander of Fort Moore, and others, relating to the Creek Indians, March, 1728. Copy. 32½ pp.
281. iii. Resolution of the Assembly S. Carolina, Sept. 2, 1727, to pay for the Expedition out of the sinking fund etc. Copy. ½ p.
281. iv. President Middleton's Commission and Instructions to Col. John Palmer to command against the Yamasees. (v. covering letter.) Signed, Ar. Middleton. Copy. 1 p.
281. v. Commission of Capt. Thomas Mountjoy for the privateer, Palmer, Sept. 5, 1727. Signed, Ar. Middleton. Copy. ¾ p.
281. vi. Instructions to Capt. Montjoy for a cruise against pirates etc. Sept. 9, 1727. Signed, Ar. Middleton. Copy. 1 p.
1728.281. vii. President Middleton to the Governor of the Havana. Charlestown. 23rd March, 1727 (1728). I send you these by a flagg of truce to inform your Excellency that in Aug. and Sept. the coasts of this Province were mightily infested and our vessels taken away almost from our very harbours etc. I therefore fitted out an armed sloop against pirates, which came up with the Francis and Rebecca of London bound from Virginia with tobacco, but taken on that coast by Don Antoneo Costaneo Jove, in the sloop Antoneo fitted out from the Havana with your Excellency's Commission etc. Returns the crew that had been put on board to carry her in to Havana, and requests him to call the aggressor to account etc. By private letters we are assured that the Treaty between the two Crowns is at last signed, etc. Signed, Ar. Middle ton. Copy, l½ pp.
281. viii. Don Dionisio Martinez de la Viga, Governor of the Havana, to President Middleton. Havana. 25th May, 1728. Replies with compliments to preceding. Continues:—The sailing from this port of some vessels with letters of marque could not be unexpected, considering the hostilities committed on these coasts by the squadron of Vice Admiral Hosier ever since the beginning of April of the foregoing year, as well as those of a sloop fitted out from Jamaica which cruized off the Cape of San Antonio making prizes of several Spanish vessels etc. and if this be permitted to be done by the meanest of H.M. subjects being in perfect peace, as yr. Honr. supposes, (without entering into other proceedings which has been practised in these seas,) etc., your Honour can have no just cause to disapprove our true motives of resentment of such proceedings etc. Explains that he detained the vessel sent to him till news of the signing of the Treaty was confirmed, and now sends her back with all the prisoners that are there, etc. Signed, Don Dionisio Marz. de lauizod. Spanish. Copy, l¾ pp.
281. ix. English translation of preceding. l¾ pp.
281. x. Same to Same. Havana. 3rd June, 1728. The sloop has been detained twice owing to advices from the fort of Apalache of its being besieged by the Indians and English of your Government. Good motives and reasons sufficient to detain her till that affair was settled, etc. Has decided however to send back the prisoners etc. "promising myself that yr. Honr. will give the necessary orders for the said Indians to retire, supposing that motion did not directly proceed from you" etc. Signed, Don Diosio de lauizd. Spanish. Copy. 1 p.
281. xi. English Translation of preceding, ¾ p.
1728.281. xii. (a)[?Col. Parris] to Wargent Nicholson, Factor to the Royal Assiento Company in the Havana. Charles Town, March 27, 1728. Describes outrages committed on the frontier plantations by Yamasee Indians encouraged by the Governor of St. Augustine. Continues:—Then the Governor of St. Augustine sent our Govr. a very impudent sawcey letter, with a message by the prisoners to know if he was asleep, that he suffer'd his frontier plantations to be cut off etc. I was in company with the Govr. when this message was deliver'd him, on which he smiled, and gave orders immediately to Col. Palmer to raise 100 white men and 100 Indians etc. v. covering letter. Continues;— There was not a man killed on our side, so that we have now ballanced accounts with them, and they never will come near us more. Palmer had positive orders not to meddle with or hurt one Spaniard etc.
281. xii. (b) W. Nicholson to Col. Parris. Havana. May 14, 1728. I was glad to see a narrative of your proceedings at St. Augustine, which was much multiplied here, etc. The Governor of St. Augustine is privately condemned as the agressor by all the impartial officers here, and the Franciscan Fryers have been a long time expecting such reward to the provocations which they have some of them been eye-witnesses to etc. Signed, Wargent Nicholson.
281. xii. (c) Col. Parris to [? President Middleton]. Charles Town, 1st June, 1728. Encloses above letter (xii. a) which has proved of good effect etc. Before it arrived, the Governor of St. Augustine had advised the Governor of Havannah that we had invaded him with 8000 men, and how manfully he had defended himself etc. The Factor laid my letter before the Governor and Council. The Governor made answer it was a just reward for the provocation the Govr. of St. Augustine has given us etc. Signed, Alexander Parris. The whole 2 pp. Copies.
281. xiii. Copy of 95th Article of H.M. Instructions to the Governor of S. Carolina, Sept. 20, 1720. ½ p.
281. xiv. Muster-roll of officers and men (100) on the Expedition against the Yamasees under Col. John Palmer. 1st May, 1728. Signed, William Peter, Capt., John Hunt, Capt., A. Parris, Commissary. Copy. 2 pp.
281. xv. List of preceding papers. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 387. Nos. 81, 81. i–xv.]
June 14.282. Memorial of loss and damage (£1400) sustained by William Brooker of New England, commander and part owner of the Faro merchant, seized by the Spaniards at Bilboa. Deposition, signed, Wm. Brooker. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 19th June, 1728. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 27. No. 27.]
June 18.283. Copy of Lt. Governor Pitt's Instructions. [C.O. 5, 193. ff. 605–702.]
1728.
June 18.
London.
284. Memorial of loss and damage (£1500) sustained by the capture of the Adventure, Charles Devon, commander, taken by a Spanish man of war in March, 1727, in her voyage from Salt Tertudos to Piscataqua, N.E., fully laden with salt. Signed, Robt. Willimott. Endorsed, Recd. Read 20th June, 1728. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 27. No. 32.]
June 18.
London
285. Memorial and proposal of Thomas Coram of London, Gent, for settling the waste lands between the River St. Croix, the boundary of Nova Scotia and the River Kennebec, the boundary of Maine, N.E. Cf. Cal. C.S.P. 1713, 14 etc. Describes this tract, 150 miles in breadth, its history, and the claim of the Massachusetts Bay to it. Continues:—When their Charter was restored under William and Mary, and that grant was ready to pass the seales (exclusive of the foresaid tract which was not so much as mentioned in their petition for the restoration of their priviledges in the said Charter), their Agents vizt. Increase Mather, a teacher of one of their Congregations, Elisha Cooke and Urian Oakes, Phisicians, and — Wiswell a plebean, all 4 cunning artfull men, grasping at vaster territories, with an eye to the foresaid noble tract of country, untruly alleidges by petition that the Massachusetts had taken Nova Scotia from the French (whereas in truth it remained in the hands of the French) etc., and therefore prayed that Nova Scotia, New Hampshire etc. might be annexed to the Massachusetts Bay both as to soyle and government, least their settleing Nova Scotia with English families might be retarded; By which fals allegation and pretence they got comprized in that grant Nova Scotia and all the land between it and the province of Main, within which limits is the said tract of country, but with a reservation that they should not grant any lands therein. And thus they once had a title to the Government (but not the soyle) of the land in the said tract, tho' unfairly obtain'd etc. Instead of settling Nova Scotia with the English families as they had pretended, they only rebuilt the demolished fort at Pemaquid in 1692, for a shew of their government over the said tract of country, which was all they ever did therein, where they never settled any families to inhabit; they only left a few of their own men, raw undisciplined fellows to be as soldiers in the said fort, in which they remained in a naked and starving condition, and being under the command of a very ignorant and worthless person named John Chubb Governor of the same, they in Sept. 1696, unworthily delivered up the said fort and country upon articles, without the least resistance and surrendered themselves prisoners to two French letter of mart ships that came there and demanded it for the French King, demolished the fort, and according to the said Articles, they carryed off from thence those few New Englanders who were in it, and were all the English in that whole tract of country, and left not so much as any one living English subject in any part of the said land and ilands between R. St. Croix and R. Kennebeck. Upon this easy conquest of the aforesaid tract, the French King commited the Government thereof to his Governor of Nova Scotia, and it remained to the French at and after the Peace of Reswick. In 1698 the French built a church on their said new conquest at the very River Kennebeck for a standing testimony of their right to and possession of the said tract etc. Refers to B. of T. papers, e.g. Lord Bellomont's letter, 1st July, 1700, v. C.S.P. No. 641. Continues:—After the receipt of said letter, the Governor of New England had orders from Court to press the General Assembly to repossess themselves of the said tract of country, rebuild the fort and settle families thereon, but they would have no regard to the strongest instances, etc., alleidging (1703) that should they put their Province to the expense of regaining the said tract etc., the land would still be the Queen's, H.M. might give it to whome she pleased etc.; and they affected to apprehend from the advices given them by Sir Henry Ashurst their Agent here, that the Queen had a designe to give the said tract to Col. Dungan (Lord Limerick) for his settling the same with his country folks, Roman Catholicks from Irland, for which reasons they unianemously persisted in their resolution etc. Which willfull neglect and obstinate resolutions etc. was the better known to your Memorialist at that time, not only from his then living at Boston and his constant observations with concerne etc., judging that large and noble tract may be easily made greatly beneficial to the Crown, beside affording constant supplys of naval stores of every kind etc., but also from his near neighbour and intimate acquaintance Dr. Urian Oakes, then Speaker, by whom he was well informed of everything transacted in that House relating to the said tract of country which continued to remaine to the French, who having their hands full in Queen Ann's warr, forbore further settling the same, whereby it has lain wast and uninhabited (except by a few Indians) ever since. And was recovered to the Crown by Genll. Nicholson etc. upon Articles, 1710, which expressly included all the land from Cape Gaspee to the River Kennebeck, which til then was in actual possession of the French King, and by him yealded to the Crowne of Great Britain by the Treaty of Utrecht. Notwithstanding the Massachusetts' wilfull neglect of, and their basely giving up to the French the said noble tract etc.; yet hating that any settlement should be made thereon tho' with the greatest probabilety of future benefit to the Crowne etc., unless to be under their own Goverment (a thing they have always been greedylie grasping at), they continually made most unreasonable opposition aganst the Crownes intrest many years in the latter part of Queen Ann's reigne and the greatest part of the reigne of His late Majesty etc., to prevent your Memorialist and his associates from obtaining permition and encouragement from ye Crown to plant an elegant Colony on the said tract etc. under H.M. right and Government, whilst he and his associates for several years together used their utmost endeavours for obtaining the same; and for proving those lands to be absolutly in the right of the Crowne, against the unjust claims and pretensions of those violent and obstinate opposers; which was done with great fateigue and expence to your Memorialist. And in case the said noble tract of country in the said Charter had been fairly obtained (as it was not) it is conceived that the Massachusetts so giving it up, abridges at least so much of their Charter. And like to this was the case of Lord Baltemore concerning part of his Province of Maryland laying on Delaware Bay, which he abandoned to the Dutch, and the same being afterward reconquered by the Crowne was thereupon granted (de novo) to James Duke of York etc. By these facts it may plainly appear etc. that the foresaid tract etc. is together with Nova Scotia entirly in the Crowne, and may be disposed of as the King in his great wisdome may think fit etc. Wherefore, etc., if the King shall judge it for H.M. service to have the said uninhabited tract settled with inhabitants, for the better producing more certain, future ample supplys of hemp and other naval stores, without further dependancy on precarious supplys from foreigners etc., there are yet a good number of those usefull men who took some share in the great travel and fateigue your Memorialist underwent many years in the two last reignes to obtaine liberty and encouragement to settle a Colony on the said tract etc., still remaining very desirous of the King's favour to grant a settlement for them and their families on the same, under H.M. civil Government to be erected there; and to pay a reasonable quitt-rent in hemp to the Crowne; And as many of those men have been experienced in military service, they would by their building small forts at first with wood and earth, be capable to defend themselves and protect the country without further expence to the Crowne for sending soldiers thither. And when a proper settlement shall be once begun by such vetterns, suiteble inhabitants that occation, under H.M. civil Government, many other usefull people, foreigne Protestants, as well as Britons, would soon settle themselves in a regular and safe manner at their own expence on the encouragement of having a suiteble portion of the said land to be (by some person or persons properly appointed) thereon granted to them and their posterity, paying a quit-rent as aforesaid. And as there will continually be great numbers of future convicts condemned in Great Britain and Irland to serve a term of years in H.M. Plantations; and to be transported thither at the Crown's expence as they are now transported; they cannot be sent to any other part so advantageous to the Crowne, as to employ them under strict and prudent management for the service of H.M. in clearing and cultivating the said wast and derelict land for the compleat furnishing in due time ; constant and full supplys of hemp and masts from thence for the Navy ; each convict to have after the expiration of their respective services on the said land, a small portion thereof granted for them and their posterity to settle and inhabit under the like conditions with others of raising hemp and paying quit rent in the same to H.M. for for the use of the Navy. There are also many others, able persons of both sexes, who live in continual danger of being apprehended for criminal practices which by the faults of their parents or otherwise, they are constantly repeating, which renders them a nuisance and a pest to the publick, especially in and about the Cittys of London and Westminster, and they would gladly be rescued from their necessity of commiting those crimes, and the evil consequences thereof, by volentary engaigeing themselves to serve H.M. a term of years in the said tract of country etc., where they might by right management, be encourag'd and renderd very serviceeble, if any proper persons were appointed to receive and transport them accordingly. Many such offensive subjects the French usually send to inhabit in their Plantations, tho' with this differance ; of forcing them, insteed of accepting them as volunteers ; for in 1718, your memorialist being then in Paris, above 800 able-bodied beggars, ballad-singers and other vagabonds were seazed in one day in the streets there, and sent away to Messesipi etc. Proposes that one of H.M. largest storeships should be detailed to transport emigrants and 2 small sloops to stay there. The storeship on its second homeward voyage to be laden with masts for the Navy etc. And forasmuch as such a usefull undertaking will require absolutely to have some person of known integrety and experience in those parts to begin the same, offers himself in that capacity, etc. Signed, Thomas Coram. Endorsed, Recd., Read 19th June, 1728. 12 pp. [C. O. 217, 5. ff. 78–83v., 84v.]
June 18.
Richmond.
286. H.M. Additional Instructions to Governors Burnett and Montgomery and to the Governor and Company of Rhode Island and of Connecticut. Whereas We have been graciously pleased to constitute and appoint a Surveyor General of all Our woods in North America with proper Deputys under him in order the better to secure and preserve for the use of Our Royal Navy such trees as shall be found proper for that service, etc. you are to be aiding and assisting them and give orders to all Officers civil and military to be aiding and assisting them in preventing the destruction of Our woods, and in punishing such as shall be found offending therein. Signed, G. R. [C.O. 324, 36. pp. 73, 74.]
June 18.287. H.M. Additional Instruction to Governors of Planta- tions, to the Governor and Company of Rhode Island and Connecticut, to Springet Penn and Hannah Penn, Proprietors and Governor of Pennsylvania and to Charles Lord Baltemore, Proprietor and Governor of Maryland and to the Lords Proprietors of North Carolina. In all prayers, litanies and collects for the Royal Family to be used under your Government instead of the words [H.R.H. the Prince of Wales etc.] are to be inserted [Our gracious Queen Caroline, the Royal issue etc.]. Enclosed, Order of Council 15th June, 1727 to that effect. Signed, G. R. [CO. 324, 36. pp. 75—80.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
288. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Representation upon petition of Francis Whitworth (v. 12th June). Mr. Whitworth informed us he has no salary for executing the office of Secretary to Barbados, and that the profits accruing to him from his office, do only arise from such reasonable fees, as have for many years past, been in ye said Office. We therefore humbly propose, that his account be transmitted to your Majesty's Governor, and that he, with the Council, do examine and settle the same, and that the paymt. of what shall be found due upon propper vouchers, according to the usual, and accustomed fees given upon the like occasion, be earnestly recommended to the Assembly for immediate payment, and that the said Assembly, do for the future, take care to pay what shall become due to the Secretary for such services, as shall be performed by him or his Deputy for the public. [CO. 29, 15. pp. 23, 24.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
289. Same to the Governor of Connecticut. Acknowledge letter of 18th Sept., 1727. Continue:—H.M. having been graciously pleased to constitute us his Commissioners for Trade and Plantations etc., we take this opportunity to acquaint you that it is H.M. pleasure and express command, that the Governors of all his foreign Plantations do from time to time give unto us frequent and full information of the state and condition of their respective Governments and Plantations, as well with regard to the administration of the Government and justice in those places, as in relation to the commerce thereof: and more particularly that the said Governors transmit unto us yearly accounts of their said administration by way of Journal, together with the Acts of Assemblies; all which things you are therefore accordingly to observe in relation to the Colony of Connecticut. Particularly we desire you to inform us, What number of inhabitants there are? What of freemen, and what of servants, white and black? To what degree are those numbers increased or decreased within five years last past? What is the whole number of the Militia? What commodities are exported to this Kingdom? What trade is there, either by exportation or importation with any other place? And from whence is that Colony now furnished with supplies (particularly of any manufactures) that it was wont to be furnished withall from Great Britain? How, and in what particulars is the trade of that Province increas'd or decay'd of late years ; and what hath been the reason? What are the present methods used to prevent illegal trade? And what further methods do you think adviseable? What number of ships or other vessels are there belonging to that Colony? And what number of seafaring men? What number and what sorts of those vessels have been built there? What manufactures are settled in that Colony of any sort whatsoever? To all which inquiries, we also further desire you to add whatever else you may in your own prudence think conducive to H.M. service, to the interest of this Kingdom, and to the advantage of that particular Colony. We take this opportunity to remind you of sending over a compleat collection of the laws, which has been so often promis'd some years ago, by several Governors, upon letters writ them from the Secretary of this Board for that purpose. [C.O. 5, 1294. pp. 19–22.]
Similar letters, mutatis mutandis and omitting opening sentences, sent 20th June and duplicates in July, 1731, to the Governor of Rhode Island and Deputy Governor of Maryland. [C.O. 5, 1294. p. 22.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
290. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Mont- gomerie. Acknowledge letter of 6th May and congratulate him upon his safe arrival. Continue:—We don't doubt but that by your prudent administration all differences will be reconcil'd, and you may depend upon it, that nothing shall be wanting on our part, towards making your administration easy. All that we shall trouble you with at present, is, to desire that in your future correspondence with us, all letters or other papers may be sent directly hither under cover to the Board, and that you take care to mention in every letter the ship by which your proceeding letter was sent. [C.O. 5, 1125. p. 118.]