America and West Indies
July 1729, 11-20

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

Year published

1937

Pages

445-455

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: July 1729, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 36: 1728-1729 (1937), pp. 445-455. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72475 Date accessed: 29 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

July 1729, 11-20

July 11.
Bermuda.
822. Lt. Governor Pitt to Charles Delafaye. Refers to letter of 26th (? 30th) April. Continues:—The inhabitants still dayly suffer by the oppressions of the Spaniards who take and destroy their vessels etc. Begs for his favour in reminding his Grace of doing something for them and of forwarding the acts now and formerly transmitted for the royal assent etc. Encloses Journal of Assembly, 18th Nov. 1728—6th March, 1729 ; an Act to prevent any person allowing and encourageing any negroes from rioting and meeting at unreasonable times in his house or possessions etc. ; an act to prevent any person from makeing, haveing or keeping any nett exceeding the length of 3½ fathoms in his house or other place whatsoever, and to prevent hauling fish by any other contrivance ; an act for repealing an act for establishing fast days etc. ; an act for making an addition to the sallary of H.E. John Pitt Esq. etc. A further additional act for the more speedy repairing of the highways ; an act laying an imposition on negroes and other slaves imported; an act to supply the deficiency of the sever all funds for finishing the fortifications and for defraying the other charges of this Government. Which I think are absolutely necessary as well for the peace and tranquility of this Government as for compleating the fortifications which are now allmost finished ; I allso desire you'l put His Grace in mind of what I wrote in my last letter relateing to powder and amunition, which through the extream poverty of the people cannot be purchased by any tax to be raised, the inhabitants being scarce able to bear what are allready laid etc. Signed, John Pitt. Endorsed, R. 23 Sept. Extract of letter to His Grace (taken out of this) sent to Mr. Stanhope, 29th Sept., 1729. Addressed. Sealed. 1½ pp. [C.O. 37, 29. No. 5.]
July 11.
Bermuda.
823. Same to the Duke of Newcastle. To same effect as preceding. "In a short time the small number of trading people here will be entirely ruined unless proper measures are taken to prevent the insolency of those abandoned people" etc. Signed, John Pitt. Endorsed, R. 23rd Sept. 2 pp. [C.O. 37, 29. No. 6.]
July 14. 824. H.M. license (by Queen Caroline) to Ralph Gulston, in pursuance of his contract with the Commissioners of the Navy to bring over 6 ship-loads of masts etc. in 1728, 1729, 1730 and 1731, to cut trees in New England, after they have been viewed by the Surveyor General of the Woods, who is to be aiding and assisting him etc. Countersigned, Holles Newcastle. [C.O. 324, 36. pp. 126–129.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
825. Mr. Popple to Mr. Fane. Encloses, for his opinion in point of law, five Acts of the Massachusets Bay, 1728, (i) for repealing an Act for punishing and preventing of duelling and for making other provision instead; (ii) to more effectually secure the duty on the importation of negroes; (iii) for the encouragement of making paper ; (iv) for regulating the ferry between Bristol and Rhode Island ; (v) for altering the time for holding the Courts etc. within the counties of Essex, Middlesex and Plymouth.[C.O. 5, 916. p. 205].
July 15.
Whitehall.
826. Same to Same. Encloses, for his opinion in point of law, four Acts of Bermuda (i) for raising a sum of money for the speedy repairing the Castle and other fortifications ; (ii) repealing an act to prevent the destruction and transportation of palmeto tops, and an act amending the same ; (iii) for raising a quantity of timber plank and lime necessary for the repairing the Castle etc. (1727); and (1728) (iv) for raising a sum of money necessary for the repariing the Castle and other fortifications. [C.O. 38, 8. pp. 145, 146].
July 15.
New York.
827. Lewis Morris jr. to the Duke of Newcastle. Abstract. Only five of the Council were met at the time of his suspension from the Council (v. 30th June), one of whom says he dissented from it and desired his dissent to be entered, which was not done. Continues:—H.E. did not think fit (tho' desired) to give any reasons, but (if I guess right) it was because I protested against the manner of introducing and signing some warrants, for the disposition of the publick money contrary to H.M. letters patent, tending to render H.M. Councill here useless, and insignificant, and also being of dangerous consequence to H.M. interest and prerogative, by complying with the votes and resolutions of an Assembly etc. Argues case. Cf. June 30. Traces steps taken by New York Assembly since Govr. Hunter's time, like other American Assemblies, towards independence, first by refusing a revenue and salary for the Governor, then, in Governor Burnet's time, by making votes what should be the salaries of the several officers of the Government, marking their resentment upon those who were known to have been active in the interest of the Government etc. On their reducing the salary of Chief Justice Lewis Morris, he demanded their reasons etc. (v. encl.). By their votes of 7th Oct. 1726 they made it plain that they regarded these votes for salaries as directions to the Governor and Council, and that no alterations or other warrants were to be issued by them for such salaries. They did accordingly address, which was referred to the Council, who esteemed it a proceeding of great insolence, and would have taken proper notice of it, but Mr. Burnet having advanced his own money towards building a fortification on the frontiers, and that if he should differ with the Assembly (who studiously sought all occasions to quarrell) they would make use of that pretence to avoid raising money to pay for it, he chose to let the matter drop etc. The Assembly judging this to proceed from fear etc. were encouraged to rise in their demands and to make resolves against the Court of Chancery, as in Hunter's time, as being erected without their consent etc. The present Governour has thought it his interest to comply with the Assembly in everything, the Court of Chancery has been entirely dropped, to the great prejudice of all those who have causes depending there etc. His promises, on his arrival, if not direct, were understood to be tantamount to undertaking to give in to the measures of the Assembly, being entirely under the influence of George Clark, Secretary of the Province, who is supposed to be the contriver of most of these resolves. "Whether this complying conduct of the Governor will prove as much for H.M. interest as he thinks it conduces to his own, time will discover etc. For my part I thought it destructive of it, and what would (if not checked in the beginning) issue in this people throwing of their allegiance, which induced me to oppose it" etc. Does not ask to be restored to the Council, unless he can be free, and his voice not under the direction of the frown or nod of a Governor etc. To a timid and pusilanimous condescention in the Councill, is almost solely owing this insolence of the Assembly, for "Governours, sitting and voting as Councellours, in the making and passing of laws, it is very much in their power to make any bill sent up by the Assembly, (calculated for his private interest) to pass the Council by his vote, tho it be never so much against that of the King's. I did also protest against this practice, but was suspended before I had drawn up my reasons for it, and perhaps to prevent that might be the true reason of my suspention" etc. Suggests that copies of the Governor's instructions, wherein the advice and consent of the Council is made necessary, should be transmitted to be entered in the Council books. At present they do not know when they may, and ought to interpose their advice etc. Signed, Lewis Morris, jr. Endorsed, Recd. 27th Oct., 1729. 6 closely written pp. Enclosed,
827. i. Duplicate of No. 799 iii.
827. ii. Duplicate of No. 799 i.
827. iii. Paper published by Governor Hunter in reply to the resolution of the Assembly that the erecting or exercising a Court of Equity or Chancery without consent in General Assembly is unwarrantable, and contrary to the laws of England and a manifest oppression etc. Printed, New York, 1713. 7½ pp.
827. iv. Resolves of the Assembly appointing several salaries, 10th Aug. 1728. Copy. 1¼ pp.
827. v. (a) Speech of Chief Justice Lewis Morris to the Assembly of New York, 3rd May, 1726. Demands their reasons for voting a reduction of his salary by £50 etc.
v. (b) Reply of Assembly to preceding. Such reduction did not proceed from any malversation on his part, but because he formerly, and all other Chief Justices before him had no greater salary than £130, and the present circumstances of the Colony make them less able to allow excessive salaries now, than they were then. The whole, printed, New York, 1726. 2 pp.
827. vi. Reply of C. J. Morris, 17th June, 1726. Abstract. It has cost the county £2000 for the Assembly to debate the matter. He only was induced to continue in office when a former Assembly proposed that his salary shd. be raised to £300 etc. The King has by his prerogative the right of determining what salaries are proper for his servants etc.; once these salaries are fixed, to deprive an officer of the whole or any part of them, without his being convicted of having done something to deserve it, is not agreeable to the principles of a natural equity or the laws and practice of England, or of the House of Commons etc. Continues:—That we are plants, in a manner but of yesterday's growth; and as appears by the Sibboleth, so easily distinguishable in most of our Speech the greater number transplanted from a foreigne soile: and here tenderly nurst up, at the vast expence of the Brittish Crown; that we are, and ought to be, a dependant Government; and have no inherent right, to be an Assembly, and to sit and make laws but by virtue of the King's Letters Patent; are things too evident and notorious to be denyed; and yet we have taken upon ourselves the exercise of a power, not seemingly agreeable to that dependance, or warranted by those Letters Patent, which gave being to our political constitution; and this is not only done in the case of salarys: but in a more eminent manner, as will appear by your votes of 20th April last; where you order the tonnage officer to return to Capt. Hopkins the duty of 14 negroes. This money was by an Act of Assembly lodged in that officer's hands; and being publick money, belonging to H.M., could not be disposed of but by warrant drawn by the Governor in Councill etc. Their votes as to salaries etc. and printing the same, in the face of the Government, has not passed unnoticed in the neighbouring Plantations, having been published in the Boston News Papers as something extraordinary, but for what end the Publishers or contrivers of the publication best know. Where these things will end God only knows, but what they mean, is not very difficult to guess. How mischievous in its consequences such an example may be to the rest of H.M, Plantations, and of what dangerous tendency to lessen, or shake off their dependance on the Brittish Government, will be humbly submitted to H.M. etc. Replies to criticisms of his Speech. No. v. (a) supra. 5¼ pp.
827. vii. Minutes of Council of New York, Oct. 12, 1728. List of warrants for salaries issued. Copy, ¾ p.
827. viii.–x. Resolves of the Assembly of New York, 7th Oct., 1726, 25th Nov., 1727 and 30th July and 10th Aug., 1728. Copies. 3? pp.
827. xi. Minutes of Council of New York, 27th Nov.—1st Dec, 1727. Copy. 7 pp.
827. xii. Some reasons offered to the Governor and Council for not laying before them the minutes of the Committee appointed to examine into the grievances complained of by the Assembly, Sept. 13, 1728. Signed, James Alexander, Lewis Morris, 13. 2? pp.
827. xiii. Representation of the above Committee of Council of New York to the Governor in reply to the Assembly who charged them with violating their privileges etc. 30th Aug., 1728. Signed, Robert Walter, Cadwalader Colden, James Alexander, Lewis Morris, junr. 5? pp.
827. xiv. Lewis Morris, jr., to Governor Montgomerie and Council. Reasons offered against the Governor's sitting and voting in Council in the passing of laws. Copy. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1093. ff. 46–48v;., 49v;.–55, 56–57, 58–66v;., 68, 70, 70v., 72, 73, 74–77, 78–79, 80–82v., 84–85.]
July 16.
Whitehall.
828. Mr. Popple to Mr. Fane. My Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations command me to send you the Charter of Connecticut and Rhode Island, and thereupon to desire your opinion in point of law, what power still remains in the Crown to controll the laws, actions and conduct of these Governments, and in what particular they are still dependent on the Crown. [C.O. 5, 1294. p. 4.]
July 16.
Whitehall.
829. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Newcastle. Enclose extract of letter from Governor Pitt, "in relation to the distress of those islands occasioned by the daily seizures of their vessells by the Spaniards ; and to the want they are in of ammunition and stores, that your Grace may be pleased to lay the same before Her Majesty for Her orders thereon." [C.O. 38, 8. p. 147.]
July 17. 830. Governor Hunter to Mr. Delafaye. Many ships being arriv'd from England and no letter from you I conclude that either your health or my affairs are in a bad state etc. Has left the Engineer at Port Antonio, to carry on the work which was more than half finished before he left. Continues:—I mounted twenty guns, cutt the Isthmus, and did what I could to guard against surprizes and when it is finish't I'll venture to pronounce it the strongest place H.M. has in America. Nature had done so much for us that no great skill was requisite. For though we have an able Engineer, yet he leaving England in such a hurry, if I had not by chance been provided in necessary instruments, we must have work'd by guesses. It is matter of wonder to me that, considering the goodnesse of the two harbours, their situation with relation to the command of the Windward pasage and protection of ye trade, the fertility of ye soyle all around and the natural strength of ye place, nothing had been done there hitherto. Upon my return by ye advice of ye Council and Council of war I put an end to Martial Law, which I did the more readily because having no advice from home, or from the best information no preparations for an invasion by ye Spaniard on this side the sea, and the expens which attended the subsisting a useless detachment, for they were compos'd of such as I could not trust, hired servants generally Irish, who gave me much trouble by mutinys and desertion, that I begun at last to be apprehensive that our enemys had more reason to depend upon their service then I had. I have done what I could or any man in my station towards the putting the Militia under better regulation and discipline, arming the people ev'n the slaves to be trusted, which by the by is not the least part of our strength, laying in of stores of war of all kinds, rebuilding old forts and erecting new, laying bridges and causeways and cutting and clearing communications, and with all this I assure you on proof that we are exceeding weake here. The inhabitants freemen, but thinn, the slaves numerous, the Militia not at all to be depended upon, consisting chiefly of such as I have described above, and a turbulant faction of Irish lawyers, who seem to please themselves with endeavouring as much as in them lyes, to defeat or oppose all measures propos'd for ye public security (if this were not of notoriety, I could not write so). That if this Island be of that importance it is generally reputed to be, there is a necessity of some additional strength for its security unlesse we are assur'd of a lasting peace, for such measures as are in my power for that purpose require time, which is not in my power, and great application which shall not be wanting. I make no doubt but our Assembly, which is to meet next weeke from a just sense of their danger and inability will make their humble request to H.M. to take care of them in that way. At least it is ye sense of all ye men of sense and substance that I have of late convers'd with. What the effect of the Irish faction may have towards defeating it, I know not. Our laws if approv'd may contribute toward making matters easie here etc. Sends sketch of the harbours and Fort George done by his son etc. Continues:— I have wrote to Coll. Bladen. You must send over a power of attorney to somebody to receive and remitt your money, send with it your account of disbursements on ye publick acct. or mine, which I shall take care be paid etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, R. Oct. 1st. Holograph. 2¼ pp. [C.O. 137, 53. ff. 166–167v.]
July 17. 831. Same to the Duke of Newcastle. Repeats "ingrosse what I have said in detail to Mr. Delafay." Will do all in his power for Mr. Bellaguier. Concludes:—I have advice by a sloop from Carthagene that the Spaniards had lately shipt there five millions of ps. of 8 on board two ships of warr for Spain, one of them being disabled at sea return'd and her cargoe was put on board two Dutch prizes which they fitted for that purpose. Signed and endorsed as preceding. Holograph. 1½ pp. [C.O. 137, 53. ff. 168, 168v., 169v.]
July 17. 832. Mr. Fane to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Has no objection to Act of Barbados for laying a duty on wines etc. imported, but as to the other Act submitted on 27th May, to reduce the rate of interest reports that, "it is an act to reduce the legal interest of money from 10 p.c. to 8. An act of this kind may I agree be for the general advantage of the island provided it be garded with that caution as has been usual in acts of this kind. But so little care has been taken in the penning of this act, that as it stands at present it is captious and ensnareing and will in all probability involve men in endless controversies and disputes. For tho' the interest of 8 p.c. is established on future contracts from 24th June, yet it repeals the acts that allow 10 p.c. and provides that everything contained in the 10 p.c. acts shall be void to all intents and purposes, and I apprehend by this ambiguous expression it is intended to raise a question whether the 10 p.c. on old contracts is taken away or not etc. This is a very unusual clause and nothing of this kind has ever been incerted in any interest act whatever, the old contracts being never affected but always left upon the foot they stood before. Therefore I am humbly of opinion that this act, which so sensibly affects property should never be confirmed, unless it is drawn in the most plain and clear manner and without the least possibility of doubt." Signed, Fran. Fane. Endorsed, Recd. 21st, Read 22 July, 1729. l½ pp. [C.O. 28, 20. ff. 196, 196v., 197v.]
July 17. 833. Same to Same. Has no objection to 5 acts of Antigua submitted 12th June. Signed, Fran. Fane. Endorsed, Recd. 21st July, 1729, Read 16th Jan., 17? 9/0. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 152, 17. ff. 117, 117v., 118v.]
July 17. 834. Same to Same. Has no objection to the four Acts of Montserrat submitted 20th June. Signed, Fran. Fane. Endorsed, Recd. 21st., Read 22nd July, 1729. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 17. ff. 84, 85v.]
July 17.
Jamaica.
835. Governor Hunter to the Council of Trade and Plantations. On the 25th of June I arriv'd here (fn. 1) from Port Antonio having left Coll. Lilly there to finish that fort which I had cary'd on a great way. If your Losps. have the curiosity to see the plans I have sent such as one of my sons has taken to Mr. Delafay who will have the honor to lay them before you if such is your pleasure. I shall only assure your Lorps. that the harbours are the best in H.M. Dominions and the Fort when compleated the strongest by the nature of its situation in these parts. I need not mention the use to trade or warr by the command of the windward passage or advantages and addition to ye planting intrest by ye goodnesse of the soyle wch. this settlement must bring with it. The sea Captains who have been there will inform your Losps. of that, I shall only mention the uses that Lynches Island may be turn'd to, when we have gott itt for ye King, which I shall endeavour, having as yet only part of it. It would be the most commodious place for a hospital, store-houses and careening places for H.M. Navy in ye world, by reason of its security being inaccessible ev'ry where without the harbours, secure against desertion a common case in hospitals, a wholesome air and fertile soyle for herbage, and water for ye largest ships to lay their sides to the shoar. The land about is setling very fast and in all appearance in a litle time it will be a considerable place. Having stay'd there near two moneths and no fresh orders or advice from home and by all the intelligence I could gett no preparations for an attempt on that side I return'd to this and by advice of the Council and Council of Warr put a period to Martial Law. And must not hide my opinion from your Losps. that we are exceeding weake here and in a bad condition to oppose any attempt of consequence that may be made upon this Island, our Militia consisting chiefly of hired servants and these almost all of a kind not to be at all depended upon, the inhabitants thinn and slaves numerous that I can not think it safe, in case of warr to rely upon our own force. Your Losps. knowing well the importance of this island I am confident will be of my opinion. I speake from experience. I have done what man could do with what I had, and had ev'n gott some laws pass'd for better arming the people and am labouring hard to make ye Militia by better order and discipline more usefull. But that requires time and I know not how much of that we may have to spare. Our Assembly meets next weeke, all men of sense and substance here are sensible of the truth of what I have affirm'd. How far a restlesse faction here who by their conduct seem at best indifferent what becomes of us, may prevaile there I can not guesse, I hope they'll be disappointed but hitherto their arts and endeavours have been lay'd out in opposing or defeating whatever was propos'd for the publick safety. I mean a sett of Irish lawyers, for 'tis time to speake out. Our Acts of Revenue when approv'd may give life and vigour to the people and inable me to sett them and guide them right. I assure your Losps. that nothing shall be wanting on my part etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 1st Oct., Read 26th Nov., 1729. Holograph. 2 pp. Enclosed,
835. i. Speech of Governor Hunter to the Council and Assembly of Jamaica, July 24, 1729. Endorsed, Recd. 1st Oct. 1729. Printed. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 18. ff. 36, 36v., 37v.–38v.]
July 17.
Jamaica.
836. Extract of letter from Governor Hunter to [? Col. Bladen. See No. 830]. I am but lately returned from a very awkward campaign, having been waiting for ye Spaniard in the north west part of the island at the head of a detachment of very sorry Militia. I have however almost finished a very good Fort there in the entry to two of the safest and best harbours in America. I have put our other forts in order and had before my march prepared and provided them all, cut passages and communications between the two sides, and with all this I must tell you from experience, that wee are exceeding weak here, the Militia consisting of hired servants who are not to be depended upon, and the country thin peopled tho' full of slaves. You'll think it strange but it is true, my chief dependance in case of an attempt was upon the trusty slaves, for whom I had prepared arms. Our Assembly meets next week. Whether I can make them sensible of their own weakness, or whether it is in their power to do anything effectually to strengthen themselves in due time, I know not. (I had some time ago passed some laws for the better arming the people and making the Militia more usefull.) But I hope those at the helm, who know the importance of this island to the trade and interest of Great Britain will take some speedy care of us, if there be still apprehension of warr etc. If you think fit to communicate what I write to those concerned, it's well. But I would not have our condition too publick. All I can say is, that I shall do my best. I have had a hard task, but shall go on chearfully in my duty. Copy. 1? pp. [C.O. 137, 47. No. 11.]
July 19.
New York.
837. Lewis Morris junr., to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Repeats matter of June 30 and July 15. Set out, N.Y. Col. Doc. V. pp. 882–888. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd Oct., Read 17th Dec, 1729. 7 pp. Enclosed,
837. i.–xi. Duplicates of Nos. 827 iii., v.–xiv.
837. xii., xiii. Duplicates of Nos. 799. i. and iii. All endorsed, Recd. 23rd Oct., 1729. [C.O. 5, 1055. ff. 84–90v., 91v.–112, 113v.–120v.]
July 19.
Boston.
838. Governor Burnet to the Duke of Newcastle. I return my most humble thanks to your Grace for the favourable hearing of my case before the Committee of Council upon which I daily expect H.M. final orders. The Assembly's Agents have writ to them about it, in terms so disrespectfull to H.M. authority that I am perswaded your Grace will be surprised at them. And yet the house of representatives have thought their advice so proper to follow, that they have printed these letters in their votes, enclosed etc. Refers to following. Signed, W. Burnet. Endorsed, R. Sept. 4th. 1 p. Enclosed,
838. i. (a) Copy of letter from Francis Wilks and Jonathan Belcher to the Speaker of Assembly, London, April 25th, 1729, and of Francis Wilks to Same, 24th March. From Journal of Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, 27th June, 1729. Printed, by Thomas Fleet, Boston, Printer to the Honourable House of Representatives, 1729. 2 pp.
838. ii. Copy of following. [C.O. 5, 898. Nos. 58, 58 i., ii.]
July 19.
Boston.
839. Governor Burnet to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Returns thanks for the Board's report in his favour which lays him "under the most indispensible obligations." Continues:—But I must confess that the House of Representatives have shewn the utmost insensibility upon this occasion, and tho' they have seen your Lordships' report and have had the Minutes of what passed at the Committee of Council thereupon, yet they seem to acqueice in their Agents' opinion, to stand it out in Parliament. For which reason they have printed their Agents' letters page 15 and 16 of their Votes as a notification to the people of the country to prepare to follow their advice. I prorogued the new Assembly as soon as they had chosen the Council to the 25th of June, by which time I hoped to have received H.M. final order in Council and I kept them sitting some weeks in that expectation. But hearing at last that it would not come so soon, I prorogued them on the 10th instant to the 20th of August, by which time I have reason to beleive that I shall receive my decisive orders, and then I shall propose the matter to them with all the solemnity it deserves. I have avoided speaking to them at all till these packets arrive, that I might not enter into needless contests, but they could not forbear to shew their wonted regard to H.M. Instructions, upon my appointing a new Attorney General in Council according to H.M. 70th Instruction, as appears by their votes etc. The rest of the time has been spent on private matters, or in disputes, which they have raised upon my denying to comply with them in things which I thought unreasonable, and which would be too long to mention particularly in a letter, but which are all marked in their votes. The only thing that they seem'd to complain of with some reason was my delaying to sign a warrant for the pay of their wages of the members of the last Assembly, tho' there was a law for it. I thought myself indeed no ways obliged to serve them in this manner for nothing, but since they had the colour of law on their side; I did at last at the desire of the Council, sign that warrant. So that I know nothing they can justly complain of, or that should make them decline settling a salary for my time but their principles of independency, which are too deeply rooted in them, to be managed by anything but the Legislature of Great Britain etc. Encloses Votes of Assembly. Signed, W. Burnet. Endorsed, Recd. 2nd, Read 3rd Sept., 1729. 3½ pp. [C.O. 5, 870. ff. 269–270v.]
July 19.
Boston.
840. Same to Mr. Popple. Thanks for his share in the Board's report. Encloses Votes and duplicates. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 870. ff. 271, 272v.]

Footnotes

1 [? St. Jago de la Vega. Ed.]