America and West Indies
October 1729, 1-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

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1937

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485-500

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'America and West Indies: October 1729, 1-10', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 36: 1728-1729 (1937), pp. 485-500. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72479 Date accessed: 20 October 2014.


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October 1729, 1-10

Oct. 1.
Whitehall.
913. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Newcastle. Tho' your Grace may be already appris'd of the undutifull manner in which the Assembly of the Massachusets Bay persist in their refusal to settle a fixt salary on their Governor, which had been so often recommended by the Crown ; yet as this is an affair of very great consequence, and will probably fall under a Parliamentary consideration the next Session ; we thought it proper to transmit to your Grace, the copy of a letter we have lately receiv'd from Mr. Burnet together with a printed copy of the votes of the sd. Assembly for your Grace's information etc. [C.O. 5, 916. p. 206.]
Oct. 1.
Whitehall.
914. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Newcastle. Enclose drafts of warrants for use of new seals for Barbados, Jamaica, Virginia and Carolina etc. (cf. 18th Aug.). Autograph signatures. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 4. No. 38; and 29, 15. p. 115.]
Oct. 1.915. Draft of H.M. Warrant to Governor Hunter for using the new Seal of Jamaica. [C.O. 138, 17. pp. 280, 281].
Oct. 1. 916. Similar draft for Barbados. [C.O. 29, 15. pp. 116, 117.]
Oct. 2.
Canso.
917. Governor Philipps to the Duke of Newcastle. Announces his arrival in the latter end of June, "whereto, both my desire and duty had carry'd me sooner, but for want of such powers and instructions as I then thought, and doe still presume to think quite necessary to procure the settlement and security of this Province." Continues:—It is now with great satisfaction I acquaint your Grace of the great growth of this harbour in the Fishing trade since the time when it was first settled and incouraged by me, having found at my entrance not less than 250 vessels and 1,500 or 2,000 hands imploy'd in catching, cureing and loading of fish for several marketts, the returns whereof to Great Brittain is thought to advance more the revennue of the Customs, then the produce of any Province upon this Continent of the longest settlement, Virginia excepted. Many familys wou'd settle here if they saw the commencement of a fortification for their protection, which till then they look upon to be very precarious in reguard of the numbers and strength of the enemy in case of a rupture at any time with France, and the near neighbourhood of Cape Breton, where no industry or expence has been wanting to make themselves formidable. Having settled matters here as far as the time would admit, to the general satisfaction of the people who have been under some discouragement, I am now preparing to proceed to Annapolis Royall, where I am likewise expected with impatience having receiv'd assureances from the French inhabitants that they will comply with whatever tearmes of submission and obedience that I shall propose to them : Such is the universall joy that appears from every quarter that leaves me no room to doubt of being able in a little time to give your Grace a sattisfactory account of the affaires of this Province etc. I was in hopes to have found the vessell which was built for the service of this Government in a condition to be repair'd, but having appointed a survey of ship carpenters to examine her, upon their report (enclosed) the vessell was sold at publick vendue, with the produce whereof and addition of £250 have bought another vessell of a less burthen and more fitt for the service, without which I could no way remove from hence, and therefore pray that I may have orders to continue her in the service, which I cannot pretend to carry on but by moving from place to place as there shall be occasion ; her expence will not be above half so much as the other's which requir'd a complement of twelve men, whereas six sailers will suffise for this ; she is new and strong and with due care may serve the Government twenty years etc. There goes home one William Richards prisoner on board the Rose man of warr who I had hyred for a footman at my leaving England etc. The whole matter is contained in enclosed affidavits etc. Signed, R. Philipps. Endorsed, R. Dec. 6th. 4 pp. Enclosed,
917. i. Address of inhabitants and fishermen of Canso to Governor Philipps. Canso, July 8, 1729. Welcome his arrival etc. 58 signatures. Copy. 1 p.
917. ii. Address of Joshua Peirce and others to Governor Philipps. Canso, Aug. 19, 1729. On behalf of "the Gentlemen, Shoremen and Fishery of this place," express the universal satisfaction with his administration, "in that your Excellency has promised them a confirmation of all their former grants for lands" etc. Pray that the many petty differences which dayly arise in the Fishery may be decided by a civil magistracy appointed by H.E. etc. Signed, Joshua Peirce, Stephen Perkins, Elias Davis, Thos. Kilby. Copy. 1 p.
917. iii. Andrew Le Mercier to Governor Philipps. Boston, 28th Sept., 1729. Proposals, by a French Minister, for setting a Colony of French Protestants in Nova Scotia. Asks for a grant of 120 acres to each of 100 families to be brought over from London free of charge and settled in a township to be called New Caen, with a weekly market and annual fair, and be free of taxes and duties for 7 years. A loan of £2,000 in paper bills to be granted them for purchase of cattle and provisions etc., 5000 acres to be given to the under- taker or undertakers. The agreement to be void if the settlement is not accomplished within 2½ years of April 1st, 1730, etc. Copy. 2½ pp.
917. iv. Deposition of Thomas Grayson. Canso. 6th Sept., 1729. On 3rd June, 1729, William Richards described to him how Sir John Williams had killed a man named Williams in a duel in his house in Monmouthshire and, with the aid of Richards, his servant, had thrown the body into the river, etc. Afterwards Sir John advised Richards to get a service to go beyond sea, and he went with Govr. Philipps etc. Richards on examination admitted this. 2 pp.
917. v. Survey of H.M. schooner William Augustus. Canso. 16 July, 1729. It will cost more to repair than will purchase a new one etc. Signed, John Corny, Master, and three others. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 38. Nos. 24, 24 i.—v.]
Oct. 2.
Canso.
918. Governor Philipps to Lord Townshend. Duplicate of preceding covering letter. Same signature and endorsement. 4 pp. Enclosed,
918. i. Copy of No. 917 v. preceding. [C.O. 217, 38. Nos. 25, 25 i.].
Oct. 2.
Canso.
919. Same to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Duplicate of preceding covering letter. Signed, R. Philipps. Endorsed, Recd. 6th Dec, 1729, Read 11th May, 1730. 4 pp. Enclosed,
919. i. Copy of No. 917 v. [C.O. 217, 5. ff. 168–169u., 170u.–171, 172v.; and (abstract of covering letter) 217, 30. pp. 35, 36].
Oct. 3.
Custom
ho.,
London.
920. Mr. Carkesse to Mr. Popple. Encloses following for the information of the Board of Trade. Signed, Cha. Carkesse. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd Oct., 1729, Read 15th June, 1731. ½ p. Enclosed,
920. i. Mr. Fitzwilliam, Surveyor General of the Customs for the Southern Continent of America, to the Commissioners of the Customs. New Providence. 30th June, 1729. The principal place of the Bahama Islands is this of Providence, where the Governour and all the publick officers have their residence at a small village called Nassau, a good harbour for small ships defended by a regular fort etc. In this Island are the bulk of the inhabitants, consisting of about 500 white people and 250 negro's, but like soon to be augmented by the removal of 50 or 60 familys from Harbour Island and Ilathera who being exposed to the ravages of the Spaniards from Cuba and without any place of defence to retire to more [? = were] by order of the Governour and Council directed to abandon their settlements for a place of greater safety: and for the other islands etc., they are as yet uninhabited, except in the season for making of salt, and cutting wood, that the people of this place resort to Exuma for salt, and the other islands for wood which is at present their best and most vendible staple. It is easy to judge how little trade can be carried on by such a handfull of people, who require but small supplies of European commodities, and have little ability to furnish much in return, since besides the providing common necessarys for their own subsistance, there is no great improvement yet made of the commodities the soil naturally produces, some attempts have been made in sugar, but want of hands and money to erect works and buildings requisit for such an undertaking makes that manufacture go on very slowly. The great quantity of brasiletta and other dying wood, and of Madeira manchinele, mohoggony and other trees fit for building vessells and other uses, and their cinamon bark called there cortex winterranea, and the sweet wood bark called Cortex Ilatharia, might prove valuable commodities for export, and encourage the clearing of the ground for the improvement of all the commodities which any of the West India islands produce ; but as there is no immediate export for these directly to Great Britain and the inhabitants unable to transport them in shippping of their own, these commodities do not turn to that account which otherwise might be made of them; it is also said by the Spaniards that the Jesuits bark is to be found here, but the inhabitants have not yet made the discovery where it grows. The chief trade here at present is by imploying their vessells, (of which there are about 20 but very small) in carrying Maddara and Mohoggony wood, turtle, lemons, oranges, pine apples etc. to South Carolina and bringing back provisions, and going to Jamaica and being imploy'd in sugar droging during the time of lading the snipping there, and what they earn is returned thence in rum and molosses, and sometimes they export cotton of their own product to the other plantations, but hitherto in no great quantity. I have regulated some matters with relation to the Naval Officer, and as Mr. Fairfax is a man very capable and diligent in his duty, I doubt not the trade will remain under a sufficient inspection without enhancing the expence by the expence of a shallop, as I find has been proposed by the Governor and Collector etc. Signed, Richard Fitzwilliam. Copy. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 23, 2. ff. 249, 250–251, 252.]
Oct. 3.
Kensington.
921. Duke of Newcastle to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their report with all possible expedition, as the last ship to sail for New England this season will depart in eight or ten days. Signed, Holles Newcastle. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 6th Oct., 1729. ¾ p. Enclosed,
921. i. Petition of Francis Wilks and Jonathan Belcher, Agents for the House of Representatives of Massachusetts Bay, to the King. Your Majesty's said Province hath lain under great hardships and difficulties ever since the arrival of H.E. William Burnett Esq., who from his first coming into that Government to this time, as is humbly apprehended, hath made the general good and welfare of the whole Province subservient to his own private particular interest, and hath seemed by his words and actions to have no other end or view in coming to preside over them but to consult his own advantage, and at the same time to be wholly regardless of that of the whole Province. But as the Province is fully sensible he can be no ways protected in such his actions by your Majesty who is peculiarly distinguished not only throughout all Europe but the American world also for your great clemency and paternal regard to all your people, and in giving to them in the enjoyment of all their just rights and liberties all proper countenance and support etc. One of the first steps of Mr. Burnett's Government was demanding a sallary to be settled on him and his successors in perpetuity, which, as it was what had never been done from the first foundation of Government in that Province and the then Assembly apprehending it to be inconsistent with the Constitution and laws of their country to grant the Governor a sallary for any longer time than from session to session, they could not agree thereto. But they very cheerfully and unanimously voted him such an allowance for the year then current as your Majesty was pleased to think sufficient as to the quantum, and gave him all possible assurances that he should never want a support suitable to the honour and dignity of his Government. Upon which the Governor, in great violation of the trust reposed in him, did all in his power to harrass and distress the Representatives of that Assembly, sometimes by very long and unusual sittings, and then by short and hasty prorogations, and by adjourning them from the Court House at Boston the usual and general place of its sitting (and which is by far the most commodious in the whole Province for that purpose) to Salem, a place very incommodious, and no ways fitting for the reception of such a body, and where he kept them sitting several months in a most severe and difficult season, and at a time when the business of the Province did not require the continuance of the General Session. The present Great and General Assembly, which is the second since Mr. Burnett's arrival, were by the writts appointed to meet at Salem, the Governor still insisting the Assembly should be held there, no ways regarding ye hardships and distresses the great inconveniencies of that place hath and must bring upon the Members, on the contrary seeming to hold the Assembly there on that very account, as if he took pleasure and delighted in the difficulties he thereby brought upon the House, and hath harrass'd and vexed the Representatives by not suffering them to do necessary business for the good of the Province, and by these and other his proceedings and administration hath brought great damage to the Province. For tho' various affairs of great importance to the Province had in the last and preceding sessions been referred over for the consideration of the Great and General Court at this Session, yet on the first meeting of this Assembly which was on the 28th of May last, the Governor made no speech to ye Court, as usual, nor recommended to them by message or otherwise any business for their consideration, and the second day of the Session the Governor prorogued the Court to the 25th of June last, which proved very detrimental to the Province in retarding the affairs of the Session, they having done no public business saving the election of Councellors, and created needless trouble and expence, besides bringing great trouble and fateigue on the Members in journeying to and from Salem. The General Court met on the day appointed by prorogation, and the House sent up and acquainted the Governor that they were a quorum, and ready to proceed to the business of the Session, but to which they had no return from the Governor. Whereupon, and as the House had nothing recommended to them from the Governor, and the Representatives who attended the long and fateiguing session in 1728 having not received their accustomed allowance or pay, occasioned by the Governor's refusing to sign a warrant for that purpose, tho' the Clerk of the House had laid before him the proper certificates, and upon which the Governor was bound by law, as Petitioners conceive, to issue his warrt. for their payment, and notwithstanding he had signed like warrts for payment of the Council, the House etc. on 3rd July sent up a message to the Governor addressing him in the most strong and pressing terms on their behalf. But the only return made was that he should lay that matter before the Lords of Trade and take their directions thereon, which the House in a matter of this nature could not but look on as a denial to do justice to those members etc., it being in effect a repetition of the refusal to sign any warrants for their pay, which is conceived to be a very unwarrantable practice in the Governor etc. By the constitution and usage of this Province the revenue or supplys for defraying the expence of the Government is annual, being raised and appropriated by act of Assembly from year to year, and is usually one of the first acts they pass etc., but the Governor, as is humbly apprehended, in manifest breach of his duty, and neglect of the good and welfare of so large a Province etc., hath refused to suffer any act to be passed for raising and appropriating the annual supplys for the service of the current year, unless done in a method apprehended to be inconsistent with the welfare and safety of the Province, for the House having on the 2nd of July last come into a resolve for supplying the Treasury with twenty thousand pounds bills of credit for the necessary support and defence of the Government etc. to be issued out and disposed of by warrant under the hand of the Governor with the advice and consent of the Council, to be applyed to the several publick uses therein mentioned, which resolve, being worded in the accustomed manner, was sent up for concurrence, the next day the Governor by message acquainted the House that the Board had concurred the said resolve as desired, but that he did not think proper to consent to any form for supply of the Treasury but what was practiced before the year 1721, which was to grant the money without appropriating the same to any particular uses. But as this method was ofttimes found by experience to be the occasion of uncomfortable disputes between the two Houses, and lyable to great inconvenience and abuse by misapplications of the publick money, for the future prevention of all which mischeifs the method now in use etc. was agreed upon after very solemn and mature consideration and debate both by the Council and the House and consented to by the Commander in Cheif, and as the method now used is, as the House most humbly conceives both reasonable in itself, and agreeable to the power granted by their Charter, as is expressly allowed by the report of the late Attorney and Sollicitor General on Collonel Shute's complaint, and confirmed in Council by your Majesty's late Royal Father, and as under this method the debts of the publick have been as punctually answered, and the honour and justice of the Legislature as well preserved as before, so the Governor could not but well know and foresee the Assembly could never come into the same injurious methods as were practiced before 1721 etc., and therefore the House could not but consider this as flung into the Governor's message meerly to bear here at home some appearance and colour of a reason for his negativing so essential a resolve, and the welfare of the Province greatly depending hereon. The House on the 4th of July came into fresh resolves, and sent up renewed messages respecting the supply of the Treasury and the pay of the Representatives for the last year, setting forth in the most pressing manner the great necessity of a concurrence with them herein, but without any return. The House foreseeing what confusion and perplexity must soon come upon them for want of money in ye Treasury and being thus strang(e)ly treated by the Governor, and dreading the tendency and effect hereof, on the 9th of July last appointed a Committee to prepare an humble Address to be presented to your Majesty, respecting the difficulties the Province labours under from the male administration of the Governor, and the same day a Memorial was laid before the House signed by a number of merchants setting forth sundry burthens and hardships they laboured under with respect to the extraordinary and illegal fees lately exacted on the shipping by the Governor, and praying to be releived therein, which was committed to the consideration of the Committee for greivances. The House ye same 9th of July voted that a message should be sent to the Governor to acquaint him that the House was desirous to enter into the consideration of ye usual allowances and therefore desired him to pass the supply of the Treasury, that so the honour and dignity of the Government might be supported, but to which the Governor returned only the same answer as before, and the next day the House voted that they would proceed to the proportioning each town to a tax of one thousand pounds at three a clock that afternoon, and would at four a clock enter into the consideration of an allowance to H.E. etc. The Committee of greivances having on the said 10th of July met and considered of the several matters committed to them, agreed to report the following heads of greivances vizt. The Governor's denying issuing warrants for the pay of the Representatives the last year, his holding the Assembly at Salem, his refusing to concurr with the resolve of the two Houses for supplying ye Treasury, his not passing the impost bill, which both Houses had passed the 3rd of June, his not suffering the Court to sit but 2 days in May session, and then calling them together during their harvest season, and in the busie time of the year and keeping them 15 days together without anything recommended from him to them, and at the same time denying his assent to all such matters as the two Houses in discharge of their duty had gone upon and passed, except some muster rolls and accots., and his exacting unjustifiable fees on the shipping; but to prevent any report being made of these matters or any vote or resolution of ye House thereon, the Governor on the said 10th of July last without any the least previous notice abruptly prorogued the said Great and General Court to Wednesday the 20th of Augst. following then to meet at Salem aforesaid. By this male-administration of the Governor the Province is wholly defeated of ye benefit arising from ye meeting of ye sd. General Court and Assembly intended them by their Charter, the support and defence of the Government deserted, and left unprovided for, the revenue destroyed, the trade and snipping of ye Province distressed and the priviledges and franchise of the Charter invaded and broke in upon by the sole art and means of the Governor, and the terrible consequences of ye Treasury being quite empty of money, and having no supply for the necessary support and occasions of the Government are now impending over this unhappy Province, and 'tis much to be feared will be too soon felt by them unless speedily releived by your Majesty's most gracious interposition. Your petitioners must humbly hope the well-being of so large a part of your Majesty's American subjects and Dominions shall not be thus prejudiciously affected by any disagreement or dispute between the Governor and Assembly relating to the manner of supporting the Governor. Therefore, and as the last ship which sails for ye sd. Province this year will be going in a very short time, and unless some order be given in the premisses to the Governor by such ship the Province must lie bleeding under these their distresses for six or seven months to come, your Petitioners most humbly pray your Majesty to take their distressed and deplorable condition into your most royal and paternal consideration, and that proper directions may be forthwith sent to the Governor for redressing the oppressive greivances of the inhabitants etc. Signed, Francis Wilks, Jonathan Belcher. 2 large, closely written pp. Torn. [C.O. 5, 870. ff. 273, 274v.–275v.]
Oct. 6.922. H.M. Warrants to the Governors of Barbados, Virginia, Jamaica and S. Carolina, for using the new seals (described) and returning the old ones. Countersigned, Holles Newcastle. [C.O. 324, 36. pp. 156–162; and 324, 50. pp. 5, 6.]
Oct. 6.
Whitehall.
923. Mr. Wheelock to Francis Wilks and Jonathan Belcher, Agents for the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay. Desires them to attend the Board with proofs in support of the allegations in their petition against Governor Burnet. [C.O. 5, 916. p. 207.]
Oct. 7.
Kensington
924. Duke of Newcastle to Governor Hunter. In accordance with representation of Board of Trade, H.M. is pleased to order that a noli prosequi be granted Mr. Donavan. Signed, Holles Newcastle. [C.O. 324, 36. p. 163; and 137, 53. ff. 178, 178v.]
Oct. 7.
Boston.
925. Lt. Governor Dummer to the Duke of Newcastle. Encloses journal of General Assembly to end of Session. Continues:—Your Grace will see by my Speech to the Assembly, and my Message to the House of Representatives that I have used my endeavours to bring the House to [a] sense of their duty to H.M., with respect to fixing the salary etc., supposing myselfe to be under obligation so to do inasmuch as the Government, and thereby H.M. instructions for ordering the same is now devolved on me: altho' I cannot say I had any hopes of convincing them, after the fruitless endeavours of a gentleman of so much address as the late Governour etc. Your Grace will observe that in the Representatives' message, in answer to my speech, they express it as their opinion that the aforesaid instruction does no wayes relate to me as Commander in Cheif, wch. I answered as is incerted in the said Journals; and that occationed another short message from them which seems to be intended as a final refusal to fix a salary. And now I must pray your Grace's directions, how I am further to proceed in this affair; for I am very intent faithfully and punctually to observe H.M. Instructions while I have the honour to bee continued in the command here. I think it necessary to observe to your Grace that ever since that clause appointing the muster rolls to bee past on by the whole Court was brought into the resolve for supply of the Treasury, wch. was first done in 1721 etc., there has always been some opposition made to it by the Council, but it has nevertheless had their concurrence, and the Governour's consent to this day. The case as it was stated by the late Governour is in the Journals and the answer of the Representatives etc. The necessity of the supply of the Treasury for the support of the Government has weighed with me in the passing of it, as it has been don for eight years past, having no prospect of retreiving that article at present: but it seems to me that the clause in the Charter, on which that matter depends, does require an explanation from the Crown, or it will bee every year an occation of fruitless contention in the Legislature to the prejudice of H.M. service and the publick good. It may not be impropper further to observe to your Grace that as the Representatives have determin'd not to settle a salary according to H.M. Instructions, and that as I shall not in the l[e]ast depart from it, there is like to bee no support for the Chair in this Government for some time etc. Received letters of 25th and 26th June to Governor Burnet after he had spoken to the Representatives, "nevertheless I was so happy as to intimate to them the principal matter directed to in the private letter; but without success." Signed, Wm. Dummer. Holograph. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 898. No. 60.]
Oct. 7.
Boston.
926. Same to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Repeats preceding, mutatis mutandis. Acknowledges letter of 28th May, and concludes:—There being a clause in it, which relates to the government of New Hampshire, I shall acquaint Mr. Wentworth the Lieutenant Governor with it. Signed, Wm. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. 21st Nov., 1729, Read 9th June, 1731. 2? pp. [C.O. 5, 872. ff. 100, 101–102v., 103v.]
Oct. 8.
Whitehall.
927. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Newcastle. Governor Burnet's Agent has desired a reasonable time for obtaining his answer to the petition of Messrs. Wilks and Belcher (v. 3rd Oct.), "which, in common justice, and according to the usual course of our proceedings on complaints against any person, was not to be refused." Continue:—But in the mean time we thought it not improper to inform yor. Grace, that some of the matters complain'd of by this petition, have already been determin'd upon by H.M. in Council; some of them have been already redress'd by the Governor, and as to ye rest, we have not, nor can have, any proper proofs before us, till we have an opportunity of hearing both parties. How- ever, as ye petition complains, that ye current service of the year, cannot be carry'd on, for want of Mr. Burnet's assent to ye mony bill, which they alledge to be conceiv'd in ye form for such bills, used ever since 1721, we would humbly propose, that notwithstanding the Assembly seem finally to have refused to comply with H.M. Instructions relating to the Governor's salary; Mr. Burnet should be directed not to throw the Province into confusion, or put a stop to the publick business by refusing to give his assent to the sd. bill, or bills, unless there should be some particulars contained therein, contrary to their Charter, or to H.M. Instructions. [C.O. 5, 916. pp. 208, 209.]
Oct. 8.
St. Johns.
928. Capt. Taverner to Mr. Popple. I came late to this countrey occasioned by a long pasadge, ye last of July I hyred a sloop and went with a cargo of goods as far north as Cape Grotte, ye nothermost Cape in N.f.land, where fisht 6 large ships of St. Mallo, sum of them 100 men: 20 boats, ye first of agust they had pr. boate about 90 qls., the fish then wose gon of, 2 ships fisht in other harbours, I wose aboard one of them which had about 100 pr. boat. At Capt. (? Cape) Grote ye Commander of ships came on board, and toock away my sailes and rudder, pretending to sease me though many of them new me, because I could not produce a pass: nither would they deale with me for that reason, as they pretended, but ye great reason wose, they weare sorrey to se me in yt. place, for one of the Captns. told me I wose a terrour to al ye coast, that they had never seen an Englishman theare before, and perhaps in two or three years I might com and tack at theare ships from them in case of a wore: with a great deal of diffucalty I gat my sailes and ruder and returned without doeing any thing, which wose a voidge to my loss, however I purpose to goe all round ye land next sumer, at my own charge without ye goverment will be so good as to allow me anything, in my returne I saw 3 Indians; and above 50 fiers they are a nation yt. is setled by themselves between the English and the French, should the Government think fitt to imploy me, I could soon bring that whole nation to head with us etc. Has been prevented from getting in his debts this season by this voyage etc. Signed, Wm. Taverner. Endorsed, Recd. 8th Dec, 1729, Read 8th April, 1730. Addressed. 1? pp. [C.O. 194, 8. ff. 283, 283v., 284v.]
Oct. 9.
Boston.
929. Col. Dunbar to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I landed here the 23rd of last month, since which a great many hundred men of those who came lately from Ireland as well as some English and Irish familys many years settled here, and likewise many natives of this country, who are uneasy under this forme of Government, applyed to me yt. they might settle to the Eastward of Kennebeck river, haveing heard from England that a new Province was erected between the river of Kennebeck and St. Croix by the name of Georgia and under my Goverment; and as the greatest part of those who lately came from Ireland had removed themselves to Pensilvania upon the ill-treatment they received here, where a very numerous mobb threatend and insulted them as foreigners, I have presumed upon your Lordships report to the Lords of the Council in favour of this new Settlement to promise all those people that they should have grants of lands from 50 to 100 acres pr. head in each family, paying one penny sterl. pr. ann. quit rent to H.M. after 10 years, subject to one penny more whenever H.M. should demand it to defray the expence of the Governmt.; this gave such general satisfaction that I have been exceedingly pressed to begin the Settlement without loss of time, soe that I goe hence by sea in 4 or 5 days with about 250 men, wth. their own armes, in behalf of themselves and many other familys who will follow in the spring to make a beginning at a place called Pemequid, as soon as they have got a covering, they intend to clear land make staves of all sizes and cutt timber for small vessels, all these they can doe in the frost and snow, and as soon as the spring opens, they will open ground and putt in garden seeds, grain and a little hemp, each; the soil has formerly been tryed and is very good, so that I hope within 18 months to send samples of hemp for the Navy and to give a good account of the other produce of the lands; I intend to call the first town St. Georges, and doubt not it will in some measure deserve that name. I am told there are 5 fathoms depth of water close to the bank at this intended scituation, wch. will encourage trade and ship building. Several people have been with me claiming large tracts of land in this Province by virtue of antient grants from King James and K. Charles the first and from the Council of Plymouth, and some Indian titles among them Doctor Cook at the head of a company of gentlemen and merchants who call themselves the Muscongos Company, the name of a river a little to the eastward of Pemequid, these Gent, shew a grant from the Council of Plymouth for thirty miles square dated in 1629, tho' never improved, they had since another grant under the late Duke of York (since K. James ye 2nd), but they would not claim under it because there was a reservation of one penny pr. acre chief rent, least the arrears should be demanded; I told them that ye title to those lands had been often changed since their first grant and that it was now absolutely in the Crowne, but that H.M. intended it should be given to such of his good subjects as would go upon ye immediate settlement and improvement thereof upon ye same conditions as before mention'd, wch. they possitively refused to accept, or to allow any consideration or acknowledgmt. to the King thô ever so small. Doctor Cook sayd they were in possession and would see who wd. dispute it, for his part he would as soon go to law with the King as any private man, his character is so well known at the Council Board, and Board of Trade, that I need not dwell upon it, but can't omit saying that he is here at the head of the obstinate faction who oppose all the King's measures and was lately the instrument of procureing their memorable act against duelling to put all upon a level, so that a man is lyable to common affronts to wear a sword or be distinguished like a gentleman, for by that act, to draw a sword, upon any pretence, without reserve, ye punishmt. is no less than to be drawn in a cart with a rope round one's neck to ye gallows, and there to sit upon it 2 hours, they have been remarkably insolent since this law, and if their acts are thought worthy of consideration at home, I should hope this one might be returned repealed wth. resentment it would mortifye them extreamly and they richly deserve it. To the eastward of Pemequid a few miles, there is a fine navigable river called Shepscott, where 2 different setts of people here claim large tracts, one sett are 58 in numbr. the other 32, they have the like old titles, but upon my telling them as I did the first company, they seem very well pleased and arc resolved to settle 2 towns compact and to improve each of them small tracts contiguous to the towns, some few of them are of the stiff-neckd generation here and talk like their oracle Dr. Cook. It is very probable that from the Doctor's party there may now go orders for application at home in behalf of their claim, wch. contains more than half a million of acres, it is impossible they can say any more of me than what I have here owned, to wch. I added that any man yt. has made any improvements or cleared ground should have such included in their grant provided they would goe upon the immediate settlement. I could wish yt. this famous Doctor could be stigmatized in being particularly excepted from haveing any part or grant. There are some small tribes of Indians near these intended settlements, who will expect some presents as those near New York, a small matter, wth. ye good useage I will allways give them, will keep them in peace and friendship, and this with a few guns, small armes and amunition is all the expence I wd. propose to the publique. I have received much civility since my landing here, but I observe it has been generally from such as are well affected to H.M. and heartily wish for a thorough reforme in this Government by Act of Parliament. I sayd they might wth. reason expect it if it could not be done by ye common course of law, and I added, for joke sake, yt. I did not doubt but a Governour would be sent over in the spring wth. a Commission for a Kingly Governmt. and a charter of incorporation for this great towne, with blanks to name a Mayor, Aldermen and Recorder in lieu of their boasted Charter, this gave great pleasure, and one of the gentlemen saying he would give a great deal to see that joyfull day took a guinea from me to give me 30 when he should be in that number. This may be made a usefull Colony to England if it be brought under a good regulation and in my humble opinion it is high time, it is very populous and ye people generally deem themselves independent, as is their religion, for they hate the Church of England and Presbiterians alike, and are a selfish dogmatical people; the town or Citty of New York is not near so large as this; and has a Charter with a Mayor etc., but if H.M. should be advised to give one to this town, I would humbly propose that it be not too extensive at first, but put ye people upon their good behaviour to deserve further favour in another. The Church of England labours under some discouragemts. here there being no allowance but to one Clergyman, and there are 2 churches, but the Clergy depending on ye courtesy of the people wch. is very precarious; thô these 2 churches are large they are well filled, and I am informed that wherever churches have been built, people have allways resorted; this Continent may deserve a Bishop resideing, his residence may be in Georgia, where provision may be made for him out of the quit rents and reserved penny pr. acre. I am firmly persuaded that a good man who would take pains this way and encourage schools might in time work a reformation among these independents. I could wish that Dean Berkeley's Colledge may go on, and that Georgia might be thought a proper place for it. It will be spring before I can have any answer to this letter and by that time I shall have a thousand familys settled at Pemequid and Shepscott; upon Kennebeck up some leagues there is a large forest of fine masts wch. will be part of what I am to reserve for H.M. My deputys are out upon their duty; in ye spring I shall send 2 of them to Nova Scotia to execute my instructions etc. Suggests the new Colony may be granted a free trade for their own use and consumption for 7 years etc. Signed, David Dunbar. Endorsed, Recd., Read 20th Nov. 1729. Addressed. Holograph. t pp. Enclosed,
929. i. Claim of Christopher Toppan to lands in the East Country, at Sheepscott etc. Same endorsement. Copy. ¾ p.
929. ii. Grant from the Council of Plymouth to John Beauchamp and Tho. Leveret of a piece of land in New England to the North and North East of Penobscot River containing ten leagues square and paying only a fifth part of all gold and silver ore found there. 13th March, 1629. Same endorsement. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 870. ff. 289–294v.]
Oct. 10.
Portsmo.
930. Lt. Governor Wentworth to Jeremiah Dunbar. Hopes that his presence will put a stop to the waste of pine-trees which he has endeavoured to prevent for the last ten years, at great expence to himself etc. Signed, J. Wentworth. Endorsed, in Col. Dunbar's, 10th Dec. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 10. No. 22.]
Oct. 10.
Kensington.
931. Duke of Newcastle to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have laid before the King your letter (8th Oct.) etc., upon which H.M. has been pleased to order that you should send to the petitioners (Wilks and Belcher) for a copy of the mony bill to which they complain that Governor Burnet refuses his assent, and report to H.M. your opinion whether it is consistent with the Charter of [the Massachusetts Bay], or with H.M. Instructions to Mr. Burnet; together with such further observations as may occurr to you upon the perusal of that bill etc. Signed, Holles Newcastle. Endorsed, Drat. to the Council of Trade, 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 752. No. 41.]