America and West Indies
December 1729, 1-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

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1937

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540-557

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'America and West Indies: December 1729, 1-10', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 36: 1728-1729 (1937), pp. 540-557. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72484 Date accessed: 18 September 2014.


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December 1729, 1-10

Dec. 2.
St. James's.
1000. Order of King in Council. Whereas the Lords of the Committee of Councill, have by their report this day laid before His Majesty (upon the proceedings of the Assembly of the Massachusets Bay, in not complying with H.M. Instructions, to settle a fixed salary upon H.M. Governor of that Province) humbly represented that they apprehend the death of Mr. Burnet may have caused some alteration in the temper of that Province, and abated the animosity of the dispute etc., which was become almost entirely personally and that the Agents of the said Province had declared their readiness to transmitt to the Assembly, any proposition which the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations should make towards obtaining a settled salary for H.M. Governor, and that they would, as far as was compatible with their station, enforce the success thereof, And the Lords of the Committee having considered and approved of a proposition prepared for that purpose by the said Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, Their Lordships do humbly advise H.M. to transmitt the said proposition to the said Assembly, and that H.M. would suspend his just resentment against the said Province untill such time as the effect of the said proposition should be known ; etc. Ordered, that the said Lords Commissioners for Trade transmit the said proposition to the Assembly, and that no proceedings be had upon the Order in Council of 22nd May, until the effect of the said proposition be known. Signed, Jas. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd, Read 30th Oct., 1729. 1¾ pp. Enclosed,
1000. i. Copy of a Proposition referred to in preceding. v. No. 969 i. [C.O. 5, 870. ff 299–301, 302v.]
Dec. 2.1001. Order of King in Council. Approving report of the Lords of the Committee of Council, upon considering the petition of the Assembly of Massachusetts Bay [Oct. 3], complaining against the proceedings of Mr. Burnet, the late Governor. An additional Instruction to the present Governor is to be prepared, prescribing the methods hereafter to be observed in the raising and issuing of moneys, and also requiring the Governors not to take or demand any fees on shipping but what are legall and have been customarily taken by the Governors of that Province etc. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd., Read 19th March, 1729/30. l¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 871. ff. 21, 21v., 22v.]
Dec. 2.
St. James's.
1002. Order of King in Council. Approving Additional Instructions to Lt. Governor Dummer relating to the issuing of moneys and fees on shipping, v. Jan. 2, 1730. Signed, Jas. Vernon. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 192. f. 429.]
Dec. 3
Whitehall.
1003. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Townshend. Enclose following. Autograph signatures. 1 p. Annexed,
1003. i. Same to the King. Enclose draft of Commission for Governor Lord Forbes, as ordered 22nd Nov. Mem. in margin. Ld. Forbes not going, his com- mission is not entered, v. April 30th, 1731. [C.O. 153, 15. pp. 37, 38 ; and (without enclosure) 152, 40. No. 28.]
Dec. 4.
Barbados.
1004. Governor Worsley to the Duke of Newcastle. The 9th Nov. I received the Queen's Order in Council of the 18th Aug., that the law for supporting the honour and dignity of the Government is in force etc.; which I laid before the Council, and Assembly, and have published the same in all the towns, and churches, nevertheless by the 14th clause of the law (quoted), they, who have not given in the list of their negroes, or whose negro's have been tendered to the Assembly men, but not by them returned to the Treasurer, think, they are acquitted for the same, and thus tho' it is enacted by the 1st clause, that any persons possessed of any negro etc. shall pay for each 2s. 6d. between 1st May and 1st June, and shall between 25th March and 12th April give in a list of their negroes to the Assembly men of their respective parishes, and the Assembly men of each parish, are to give in their own negros upon oath to the Treasurer, yet as seventeen of the Assembly men have returned no list of the negros of the inhabitants of their respective parishes, nor have given in their own, the Treasurer excuses himself in that for want of lists, he could not know what negro's each person had in those parishes, and that the law does not impower him to proceed against any, whose list of negroes has not been returned, or who has not been returned for not giving them in. Quotes 10th clause. Continues:—But as the Treasurer by the 14th clause could not proceed against any person after 1st Oct., the doubt is, whether he, and his securitys are liable to pay the levys, and forfeitures of those, who have not given in their lists of negro's, or paid for them, or whether H.M. Attorney General here is to sue them for it; for certainly no person can be excused his tax, on account of the neglect of the officers appointed by the law to collect it; or of the dis- obedience of the persons, who ought to pay it, etc. Since the publishing H.M. orders in Council, some few have paid their levy. Refers to letter of 6th Nov. Continues:—The new Assembly etc. have passed an Excise bill etc. enclosed. The same persons have been returned for Assembly men, etc. They may perhaps, give me some trouble, yet the usual supply, for the ordinary expences of the Government, for the ensueing year, are raised etc. Signed, Henry Worsley. Endorsed, R. 3rd Feb. 5 pp. Enclosed,
1004. i. Mr. Tunckes to Governor Worsley. Barbados, Dec. 1st, 1729. In reply to reference of letter of Board of Trade, gives his opinion on the Act for reducing the rate of interest to 8p.c, that the validity of contracts made upon the 10 p.c. laws will not be affected by it etc. Signed, Tho. Tunckes. Copy. l½ pp.
1004. ii. Mr. Blenman to Governor Worsley. Nov. 26th, 1729. As the rule is to construe statutes according to the intent of the law-makers, agrees with preceding. Signed, J. Blenman. Copy. 1 p.
1004. iii. Galacius McMahon to Governor Worsley. Nov. 22, 1729. Agrees with preceding, but suggests that an explanatory act might be advisable etc. Signed, Galacius McMahon. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 45. ff. 77v, 79, 81, 81v., 83–85, 86v.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
1005. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Committee of the Privy Council. Pursuant to order of 23rd Oct. we have reconsidered our reports etc. Continue :—Having discours'd further with Mr. Coram and Mr. Hintz, about the method of settling some Irish and Palatine families and adjusted with them the several conditions upon which the Palatines are to be encouraged to settle at or near Annapolis and Canco, and likewise consider'd upon what terms the said Irish famines are to be incouraged to transplant themselves from New England to the lands between the Rivers Kennebeck and St. Croix, we take leave further to report, that by letters lately received from Col. Dunbar etc., we are informed that several antient claims to tracts of land to the eastward of Pemaquid, a fort between the Rivers Kennebeck and Penobscot, have been revived ; Whereupon we had recourse to your Lordships report of 17th Dec, 1720, upon a petition of William West etc., and a representation made thereupon the 21st of May, 1718, relating to a settlement, which the petitioners then desired to make upon some waste and uninhabited lands between Nova Scotia and the Province of Maine; quoted. See C.S.P. under dates. Continue:—Considering therefore that some doubts may still remain with respect to H.M. right of granting lands between the Rivers of Kennebeck and Penobscot, to avoid all difficulties till such time as H.M. title shall be cleared up to the lands between those two rivers; and being desirous that no time should be lost in making settlements in this part of Nova Scotia; we would propose to your Lordships, for the present, that Col. Dunbar should be instructed to settle such of H.M. subjects as are willing- to become planters in Nova Scotia, between the Rivers of Penobscot and St. Croix, and whenever H.M. title shall be made out, as we hope it may, that they may likewise be settled by grants from the Crown, due regard being always had to such settlements, as have heretofore been actually made and cultivated under legall titles; But we must observe, that according to the best infor- mation we have hitherto been able to acquire, all the lands from Canço to the River Kennebeck were possessed by the French, before the Peace of Ryswick, and continued in their possession till reconquered during the last war by General Nicholson at the expence of the Crown, and we have some reason to believe, that all the said lands from Canco to Kennebeck were included in the Commission of Monsr. Subercasse then Governor of Nova Scotia for the French; and as soon as we shall have acquired more certain knowledge of these facts, we intend to referr the same to the consideration of H.M. Attorney and Sollicitor Generall, for their opinion, how far such antient titles, as have never been carried into actuall possession and culture may be extinguished or affected by these resolutions, and consequently whether the right be not again devolved to the Crown. But in the mean time, in obedience to your Lordships' order, we lay before you the manner which we apprehend may be most convenient for the settlements now proposed to be made, either by H.M. subjects at Penobscot, or the Palatines near Canço and Anapolis. As to these settlements, and the encouragements to be given for making of them, we are humbly of opinion, the best method to be followed is that of New England, with some small alterations. The custom in the Province of the Massachusets Bay, is when forty families or thereabouts are disposed to make a new settle- ment, the Government grant them a tract of land from seven to twelve miles square and this grant is called a Township. A convenient place in this land is set apart for a town, and a lot of 40 acres there granted to each family, as likewise 100 acres or more of lands without the said town to each of the said families, and the rest of the lands within the precincts of this township, are reserved for the said inhabitants and granted to them from time to time, as their numbers and occasions may require the same. But care is allways taken to set apart lands in the first settling of every township for the maintenance of a Minister, a Church and a Grammar School. By this means, the inhabitants acquire some sort of security against the savages, and are of mutual assistance to each other ; and so soon as they are sufficiently settled, become intitled to all the priviledges of a township, of which the principal is that [? of] sending Members to the Assembly. If your Lordships shall approve of this method, we shall prepare Instructions for Col. Dunbar and likewise for the Governor of Nova Scotia, wherein we shall enter more particularly into the detail for the execution thereof, with respect to the quit-rents, reservations and restrictions necessary upon this occasion. Mr. Hintz is of opinion he can perswade the Palatines, as your Lordships desire he should, to settle near Canço and Annapolis, and that they will be contented to take up lands there upon the same terms and in the same manner as the Irish families shall do on the other side of the Province. But he declares it will be utterly impossible for him to make a voyage into Germany, at his own expence, and therefore humbly insists that he be allowed for himself and two other Palatines to assist him twenty shillings pr. diem for four months, which will amount to £120, which we conceive to be reasonable, and considering the importance of the service, cannot but hope his demand herein may be thought so likewise by your Lordships. [C.O. 218, 2. pp. 158–165.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
1006. Same to the Duke of Newcastle. In reply to Nov. 20th, enclose following, prepared in answer to previous directions from the Committee of Council etc. v. following. Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
1006. i. Copy of preceding representation. [C.O. 5, 4. Nos. 39, 39 i; and (without enclosure) 218, 2. p. 166.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
1007. Order of Committee of Privy Council. Approving representation of 4th inst., and ordering Instructions to be prepared accordingly for the Governor of Nova Scotia and Col. Dunbar, relating to the proposed settlements at Penobscot and near Canço and Annapolis. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 16th Dec, 1729. 1 p. Enclosed,
1007. i. Copy of No. 1005. [C.O. 217, 5. ff 134, 135–138, 139v.]
Dec. 8.1008. Thomas Lowndes to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Exact Charts of all the coasts, harbours etc. of H.M. American Dominions, and maps of all the inland territory might be procured with great advantage to the publick, and without any additional charge. If North Carolina which (ever since 'twas a seperate Government) has only been a receptacle for pyrates, thieves and vagabonds of all sorts, was made a district of Virginia and the quitt rents for lands let out duely received; there would be a competent fond, to reward a knowing and honest man, to make such a noble and usefull survey. The establishment for Officers in the Pro- prietors time, which the quitt-rents always discharged, amounted to £480, and if a rental was obtained (which the Proptrs. could never get) would amount to a much greater sum. The soyl of North Carolina is much better than that of Virginia, its timber is of the largest growth, there is great quantity of iron oar and (according to information) good reason to expect copper-mines, and the New England traders get from thence a very great quantity of the best pitch and tarr, in barter for rum, spirits, melosses etc., which would bear a moderate duty, to make up any deficiency, that might happen to the fond proposed etc. and provide for a light-house on the point of Hilton-Head Island in the Gulf of Florida, where there is great plenty of noble timber etc. etc. Signed, Tho. Lowndes. Endorsed, Recd. 8th Dec, 1729, Read 13th March, 1729/30. Holograph. 3¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 361. ff. 62–63v., 64v.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
1009. Mr. Popple to the Governors of H.M. Islands in America. My Lords Commrs. having received H.M. Orders to make a representation upon the general state of His islands in America etc., desire your particular answer to inclosed queries as soon as possibly you can. Annexed,
1009. i. Queries enclosed in preceding, (i) What Islands are there, under your Government, settled or unsettled, their latitudes and longitudes ? (ii) have those latitudes and longitudes been settled by good observations, and from whence are the longitudes computed ? (iii) What is their soil and natural produce ? (iv) What are they capable of producing, if improved ? (v) What is their trade, the number of shipping belonging thereto, their tonnage, and the number of seafaring men, with their respective increase or diminution, since 1724? (vi) What quantity and sorts of British manufactures do the inhabitants annually take from hence? (vii) What trade have they with any foreign Plantations, or any part of Europe besides Great Britain? How is that trade carried on: what commodities do the people under your Government send to or receive from foreign Plantations? (viii) What methods are there used to prevent illegal trade, and are the same effectual? (ix) Are there any manufactures set up in the islands under your Government, and what are they? (x) What may be the annual produce of the commodities of each respective island? (xi) What is the number of inhabitants, whites and blacks? Are they increased or decreased of late, and for what reasons? (xii) What is the number of the militia, in each respective island? (xiii). What forts and places of defence are there, within your Government, and in what condition? (xiv) What is the strength of your neighbours? (xv) What effect have the French, Spanish or other foreign settlements upon H.M. Islands under your Government? (xvi) What is the revenue arising within your Government, and how is it appropriated? (xvii) What numbers of acres of land are there already cultivated in each respective island? And what number of acres there by computation remain uncultivated? (xviii) What are the ordinary and extraordinary expences of your Government? What the present revenue, and how appropriated? (xix) What are the establishments civil and military? It is desired, that an annual return may be made to these queries, that the Board may from time to time be apprized of any alterations that may happen in the circumstances of your Govern- ment. [C.O. 153, 15. pp. 38–41; and 324, 11. pp. 11–14.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
1010. Mr. Popple to Governor Worsley. I am commanded by my Lords Commissioners to remind you of my letter dated 27th March, 1724, inclosing several queries for your answer with their Lordps' desire that annual returns be made thereto, that the Board might be from time to time apprized of any alterations in the circumstances of that island under your Government, and their Lordships not having received any such answers from you since 18th Oct., 1724, you will receive herewith inclosed the like queries for your particular answers, which I am to desire you will let their Lordships have as soon as possibly you can. Annexed,
1010. i. Queries, as C.S.P. 27th March, 1724, with request for answers as from 18th Oct. 1724. To query iii. relating to trade with foreign Plantations, the following note is added:—In your answer dated 18th Oct. 1724, to what methods were taken to prevent illegal trade, you mentioned a sloop being appointed for that purpose to prevent goods running in small creeks; Is there any such continued, and is that illegal trade you then mentioned any better prevented than it had been? Or does it still continue? If so, what may be best done to prevent such evil practices for the future without burthening the revenue of ye Customs, with too great an expence? And how stand the generality of the people of Barbados inclined to promote or discourage a smugling trade with Martinico or any other foreign Plantations? [C.O. 29, 15. pp. 118–121]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
1011. Mr. Popple to the Governors on the Continent of America (including the Governor and Company of Connecticut and Rhode Island). Circular letter enclosing following queries from the Board of Trade, (i) What is the situation of the Province [Colony] under your Government, the nature of the country, soil and climate, the latitudes and longitudes of the most considerable places in it, or the neighbouring French or Spanish settlements? Have those latitudes and longitudes been settled by good observations, or only by common compu- tations, and from whence are the longitudes computed? (ii) What are the reputed boundaries, and are any parts thereof disputed, what parts, and by whom? (iii) What is the con- stitution of the Government? (iv) What is the trade of the Province (Colony), the number of shipping, their tonnage, and the number of seafaring men, with the respective increase or diminution, within ten years past? (v) What quantity and sorts of British manufactures do the inhabitants annually take from hence? (vi) What trade has the Province (Colony) with any foreign Plantation, or any part of Europe, besides Great Britain? How is that trade carry'd on? What commodities do the people send to, or receive from foreign Plantations? (vii) What methods are there used to prevent illegal trade, are the same effectual? (viii) What is the natural produce of the country, staple commodities and manufactures [for Virginia and Maryland, add besides tobacco]? and what value thereof in sterling money may you annually export? (ix) What mines are there? (x–xiii) Queries as Nos. xi–xiii in 1009 i. (xiv) What number of Indians have you, and how are they inclined ? (xv) What is the strength of the neighbouring Indians? (xvi) What is the strength of your neighbouring Europeans, French or Spaniards? xvii–xx, as xv–xix in 1009 i. [C.O. 324, 11. pp. 152–156 ; and 5, 916. p. 223.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
1012. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Newcastle. In reply to Nov. 12th, enclose following. Annexed,
1012. i. Same to the King. Recommend confirmation of three Acts of Jamaica as being of great utility to the public, as they encourage the settlements now going forward at Port Antonio; vizt. (i) An Act to encourage the N.E. part of this island, passed in 1721, "which came not to us till lately." (ii) An explanatory Act for the further encouraging the settling the parish of Portland, passed in 1726, and (iii) for the better carrying on the new settlements at Port Antonio. [C.O. 138, 17. pp. 284,–286.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
1013. Same to the Lords of the Committee of the Privy Council. Conclude:—We do not apprehend any further encouragements are at present expected by the people of Jamaica for compleating the settlement at Port Antonio, except the confirmation of above Acts etc. as preceding. [C.O. 138, 17. pp. 286, 287].
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
1014. Same to Lord Townshend. Enclose following to be laid before the King.
1014. i. Same to the King. Enclose following Commission which is in the usual form etc.
1014. ii. Draft of H.M. Commission to Robert Johnson to be Governor of S. Carolina. [C.O. 5, 400. pp. 243– 269].
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
1015. Lord Townshend to the Governor of South Carolina. Upon complaint of the creditors and executors of Albert Muller a native of Norway, who died about two years ago at Charlestown, setting forth the difficulties they meet with in recovering his estate etc., it is H.M. pleasure that you see that justice is done and return an account of your proceedings therein etc. Signed, Townshend. Annexed,
1015. i. Memorial referred to in preceding. Copy. French. [C.O. 324, 36. pp. 164–168].
[Dec. 9.]1016. Petition of Merchants and masters of ships of London, Bristol, Dartmouth and Whitehaven trading to Newfoundland, with the most ancient inhabitants and masters of fishing voyages at Placentia, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Upon some complaints from Barnstable, Col. Gledhill is arrived with great numbers of evidence to answer said complaints. Pray for speedy hearing. Signed, William Crosse and 15 others. Endorsed, Recd. 9th, Read 11th Dec, 1729. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 8. ff. 234, 235v.]
[Dec. 10]1017. Petition of Col. Gledhill to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In response to a letter from the Secretary at War, received only on 1st Sept., petitioner has arrived with several witnesses from Placentia to answer the false charges against him. The Board's two reports mention his having neglected to answer former complaints against him. He never received any complaints from the Board, save of one Salmon, which he answered by the first ship etc. Prays the Board to appoint a short day for hearing his case etc. Signed, Saml. Gledhill. Endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 11th Dec, 1729. 2 pp. [C.O. 194, 8. ff 236, 237v.]
Dec. 10.
Boston.
1018. Col. Dunbar to Mr. Popple. Abstract. Has been through N. Hampshire and Maine. The publishing the new Act of Parliament has had a good effect upon the loggers, who applied to him in numbers to know whether they might cut trees of any dimensions, because there is a penalty for a11 trees of 12in. diameter and under, which includes all. As he conceived it was not so intended, has indulged them by enclosed Proclamation, which was approved of by the Governors etc. Asks whether he may continue it from year to year. Continues : Notwithstanding this, there is yet a sett of people here who neither regard Acts of Parliament, or any prosecution upon them, the famous incendiary Dr. Cook proclaims in the Province of Main that the King has no right there, he has built saw-mills in the heart of ye mast-trees, one of which will saw 8,000 feet of boards in 24 hours, he says they are upon his private property, and should a tryal be commenced against him, the people he imploys would be his Jury, however I am resolved to see what they will do in that case. The Agent for the contractor for masts etc., for the Royal Navy has also lately built A saw mills but pretends they are upon his private property wch. was a new acquisition on purpose under his lycence for cutting trees etc. Has given a full account to the Admiralty. Continues : I have been in several parts of the new Province of Georgia and have began to settle the people who last year petitioned his Majtie. from hence for leave to settle to ye eastward of Kennebeck River, most part of that country is claimed by people of this Province under old grants from the Council of Plymouth in 1629 and Indian deeds of later dates, some for 30 miles square and for ye consideration of a few skins. I told all these claimants that it was judged in England that the property to all those lands, wch. are included in Nova Scotia, was intirely in the Crowne, and that H.M. being now desireous to have them settled, improved, and made usefull to England would give them to such of his good subjects as would goe upon the immediate settlemt. therof, reserveing onely one penny sterl. pr. acre quit-rent, many seemed thankfully willing to accept the King's favour, but Dr. Cook and others of his turbulent kidney refused to pay any the least acknowledgment to his Majesty etc. Refers to former letter and the answer he gave them, "that until I should receive further instructions I would not concern myself with any lands thus claimed, and since there are so many of them that if they are allowed, the King will have no more there than here, and the country as hitherto may lye forever a wilderness. I made choice to plant the people I carried wth. me at Pemaquid about 7 leagues to the eastward of Kennebeck River, there was formerly a stone fort at that place but destroyed by the French before the peace of Reswick. I raisd a dry stone wall upon the old foundation, and built barracks wth. inside for 200 people, as soon as that was done I hoisted the Union Flag under a discharge of a few ship guns and 3 vollies of small armes, and with all the people drank to his Majesty's health, the entrance into this harbour is easy and open and very safe anchoridge within, it was formerly much frequented by fishing vessels, but since ye demolition of the fort, they have not gone there fearing the Indians, whenever it is rebuilt, it will be of great advantage to the shipping who trade hither, and instead of being blown from off this coast in winters, as often happen, they can put in there and lye safe until a favourable opportunity to put to sea again, when in a little more than one day they may reach Boston; the land contiguous to it is good but covered with small spruce, some oak and birch, the people are this winter imployed in clearing the land for gardens, pasture and corn. I have ordered a few acres to be prepared for hemp, wch. I intend to putt into the ground in Aprill if the seed I now write for arrives in time; there is very little of that usefull commodity raised in this country to ye eternal shame of the inhabitants, who are the worst at improvements of any people in ye world, even their bread corn comes from other provinces, and the pitch and tarr, wch. they export, is first imported from the 2 Carolinas. I did intend to have honour'd the first settlemt. with the name of St. Georges, but there being a fine river by that name 10 leagues to ye eastwd. of Pemaquid, I have called it Fredericksburg. I am afraid it may be thought I have been too forward, and have gone beyond my power; here I found such a spirit and earnest desire in many people to make the settlement, that to have delayd it would have baulked it, this I humbly hope will plead my excuse. Within this new Province are many forests of large white pine trees, so that the Royal Navy can never want a supply, but even the lands wherein they stand are claimed with all trees, woods, and a hundred et cœtera's, as I have seen in long lawyers' deeds, if such are allowed H.M. has done there, it may lye wast for ever, but if one common answer is given to all, and that the sole property is in the Crowne, I dare answer that the Province of Georgia will soon recommend itselfe to the Royal favour, and rival its neighbours, in ye spring a great many hundred familys of substance, and the best of the fishermen of this country will go thither if not countermanded, the scituation was designed by nature for the fish trade, ye fish being now taken in great abundance near ye shore, and made and cured in better time, is preferable at market to fish brought farther to the shore etc. Is concerned to hear that Mr. Hintz had not set out in October for Germany to conduct the Palatines. Hopes they will arrive before he meets the Indian tribes in the summer, not that numbers of people will be wanting, but he thinks they will be very useful. Has written to the Duke of Newcastle about Pemaquid, and the disregard of the Massachusetts Bay to the royal letters and instructions on that head. Continues: So far are they from shame or remorse on that account, that they have even now printed an abstract of all their proceedings upon that subject, and their obstinate withstanding fixing the Governour's sallary (enclosed) etc. ; it has so harden'd them that they are now firmly of opinion that if the Legislature at home could have touched their Charter, so many letters would not have been sent from Court. Refers to Mr. Dummer's letters to him and his answers, sent to the Duke of Newcastle. A ship sailing sooner than he expected he cannot send copies etc. Hopes the Board will think a few small arms, artillery and ammunition necessary for this new settlement etc. P.S. I am informed there has been a meeting of several of the claimants in Georgia and money raised by subscription to imploy Agents in England to sollicit a confirmation of their claims, some of them are for whole islands, 10 or 15 miles in length, where chiefly are the forests of masts ; in short all the lands that are vallueable are claimed by one or another, and now there is an appearance of making settlements, those people would hinder them, who from the beginning never made any themselves. Signed, David Dunbar. Endorsed, Recd. 30th Jan., Read 6th May, 1729/30. 8½ pp. Enclosed,
1018. i. Proclamation granting permission for felling white pine trees not exceeding 24in. in diameter, or trees promising to grow to masts, etc., after notice given, until a survey can be made etc. Boston, Dec. 2, 1729. Signed, David Dunbar. Endorsed, Recd. 30th Jan. 1729/30. Printed. 1 p.
1018. ii. A Collection of the proceedings of the Great and General Court, or Assembly, of His Majesty's Province of the Massachusetts Bay, in New England. Pro- ceedings and Instructions relating to the Governor's salary 1691–1729. Printed by order of the House of Representatives. Boston: Printed by T. Fleet, in Pudding Lane, 1729. Endorsed as preceding. 112 pp. [C.O. 5, 871. ff. 23–84v., 85v.; and (enclosure ii only) 5, 752. No. 46.]
Dec. 10.
Boston,
New
England.
1019. Col. Dunbar to the Duke of Newcastle. Since I had the honour of writeing last to your Grace, I have been as far as pemaquid in the new intended Province of Georgia, haveing landed there ye 20th Oct., with about 100 men of those who last year sent home a petition to H.M. for leave to settle to the eastward of Kennebeck River. We made hutts of spruce trees for our lodging etc. I imployed the men with me to raise a dry stone wall upon the old foundation [of the fort at Pemaquid] etc., and in building barracks within. As soon as the walls were finished, I hoisted the Union Flag under a discharge of 7 small ship guns wch. I carried with me and 3 vollies of small armes, and we all drank to H.M. health. I called in at Piscatua in N. Hampshire, and at Winter Harbour and Casco Bay in Main in my voyage, at the latter I went on board the New Hampshire mast ship then ready to sail to England for the use of the Royal Navy. So soon as I raised the walls of the old Fort and hoisted the King's colours I called ye place Fredericksburg. I would have called it St. Georges, but that there is a large navigable river already of that name 10 leagues farther east. Pemaquid has a fine harbour etc. Refers to its former history, cf. C.S.P. 1697, 1702, 1705 etc. Continues : It has frequently been recommended to the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, to rebuild it without any regard had thereunto, as may fully appear from a book wch. I herewith take the liberty to transmit, the design of printing this book at this time is expressed in the first page, and appears to me to be to keep the same spirit in this people who, do not, for the most part, stand in need of such help; it may be worth perusal tho' hardly to be read with any temper ; there are 100 instances of refuseing the recommendation of the Crown to fix a sallary in the Governours. I was followed to Fredericksburg by two other vessels full of people, and every day ye sight of the King's colours brought in fishing scooners and boats, crossing the bay, to see wt. was the occasion of it, their joy was very great, many of them haveing formerly known the conveniency of shelter there, it being near the fishing places, and has not for many years been frequented for fear of the Indians. I had visits from many of them at different times, and on the 12th of Nov. about 25 of them came in a body with the chiefs of the tribes of Penobscot and Narigwack at their head, they sent to acquaint me that they desired to see me etc., I received them with much civility. I told them I was come from the King of England to renew settlemts. there wch. were began 100 years ago. They told me King George was welcome and I was welcome. One of their old men asked me how little King William did, and explained himself, by saying King George's little son, when I told he was very well, he sayd they were glad of it, for they had heard from Canada that King George gave their country to his little son, I sayd H.M. might do so, but it was not declared when I left England; they seemed extreamly well pleased to have settlements near them, where they may be supplyed with blankets and provision in exchange for their furrs, wch. they often carry to Canada above 200 miles by land. When I entertained them all together (for there's no distinction but in War and Council between the King and any other) some were merry, and one of the Segamores (which is noble among them) sayd that the land about Pemaquid was his and he would sell it to me for what I pleased to give him. I told him I did not come there to buy land, nobody had a right to sell any for it all belonged to the King, my Master, and had for many years, the man seemed satisfyed, laughed and sayd, then King George was welcome, he freely gave it to him, and would lay no other claim to it, but to desire he might have the liberty of coming thither as his occasions should require. I sayd, he and all of them should be free at all times to come and goe where they pleased without interruption. Wynongonet (wch. is the name of ye King of the Penobscot tribe, a well looking man, more like a French man than an Indian) seeming grave and reserved, I asked ye reason of it, he answered that it was in great respect to me that he was so, and when he was better acquainted, he would be as merry as I pleased, they stayed a week with me in ye day time, but retired every evening to their camp or wigwams made with boughs of trees, covered with birch-bark, at a smal distance from the Fort, I allways gave them provision with them ; When they came to take leave, Wynongonet told me they had dispatched 2 months before a messenger to the French Governour at Quebeck to know his opinion of an English settlement among them, they believed he would be against it, and would, by the Jesuits, stir up the Canada Indians against it, but as for himself and the Indians on the sea coast, they desired to live in peace, and would do so and keep friendship with the English as long as they were well used, they never made warr but to resent an affront or revenge ill treatment, they sayd yt. Governour Dummer was a good man but he had not power like the Governour of Canada to performe what he promised. All they desired of me was to suffer them to follow their hunting and fishing without molestation, and to keep truck houses where they might trade with their furrs without being cheated, and they hoped I would give them some few presents and commissions as the Govr. of Canada does, and New York to their neighbouring Indians. I promised them ye libertyes they desired and that nobody should be suffered to abuse or wrong any of them, I then gave a few laced hats, blankets, pipes, tobacco and a little powder and small shot for their hunting. We parted in very good termes, they were very thankfull and desired they might meet me in their tribes in May or June next, to come to an understanding with each other. They are poor miserable people in comparison to others, haveing no settled habitations, and even their food uncertain, their dress is frightfull, and upon extraordinary occasions they make themselves hideous with red paint, they clean their hands in their hair and make large holes thro' their ears in which they putt scutts of hares, long feathers and long tobacco pipes. All the expense I was at by them was within £37 sterl., wch. I do not mention with design to ask it, a small matter so bestowed may keep allways quiet, and so prevent a larger expence and much trouble. Dureing my stay in Georgia I went up 3 of the great rivers, wch. are navigable for large ships, 25 miles into the country, they are wide and deep but in most places rocky shores, the names of them are Johns river, Damarescotty river, and Shepscot River, they all lye between Kennebeck and Fredericksburg, wch. is not above 7 leagues in all, so that they must be very near one another, the land is neither mountainous nor level, but in easy hills, where a plough may goe; all is covered with trees mostly spruce, but there are good white pines and large oaks, nobody that had the care of the woods on this Continent ever was in these parts before me, and 'tis pitty, for the people from this Province have made it a practice many years to send thither to make cannoos and shingles of the largest mast trees, and staves of oak fit for ship building, leaveing the crooked parts to rott on the ground; as those rivers with others are wide and long it will be difficult to prevent this practice, my best endeavours shall not be wanting, but really it will be impossible without a small sloop and 6 men to attend me; I burnt in one of the rivers above 60 cannoos made this last summer out of trees fitt for large masts, and a parcel of shingles. I just in time prevented a tree of 39 inches, with ye bark, in diameter, and a proportionable length, from being cutt by a shingle maker, and have left two deputations in those parts to guard ye woods this winter; I have accounts of fine forests of masts in that province, on ye east side up Kennebeck river, besides many wch. I saw myself, so that H.M. Royal Navy can never be in danger of wanting masts, yards and bowspritts, tho' in my humble opinion, as all the land, at least 100,000 acres best wooded and nearest navigable water, are to be reserved as a nursery for the Royal Navy in this new Province, the masts there should be preserved until new Hampshire and Province of Main are exhausted, which wth. care may yet supply England for several years, altho' vast destruction has been made among the woods, where many saw-mills are erected to cutt them into planks and boards etc. In spite of his remonstrances, Mr. Waldoe, the Agent for the contractor with the Navy Office, insists upon his right to use sawmills which he says he has built upon his private property etc. Continues: So many claims and titles to lands in Georgia were made to me, that if they are allowed, H.M. has none there. I have seen some pretended Indian deeds of different dates wherein 30 miles square were sold for 50 skins, and even several deeds to different people for the very same tracts of land, and many of the Indians say that the people pretending to sell those lands had no claim or right to them. Most of these claimants are willing and thankfull to take new titles or grants from H.M. as proposed at one penny sterl. quit rent pr. acre, and would go upon the immediate settlemt. and improvement of the lands, but they desire 3, 4, 500 and some a thousand acres according to their familys and abilitys, wch. is more than was proposed by the Lords Commissioners for Trade to be in one grant, the spirit to make this new settlement is now so strong in these parts that if it be not baulked, a more consider- able progress will be made in 3 or 4 years, than ever was in any Collony in 40 years, and I flatter myselfe be more usefull to England then some of its neighbouring plantations, and will produce grain as in England. I have opened some acres in which I intend to put hemp seed in Aprill next if the seed arrives in time wch. I now send for, and I shall hope to send some of the produce next year to the Navy for a sample and tryal. If the Pallatines come soon after, they are skill'd in dressing it, and are good husbandmen and artificers. As it was proposed to make this settlement without expence to H.M., everything in my power shall not be wanting, but if it be thought expedient at home that the fortifications should be rebuilt, and that a few pioneers tools be sent me from the Ordnance Office and any summ of money payd as the Lords Commissioners shall appoint, I will husband it to ye best advantage etc. The guns which were at Pemaquid when taken by the French were carried to St. Johns in ye bay of Fundy, afterwards to Annapolis, where I am credibly informed, 24 of them lay last year in the earth, useless ; at this town of Boston are a great number of cannon, some of them well mounted in a fort, entring this harbour, but close to the towne are 34 large iron guns about 30 to 34 cwt. mostly buried in rubbish and useless, tho' they are called ye North and South batterys. Suggests that these and a few smaller from home be sent etc. In expectation of their being so ordered, has ordered a great quantity of lime to be burnt from a vast ridge of oyster shells near the place and will have oak plank ready for the carriages. Continues: This new country being in ye state as nature left it, wild and unimproved, it will be some time before corn and provisions will be plenty, there are many able labouring men that will want bread until then if not supplyed by some means, it has been proposed to me yt. if they could be supported they would repay the expence in hemp the 3rd, 4th and 5th year. What I most covet at present is a few small armes and ammunition. I wish I could have some before I meet the Indians in May next, yt ye people may appear in armes, there are none to be bought here, so that I have not been able to leave above 80 guns or firelocks among all ye men etc. Continues: The Indians all along this Continent haveing Jesuit Missionarys among them are much influenced by the French Governour at Quebeck. Suggests that a letter be asked for from the French Court to command him not to stirr up the Indians against the English etc. Continues: Since my return to Boston Mr. Dummer has seemed highly dissatisfyed that I have been to make any foundation for a settlement in Georgia, saying that all the lands as far as Nova Scotia is under the Governmt. of this province, he asked me if I had any comn. or authority for what I did there, I answered that in a few days he shd. be satisfyed in that point, hopeing I might have received further orders from home, and not careing to shew him the report of the Lords Commissrs. for Trade, 14th May last, if it had been known that I had not an absolute Commission it would have spoiled ye undertakeing etc. Refers to enclosures. Continues: The behaviour of many of the people here has often ruffled me, some do publiquely say H.M. has no right to the woods here, others have asked me what right the King had to any lands here, and how he came by such right, some have claimed by Indian titles so late as dated in 1719, and in their deeds they have warrantees to defend the possession against all persons whatsoever ; the people of this Province now sitting here in Council and Assembly are upon laying out a line of towns before they have a new Governour, the upper and lower Houses do not aggree, ye former wth. the late Governour haveing nominated [an] Attorney General, the latter lately upon ye annual day of election insisted to have a right of nomination, wch. the upper refuseing it was moved in the House of Representatives by the famous Dr. Cook, that there should be an order of the House to the Grand jurys to regard any indictment or presentment of the Attorney General onely as wast paper; they are upon some methods how to raise ye vallue of their bills of credit, wch. are now so low as 20 sh. pr. ounce for silver there is about £300,000 of these bills from this province, they were at parr at first, and some people who then lent out money to interest, if they were now repd. principal and interest, would not get back one half of the vallue of what they lent at first. It is wonderfull to see how little this province has been improved, and chiefly occasioned by two great tracts of land in few hands, some having several hundred thousand acres, and tho' improved land sells very dear, the whole that is layd out into townships does not yeild 3 pence pr. acre one with another. I have been thinking that if ye Charter here be declared voyd or forfeited by Parliament, and in the new form of Governmt. all new stragling towns excluded from sending Representatives, their number wd. be diminished to one third, and these for the principal towns might be men of some substance, whereas at present to see such as are sent from the new towns looks like mockery, if then a smal tax of one penny sterl. was proposed to be raised upon all lands layd out into townships and granted to private people pr. acre, to pay off the debt and cancel their bills of credit, many would relinquish their remote grants not yet improved (wch. would thereupon fall to H.M.) and remove nearer the seashore, so that the settle- ments would be more compact and ye lands much better improved. I dare say some millions of acres would be dis- claimed rather than pay this trifle especially for lands remote. The Province of Maine, wch. is annexed to the Masachusets, is devided from it by ye Province of New Hampshire, wch. is a distinct Governmt. and a very small one, it would certainly be more for the ease of the people either that Maine and Hampshire were annexed, or New Hampshire to the Masachusets and Main to Georgia, to wch. it now joyns, onely Kennebeck river between them etc. Signed, David Dunbar. Endorsed, R. Feb. 3rd. 18 pp. Enclosed,
1019. i. Duplicates of Nos. 1042 i–iv. [C.O. 5, 898. Nos. 62, 62 i–iv].