America and West Indies
December 1730, 24-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

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1937

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410-424

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'America and West Indies: December 1730, 24-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 37: 1730 (1937), pp. 410-424. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72542 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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December 1730, 24-31

Dec. 24.
Jamaica.
627. Governor Hunter to the Council of Trade and Plantations. By this conveyance of a merchant ship call'd the Hunter I have the honour to transmitt to your Lordships eight acts pass d in the two last Sessions of Assembly and also the Journals of the Council and Assembly, and the Minutes of the Council to the 10th instant. The title(s) of the acts are as follows: (i) for raising partys for dislodging and reducing the rebellious slaves in the windward and other parts of this island; (ii) for raising money and applying the same to the use of the said partys etc. (iii) for explaining the preceding act, and giving further time for assessing, collecting and paying in the taxes therein mentioned. The three abovementioned were pass'd the first session and their duration being only for three months they are now expired, so need not any animadversion; (iv) An act for keeping out the partys under Capt. Brook for a longer time. This act is not in force, the Grand party having been disbanded at Port Antonio before it reach'd that place to be publish'd, occasion'd by the great rains and overflowing of the rivers that render'd the roads impracticable to have it sent thither within the time limited in the said act. (v) An act for preserving the harbours of Port Antonio in the parish of Portland. The title of this act explains the intent and purport of it etc. Recommends its confirmation; (vi) for repealing an act to prevent dangers that may arise from disguised, as well as declared Papists. Some objections which I was inform'd were made to the act which this repeals by your Lordships, the obligation on masters of vessels to bring no white servants but such as were provided with proper certificates of their religion, which might prove a hinderance to the transportation of such, prevail'd with the Council to pass this repealer, and these reasons with one more viz., that it had no effect, all or almost all of the Romish religion, avowed or conceal'd having publickly renounced, or recanted, I was induced to give my assent to it. Had the original act pass'd in the forme that it was first brought into the Assembly, that is to say respecting only such as were imported from Ireland, from which sort our chief danger arises, in my opinion it would have been an act not only fitt for H.M. approbation, but necessary for the safety of security of this Island, (vii) An act to prevent the selling of powder to rebellious or any other negroes. The title of this act sufficiently explains the intent and meaning of it, and I think it a very necessary and good law and fitt to be lay'd before H.M. for his approbation; (viii) for the encouragement of voluntary partys and in default of them to raise and send out others to suppress the rebellious negroes in the windward parts etc. Altho' the encouragements in this act are very considerable to voluntary partys, yet I am afraid it will have little or no effect, for notwithstanding this act has been pass'd above a month, few or no volunteers have offered their service, so that I have given orders as the act directs for making draughts out of the several Regiments to compleat the number therein mentioned, but as such men are chiefly indented servants and go with an unwilling heart I have but little hopes of success from them; however, I shall do everything in my power for that service. In my last I acquainted your Lordships of the miscarriage of our Grand Party, as 'tis call'd, chiefly occasioned or owing to the want of conduct or resolution in their Commanding Officer; who being a Member of Assembly and by them recommended to that command is now at their desire under a prosecution before a Court Martial, the result of which is not yet determined. The slaves in rebellion are so numerous and so well provided with arms and ammunition that I am perswaded they must have some intelligence with and encouragement from some either without or within this Island, which is in so weak and defenceless a condition that 'tis no vision to suppose they may one day become a prey to their own slaves, and whatever methods have been hitherto projected or entered into by the Assembly for the security of this Island have been but meer grimace, and no ways sufficient for the purposes intended, of which H.M. Council here were so fully perswaded that towards the close of the last session they agreed upon an humble representation to H.M. upon that subject, which I send by this conveyance to his Grace the Duke of Newcastle, in order to be lay'd before H.M., with the most sincere tender of our duty, and loyalty; and to which I intreat your Lordships' countenance and favour. Encloses copy and answers to Queries etc. Continues :—By which [answers] you will please to observe the value of this Colony, and the importance it is of to the Crown of Great Britain, and as these calculations and estimates have been taken from the most authentick informations I have been able to procure, I hope they may give your Lordships intire satisfaction. The Naval Officer's accounts will satisfie your Lordships as to the number of our shiping, which is the only querie not particularly answered. Repeats his request for great guns and ordnance stores for the new fortifications. Encloses letter from the General of the gallions from Carthagene relating to the Genoese etc. Admiral Stewart who has taken great pains to guard the wreck, recover the treasure and prevent depredations has at the desire of the General of the gallions thought fitt to putt under the care and direction of Don Herrera a Knight of Malta all the treasure and effects that have been saved, etc., who is to embarck with the same on board H.M.S. Adventure, Lord Muskery Commander, whom the Admiral has ordered to call at the Havana to take in that part of the treasure which was carried off by the second Captain of the Genoese to Trinidado in one of our sloops, which he carried off to their assistance, and who is now a prisoner as I am informed at the Havana. Lord Muskery is ordered by the Admiral to proceed from thence with the said Herrera and the treasure to Cadiz in his way home; but of this Admiral Stewart will send full particulars to the Lords of the Admiralty etc. Refers to case of Neal Walker and Proclamation for his arrest and seizure of Spanish treasure brought in etc. (v. 1st Oct. supra). Continues:—In pursuance of which Mr. Stout one of the Custos's to the Leeward seized or had delivered to him treasure to the value of 6000l. or there-abouts, which by my order he delivered over to Don Guiral etc. There has been another Spanish vessel wrecked upon one of the little islands to the leeward of this call'd the Camanas, loaded with wine and brandy and some dry goods, a brigantine call'd the St. Michael from Cadiz bound to Vera Cruiz; seven men who were only saved out of forty-six were brought into this island from thence by one of our turtling vessels, who also brought in the crew of Mr. Ware's sloop which had been carried off by the second Captain of the Genoese to Trinadado, and was wrecked in the same place about the same time on her return ; they report that Neal Walker has been also a plundering that wreck, so that it seems he takes refuge in one of the above-mentioned islands. I shall do what I can to have him secured, in the mean time the Naval Officer has by my order seized such wines and brandy as were brought off from that wreck by the turtlers or others for the King, that it may be restored to the just claimants ; as yet I have had no particular account of the quantity so seized etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 13th March, Read 13th July, 1731. 7½ pp. Enclosed
627. i. Address of the Governor and Council of Jamaica to the King. Express their sincerest attachment to His Majesty. Nov. 21, 1730. Think themselves bound in duty to represent the dangerous and defenceless state of the Island. Continue:—This Island hath for many years past been in a declining condition as to its trade, and the number of white inhabitants is very much decreased so that wee have great reason to apprehend there is not in it a strength sufficient to resist an invasion either of the French or Spaniards in case of a rupture etc., their Colonies being populous and so comodiously situated for an attempt of that kind, that wee cant fail becoming a prey to them. Many of our slaves have run into rebellion, and fixt themselves in fastnesses in the mountainous parts of this island, from whence they have of late made frequent incursions and committed great ravages upon the new settlements. They are now grown to a greater head than ever, and wee have less power to quell them, having neither means nor power to help ourselves. Wee are more convinced of the weak and defenceless condition of the Island by the defeat of several partys which have been lately fitted out at a great expense of men and money in order to reduce those rebels, but by the want of experience in the Officers, and of discipline in the men, they have always miscarried or met with little or no success, which hath encouraged our slaves to that degree that wee are under the greatest apprehension of a general insurrection, which may be the entire ruin of this Colony, there being so great a disproportion in the number of whites and blacks. Our neighbours seem sensible of this our weakness and the Spaniards in particular have not scrupled of late publickly to boast what an easy conquest they shall one day have over us. Wee beg leave to assure your Majesty that these evils are not distant and imaginary nor are wee apt too suddenly to take alarms, but wee think it our duty to lay this before your Majesty that this country may not be lost for want of a due and timely representation etc. Pray that measures may be taken for their security etc. Signed, by order of H.E. and the Council, Jos. Maxwell, Secry. 2¾ pp.
627. ii. Don Manuel Lopez Pintado, General of the Galleons, to Governor Hunter. 4th Nov. (N.S.), 1730. Relating to the Genoese wreck, v. preceding. Spanish. Copy. 1½ pp.
627. iii. Governor Hunter's Answers to Queries by the Board of Trade, (i) The natural soil is very fertile and produces sugar, molosses, rum, indigo, cotton, ginger, piemento or all spice, fustick, ebony, lignum vitæ, mohogony and other valuable timber, and of late coffee, and if the island were improved, there is land uncultivated sufficient to make sugar to serve all Europe. Estimate of annual shipments to (a) Great Britain :—(Totals :) 25,000l. hhds. sugar, = 300,000l. sterl.; 7000 puncheons of rum, 100 galls, each, reduced to 80 galls, delivered at the mast, = 42,000l.; 100,000 bags of ginger, 1 cwt. each, c = 40,000l. ; cotton, 30,000 bags, 150 lb. each, 20,000l. ; piemento, 400,000 lb., = 10,000l. ; Mohogony, 20,000l. Duty paid in Great Britain on above rum, sugar, ginger and piemento, = 230,583l.; freight paid in Gt. Britain, 97,205l. (b) To the Northern Colonies: Molosses, 400 casks at 70 galls, each, and some indigo, fustick, ebony and lignum vitæ.
(b) By the best calculation there are in Jamaica, 100,000 negroes, valued at 25l. each; 200,000 cattle, mules and horses, at 5l. each; 400 sugar works, at 1000l. each. Lands and houses, value uncertain, (ii) Gives latitude and longitude of the Island, and history of Port Royal and Kingston: "Kingston arose out of the ruins of Port Royall and is at present the most considerable place of trade and merchandize. It is very regularly built and has a great many good houses and fine habitations in it etc. The town of Titchfield at Port Antonio is as it were in embryo, consisting at present but cheifly of hutts and very few houses, but as it has by nature a strong and commodious situation for trade, has the best harbor in this island, adjacent to it, it's probable it may in time come to be a very thriving place, especially when the rebellious negroes (whose cheif residence is but about 12 miles distance from it) shall be destroyed or taken etc. (iii) Refers to Naval Officer's accounts. Continues :—The number of seafaring men is very much decreased of late, occasioned cheifly by the decay of trade which formerly employed upwards of 30 sloops which carryed between 30 and 40 men apeice, and now not above 5 or 6 etc. About 20 years ago there were 1500 seafaring men actually inhabitants of the Island, and now not over 200. (iv) The chief manufactures imported from Gt. Britain are woollens and linnens etc. The value formerly amounted to 5l. or 600,000l. pr. annum, but of late has fallen considerably, occasioned as 'tis said by the obstructions that seperate traders meets with upon the Spanish coast, (v) The cheif trade with foreign Plantations is carryed on by sloops to the French on Hispaniola. Wee carry to them negroes and current cash, our returns are cheifly in indigo and some sugar, some people are of opinion that this is not a beneficial trade to this Island, others have different sentiments. Wee formerly had a very considerable trade to most of our neighbouring Spanish settlements, as well to the Continent as to their severall adjacent islands, but that is now mostly at an end especially at those places where the South Sea Company have factorys setled, and the number of seafaring men which were formerly employed in this trade were of great strength and security to this island. I know of no trade from this island to any part of Europe except to the Northern Colonys but what centers in Great Britain. Indeed there is a considerable trade carryed on betwixt us and the Northern Colonys, the importation from thence chiefly consists in flower, bread, corn, beef, pork, butter, salt fish, rice, staves, lumber of all kinds and horses, in return they only take from us a small quantity of molosses, the rest of their returns is cheifly in cash etc. This country could supply itself with most of those commoditys, but the inhabitants are so intent upon making of sugar, which it seems turns to better account, etc. Could they be prevailed upon, it would be the means of employing numbers of white people and improving great part of our uncultivated land, (vi) The methods used to prevent illegal trade are by putting in execution the Acts of Trade and Navigation and the municiple laws of the Island, particularly an Act to prevent clandestine trade, tho' considering the large extent of the island and the want of a sufficient number of port officers and the thinness of the inhabitants, there may be some illegal practices carryed on at some of our remote bays and creeks etc., it being impossible for the Government here to keep a sufficient number of port officers at so many different and remote parts, (vii) There are no manufactures except of the produce mentioned (i). (viii) Refers to (i). (ix) Numbers of inhabitants as returned from each of the 19 parishes. Totals :—Masters and mistresses, 2171 ; white men servants, 3009 ; women ditto, 984; white children, 1484. Free negro, Indian and mulatto men, 136 ; women ditto, 321; children ditto, 408 ; slaves, 74,525 ; cattle, 55,341. Continues :—This computation of the negro slaves and cattle differs considerably from the computation in (i), which I take to be the truest, having had it from such gentlemen as have been conversant in these affairs for many years, (x) By all accounts the inhabitants are of late considerably decreased, it having been some years ago computed there were 10,000 white men, women and children, the return now made is only 7648. I take this in a great measure to proceed from our decay in trade and want of due encouragement by law for white men and their familys to come and settle, and it is a generall mistaken notion that there is not land sufficient to give 'em upon their arrivall, there being still enough ungranted and uncultivated for many hundreds of familys, the French upon Hispaniola have an admirable method of improving and cultivating their Colony, the King by his order obliges every merchant ship trading thither to carry a proportionable number of white people according to their tonnage freight free, upon their arrivall the Government allotts them a proportionable quantity of acres suitable to the number of their familys, gives them credit for a number of negroes and utensils for manuring their ground with sufficient provisions untill the land given them can produce the same, for which the poor people give bond to the King to pay the value of the negroes utensils and provisions so soon as the lands so given them shall produce the same. So that in this case your Lordships will observe there only wants first an originall fund, because the annuall income afterwards will be sufficient to support the same. By this means that Colony is mightily setled and improved. This and such-like proposalls have been often mentioned to our Legislature here but alass without success, there has been always some private views or other that have obstructed proposalls of that kind, (xi) By the returns made to me by the severall Collonels of the Militia, I compute there may be about 3000 effective men horse and foot fit to bear arms, but it is to be observed that the greatest part of them are hired and indented servants, who have no property in the country, so that it may justly be apprehended that many of them considering their religion might prove rather of disservice than of use to us in case of a rupture at any time with France or Spain etc., and this small body are scattered from one end of the island to the other, and could not be gathered together in a considerable time so as to make any tolerable defence in case of any sudden attempt upon this island, (xii) The French at Martinico and Hispaniola are considerably increased both in number and strength, and the Spaniards are strengthening the harbours of Carthagena, the Havanna and other places, and as they are very populous our greatest danger is to be apprehended from them etc. (xiii) The effect those settlements have upon the trade of Jamaica has already been answered etc., and in case of a rupture is plainly to be observed from their situations. The French at Petit Guavas on Hispaniola and the Spaniards at St. Iago on Cuba can effectually annoy and take all our ships that comes or goes through the Windward Passage unless wee have a superiour squadron kept here to protect the trade. The Spaniards may do the like at Havanna to such of our trade as may go to Leeward thro' the Gulf, and the privateers from Porto Rico and St. Domingo are even now in time of peace troublesome, but would be much more so in case of a warr to such ships as should be bound from Europe or Guinea hither, (xiv) The Revenue and its appropriation. Charges on the Revenue :—Capt. General's salary, 2500l. ; Forts and fortifications, 1250l. ; Chief Justice's salary, 120l. Officers and gunners at Fort Charles, 803l. 2s. 6d. ; Captain of the Train in Spanish Town, 45l. 12s. 6d. ; Auditor General (150l. at 35 p.c. excha.) 202l. 10s. ; Waiter's salary, 1250l. ; salaries of Clerks and other Officers of Government and contingent charges (average), 2958l. 15s. Total: 8000l. per ann. Receipts:—Impost at a medium of nine years last, 2,966l. 2s. 1d. ; by Quit-rents, 1,460l. 14s. 3d. ; fines, forfeitures and escheats, 487l. 13s. 3d.; wine lycences, 200l,; gunpowder, 257l. 2s. 11d.; a new impost, including indigo at 3d. per lb. and sugar at 3d. pr. hundred, computed at 3000l. Continues:—The last item has for some time past fallen considerably short, so that there will be a deficiency and consequently a supply wanted from the country to make up etc. (xv) The quit-rent since the Earthquake in 1692 is ½d. per acre for all lands pattented. As to what number of acres remain untaken up or uncultivated, it would require a general survey and rent roll of each parish to ascertain, and that (tho' necessary) would be a work of time and attended with great difficultys and charge, (xvi) Answered in xiv. (xvii) There is one Supreme Court of Judicature held quarterly for the whole country consisting of a Cheif Judge who is Cheif Justice of the Island and has six Assistant Judges who by a law of the country have power in all causes civill and criminall etc., as the Courts of King's Bench, Common Pleas or Exchequer in England. The Officers who hold by pattent from the Crown on the Island establishment are :—Governor Hunter, 2,500l. ; Alex. Henderson, Attorney General, 400l. (per agreement with the Council); Richard Mill, Cheif Justice, 120Z. (established by law); Horatio Walpole, Audr. General (salary pd. in England sterl. money) 150l. ; George Ellis (Inspector and Comptroller of H.M. Customs, appointed by warrant from the Commissioners), who allow him payable out of the dutys, 150l. ; Giles Diston, ditto. List of Civil Officers who act by patent and have no salary:—John Anthony Belaquier, Secretary, Joseph Maxwell his deputy ; Peter Forbes, Provost Marshall, Edmund Hyde, his deputy ; Anthony Corbier, Naval Officer, John Butell, his deputy; John Page, Clerk of the Grand Court, Wm. Henderson, his deputy; ——Wyndham, Clerk of the Patents, Tho. Pearce, his deputy; Coleman, Clerk of the Crown and Peace ; has no deputy, but Kyrle Bowerman officiates by my warrant. Admiralty Officers, by patent from the Admiralty, William Brodrick, Judge of the Admiralty, William Cockburn, Register; Alex. Henderson, Advocate General, George Fisher, Marshall. Military list; two Captains and six lieutenants of the Two Independent Companies, on the English establishment; on the island establishment, William Dalrymple, Capt. of H.M. fort at Port Royal, 6s. per diem ; George Fisher, Lieut., 4s. 6d. ; 12 montrosses, 2s. 6d. each; armourer, 40l. per ann. ; David Thomas, Capt. of the train in Spanish Town, 45l, 12s. 6d, N.B. Besides the Grand Court there are in each precinct a seperate Court held quarterly called a Petty Court for tryall of all causes under 20l. value in their several precincts. There are likewise a Custos and several Justices of the Peace in each precinct, there is likewise a Court of Chancery generally held at Spanish Town where the Governour for the time being presides as Chancellor assisted with two masters, (xviii) The Engineer being indisposed cannot answer at present as to the forts and fortifications. The whole endorsed, Reed. 13th March, 1730/1. 5 large folded pp. [CO. 137, 19. ff. 37–40v., 41v.–44v., 45v., 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 50v.]
Dec. 24.
Jamaica.
628. Governor Hunter to the Duke of Newcastle. Acknowledges letter of 25th Sept. and has published the order relating to the depredations committed by Spanish vessels etc. Continues:—I hope it will have its effect on the minds of the traders who began to be very uneasy as well as on the Spanish cruisers who have acted illegally and unwarrantably with the connivance, if not the encouragement of some of their Governors. Encloses copy of preceding letter to the Board of Trade and repeats part of it. Concludes by reminding him of memorial for guns and stores for Port Antonio : "Our workmen are now upon the spott (the weather permitting) carrying on the works with what expedition they can" etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, R. March 25, 1731. Enclosed,
628. i. Copy of encl. ii preceding.
628. ii. Copy of Hunter to C. of T. preceding.
628. iii. Copy of encl. i preceding. [C.O. 137, 53. ff. 285–289, 291–294, 295.]
Dec. 24.
New York in
America.
629. Mr. Bradley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I humbly pray your Grace will be pleased to recommend to the Lords of Trade and Plantations, the speedy consideration of the inclosed case. Signed, R. Bradley. 1 p. Enclosed,
629. i. Case of the Attorney General of New York. He was appointed by H.M. warrants, Sept. 1722 and Feb. 1728, with the same salary and fees as his predecessors. Mr. Rayner had 150l. sterling, from home, per annum. At this rate, he should have had 1200l., but has received in all for salary 52l. There is due to him for fees for public prosecutions 1878l. sterl. of which he has been voted only 150l. from the Assembly in their last sessions, of New York money, which is scarcely 91l. sterl. Concludes:—For want whereof I and my family labour under inexpressible hardships etc., neither is there any hopes of any redress from hence ; the people in these countrys seeming determind to starve and weary out the officers of the Crown, as those who are most likely to oppose their seeming views to an early independancy on Great Britain. Signed, R. Bradley. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1093. ff. 157, 158.]
Dec. 25.630. Petty expenses of the Board of Trade from Michaelmas to Christmas, 1730. (v. Journal). 6 pp. [C.O. 388, 79. Nos. 70–73.]
Dec. 25.New York.631. Mr. Philipse to Mr. Leheup. Abstract. Encloses duplicates of what he wrote 5th Dec. Requests copy of the Albany Memorial against the Oswego acts, with the names of the signers. If hereafter any acts of such importance as those should be disallowed, care must be taken to have it signified here in the speediest manner, lest they should be left in a similar dilemma as the want of the repeal of those acts occasioned. "For tho' it passed in Dec. 1729, the same did not come to the Governor's hands until the middle of August etc. Refers to enclosed printed votes of Assembly and copy of representation therein mentioned (v. 21st Dec), and entreats his earnest solicitation on behalf of it. "For to desert Oswego, or leave the Indian trade loose there, would be of fatal consequence. And it's very improbable that the Assembly will againe provide for that charge by a general tax. Nor dos that seem reasonable, because no part of the Government but the trade itself reaps the bennefit: which is evident, by the present circumstances of the traders; who now have almost all their Indian goods from England on their owne accountes, whereas they formerly bought the same from the merchants and factors at New York." Refers to French designs to build a fort in the Sinnekes' country and another at the Cruyn Point, (v. 21st Dec.) Hopes that means will be found to dispose the Court of France to put a stop to any such attempts etc. For should they complete these fortifications, "they would soone bring the Six Nations under their subjection, and in process of time be able to drive H.M. subjects into the sea : which would doubtless affect us first. For their skeems are generaly attended with very distant views. They already encircle most part of the British Dominions in North America. And there is no certainty that the present good understanding between the two Crowns wil subsist for ever. When I reflect on the scituation of these affairs, it gives me very melancholy apprehentions. And tho' no fatall consequences may result from them in my days, give me leave to conjure you not to omitt any solisitation to back what H.E. has represented on those heads."(v. 21st Dec.) etc. The Governor has drawne no bills at this time, but promist to spare one for you out of the first he draws etc. Signed, Ad. Philipse. Endorsed, Recd, (from Mr. Leheup), Read 9th April, 1731. Holograph. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1055. ff. 178–179v.]
Dec. 27.
Charles
Town.
632. Governor Johnson to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Abstract. Upon his arrival proclaimed his Commission. Returns old Seal and has published H.M. orders for use of the new, and has obeyed instructions, Sept. 25, 1730, as to reprizals to be made for depredations by Spaniards etc. Concludes :—The seven Cherriquee Indians committed to my care, are all arrived here in good health, and mighty well satisfied with H.M. bounty to them. Signed, Robt. Johnson. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd Feb., Read 31st March, 1731. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 362. ff. 19, 19v., 25v.; and (abstract) 20 ; and (abstract only) 5, 406. p. 26.]
Dec. 27.
Charles
Town.
633. Same to the Duke of Newcastle. Duplicate of preceding. Endorsed, R. Feb. 18th. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 388. ff. 29, 29v., 30v.]
Dec. 28.
So. Carolina.
634. Mr. Bonnet to Mr. Delafaye. The inhabitants of Providence as well as their Governor labours under a great deal of uneasiness occasioned by one Mr. Colebrooke, who was associated with Mr. Rogers junr.; he is a man of pleasant conversation, and good sense but extreamly perverse in temper, having affirmed in the Assembly of which he was Chairman (when the Governor and Councill recommended to them the raising money for repairing the Fort, etc.) that the Governor when in England had receiv'd from the Government 500l. sterl. for that purpose and strenuously incisted that he shou'd repair the fort at his own expence, or give an account of that money tho' in the warrant to receive it 'twas mentioned for past services ; It is well known that Governor Rogers lost considerably in his former administration in retreiving the island from the hands of the pirates and maintaining it against the Spaniards, and has been at great expence lately in building barracks in the fort and for the soldiers, there not being when he arrived a place for them to shelter in, nor even their arms from the rain. The Governor dissolved the Assembly the 9th instant at which time Mr. Colebrooke seized on all their proceedings with all the papers belonging thereto tho' the Govr, is required by his Instructions to forward fair transcripts to H.M., etc., which Mr. Colebrooke could be no ways ignorent of, having heard them read lately, and must have a copy of 'em by him which was sent to the Assembly for their perusual and better Government. The Govr. and Councill required him by a letter to deliver them up, that the Clerk might take copys etc., and afterwards by a verball message by one of the Councill and the Cl. which he still refusing the Governor was obliged to send his warrt. to bring Mr. Colebrooke before him and Councill, who then told him he positively would not deliver the Assembly proceedings, for which the Governor committed him, and was admitted to bail according to his petition to the Governor and Council and is to be heard in a few days at a Spetial Court etc. I think these proceedings are in some measure commencing a civill warr. There are many other such vexatious proceedings of Mr. Colebrooke's etc., as well as of one Mr. White his great friend, and till within few days our Chief Justice, who took the liberty while setting on the bench, to say, in a great passion, that the Governor was arbitrary, for having confined a person for felony, who was one of the Attorneys of that Court, and was to have defended a cause, against a person, who was so notorious, that he has been condemned to be hang'd at St. Christophers ; whose part Mr. White took very much, and would not allow the cause to be tried. Since I am here, the Govr. has wrote me word to return to Providence having another view of serving me then that of going to England etc. Signed, Lews. Bonnet. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 388. = No. 8. ff. 31, 31v.]
Dec. 29.
Custom ho.,
London.
635. Mr. Carkesse to Mr. Popple. The Commissrs. have consider'd the Act of Virginia etc. (v. Dec. 10th), and in their opinion the said act will be a prejudice to the revenue under their management for the following reasons, (i) The duty of 35. pr, hhd. which is to be paid by the planters for having the tobacco hhds. examined, stamped and nailed, with the other expences and restrictions which they will be subject to in complying with the act will discourage many of the lower sort from planting tobacco and be the means of advancing the price of what is raised by the rest, which will lessen the consumption and consequently the revenue, (ii) If the Inspectors to be appointed for making the said examination should under the pretence of bad tobacco, prevent the ordinary sort from being brought hither, it wou'd be a great loss to the revenue by reason that all tobacco pays the same duty, and the Commrs. apprehend it is the ordinary sort of which there is the greatest consumption upon account of it's cheapness. The Commissrs. are further of opinion that the laws of this Kingdom do very well provide against the importation of all tobacco which is really bad, by reason that if the importer upon landing it here thinks any part unmerchantable, he is at liberty to cut it off without paying any duty for it, in which case it is burnt by the proper Officers. As to the provision made that every master shall deliver to the Naval Officer two fair manifests of his lading and swear to the contents in order to be sent to the Cheif Officer of the port where the ship is bound, the same method has been many years in practice pursuant to the Instructions given by this Board to their Collectors in America, before whom every master is already obliged by law to make oath of the true content of his lading before he clears from thence, of which one copy is sent home by the ship and another copy by some other conveyance, but there being no penalty on the master if he fails to deliver them, they are frequently sunk, and the like is to be expected with regard to such invoices as the Naval Officers are to send home by this act when it will answer any fraudulent designe, since no provision is made therein to oblige them to deliver it, nor cou'd any penalties laid for that purpose be recovered in this Kingdom, for which reasons the Commrs. are also of opinion that this part of the act is of no service to the revenue etc. Signed, Cha. Carkesse. Endorsed, Recd. 1st, Read 20th Jan., 1730/1. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1322. ff. 93–94v.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
636. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Request payment of Office expences and Officers' salaries for quarter ending Christmas. Account annexed. [C.O. 389, 37. pp. 320–322.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
637. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Newcastle. Enclose following. Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
637. i. Draft of Warrant empowering Governor Burrington to use a new Seal for North Carolina, described, the former one to be returned to the Council of Trade etc. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 306. Nos. 19, 19 i; and 5, 323. ff. 50–51.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
638. Same to the Committee of the Privy Council. Representation upon petition on behalf of Connecticut, upon repeal of the act for settling intestates' estates etc., referred to them April 25th. The annulling of the said Act for dividing the lands of intestates must certainly be attended with great confusion amongst the people of Connecticut; and therefore we are of opinion, it would be an instance of fatherly tenderness in H.M. to comply with their request with regard to the quieting of possessions already vested: And we think this may be done by H.M. Royal licence to pass an Act for that purpose, with a saving therein for the interest of John Winthrop Esq. But we can by no means propose that the course of successions to lands of inheritance in this Province should for the future be established upon a footing different from that of Great Britain. In return for so great a favour from the Crown, we apprehend, ye people of Connecticut ought to submit to the acceptance of an explanatory Charter, whereby that Colony may for the future become at least as dependent upon the Crown and their native country, as the people of the Massachusets Bay now are, whose Charter was formerly the same with theirs. And we think ourselves the rather bound in duty to offer this to H.M. consideration, because the people of Connecticut have hitherto affected so intire an independency on the Crown of Great Britain that they have not for many years transmitted any of their laws for H.M. consideration, nor any accounts of their publick transactions. Their Governors, whom they have a right to choose, by their Charter, ought always to be approv'd by the King, but no presentation is ever made by them for that purpose ; and they, tho' required by law, to give bond to observe the Laws of Trade and Navigation, never comply therewith, so that we have reason to believe, they do carry on illegal commerce with impunity, and in general we seldom or never hear from them, except when they stand in need of the countenance, the protection or assistance of the Crown. But if this method of giving relief to the people of Connecticut should not be thought adviseable, H.M. may allow them to apply to Parliament, in which case it is to be hop'd, proper care will be taken by the Legislature of Great Britain, to secure the dependence of this Colony upon H.M. and their Mother Country. [C.O. 5, 1294. pp. 24–28.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
639. Duke of Newcastle to Governor Hunter. The desire I have of shewing on all occasions my esteem and friendship for Mr. Poyntz has engaged me to write etc. in behalf of the executors of his brother, that they may have your favour and countenance in recovering the effects of the deceased for the benefit of his children etc. Nothing is desired but that they may have justice done them with as much dispatch as you can procure for them, without doing anything contrary to Law etc. Signed, Holles Newcastle. Copy. [C.O. 324, 36. p. 251.]
640. Correspondence of Commandants of Essequibo with the Directors of the Dutch West India Company. [C.O. 116, 26.]