America and West Indies
July 1731, 11-15

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

Year published

1938

Pages

174-188

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: July 1731, 11-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 38: 1731 (1938), pp. 174-188. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72576 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

July 1731, 11-15

July 11.
Portsma.
New
Hampshire.
290. Col. Dunbar to Mr. Popple. Was at Fredericks Fort when he received his Commission for Lt. Govr. etc. Is wholly indebted to the Council of Trade for that favour and will do his best to deserve their good opinion etc. Continues: I waited some time at Fredericks Fort to receive an officer and a partie of soldiers from Collo. Philips regiment from Nova Scotia etc. I sent for them according to my Instructions upon rumours that the Indians were prejudiced against us, in September last, but they did not arrive until the 14th of June, the 23rd of the same month I sailed thence, and landed here next day; I was very kindly reced. by the Gentn., but my Commission was not published until the 28th that they might have time to shew some honours which Govr. Belcher was pleased to order upon that occasion, and which I would willingly have declined; upon the first inst. the Assembly sat, and by a written order from Boston from the Chief Governour were only to renew a former vote impowering a Committee to meet another from the Massachusetts Bay at Newbury about setling the lines, and then immediately to prorogue them to September. I was surprized a few moments before I had the honour to meet the Assembly to be told that a speech was expected from me, and it put me under concern as I have no talent that way, herewith I send you a copy of it and the answer of the House of Repre- sentatives, but intreat it may not be made a Coffee House diversion by exposing it in print (more majorum). I was not less surprized to be informed from the sd. order from the Governour, that any vote passed here must be sent to him to Boston to be signed, and when I asked the opinion of the Council thereupon and whether or no the chief Governour was then present or absent, I was answered that he was deemed to be virtually present, and I had nothing to do but obey his orders. A majority of the Council (there were but six present) were of that opinion they are under some obligations to him but the other Gentn. quoted instances where Lieut. Govrs. have held General Assemblies, passed acts and done every other act of Governmt. in his own name when the Chief Govr. was at Boston, however I was inclined to avoid disputes with him as may be seen by a copy of a letter I wrote to him on the 3rd instant, with his answer to it, so that I am of so little significancy that I am really ashamed; however if my Lords Commissioners are of opinion against me I shall chearfully submit, tho' Mr. Belcher is the very last man upon the globe that I would choose to be a sub to, it is incredible how he has maltreated me, he has not only murthered my character in this country, by saying I was a poor lying insignificant fellow, but influenced as great acts of injustice against me as ever was imposed upon any man etc. Complains that he has intercepted his letters and handed about one from his wife etc. (v. July 15th). Continues: I am really apt to beleive it is a counterfeit letter, because I cannot conceive what my wife could write to me to give my enemies so much pleasure; I lately had an accot. of this attempt of Mr. Belcher's to print the letter from a gentn. of fortune and veracity, which provoked me to write a letter to him. Encloses copy to the Board. Continues: If it be thought I was too warm, I hope the provocation will justifie me; after this I fear my accot. of the present state of this province etc. may be tho't somewhat prejudiced against Governour Belcher; it is most certain that no colony can be in greater confusion, he has turned out so many gentn. from the country imployments without consulting the Council or shewing that he had a power in himself by his Instructions etc., that there is a stagnation of Justice, no Superior Court having sat since he displaced the old Judges, of which, now not one amongst the four of that Court; the Speaker Collo. Wiggins was one, and upon the Governour's putting a man before him in a new Commission, who had ever been his inferiour, he declined acting for which he was by an unpresidented written order striped of all imployments in open Court, having been Collo. of one of the regiments and for many years in Commission of the Peace, he is a man of a very good character and much esteemed etc. The Governour has not yet appointed any Justices of the Peace in the town where Collo. Wiggins lives, nor in four other townships where he hath turned out gentn. who have long served in that Commission, the country imployments are worth nothing and none but gentn. of fortune can support ym., a Judge of the Superiour Court I am told is not worth more than thirteen pounds pr. annum, which is about 2d. per diem sterl. He has removed the Courts from this which is the Province town to 3 country towns so that but one of four yearly Courts sit here, he is said to be influenced to do all this by one Mr. Waldron, an Attorney, who has been for some time Clerk of the Council, he is now a Member of it, by the Govr's. appointment, tho' there was no vacancy that he had power to fill, untill they prevailed upon Mr. Westbrook his father-in-law to resign, he is also made a Judge, and a Justice of the Peace, and is commissioned Province Secretary which is new here, he is very obnoxious to many of the better sort of people and to him are imputed all the inconveniencies now upon the Province. I have had frequent complaints from the country which you'l find I represented to H.E., and you'l see by his answer to how little purpose. I fear that I am remiss in my duty in not remedying them myself, and beleive I shall, if he does not soon appoint magistrates; no two were ever more like to like then Mr. Belcher and his chief Minister which he has the assurance to call Sr. Robert, this is fact and cannot be denyed he has another at Boston which he himself calls so, one Pemberton whom he sends on errants, anybody who has been at Boston can vouch this, Mr. Dalton a gentn. now in Londo. of extraordinary good character and Mr. Barker a relation to Sr. Thomas Frankland can vouch it; the sudden prorogation of the Assembly here made the country a little dissatisfied with me, until the Governour's orders were made publick for so doing; this prevented them from addressing H.M. and therefore some of the Council and Assembly the three members for this town and some other of the chief inhabitants have joyned in a memorial to my Lords Commissioners which they have requested me to transmit, and to pray a speedy answer. I herewith send it and humbly recommend it to their Lordships it could not be imagined that from my last arrival here as Lieut. Governour I could know so much as I do of the state of the country. I have formerly spent part of my time here as Surveyor, and in my letters home I always did them the justice to say how civil and respectful they were to the King's Officers, and a very different people from their neighbours of the Massachusetts, who too frequently shew their disregard to H.M. servants; I mention this only because it has been represented here that I had given an ill character of them at home, which would have been false and unjust; I heartily wish they were under a seperate Govermt. from the Massachusetts for the reasons in their memorial and I hope it will not be imagined I am induced to be of this opinion in hopes of being the man myself, the Province is small and unable at present to give a seperate Governour anything more then they have now setled upon their chief Governour, and therefore it would be worth nobody's acceptance but one of themselves, the late Lieut. Governour was born here and there are many worthy gentn. and good subjects, Mr. George Jaffry is the second in the Council, Collo. Walton the first being ancient, is passed being fit, and when my Lords are pleased to remove me, I take leave to recommend Mr. Jaffry as the properest person to serve H.M. I ought to do the gentn. the justice, to own that there are others well deserving but if they had the nomination themselves, Mr. Jaffry would be the man etc. Refers to enclosures. Upon reading them I beg my Lords will observe the difference in the wording of the two acts from this Province and the Massachu- setts, for adjusting the lines between ym., and whether one do's not shew a better disposition towards it than the other; it is not to be expected it can be setled on this side the water, an order from H.M. with an explanation of the words relating to it, and the line of longitude, in the last Charter must determine it, and they hope they will not be circumscribed by the northerly course of the turn of Merrimack River but that their westerly bounds will extend as farr as their neighbours on either side; If the charter of the Massachusetts is to be vacated then Merrimack River will be the natural bounds between the two as far as the course is near westerly, and whenever that happens the Province of Main added to New Hampshire would be a handsome and extensive Governmt. and would be convenient and pleasing to both people; there is another wide difference between New Hampshire and their neighbours, there they are Independants, and great zealots, here they are moderate and inclining to the Church of England, tho' there never was one within the Province; the Gentn. of this town, and who are generally in disgrace with H.E., have made handsome subscriptions for building a church, and are upon beginning it, but the maintenance of a Minister at first will be very heavy upon ym. as the congregation will not be very numerous, they are upon sending a modest and ingenious gentleman to be ordained by my Lord Bishop of London, who has been some years a preacher in this country, he was bred at Cambridge Colledge near Boston and is very desirous of being in orders, but discouraged from the thoughts of returning to this country because the maintenance of Ministers is generally very small, and no chance for a man of any merit to preferment. I'll take the liberty to recommend him to my Lord's interest to get some encouragemt. from H.M. as well from the Society for propagating the Gospel, and I hope such would have a very good effect in these parts. Govr. Belcher bro't over some Church plate and ornamts. for one of the churches at Boston, as H.M. bounty, I humbly pray my Lords will recommend this new one for the like favour. Enumerates six present Councillors. Continues: There is but one more vizt. Capt. Frost, but he is uncapable having lost his speech and his limbs by the palsy etc. Mr. Waldron is hitherto only recommended to H.M. for a mandamus, but I earnestly intreat the favour that he may not be of the number for the aforesd. reasons, and for the oppositions he formerly gave me in conjunction with his father-in-law Mr. Westbrook when I made a formal tender of 130 mast trees which were seized here by my Deputies, this may appear by a copy of a most scurilous letter wrote by Mr. Waldron, and signed by Mr. Westbrook to the late Lieut. Governour here, wherein he and I were much abused, which copy I transmitted to you 18 months ago, and which I request you will once more lay before the Board. As Lieut. Governour I am told I have no place nor vote at the Council table when the Chief Governour is there. I therefore pray that I may have an order or qualificatión to regulate as my Lords intend it should be, and I should take it as a very signal mark of their Lordps. to recommend Mr. Benning Wentworth eldest son of the late Lieut. Govr., Mr. Theodore Atkinson, Mr. Joshua Peirce senr., Collo. Andrew Wiggin, and Collo. John Gilman to be of the Council; my brother will take out their mandamus's, these would only make up ten of the number, and it would be a credit to me to be intrusted with a blank mandamus or two to fill upon occasion; the gentn. that is about going to be ordained his name is William Shurtaff, if my Lords would be pleased to recommend him to be Province Secretary by H.M. Commission he is well qualified and would be a help to him and his small congregation, it is not worth above 25l. sterl. pr. annum. It is now time for me to make an apology for this tedious epistle which with my most humble duty I pray you will lay before my Lords and favour me with an answer etc. Signed, D. Dunbar. Endorsed, Recd. 28th Sept., 13th Oct., 1731. Copy sent by [Capt.] Bax. 5 pp. Enclosed,
290. i. Deposition of Theodore Atkinson and Thomas Packer. Copy of July 15 encl. i. q.v.
290. ii. Memorial of members of Council and of Assembly and of other inhabitants of New Hampshire to the Council of Trade and Plantations 10th July, 1731. We etc. inhabitants of H.M. loyal and dutifull tho' small and poore Province of New Hampshire in America being lately dissapointed of an opertunity of addressing our most gracious King from the Representatives of our people in General Court assembled and setting forth the hardships we suffer by the dispute about the lines between us and the Massachusetts Bay, this dissapointment being occasioned by a sudden prorogation after one day's sitting by our Lieut. Governour pursuant to directions sent from our Chief Governour from Boston, which was very surprising to the House of Representatives here who at the instant of prorogation were prepairing such address, doe therefore most humbly pray to be permitted to lay our said hardships before your Lordships. When our present Chief Governour was pleased to com- municate to us the Royal Instruction for settling the said lines we received them with all thankfulness and duty and imediately proceeded upon naming our Commissioners in the very manner prescribed in the Instructions, but our choice not being approved by H.E. and very difficult to find others qualified we readily came into other measures to facilitate the settlement of the said lines, as may appear by attested coppys of the proceedings thereupon. All which proving ineffectual and having too much reason to be- leive that our neighbours of the Massachusetts Bay doe not desire to have the lines fixed because wee apprehend that they are making settlements which will be deemed farr on our side the lines and are frequently exercising an authority and jurisdiction nine, tenn and eleven miles to the northward of Merrymack River by seizing and carrying away some of our inhabitants, imprisoning sueing and fineing them at their courts on the south side of the sd. river to the great dammage and dis- couragement of many poor familys. We therefore humbly pray your Lordships favour that H.M. may be addressed to interpose and give his royal orders for ascertaining and determining the lines in dispute to which we shall cheerfully submit as we have always done to his pleasure well knowing that H.M. can have no other intentions than the wellfair, prosperity and ease of his loyal subjects. We further begg leave to represent to your Lordships that this small Province labours under vast disadvantages by being under the Government of the same person with the Massachusetts as that Province is very considerable in respect to us, and the Governor's sallary chiefly arising there. We have been denied and cannot at any time reasonably hope for his assent to some acts which would be beneficial to our small Province, which if we were under a seperate Governour would not be denyed to us and which might also enable us much better to pay the sallary which we have already pursuant to H.M. Instruction settled upon our Chief Governour, so as to enable a Governour of our own to support that rank. If we might presume to begg this favour of his Majesty it would be such an act of his goodness as would forever make His memory deare to our posterity as his royal person is now to us. To mention any other greivance which we feel we fear would render us too troublesome to your Lordships and imploye more of your precious time than our proportion, and they are such as might easily be remedyed here, several of our towns are at this time destitute of any magistrate insomuch that a constable has come to the town of Portsmouth 38 miles to be sworn into his office, and no Justice of the Peace nearer to the town he came from then 23 miles, this misfortune we labour under by an unhappy displeasure conceived against some of us by our Cheif Governour as we apprehend tho' we humbly are of opinion without the least grounds, we having not only complyed with everything he asked of us in his Majesties, but passed a vote for paying him six months sallary beforehand, whereby in case of death or removal we may be lyable to pay the same or most part thereof to his successor. Pray for an answer to this remonstrance etc. Signed, Geo. Jaffrey, Andrew Wiggin, Theodore Atkinson, Benning Wentworth, David Jeffries, John Wentworth, Josha. Peirce, Thos. Packer, Josh. Peirce, David Cargill, Willm. Brock, J. Bradford, Jno. Rindge, John Macmurphy. Endorsed as covering letter. 2 2/3 pp.
290. iii. Governor Belcher to [?] Boston, 21st June, 1731. Col. Dunbar may soon be expected at Portsmouth, where his Commission is to be published etc. Continues: "I would have the Assembly sitt the 1st of next month in order to agree on the 13th of July to meet the Commissioners of this Province about the line at New bury etc. Your Assembly having voted the time agreeable to the Committee here, let the Court be prorogued to the first Wednesday in Sept. next and the vote they make the Secretary must send me hither to Signe. Signed, J. Belcher. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. ½ p.
290. iv. (a) Speech of Lt. Gov. Dunbar to the Council and Assembly of New Hampshire. 1st July, 1731. Expresses pleasure at appointment and appreciation of his predecessor, whose administration made him universally beloved. Their meeting is intended to proceed upon settling the line etc. Signed, D. Dunbar. Copy. 1 p. (b) Reply of Assembly to preceding. 1st July, 1731. H.M. apointing a Lt. Govr. that hath been so long and continually imployed in publick services is a mannifest mark of his royal goodness and kindness to this people. The memory of the late Lt. Govr. will always be dear to them etc. We shall doe everything that can be reasonably expected from a loyal people to make you easy etc. Signed, Andrew Wiggan, Speaker. Same endorsement. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 873. ff. 144–147, 148–152v. (with abstract).]
July 12.
Hampton
Court.
291. Duke of Newcastle to the Council of Trade and Plantations. It having been represented to the King, that the Officers and private men of the two Regiments that were sent to Jamaica last year, suffer greatly from the badness of the climate, and that the said Regiments are of little or no use for suppressing the rebellious negroes there; H.M. has com- manded me to signify to your Lordps. his pleasure, that you examine into this matter, and report your opinion with all expedition, how farr the said Regiments may be usefull towards reducing the rebellious negroes, or necessary to be continued for the defence and security of that Island. Signed, Holles Newcastle. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read 13th July, 1731. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 19. ff. 35, 36v.]
1731.
July 12.
Boston.
292. Governor Belcher to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses duplicate of 21st June and awaits answers to his many letters since 10th Dec. Repeats letter to Duke of Newcastle July 10th. Concludes: I hope nothing Col. Dunbar may write will have any influence to my prejudice, till I first have an opportunity of answering for myself. He is a gentleman of a most uneasy restless temper, and I wish to God I was clear of him. I am sorry while I tell your Lordships that Governor Montgomerie of New York dy'd there very suddenly the first instant. He was a gentleman of an uncommon character, universally belov'd living, and so lamented dead. Signed, J. Belcher. Endorsed, Recd. 28th Sept., Read 19th Oct., 1731. 2 ¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 873. ff. 193–194, 195, 195v., 196v. (with abstract).]
July 13.
Boston.
293. Governor Belcher to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Repeats part of preceding, mutatis mutandis. Signed, J. Belcher. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd Sept., Read 19th Oct., 1731. [C.O. 5, 873. ff. 191, 191v., 192v.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
294. Mr. Popple to Mr. Fane. Encloses, for his opinion in point of law, 12 acts of Jamaica passed in 1730. [C.O. 138, 17. pp. 316–319.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
295. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Repre- sentation upon Act of Jamaica for the better regulating slaves etc., (for reasons set out, A.P.C. III. pp. 344, 345 q.v.) The Act in effect repeals former laws passed at Jamaica in favour of several negroes who had been made free for their faithful services, and their descendants, and especially John Williams, his wife, and descendants." It is also impolitick in its tendency with respect to the interest and welfare of Jamaica, as well as unequitable to the persons above mentioned; and to the whole order of free negroes, since it manifestly tends to discourage the integrity of the slaves in that island, as well as the industry of those who are become free : whereas it would in our humble opinion be very prudent, eminently to reward all extraordinary examples of fidelity and virtue amongst the negroes of all denominations for the better governing of a people whose service is so essential to the prosperity both of this Colony and of all your Majesty's Plantations. We therefore take leave to lay this act before your Majesty for your disapprobation. [C.O. 138, 17. ff. 319–321.]
July 13.
Boston.
296. Governor Belcher to the Duke of Newcastle. Is obliged to trouble his Grace again after his letter of 10th July, because he learns that some complaint is going home from New Hampshire against him. Continues: I have good reason to believe my Lt. Governor is att the head of this affair. Your Grace will upon this judge how inconsistent it is with the King's honour and service to have Collo. Dunbar continu'd to interfere and give trouble to the King's Governor etc. Continues: I now take the opportunity to give your Grace ten thousand thanks for the stop you put to his Commission for some time (as my friends inform'd me), and I wish to God it had been finally stopt, for he is the most restless uneasy Gentleman I ever had to do with. I woud still begg of your Grace he may be otherwise provided for, and that Coll. Henry Sherburn might be my Lieutenant Governor etc. Col. Dunbar's ill nature and prejudice against him are such that he supposes the same com- plaints against his are of the same kind as his pompous and fictitious complaint about Frederick's Fort, by which also much trouble was caused owing to his not having been allowed to see its contents before being sent home etc. When he himself exhibited a complaint against Governor Burnett at Whitehall, the answer was that no proceedings could be made upon it but to serve Governor Burnett with a copy for his answer etc. Concludes: I remember an observation of a great man when I was att Whitehall upon an opposition made in the house of Commons, that the pasture was streight and the cattle numerous. This may it please your Grace (comparing small things with great) is the case att New Hampshire. Men that are out of office, wou'd feign be in, and because they can't, the next thing is to murmur and grumble etc. Awaits copy of the complaint for his answer. Signed, J. Belcher. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 898. No. 90.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
297. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Rep- resentation on Act of New Jersey, 1728, for appropriating part of the interest money paid into the Treasury by virtue of a law to the incidental charges of this Government and for subjecting the residue to future appropriations. Describe provisions of the Act of 1723 referred to. Continue: — Under these regulations [the original bills] have obtained a general circulation and have not hitherto been subject to that discredit which hath usually attended a paper currency in other parts of America. But by the present act the original appropriation is destroyed and the surplus of the interest made applicable to other purpose that of sinking the paper debt. Refer to their letter of Nov. 20, 1728, recommending Governor Montgomerie to urge the Assembly to repeal the last clause in the Act of 1728, "and to restore this fund to its original appropriation for the more speedy and effectual sinking the said paper currency, which not having been complied with on their part, we now take leave to lay the said act before your Majesty, for your disapprobation." [C.O. 5, 996. pp. 274–277.]
July 14.
Portsmo.
N.
Hampshire.
298. Lt. Governor Dunbar to Mr. Popple. Has been requested by some of the principal gentlemen to send enclosed to the Board of Trade, requesting liberty to emit 40,000l. that county money etc. Continues: — It is not above 11,000l. sterl., and there is a very great necessity for it, there is no such thing as gold or silver mony here, and so little paper money (as it is called) that one of my Deputy Surveyors tells me he cannot gett of that sort, vallue for a bill of 15l. sterl., and I myself have been 10 days enquireing for province bills for a 30 or 40l. bill to London, and must at last send to Boston for it, to defray my expences here, the Province is small and really poor, but the people deserve better, they have a just sense of their duty to H.M., and it would be great favour to them to be indulged in this petition, and it would give me a great deale of pleasure to be an instrument of doing them any service, which is all the reward I can expect; I presume I need not tell my Lords that there is no sallary but to ye chief Governour, and tho' that is four times a proportion from this Province in respect to ye Massachusets one thousand pounds wch. is recomended to be settled on a Governour, yet it is too inconsiderable for any man's support but one of themselves. I am told the perquisites are worth 40 or 50l. sterl. pr. annum; since my arrival they have not amounted to so many shillings this currency etc. Proposes to return to Fredericks Fort for 2 or 3 months. "I reckon that my home for tho' the gentlemen here are exceeding civil and give me dayly invitations to entertainments, yet I am obliged to lodge in a publique house, and the best of them are bad in this country etc. PS. You will see by the letters wch. has passed between Governour Belcher and me, and which I now send to my brother to be communicated to my Lords, that he refuses to lett me see any of his Instructions, but what is worse he has of his own head put this Province under such confusion by turning out the principal gentlemen, without asking the consent of ye Council, or ever shewing his Instructions to enable him to do that of himself, wch. other Governrs. were restraind from by theirs, that noe Superiour Court has yet satt since his arrival here. Signed, David Dunbar. Endorsed, Recd. 7th Sept., Read 19th Oct., 1731. Holograph. 2 ½ pp. Enclosed,
298. i. Resolution of the House of Representatives of New Hampshire, 5th May, 1731. The county being liable for 1,500l. a year as a sinking fund for former bills, and 1500l. a year for the support of the Government, "which said sums altho' H.M. good subjects are heartily and chearfully willing to pay to the utmost of their abilitys towards the honble. support of the Government cannot by any possibility pay, partly by reason of the scarcity of money and partly because the sums exceed what is a reasonable tax, Wherefore etc. voted, that an act be drawn up for emitting 40,000l. at 5 p.c. for 15 years etc., and that H.M. be addressed to confirm said act etc. Endorsed as preceding. Copy, certified, James Jeffry, Clerk of Assembly. 1 ¾ pp.
298. ii. Minute of Council of New Hampshire, 6th May, 1731. Suspending application for leave for emitting above 40,000l., inasmuch as the Governor, at the request of the late General Assembly, made application to H.M. for licence to postpone the payment of the outstanding part of the 15,000l. loan and for emitting 6000l., to which H.E. has not as yet recd, any answer. Same endorsement. Copy. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 873. ff. 178–180v. 181v.–182v.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
299. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Newcastle. Enclose following representation to be laid before the King. Annexed,
299. i. Same to the King. In obedience to your Majesty's commands etc. (12th July), we have considered how far the two Regiments in Jamaica may be useful towards reduceing the rebellious negroes, or necessary to be continued there, for the defence and security of that island. These regiments we presume were ordered upon this service in consequence of an humble Address to your Majesty from the Govr. and Council of Jamaica in Nov. 1730 etc. (v. C.S.P.) quoted. Continue: By our last returns from Jamaica the number of white people including men women and children and indented servants was 7648, and the number of black slaves 74,525 exclusive of the free negroes who were then 865. But, since the fears which the people of Jamaica entertained of a Spanish invasion have been removed by the late conventions between your Majesty and the Crown of Spain and, as we have been informed that the regiments now in Jamaica can be of no other use for the reduction of the rebellious negroes than by keeping the black slaves in order at home, whilst the militia of the country shall be employ'd in hunting the former in the woods; we are humbly of opinion that your Majesty may be pleased to withdraw one of those regiments at least, if not both of them, especially as the people of Jamaica are unwilling to contribute for any continuance to their support. But on the other hand, if your Majesty should approve of this proposal, we could wish the same might be executed in such manner as not totally to deprive this valuable island of a force which is at present a considerable increase to the number of their white inhabitants, and which seems in some sort necessary for securing their domestick tranquility; wherefore we would humbly propose that the com- manding officers of both the said regiments should receive your Majesty's instructions to disband not only such of their soldiers as arc artizans and may be qualified to get their living, but in general all such as shall meet with fitting encouragement for settling, and shall be willing to stay in that country. The remaining Regiment, if one shall remain, may next be compleated to its full complement out of that proposed to be reduced. And as the two Independent Companies in Jamaica may reasonably be supposed to be very weak, from the great charge that attends recruiting in that island, we would also propose that they might be filled up out of the said regiments, whose officers may afterwards come home to raise their companies again in England, by which means the force of these regiments will still in great measure be preserved to Jamaica, and your Majesty will save the expence of bringing back the greatest part of the soldiers from thence to Great Britain. With respect to the negroes who have seated themselves in the mountainous parts of Jamaica, we beg leave to acquaint your Majesty, that we have reason to believe, that some of them are descended from the negroes left there by the Spaniards, when the English first possessed themselves of this island, and that their numbers have since been considerably encreased by those that have from time to time deserted from your Majesty's subjects. They are by some accounts supposed to be about 500 men able to bear arms, but what their positive number may be we cannot determine. Heretofore when they have been trouble- some by their incursions amongst the outward settle- ments at Jamaica, the usual method was for the Governor to contract with the King of the Musquitos for a party of his subjects to hunt them in the woods, but we are informed that when the King of that nation was last at Jamaica, he was sent home dissatisfied with the usage he received there, which may possibly be the reason why the people of Jamaica have not applyed to him upon this occasion. But as the reduction or expulsion of these runaway negroes is absolutely necessary for the peace and settlement of Jamaica, we would humbly propose, that your Majesty's Governor of Jamaica should be instructed to try if by methods of lenity and good usage they may not be brought into your Majesty's obedience, in which case a proper tract of land may be allotted them in Jamaica for their habitation; but if this should be found impracticable or dangerous, and the island should be destitute of a sufficient force to reduce them, that then the Governor should endeavour to conclude a treaty with them for their being transported to one of the uninhabited Bahama Islands, or some other part of your Majesty's Dominions in America, where they might settle under proper regulations, and in time become good subjects to your Majesty, and useful to the publick. Autograph signatures. Paper seal on report. [C.O. 137, 47. ff. 107–109, 138, 17. pp. 321–326.]
July 15.
Portsmouth.
300. Lt. Governor Dunbar to Mr. Popple. By letters from my brother I understand that Governour Belcher's friends deny that any force was sent down or any jurisdiction exercised by his order at Fredericksfort, it is notorious that every child in this country knows it etc. Refers to enclosures. Continues: It is no wonder they can deny matters of fact, when it is courantly reported and believ'd here that Collo. Tailer and the Committee sent by Mr. Belcher to ask improper questions at Fredericksfort, were onely putt in there by stress of weather etc. It would be hard to give a general bad character of any country, but I will say that I never knew truth less regarded any where in my life than in New England, (I comonly mean by that, the Masachusets province onely) etc. My brother gave me hopes that my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty would have sent a new commission for a Judge of Vice-Admiralty for the Masachusets instead of Mr. Byfield before whom, experience has convinced me, it is to no purpose to exhibit any libell. I took the liberty formerly to say it was very inconvenient to have the Admiralty Court officers here onely Depty. to those at Boston, and it would be great care to the people of Maine, if anything relating to them in that Court, could be tryed here without goeing 60 miles farther to Boston, it would be a very great conveniency to me and my Deputys, as all the pine trees are in New Hampshire and Maine. Pray commend this to my Lords for the opinion and intercession for such commission for George Jaffrey, now Deputy Judge of Vice Admiralty here. Signed, David Dunbar. Endorsed, Recd. 7th Sept., Read 19th Oct., 1731. Holograph. 2 pp. Enclosed,
300. i. Mr. Willard to three Justices of the Peace of York County; Communicates: Order of Governor and Council of the Massachusetts Bay to enquire into the complaint of Josiah Grover, which they apprehend to be a most flagrant and notorious riot etc. Upon sufficient evidence of the facts, they are to issue their warrant to the Sheriff to apprehend the offenders etc. He must be directed to take sufficient assistance to execute his warrant etc. Cambridge, Sept. 18, 1730. Signed, J. Willard. Copy. 1 p.
300. ii. (a) Order of above Justices to the Sheriff in accordance with above order. York, 25th Sept., 1730. Signed, John Wheelwright, Jos. Hammond, Wm. Pepperrell jr. (b) Sheriff of York County to the Justices. Oct. 13th, 1730. Has apprehended, by virtue of above writ, four prisoners and the schooner mentioned. Signed, Jer. Moulton, Sheriff. The whole endorsed as covering letter. Copy. 3 pp.
300. iii. Information of Josiah Grover to the Governor and Council of the Massachusetts Bay. Cambridge, 16th Sept., 1730. Complains of being driven from his settlement and seized in a schooner by some Irishmen from Pemaquid or Fredericks Fort. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 3 pp.
300. iv. Order of the Council and Assembly of the Massachu- setts Bay, 26th June, 1716, that, for the more convenient administration of Justice, all the lands families and settlements within this Province to the eastward of the Province of Maine shall be annexed to the county of York etc. Consented to, Wm. Tailer. Same endorsement. Copy, examined by, J. Willard, Secry. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 873. ff. 183, 183v., 184v.–185, 186v.–187v., 1880.–190v.]
July 15.
New
Hampshire.
301. Lt. Governor Dunbar to the Duke of Newcastle. Has received H.M. Commission to be Lt. Governor, and is very sensible of his unworthiness of so high a trust, but "will do my best endeavours to doe it like an honest man" etc. Returns thanks for his Grace's support when so much opposition was made to it etc. Continues: — Your Grace will be more and more sensible every day that the interest formed against me, was the same that opposes everything relateing to H.M. and His interest in ye Masachusets Governmt. If I had been less diligent in my duty in America. I should have had more friends and more mony too etc. My enemies have stuck at nothing to blacken my character with your Grace, they are in that respect not unlike the papists who are of opinion they may use all ways and means to promote their own interest and keep no faith with hereticks, such, my Lord, are all those that differ from the Masachusets principles, in their opinion; dayly demonstration evinces it, they deny facts upon public record. One instance was that they never sent any force to disturb the settlements at and near Fredericksfort, when in fact a High Sheriff was sent, who is also Major of a regiment in the Province of Maine, with an armed sloop and 36 men in arms to take prisoners from thence, and effected it, and some of the men to this day in ye county gaol of that province, more than 100 miles from the place where they were taken. I had ye honour some time agoe to give a full account hereof to your Grace and to my Lords Commissioners for Trade etc., but there has been such tricks plav'd with my letters both to as well as from England, that many have miscarryed both ways, it is pretty common at Boston, and even Governour Belcher (under whose command I now am) has deigned to be so far concerned yt. way that H.E. has even handed copys about of one letter from my wife to me; this, may it please your Grace is a heavy charge against a man yt. ought to be a Gentleman. I have had the honour of writeing often to your Grace, and if I fail to prove any one particular as I represent it, I can expect no other but a scandalous dismission from H.M. service and to be abandoned by all men of honour; until then I most humbly beg your Grace not to believe anything yt. may be suggested to my discredt. until I have an oppertunity of justifying myself. I have now sent accounts of the new settlements, of wt. relates to this Province to my Lords Comms. for Trade, and requested yt. copys may be layd before your Grace. I have no clerk or assistant, and the ship that carries this is weighing anchor etc. Governour Montgomery dyed suddainly at New York the 1st instant. Signed, David Dunbar. Holograph. 3 ¾ pp. Enclosed,
301. i. Deposition of Theodore Atkinson and Thomas Packer, 15th July, 1731. Major Jeremiah Moulton, High Sheriff of the County of York, Mass., talking with them about an expedition he had been upon to Fredericks Fort, told them he recd, a warrant from the Justices of said county, by virtue of an order from Governor Belcher and the Council, and in pursuance thereof took up a vessel and enlisted upwards of 30 men, well armed etc., and did proceed to Pemaquid Harbour, but the wind not allowing him to goe up to the Fort was forced into another harbour, where he stopped all people passing up and down the river, until he had got as many as he wanted, and secured them on board. He said he was not limited to any certain number of men, but might have carried the whole county of York if he had thought proper. Signed, Theodore Atkinson, Thos. Packer. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 10. ff. 84–86.]
July 15.302. Lord Baltimore to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Proposes John Ogle, of Dublin, and John Broughton, of Westminster, as security for Lt. Governor Ogle (v. 1st July). Signed, Baltimore. Endorsed, Recd. 16th, Read 20th July, 1731. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1268. ff. 14, 17v.]