America and West Indies
November 1731, 16-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

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1938

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347-356

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'America and West Indies: November 1731, 16-30', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 38: 1731 (1938), pp. 347-356. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72593 Date accessed: 20 October 2014.


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November 1731, 16-30

Nov. 16.
Whitehall.
491. Duke of Newcastle to Lt. Col. Cornwallis Draft of Instructions for withdrawal of the two regiments from Jamaica as in accordance with instructions of 16th Sept. q.v. 2x¼ pp. [C.O. 137, 53. ff. 400–401.]
Nov. 16.
Whitehall.
492. Same to Governor Hunter. Similar draft of instructions. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 53. ff. 402, 402v.]
Nov. 16.
Annapolis
Royal.
493. Lt. Governor Armstrong to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Begins with duplicate of 5th Oct. Concludes: I hope your Lordships will favour me with such directions as the facts therein [5th Oct.] related requires, for other ways, it will be a difficult matter to bring those people, to any reasonable terms of obedience to H.M. Government, or even to any manner of good order and decency amongst themselves; for tho' they are a litigious sort of people, and so ill natur'd to one another, as daily to encroach upon their neighbours propertys, which occasions continual complaints, and which were partly the cause of some of the paragraphs of my aforerecited letter, yet they all unanimously agree in opposing every order of Govern- ment, tho' never so conducive to their own interest, as I presume your Lordships will observe, by their answer to the Instrument I issued, by the advice of the Council on 13th Oct. etc. all which I transmitt for your Lordships' farther information, and advice thereon etc. Signed, L. Armstrong. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd June, Read 5th Oct., 1732. 7 pp. Enclosed,
493. i. Minutes of Council of Nova Scotia, 13th Oct.–11th Nov. 1731. Upon the petition of some French inhabitants for the confirmation of their succession as heirs to the Seigniority of Cobaquil, they were informed of the necessity of having their land all first surveyed, before H.E. could give them any grants, and a notice (quoted) to this effect was prepared and sent into the several districts etc. To which the inhabitants of the River of Annapolis Royall, replied, that they were grateful for his care, but they were made answer (quoted 11th Nov.), bound by contracts, and most of them too poor to pay the cost of surveying their lands. They therefore desired H.E. not to detain the Surveyor any longer, not having any intention of employing him for that purpose. If any difficulty arises about the lands granted before or now, they beg H.E. to decide it, since they were promised at the time of taking the oath of allegiance that they should not be disturbed in any way in the enjoyment and possession of their privileges etc. 87 signatures. A true copy, Signed, Wm. Murrell, Secry. Endorsed as preceding. 6 pp. [C.O. 217, 6. ff. 107–110v., 111v., 114v., 115v.; and (abstract of Covering letter) 217, 30. pp. 49, 50.]
Nov. 17.494. Representation of the Lt. Governor, Council and Assembly of Antigua to the Council of Trade and Plantations. For many years past a most pernicious trade hath been freely and openly carryed on between the inhabitants of Boston, Rhode Island and other parts adjacent, and the subjects of the French King in Martinieco, Guardeloupe and Hispaniola; in direct breach of the Treaty of Neutrality etc., to the great damage and impoverishment of the Brittish Sugar Colonies: the decrease of their inhabitants: and the improvement of the said French islands. Boston and Rhode Island by their near and convenient scituation with respect to the Brittish Sugar Islands, may with ease and mutual profit supply the wants of each other, was the trade confined to that channell, and the Sugar Colonies of Great Brittain would have thereby an infinite advantage over the French or Dutch: whereas by this trade taking a contrary and unnatural course, the French and Dutch settlements daily encrease and flourish while those belonging to the Crown of Great Brittain are upon the decline and languish. The Sugar Islands are in absolute necessity of a trade with Boston, Rhode Island and other parts of the Continent, for boards, staves, fish, horses and all manner of lumber; without which a sugar settlement cannot be made or improved, and the inhabitants on the Continent have in return rum, sugar and molasses; and as far as the Sugar Colonies are deprived of these conveniences, so far they must want improvement and in proportion decay. By the great quantity of boards, staves, horses, fish and all manner of lumber sent from Boston and Rhode Island to the French and Dutch Colonies, this island has often been drove to great extremitys and want, and usually purchase them at a more inhanced price; when their neighbours of a foreign nation have great abundance on easy terms; and these supplys afforded them by our own countrymen, contrary to law and the violation of a treaty. The evil effects of this trade and the mischievous consequences attending it cannot be more clearly evinced to your Lordships than by the growing greatness of Martinico, a large, seasonable and fruitfull island; which some short time before the treaty of Utricht had few more inhabitants (if any) than this island; and their trade and sugar settlements were little superiour: but it is with the greatest concern that we are now obliged to acknowledge that our inhabitants dureing eighteen years peace have scarcely encreased one man; and that Mountserrat and Nevis have much decreased: and yet the French in that island only, have augmented their number near tenfold; and their trade and sugar works in the same proportion: which in case of a rupture with France will in all probability prove the ruin of this, as well as the other Leeward Islands; and that by their own strength without the usual inforcement from France. The French are not only in a flourishing condition at Martinico, Guardeloup, and Mary Gallante, but are also possessed of a large fruitfull tract of land at Hispaniola, with numerous inhabitants and a very great trade, to almost all parts and their forces and sugar settlements equal to those at Martinico. That the French daily encrease and make new settlements at Dominico and Sta. Lucia, at each of which places according to the best accounts are already settled near 500 inhabitants; and that some of the Brittish Sugar islands on the other hand have been, and are now at a stand, and others on the decline, must be imputed in a great measure to this fatal illegal trade which has had a long continuance, and has produced these mischiefs, and in time will be productive of more. By this trade from Boston and Rhode Island, the French are not only vastly benefitted and improved, but the Dutch also at Surinam. This trade enabled them to make their first settlements there, and from a small begining they have been able many years since to employ annually 40 or 50 sail of shiping in the trade to that place, and to make upwards of 40,000 of their hogsheads of sugar; whereas without this trade neither the French or the Hollanders would ever have made sugar to any advantage, much less to rival and exceed the Brittish Islands, and by a restraint of it they must soon decline and in time quite decay. The Dutch at Surinam are so plentifully supplyed by this trade in all the particulars requisite for makeing and improveing sugar plantations, and at the same time are under that necessity for want of horses for their mills and for other uses, that they have been induced to make laws to restrain this trade, unless each vessell tradeing from Boston and Rhode Island thither, do bring each such a particular number of horses; and this law is so rigidly observed and put in execution, that in case of accidents of bad weather, that the horses shipt on board, should dye or be otherwise lost, the master is constantly obliged to preserve the very hoofs of those that are lost, to excuse himself from the penalty of their law. The Brittish Sugar Islands lye under very great discouragements by reason of this trade with regard to our neighbours the French and Hollanders, not only of the 4½ p.c. and enumerated dutys, (which are unknown to them) and that our land is much worn and impoverished and wants a more expensive and chargeable cultivation; and consequently the profits thereby diminished, but also with respect of the want of those very necessarys which our forreign neighbours are so plentifully supplyed with and at much easier rates. This island only with proper encouragement and with the necessary supplys of all things requisite for improveing our Plantations might reasonably make 10,000 hhds. of sugar more yearly than they either can, or do make at present and 5000 hhds. of rum in proportion thereto, besides a considerable quantity of rum more in proportion to the sugar we now make; which 'tis humbly apprehended your Lordships will be of opinion is giveing the advantage of so much yearly into the hands of the French and Dutch. The early success that the bill for prohibitting this trade met with dureing the last session of Parliament, and the accidental miscarriage of it by their sudden riseing, gives us better hopes at the ensueing session: and we earnestly entreat your Lordships as we are more immediately under your care and protection to add your influence to the passing a law for prohibitting effectually, this illegal and destructive trade to the Crown of Great Brittain. Signed, Edw. Byam, Natha. Crump, Tho. Freeman, Speaker and 20 others. Endorsed, Recd, (from Mr. Yeamans), Read 17th Nov., 1731. 1 large p. [C.O. 152, 19. ff. 74, 74v.]
Nov. 17.
Whitehall.
495. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Newcastle. Enclose following, just received, to be laid before H.M., "it being of the same nature as that from Barbadoes" etc. (v. 9th Nov.). Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
495. i. Representation of Lt. Governor, Council and Assembly Antigua to the Council of Trade and Plantations. See preceding, No. 494. Copy. 7 pp. [C.O. 7, 1. Nos. 35, 35 i; and (without enclosure) 153, 15. p. 113.]
[Nov. 17].496. [? Mr. Ochs and Mr. Stauber] to the Council of Trade and Plantations. If the dispatch of their business is further prolong'd, it will have to be deferred another year or laid aside etc. It is unnecessary to stay for an answer of the Lords Proprietors that are bordering on the River Patomak etc.; The Board need only express it plainly that this Colony is to be settled upon the King's land beyond the limits which the charters of the said Lords Proprietors claim etc. Endorsed, Recd., Read 17th Nov., 1731. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 1322. ff 185, 186v.]
Nov. 17.
Whitehall.
497. Mr. Popple to Messrs. Wilks, Partridge and Sharpe. Memorandum of a summons to attend the Board. [C.O. 29, 15. p. 242.]
Nov. 17.
Whitehall.
498. Mr. Popple to the Honble. Saml. Barwick Esq., President of the Council of Barbados. The Government of the island of Barbados, according to H.M. Commission, being devolved upon you, since Mr. Worsley's departure, etc. My Lords Commissrs. desire you will give them constant accots. of all transactions there; But as Mr. Worsley has omitted the sending to this Office the several Naval Officer's lists during the whole Governmt., I am particularly commanded to desire, you will send authentic copies thereof for that time, by the very first opportunity, as also an answer to a letter I wrote to Mr. Worseley, 10th June last etc., of which I now send you a duplicate. [C.O. 29, 15. pp. 241, 242.]
Nov. 17.
Whitehall.
499. Mr. Popple to Governor Belcher. My Lords Commissioners command me to acknowledge the receipt of letters etc. of the 1st, 12th, two of 21st and 24th of June, 12th 13th and 26th July, and 20th, 21st, 27th and 31st of Aug. last, and to desire you will be punctual in your correspondence wth. them, and give them constant accounts of wtever occurrences shall happen in your Governmts. Acquaints him with proceedings upon his dispute with Lt. Gov. Dunbar (Nov. 4th). Continues: In the mean time my Lords can by no means approve of your having forbid the Capt. of Fort William and Mary to suffer H.M. Lieut. Governor to enter that fort, unless he divests himself of all authority, and desires admittance only, as a private gentleman; But as this dispute now lies before His Majesty, my Lords will not at present say any more upon ye subject. His Majesty has been pleased to refer an Address from the Assembly of the Massachusets Bay etc., wherein they desire a repeal of your 16th and 30 Instruction etc. But their Lordps. who have heard what Mr. Wilks, Agent for the Province, had to offer upon this occasion, can by no means agree to any alteration in either, and have reported their opinion accordingly etc. (v. 4th Nov.). His Majesty having likewise refer'd to this Board 18 acts pass'd in the Massachusets Bay in 1731, they are now under consideration, and their Lordships will soon report thereupon. The matter in dispute concerning the lands to the eastward of Kennebeck is likewise under consideration, and their Lordships propose very shortly to lay their opinion before H.M. concerning it. My Lords do not mention anything particularly relating to your salary; H.M. having graciously been pleas'd to allow your receiving what the Assembly have already voted for you. But as this is to be no president for the future, you will do well to use your utmost endeavours to induce the Assembly to comply with the King's request. The people of New Hampshire having in their Address to my Lds. Commissioners complained of some hardships they lye under for want of ye appointment of officers and ye holding of Courts, I am commanded to send you a copy thereof for your answer thereto. There being six vacancies in the Council of New Hampshire, my Lords Commissioners have recommended Benning Wentworth, Richd. Waldron, Anth. Reynolds, Benjn. Gamblin, Theo. Atkinson, and Joshua Peirce etc., and have likewise proposed that the Lieut. Governor for the time being shall always be of yt. Board etc. The eight New Hampshire acts, which you transmitted 5th Dec. 1730, not being under the seal as they ought to have been, according to your Instructions, cannot be taken notice of, as authentick laws; and therefore I am to desire you will send other copies, and under the seal of that Province. [C.O. 5, 917. pp. 15–18.]
Nov. 17.
Whitehall.
500. Same to Lt. Governor Dunbar. Acknowledges letters etc. of 17th Nov. and 2nd Dec. 1730, and 4th June, 11th, 14th and 15th July, and 18th and 20th Aug. last, My Lords desire you will be punctual in your correspondence with them, and give them constant accts. of whatever occurrences shall happen. Repeats gist of paragraph in preceding relating to dispute with Governor Belcher, and concerning lands E. of Kennebeck; also concerning Address from N.H. about holding Courts, and recommendation of six Councillors. [C.O. 5, 917. pp. 19–21.]
Nov. 18.
Whitehall.
501. Mr. Popple to Governor Johnson. My Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations have commanded me to acknowledge the receipt of your letters of the 26th of March and 13th of August last, and to desire you will continue to give them constant accounts of all transactions during your Government. By your letter of the 26th of March you inform the Board, that you have allowed the Assembly to appoint their own clerk, until H.M. pleasure shall be known upon that head. But I am commanded to acquaint you that in this Kingdom H.M. always appoints the clerks to the House of Commons, and as by your 14th Instruction, you are not to allow the Assembly any greater privilege than is claimed by the House of Commons here, you are for ye future to insist upon H.M. prerogative in naming all his officers; and accord- ingly to name him yourself. I am commanded to desire you will transmit to my Lords authentick copies of all laws pass'd by you, and of all other publick proceedings. [C.O. 5, 401. p. 19.]
Nov. 18.
Whitehall.
502. Mr. Popple to Mr. Sharpe. Presses for reply to 4th Nov. [C.O. 5, 1366. pp. 80, 81.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
503. Order of Committee of Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report thereon Signed, Jo. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 1st Jan., Read 4th May, 1732. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
503. i. Petition of Joseph, Viscount Micklethwait and Francis Whitworth to the King. Petitioners have obtained several Orders of Council directing the Governor and Council of Barbados to examine and settle their accounts and to recommend to the Assembly the immediate payment thereof. The Governor in Council accordingly found by proper vouchers etc. £2823 16s. 9d. to be owing to them, and recommended to the Assembly the making a speedy provision therefor. But the Assembly desiring to have the accounts laid before them, the Governor refused to do it till he should receive H.M. commands thereon etc. Pray that he may be directed to lay said accounts before the Assembly, and recommend also to them the payment of what has since grown due etc. Signed, Micklethwait, Francis Whitworth. Copy. 3 pp. [C.O. 28, 23. ff. 19–21, 22v.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
504. Order of Committee of Privy Council. Referring back to the Council of Trade and Plantations draught of Instructions for the Governor of S. Carolina about the settlements of Swiss Protestants, to be altered in accordance with the directions given them at this Board. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 26th, Read 30th Nov., 1731. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 362. ff. 44, 45v.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
505. Order of Committee of Privy Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report thereon. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 26th Nov., Read 1st Dec. 1731. 1¼ pp. Enclosed,
505. i. Petition of Patrick Blake, of St. Kitts, and Martin Blake his son, 17, heir apparent of his wife, Mary Ann, decd. Andrew Bodkin, father of Mary Ann, died, 1689, seized in fee of a valuable plantation in the English quarter of St. Christophers. Mary Anne his only child being then only three or four years old and the island in great confusion, Andrew Thauvet got possession of said plantation by virtue of some grant from some Governor. In 1714, Mary Anne having inter-married with Patrick Blake, they recovered possession by judgment of law etc. But lately one Augustus Boyd of the said Island Gent, brought an ejectment as heir of Thauvet decd., pretending that Andrew Bodkin went away with the French from the island in 1689, when the French quarter was conquered by the English, and that therefore he can recover the plantation by virtue of an act of 1712 for settling the estates and titles of the inhabitants, it being thereby enacted that all the lands in the English quarters of any Frenchman or woman who quitted or deserted the same upon our retaking the island, and went off with the other French subjects etc. were forfeited to the Crown etc. Quote Sir E. Northey's adverse opinion of this Act, which was unconfirmed. In 1718 an act was passed providing that such natural born subjects who had been in rebellion and their heirs pretending title to any lands so forfeited having first obtained license from under the Great Seal might within two years after the date of that act but not after prosecute their claim in any Court of record in the island. But a clause was added that the same should not be in force until H.M. pleasure should be known. Mary Anne being of so tender age at her father's death knew nothing of his conduct, nor are petitioners acquainted therewith, otherwise than that they have been credibly informed that he was never in any rebellion, but being supposed to be a Roman Catholick was at that time seized with many other persons of that perswasion by some of the English and by them involuntarily sent away to some French or Spanish island where he soon after died for want etc. But it will be very difficult to prove the circumstances of his case at that time, and if Boyd can only prove that Bodkin was gone off the island and the act of 1712 should be deemed in force petitioners may be on the trial in March next in great danger of being divested and evicted of their inheritance etc. The act of 1712 was a breach of Governor Douglas' instructions, being of an extraordinary nature and having no clause suspending its execution until H.M. pleasure be known. It is also repugnant to the laws of Great Britain, which are always calculated to secure the properties and especially the freeholds of British subjects. Pray that said Act may be rejected. Copy. 7 pp. [C.O. 152, 19. ff. 75–79, 80v.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
506. Order of Committee of Privy Council. Approving representation of the Council of Trade and Plantations upon Act of Jamaica for raising several sums etc., 25th Aug. last (q.v.), and ordering that Instructions be prepared for the Governor of Jamaica and for the Governors of the several Colonies in America as therein proposed. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 29th, Read 30th Nov., 1731. 2⅓ pp. [C.O. 137, 19. ff. 95–96v.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
507. Order of Committee of Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd., Read 1st Dec, 1731. 1 p. Enclosed,
507. i. Petition of Ralph Noden, in behalf of himself and the rest of the merchants of London trading to America and in particular to Bermuda, and in behalf of the inhabitants of Bermuda, to the King. Since the removal of the Independent Company to New Providence in 1730, the negroes, who are much more numerous than the white people, have destroyed many of H.M. subjects by poyson, and many more are now lingering under that misfortune, whose lives are dispaird of, some of the actors of this horrid villany have been discovered, convicted and publickly punished, but still continue to meet in numbers in a most mutinous manner, conceived to be with an intent utterly to extirpate and destroy your Majesty's subjects in that Collony, the consequence whereof would prove fatall to the whole trade of your Majesty's Dominions in America etc. The insolence of the negroes was never known whilst the Independent Company remained there, but kept them in due sub- jection, and were esteemed the greatest preservation to that Collony in defending it from rebellion within, and insults from enimies and pirates from abroad etc. Prays that it may be ordered back. Signed, Ra. Noden. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 37, 12. ff. 76–77v., 80v.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
508. Duke of Newcastle to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses letter he has received from the Governor of Newfoundland (v. 1st Oct.), "by which you will find the difficulty there is, to settle good order and government among H.M. subjects there, which seem to arise chiefly from the interfering, that is pretended to be, between the powers given by act of Parliament to the Fishing Admirals, and by the King's Commission to the Justices of the Peace; I also send you a copy of the report made by Mr. Attorney General explaining how the law stands in this particular" etc. (v. 1st Oct.). Continues:—You are to report to His Majesty what in your opinion is proper to be done to remedy this evil, and the other inconveniencies mentioned in Capt. Clinton's letter. Signed, Holles Newcastle. Endorsed, Recd. 24th Nov., 1731, Read 9th March, 1731/2. 1 p. (For enclosures v. 1st Oct.). [C.O. 194, 9. ff. 89, 94v.]
Nov. 24.
Whitehall.
509. Duke of Newcastle to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have laid before the King the Representation of the Assembly of Barbados etc. (v. 27th Aug. supra). Continues: His Majty., having very much at heart the improvement of the commerce of His subjects, and particularly that branch of it, that relates to H.M. Plantations, and being desirous to have a more perfect account of this matter, has commanded me to signify his pleasure to you, that you should lay a state of it before His Majty., taken from the best informations that you shall be able to procure: And His Majty. would have you inform yourselves, with as much despatch as possibly you can, how effectual the several proposals, made by the Assembly, may be towards attaining the desired end, and whether any, or what inconveniences may arise, from putting all or any of them in practice, to His Majty.'s Northern Colonies, and to the Trade and Navigation of this Kingdom, or any other of His Majty.'s Dominions: of all which it is the King's pleasure that you should forthwith make your report to His Majty., with your opinion, upon each particular; and that you should also suggest such other expedients, if any shall occurr to you, as you think proper for this purpose. I have also laid before His Majty. the representation to yor. Lops, from the Lieut. Governor, Council and Assembly of the island of Antigua etc., and His Majty. has commanded me to referr it likewise to your con- sideration. Signed, Holles Newcastle. Endorsed, Recd. 26th Nov., Read 1st Dec, 1731. 1½ pp. [C.O. 28, 22. ff. 134, 134v., 135 v.]
Nov. 24.510. Mr. Fane to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In reply to enquiry from Mr. Popple, is of opinion that upon the expiration of a temporary act, repealing a clause in an act of the Massachusetts Bay, that clause revived again. This has been determined to be the constant construction in cases of the like nature here etc. Signed, Fran. Fane. Endorsed, Recd. Read 24th Nov., 1731. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 873. ff. 257, 258v.]
Nov. 25.
St. James's.
511. Order of King in Council. Repealing Act of New Jersey concerning the acknowledging and registring deeds and conveyances etc. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 15th Aug., Read 7th Sept., 1732. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 972. ff. 233, 233v., 238v.]
Nov. 25.
St. James's.
512. Order of King in Council. Repealing Act of New Jersey for shortening of law-suits etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding, 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 972. ff. 234, 234v., 237v.]
Nov. 25.
St. James's.
513. Order of King in Council. Repealing Act of New Jersey for the frequent meeting and calling of the General Assembly etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 972. ff. 235, 235v., 236v.]
Nov. 25.
St. James's.
514. Order of King in Council. Repealing Act of Jamaica for the better regulating slaves etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 137, 20. ff. 33, 37v., 37v.]
Nov. 25.
St. James's.
515. Order of King in Council. Repealing Act of Virginia, 1726, for the more effectual preventing the bringing tobacco from North Carolina and the bounds in controversy. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd., 15th Aug., Read 7th Sept. 1732. 12/3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1323. ff. 5, 5v., 9v.]
Nov. 25.
St. James's.
516. Order of King in Council. Repealing Act of Virginia, 1705, against importing tobacco from Carolina and other parts without the Capes of Virginia. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 12/3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1323. ff. 6, 6v., 9v.]
Nov. 29.517. Order of King in Council. H.M. having approved of a new seal for New Jersey (v. 1st July), the Council of Trade are to prepare a draught of a warrant empowering the Governor to use it etc. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 14th Dec, 1731. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 972. ff. 226, 231v.; and (endorsed, Recd. 15th Aug., Read 7th Sept., 1732). ff. 239, 244v.]
Nov. 29.
St. James's.
518. H.M. Instructions to Lord Baltimore. [C.O. 5, 192, ff. 605–637.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
519. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Committee of the Privy Council. Enclose following. Annexed,
519. i. H.M. Additional Instruction to Governor Johnson empowering him, under conditions specified, to grant the Sieur Jean Pierre Purry and his heirs 12,000 acres in South Carolina, subject to the usual quit-rent after 10 years etc. [C.O. 5, 401. pp. 20–23.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
520. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Committee of the Privy Council. In pursuance of order of 23rd inst., enclose following. Annexed,
520. i. H.M. Additional Instruction to Governor Hunter. Whereas by Our Additional Instruction to you, 13th Nov., 1727, you was strictly forbidden to give your consent to any law, upon any pretence whatsoever, imposing a tax upon negroes imported into Jamaica or landed there for refreshment only; and whereas notwithstanding you did in Feb. last give your consent to an Act for raising several sums etc., laying duties on negroes imported and exported etc., and a duty on convicts imported, in direct opposition also to the Act of Parliament for the further preventing robbery etc., which extends to all our Plantations in general: We cannot but express Our great dissatisfaction at these your proceedings, and do command you upon pain of Our highest displeasure, and of being recalled from that Our government, to adhere more strictly to your Instructions for the future; and we do absolutely forbid you to give your assent to any law imposing duties upon slaves imported into Jamaica, payable by the importer, or upon any slaves exported that have not been sold in the island and continued there for the space of twelve months. It is Our farther will and pleasure that you do not give your assent to any act whatsoever for imposing duties on the importation of any felons from this Kingdom into Jamaica.
520. ii. H.M. Additional Instruction to Governors of H.M. Plantations in America. It is Our will and pleasure that you do not give your assent to or pass any law imposing duties etc. as concluding paragraph of pre- ceding. [C.O. 138, 17. pp. 350–354.]
Nov. 30.
Boston.
521. Mr. Willard to Mr. Popple. Encloses Minutes of Council of the Massachusetts Bay for half year ending Aug., and of Assembly, May 26—9th Nov., with the Acts passed in that time. The Treasurer's accounts are not yet pass'd the Court etc. Signed, J. Willard. Endorsed, Recd. 17th Jan., 1731/2, Read 23rd Feb., 1732/3. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 875. f. 37, 40v.]