America and West Indies
January 1732, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

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1939

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1-8

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'America and West Indies: January 1732, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 39: 1732 (1939), pp. 1-8. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72616 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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January 1732, 1-15

Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
1. Mr. Popple to Mr. Oxenford. Requests an account of sugars imported from the British Sugar Islands respectively from Xtmas 1726 to Xtmas 1730; quantities re-exported, and whither; exports from G. Britain to the Sugar Islands, and to America, distinguishing each Colony. In all the respective accounts the quantities and value to be fixed. [C.O. 29, 15. p. 247.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
2. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Newcastle. Enclose following, lately received from President, Rip Van Dam, to be laid before the King. Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed, 2. i. Representation of the President, Council and General Assembly of New York to the King. Sept. 15th, 1731. Duplicate of encl. i, Nov. 2, 1731, q.v. 1 large p. [C.O. 5, 1086. Ff. 34, 37.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
3. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Commissioners of H.M. Treasury. Request payment of Office expences and Officers' salaries for quarter ending Christmas last. Account annexed. [C.O. 389, 37. pp. 333, 334.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
4. Mr. Popple to Mr. Fane. Encloses, for his opinion in point of law, 9 acts of New York, 1731. [C.O. 5, 1125. pp. 178–180.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
5. Same to Same. Encloses, for his opinion in point of law, four acts of the Massachusetts Bay, 1731 ; (i) for the better regulating swine; (ii) for the better curing of fish; (iii) for encouraging the killing of wild cats; (iv) for apportioning and assessing a tax of £68 18s. and a tax of £20 laid on the town of Weston for not sending a Representative, and other taxes etc [C.O. 5, 917. p. 29.]
Jan. 5.
Jamaica.
6. Governor Hunter to the Duke of Newcastle. Acknowledges orders of 16th Sept. Continues: The duplicates by a Bristol ship as I had the honor to write to your Grace I had received above a month ago, and exactly pursued all such orders and directions as were contained therein. This goes by a Bristol ship which sails immediately, so that I can not write so fully as I would. The Independent Companys will be compleated in a few days, and gratuity order'd by H.M. has been and shall be punctually pay'd to all. Yesterday the Assembly met and I spoke to them, as in the copie inclosed, etc. Their fears may work upon them at this time, but even these have not been able hitherto to get the better of humour and faction: I have done my best, inclose with this also the late letters which pass'd between the Field Officers and me, only because they send, as I am told, all such home. There are bad reports from the north side of the island, of the desertion of the negroes from the plantations there, even affirm'd by one of their members yesterday in the House, but I shall not be particular as to that untill I shall receive more authentick information. Your Grace will have the goodness to pardon this confusion, for I assure you that at present I have not time for necessary rest and refection. I shall go on to the utmost of my strength, that 1 may never be thought unworthy of so good a patron etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, R. March 7th. 2 pp. Enclosed,
6. i. Speech of Governor Hunter to the Assembly, 4th Jan., 1732. v. following end. i. Copy. 2½ pp.
6. ii. Lt. Col. Cornwallis, Lt. Col. Fountain and Major Hely to Governor Hunter. 15th Dec, 1731, O.S. As your Excellency was pleased (13th inst.) to require the field officers of the two regiments to wait on you at Spanish Town, to advise with them, in taking proper measures for destroying the rebel slaves etc., not having a proper opportunity when there, to declare our oppinions, before your Excellcy. and Council, for want of such lights as were necessary to guide us therein, by reason the overseer (or guide), who was with the last command during the action etc., was not examin'd when we were present, everything being agree'd upon by your Excellcy. and Councill, before our attendance was judged necessary, according to the resolution delivered to Col. Cornwallis when we were called for; having since that made it our business to enquire of the said overseer, the nature of the ground the late party march'd; we are inform'd by him and by other accounts that this is the third party that has been defeated in the same place, and that in marching to the settlement of the rebellious negroes, which is four or five days march at least from the breastwork, the men were oblidged to go along the course of a river as the path leads, and cross the fords above twenty times in one day and near as often every day, which in most places is breast high, and that they often meet with high rocks, to get over which, they were forced to climb on each others backs, and to hand up their arms, baggage and ammunition, and that on every side the river, there is thick wood, and mountaneous ground arising from it, by which means a few men lodged above, on either side the river, may destroy any number sent against them whilst they are crossing these fords, almost without being seen, which was the case of the last party, where some Mere wounded within fifteen yards of the ambush, without seeing the enemy, whose method was to fire, then lie down, and load again, and so keep themselves constantly under cover; This, and otheraccounts, convincing us of the several difficultys those partys labour'd under etc., and considering the rapidness of the rivers, the depth of the waters, and the many mountains, and high rocks they met with in the passage, the several narrow defiles where two men could not march abreast, with many other almost insuperable difficultys, together with the nature of the people they had to engage, who were too well acquainted with all the narrow passes and other advantagious posts, from whence they can with most ease annoy any partys sent against them; etc., we think our duty to lay before your Excellcy, our humble opinions relating to the present order for the speedy march of the remains of the troops to the same place etc. We are humbly of opinion that the only practical way to pursue and destroy those runaway negoes etc. is to have a sufficient number of negroes ordered to cut and clear roads, so that six men at least may march abreast, and where the places will not admit of such roads to be cut, then to chuse some more practicable places for it, and that all narrow defiles should be avoided as much as possible etc. Likeways at convenient distances, that breast Morks, redoubts etc. be raised in case of accidents as supports etc. Without some such works, it will be scarce possible to be of any service to the country in keeping for their use the negro settlement;—should the party meet with success, since it will be necessary that provisions be conveyed to them from Port Antonio, which cannot be safely done without some security being made, for partys on that service etc. Suggest that sending all the troops on parties under such difficulties as the present will discourage men in the two Regiments from enlisting in the two Independent Companies etc. But if this opinion does not meet with H.E.'s approbation, they will always be ready to comply with his commands etc. Signed, Ste. Cornwallis, Jas. Fountain, Jno. Hely. Copy. 2 pp.
6. iii. Governor Hunter to Lt. Col. Cornwallis etc. 21st Dec, 1731. Reply to preceding. Thanks them for acquainting him that they have sent a copy of preceding to England. He had not done so, or made it public, thinking it might bear a construction which might cause them concern, that at such a time they should raise difficulties and dangers. He is still of opinion they are neither such nor so many as they suggest. The remedies proposed by them require much more time than there is the least hope of their having the assistance of the two Regiments. Continues: There are other paths besides that short and unsuccessful! one, by one of which Peters, not long agoe, who is one of the overseers and guides on this last expedition, could march into and drive the rebels from that their chief strength and settlement, of which he was posess'd three days, and then contrary to his orders deserted; and my orders to the officer commanding in chief confin'd him to no particular route to that same settlement, but left that to his discretion when he had taken the best advice he could etc. I should think it as easy as H.M. Officers and troops to find that way and to get possession as Peters did with a less considerable party without complaining of any such difficultys. I think it highly to H.M. service, the safety of this his island and the honour of his troops that whilst they remain here they be imploy'd in the destruction or reduction of these slaves and the Genl. Assembly being to meet on the third of next month I make no doubt but they will agree upon measures to supply such things as you say, in your memorial, will be wanted, but exert themselves to the utmost to render the next effort more successful. I acquainted Capt. Lamilliere that he should, as he desired, have a Genl. Court Martial for the justification of his conduct etc. Concludes: It is the opinion of most in this island that there has not been that alacrity in the officers for carrying on the service design'd by H.M., but by difficultys and divisions first begun by Capt. De la Milliere and afterwards confirm'd by orders from the Commanding Officers of the two Regiments, which were that none of the men should work without being paid for it, tho' no work was ever required of them but what was for their own preservation, the want of which must have been the loss of many men, and it was very hard some work could not be allow'd a countrey who had been so bountifull to give so large an additional allowance even beyond their abilitys purely to engage them the more willingly to serve the country. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 54. ff. 13, 13 v., 14 v.–l6, 17, 17 v., 19, 19 v.]; and {duplicate of encl. iii. only) 137, 47. f. 122.]
Jan. 5.
Jamaica.
7. Governor Hunter to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Having wrote to his Grace the Duke of Newcastle by this Bristol ship just upon her departure, I thought it my duty to inclose to your Lordships a copie of what I say'd to the Genl. Assembly yesterday, upon their meeting, to which I refer you for an account of our present situation. I can make no judgement as yet of what they will or can do for themselves, as soon as I can, I shall not fail to inform you etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 6th March, Read 12th Sept., 1732. 1 p. Enclosed,
7. i. Speech of Govr. Hunter to the Council and Assembly of Jamaica, (4th Jan.). They were summoned upon the news of the bad success of the parties sent out against the rebellious slaves. By advice of the Council, he ordered the troops to be drawn, together at two places of rendezvous, Port Royal and St. Antonio. H.M. has determined to recall the two Regiments here, and he expects orders for their embarkation this month. H.M. has given orders for completing the establishment of the two Independent Companies by enlisting such private soldiers as are willing, and for discharging such as wish to remain, and recommends that proper encouragement and gratifications be given to all such. Recommends to the Assembly the immediate provision for the necessary supplies for the ensuing year, in order to avoid having to meet again soon, and to the Council of Assembly the taking of solid measures for their safety. " It has been suggested at home to H.M. Ministers, and the Lords Commissioners of Trade, that a treaty with the rebels, by which they are to aggree to be transported to some of the Bahama Islands, or the employing again the Musketo Indians against them may be of use" etc. Leaves it to their judgment. His own belief is that "nothing can prevent the growth of the evils you labour under, but the speedy peopling of the unsettled part of the country." Emphasises the present opportunity of inducing the soldiers, men inured to military labour and discipline, to settle on the good lands in the North East, with defensible barracks or guard houses erected in proper places to prevent surprises. "This would not only distress the rebels by cutting off their access to salt and fishing there, confine them to their fastnesses, and probably make them disperse, but facilitate any future offensive etc., and encourage greater numbers to become settlers there" etc. Hopes they will inprove this suggestion etc. Same endorsement. Copy. 2½ pp. [C.O. 137, 20. ff. 39, 40–41 v., 42 v.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
8. Mr. Popple to Mr. Mathews, Solicitor in behalf of Mr. Blake, and to John Sharpe. My Lords Commrs. have appointed the 18th inst. to hear petitioners against the act of St. Christophers, 1712, for settling estates and titles etc. [C.O. 153, 15. p. 125.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
9. Mr. Popple to H.M. Attorney and Solicitor General. Encloses petition of Rev. Timothy Cutler etc. (v. 1st Nov. 1731), complaining of several acts passed in the Massachusetts Bay, subjecting the members of the Church of England to pay to the support of the Ministers of other perswasions, and requests their opinion thereupon, and upon similar petition referred to them 14th Nov., 1727; and upon an Act of 1727, in addition to several acts for the settlement and support of Ministers etc. [C.O. 5, 917. p. 30.]
Jan. 7.
St. James's.
10. H.M. Warrant appointing Isaac Amyand Clerk of the Assembly, S. Carolina. Countersigned, Holies Newcastle. Copy. [C.O. 324, 50. pp. 95, 96; and 324, 36. p. 299.]
Jan. 7.11. Mr. Fane to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Has no objection to four acts of the Massachusetts Bay, 1731. Signed, Fran. Fane. Endorsed, Recd. 9th Jan. 173 ½, Read 18th Jan., 173 ¾. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 876. ff. 19, 24 v.]
Jan. 9.
Horringer
near Bury.
12. Mr. Davers to [? Mr. Brudenel]. I am now in hopes I have secured my interest soe well wh. I left in Barbadoes that I shall have noe occation to goe there again upon that acctt., and the father of the gentleman who bought my estate having an inclination to be one of the Counsell etc., recommends him, Thomas Applewhaite, to fill his place etc. Continues : I was in Town all the Hollydays in hopes to have the pleasure of waiting on you myself and called at yr. house before I left the Town, but yr. Servant told me he did not know when you would come, for he had no direction to send your coach etc. I am confident the Duke of Newcastle will be soe good (if you speake to him) to doe this for me etc. 'Tis noe more than a feather in the cap, but 'tis what the Barbadians like etc. Signed, Sr., Yr. most obedt. and obliged humble servant, J. Davers. Endorsed, Recd, (from Mr. Brudenel), Read 13th Jan., 1731/2. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 22. ff. 142, 142 v., 143 v.]
Jan.12
WhiteHall.
13. Duke of Newcastle to the Council of Trade and Plantations. You are to prepare a Commission and Instructions for Col. William Cosby, appointed Governor of New York and New Jersey etc. Printed, N.Y. Col. Doe. V. p. 930. Signed, Holles Newcastle. Endorsed, Recd., Read 13th Jan., 1731/2.. 1 p. ¾[C.O. 5, 1055. ff. 227, 228 v.]
[Jan.13].14. Memorial of the Master Wardens and Assistants of the Company of Feltmakers of London in behalf of themselves and all the Hatmakers of Great Brittain to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Most humbly sheweth, that the making of hatts hath arrived to the greatest perfection in Great Brittain and a trade hath been by them with great diligence and expence settled with the inhabitants of the Plantations in America who have heretofore been solely supplyed with hats from hence in exchange for beavor skins and other the produce of the said Plantations. That the inhabitants of the said Plantacons having beavor and provisions considerably cheaper than in Great Brittain (not being chargeable with custom, freight or hazard of the seas) hath induced them to set up the manufacture of making beavor hatts and to neglect the business in which they might be more beneficial to this Kingdom and thereby better answer the end of settling the said Plantations and in order to bring the hat making into greater perfeccon there they have procured many of the artificers of Great Brittain to goe to the said Plantations to whom they give great rewards and the persons setting up the trade there take many apprentices for two yeares only and have large sumes of money with them to learne them their said art. That by reason of the duty of about sixpence per skin paid in Great Brittain and of freight and other charges the inhabitants of the said Plantations are enabled to serve the forreigne markets and even to send over hatts to Great Brittain cheaper than the hat makers can make them, by meanes whereof the said trade of hatmaking in Great Brittain now does and will daily decline and the Navigacon rendred useless as to the importation of such of the produce of the Plantacons as were usually sent in trade for hats and the making of hatts witli coney wool will be extreamly lessened and severall lands in Great Brittain rendred of little or no value and the whole manufacture of Hatmaking in this Kingdom in danger of being further greatly depressed to the great impoverishment of many poor familys whose livelihood depends thereon. Wherefore it is humbly proposed that the inhabitants of the said Plantations may be prevented from wearing or vending any hats save what are of the manufacture of Great Brittain which will increase the Customs and Navigation and set to work great numbers of poor familys and enable the Hatmakers to revive their declineing trade. Endorsed, Recd. 13th Jan., Read 1st Feb., 173 ½. Seal. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 9. ff. 93, 93 v.]
Jan. 13.
Treasury
Chambers.
15. Mr. Scrope to Mr. Popple. The Lords Commrs. of H.M. Treasury desire copies of the case tried at Boston 9th May, 1730, and the act of appeal thereupon to the High Court of Admiralty mentioned in your letter of 21st Dec. etc. Signed, J. Scrope. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 20th Jan., 173 3½. Addressed. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 874. ff. 20, 27 v.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
16. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Thos. Davers Esq. one of your Majesty's present Council of Barbados, being now in Engld. has signify'd to us, that he is determined not to return to that Isld., and that he is willing his name should be left out of the said Council. Recommend Hugh Hall in his place etc. [C.O. 29, 15. p. 248.]
Jan. 14.17. Memorial of Merchants etc. trading to South Carolina to the Council of Trade and Plantations. More than a year ago, petitioners convinced Mr. Fane of the absolute necessity of restoring the summons Act in S. Carolina, by reason of the great number of negro slaves in that province and the small number of planters, and those dispersed at a great distance etc. Pray that the law process there may be as it was before 1726, that commerce may be put upon a more equal foot between the British merchant and the planter etc., and that they may have some reasonable hopes of recovering debts fairly and justly contracted, which by the capias act cannot be effected. Signed, Thomas Smith, John Hewlett and 8 others. Endorsed, Recd. 14th Jan., Read 16th Feb., 173 ½. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 302. ff. 50, 51 v.]
Jan. 15.
Jamaica.
18. Lt. Col. Cornwallis to the Duke of Newcastle. Acknowledges order for embarkation of 16th Nov. etc. Continues : In obedience to H.M. former order the two Independent companys are already compleated, and I believe the encouragement given by the Assembly (enclosed) will induce most of the rest to become settlers etc. Expresses gratitude for his assistance in forwarding his preferment etc. Signed, Ste. Cornwallis. Endorsed, R. 23rd March. I ¾ pp. Enclosed,
18. i. Encouragements offered by the Assembly of Jamaica tothe soldiers of late Collo. Hayes's and Collo. Cope's Regiments to serve against the rebellious negroes and to settle etc. (v. 16th Jan. encl. v.). [C.O. 137, 54. f. 21, 21v., 22v., 23 ; and (duplicate of encl. only) 137, 47. ff. 125, 125 v.1