America and West Indies
December 1732, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

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1939

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266-278

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'America and West Indies: December 1732, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 39: 1732 (1939), pp. 266-278. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72637 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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December 1732, 1-15

Dec. 2.
New York.
472. Governor Cosby to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses Naval Officer's accounts of inward and outward entries, 29th Sept., 1731—24th March, 1732. Signed, W. Cosby. Endorsed, Recd. 9th Jan., 1733, Read Aug. 13, 1734. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1056. ff. 136, 139 v.]
Dec. 2.
Barbados.
473. President Barwick to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have nothing at this time to interrupt you withall more then to transmit the sundry following papers this being the first opportunity etc. vizt. duplicates of Minutes of Assembly, 3rd Nov., 1731—4th April, 1732; Treasurer's accounts, 27th May —27th Nov., 1731 and 13th Dec—13th June, 1732; Storekeeper's accounts; Minutes of Assembly, 5th April—20th Nov., 1732. Concludes: As to the Naval Officer's lists I don't find he will send them in and I am under the like uncapacity of sending them as when I writ last. Signed, Samll. Barwick. Endorsed, Recd. 14th Jan., Read 23rd Feb., 1732/3. 1 p. Enclosed,
473. i. Storekeeper's account of stores of war in the magazine. Many are entered as "decayed" or "destroyed by rust." Signed, Samuel Durousseau. St. Anne's Castle, Sept. 23, 1932. Endorsed as preceding. 1 large p.
473. ii. Treasurer's quarterly accounts, 27th May—27th Nov., 1731. (Cf. 16th April, 1732), showing Receipts (details given), £1332 9s. 3d.; £856 3s. 8¾d.; £1113 18s. 1d.; and £1418 9s. 8¼d. Expenditure (details given), £2477 10s. 7d.; £1969 2s. 7d.; £1241 17s. 3d.; and £1572 16s. 10d. Balance in hand, £4790 2s. 3d. Signed and sworn to by, Byrch Hothersall, Treasurer. Same endorsement. 29 large pp. [C.O. 28, 23. ff. 53, 54 v., 55 v., 57 v.—63 v., 64 v., 65, 66 v.—73, 74 v.)
[Dec. 2.]474. Petition of the President and Council of Barbados to the King. We your Majesty's most dutifull and loyall subjects etc., having taken into consideration the declining state of the British sugar trade, think ourselves indispensably obliged in duty to your Majesty and in justice to ourselves and this Colony to represent, that the inhabitants and their predecessours have been the chief promoters of the British sugar commerce, which has been and still may prove a very profitable trade to Great Britain, and never can interfere with the true interest thereof. That the British Sugar Plantations are commodiously scituated for trade and wars, and have within these 30 years imported into Great Britain to the value of 25 minions in sugar and other American produce (nowayes interfering with the produce or manufacture of Great Britain) which without those Plantations must have been bought cheifly with cash from foreigners. That those Plantations with proper encouragement may etc. be brought to import into Great Britain, directly and by way of foreign ports, upwards of two millions sterling pr. annum the greatest part of which would be taken back in British produce and manufactures, and the rest would center in Great Britain to the great advancement of the national stock, while many thousand of poor artificers and manufacturers would be maintained thereby. That the negros, buildings, utensills and other stock in those Plantations can't amount to less than ten millions (exclusive of the land) which is employed much more to the advantage of the British nation than any such sum can be in any other part of the British Dominions. That no less than 6000 seamen and 100,000 tons of British shipping may be employed in this branch of the British commerce. That this Sugar Plantation trade supports all the British Plantations in America and their fishings. The encouragement of which will keep them all united and consequently more dependant on Great Britain. But etc. this trade is now in a declining way and in danger of being lost to the British nation without some speedy remedy from a British Parliament. That the subjects of foreign Powers have liberty to vend their produce not only in their respective dominions, but also to most of the foreign European ports on much better terms than your Majesty's subjects can vend theirs, so as to afford to sell their sugar at foreign marketts at least 10 pr. ct. cheaper than the British subjects and yett gain 15 pr. cent over the British planter by means of the charges of freight, commissions, port charges and other incidents that attend a double voyage. That they even supply Ireland and the British Northern Colonies upon much better terms than the British subjects by means of easier dutys to the Northern Colonies and a single direct voyage to Ireland. That they have by means of such a general rent and other encouragements in trade, increased within these few years to a great degree, far beyond the increase of the British Sugar Colonies. That many of your Majesty's British Colonies in America have liberty to carry their produce directly to several foreign ports of Europe, Ireland and elsewhere, wch. are thereby become the most flourishing Colonies. Your Petitioners therefore humble pray your Majesty's most gracious interposition that they may have the like encouragements as to the rent of the produce of their labour and soil as other British subjects now actually have for their produce, and such as the foreign sugar planters have for the like species of foreign growth, and that no foreign sugar penneles, rum, spirits, melasses or syrrups of the growth produce and manufacture of foreign Plantations or Colonies be imported into Ireland or any of the British Plantations or Colonies in America untill they have been first imported into Great Britain. Or that those several species of foreign growth do pay the like duty's upon importation into Ireland or the British Plantations or Colonies as are now paid upon their importation into Great Britain. Or that your Petitioners may have such other redress as your Majesty in your great wisdom shall judge the nature of their case to require. Copy, certified by, Wm. Webster, D. Clerk of the Council. Endorsed, R. Jan. 15th, 1732/3. 2 closely written pp, [C.O.; and 28, 40, Nos. 17, and (duplicate) 18.]
Dec. 5.
Cockpit.
475. Mr. Walpole to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Having recd, from Mr. Whitaker (whom Mr. St. John has tho't fit to appoint his Deputy Surveyor of South Carolina during his absence in North Carolina), a letter accompanied wth. ye copy of a memorial wch. ye said Mr. Whitaker has presented to ye Governr. of South Carolina in behalf of Mr. St. John relating to ye charge and imputation against him as if he had demanded exorbitant fees; I have tho't fit to transmit a copy of ye same with copies of some other papers concerning ye affairs of South Carolina to yor. Lordps. as what perhaps may be of use to you in ye consideration of matters relating to that Province wch. are now depending before you. Yr. Lrdps. most obedient and most humble servant. Signed, H. Walpole. Endorsed, Recd. Read 5th Dec, 1732. 1 p. Enclosed,
475. i. Mr. Whitaker to Mr. Walpole. South Carolina. 21st Sept., 1732. v. covering letter. Mr. St. John was importuned to make a favourable representation or be silent upon the Quit-rent Laws, and threatened if he did not. The enquiries he made for the observations to be submitted to Mr. Walpole in April, caused the violent proceedings of which he has complained to him etc. Though greatly provoked, he has always addressed the Governor and those in authority in terms of the greatest respect. The Governor and Council were so very flexible in the Quit-rent law, that he fears they will too much incline to the Assembly's bill for prolonging the time for registering of titles. Continues: Your Honour has been pleased to take notice of an information that you have receiv'd that the Surveyors of the country are running out lands under pretence of old purchase receipts from the late Proprietors and deeds lost and burnt. As a very great latitude has been already taken in making use of the Quit-rent Act, tho' the people here are yet uncertain of the fate of it, and as there is a liberty given by that act to confirm titles under purchase receipts and old deeds burnt and lost, it is more than probable that a very extensive use will be made of this law etc. But Mr. St. John passes no survey in his office but what is made by the Governor's immediate warrant. There is one of a special nature (copy enclosed) which will shew that the Governor and Council are very open to applications of that sort etc., though it must be acknowledged that when they have given their consent to a law that is prejudicial to the interest of the Crown, they can't well deny the people the benefit of it while it subsists unrepeal'd. But the greatest evil that is to be fear'd is from the sanction that the Quit-rent Law gives to the patents and the surveys made under them which the act allows to be made by any common Surveyor without any obligation upon him to return his survey into any office where it may be examined and approved, and by this means 'tis apprehended there's room left for the greatest frauds and concealments in the King's lands etc. Remarks how great a tenderness is shewn for these patents by the Governor and Council etc. They are everywhere specifically named. The Governor by his warrant cautions that the lands to be surveyed be not heretofore run out on any warrant or patent. In the resolves of Council etc., lands holden under patents and made valid by the Quit-rent Law are particularly absolved from the method prescribed to be observed in surveying the King's lands, and yet this Darling, thus fostered and nourish'd, sweeps away from the Crown 800,000 acres of land, and at least £1000 pr. annum rent etc. Illustrates the great industry to conceal the King's lands by the Assembly's vindictive persecution of Edward North, a poor cattle-hunter, who turned his knowledge of the woods to account by acquainting newcomers where vacant lands were to be found. Thinking that he was employed by Mr. St. John to make discovery of concealed lands, they summoned him to appear before them for having committed several indirect practices in surveying or shewing of lands. The man living in a very remote part of the country could not give immediate obedience and was committed to prison where lie lay for a month. They could not fix anything on him. Subsequently, when the man attended the Council as a witness in a private cause, the Governor in very boisterous and threatening language told him he would lay him in gaol, and hamper him for undertaking to shew people land which the Governor said was creating a disturbance, and setting people together by the ears. Describes his own protest on this occasion etc. Is certain that much the greater part of the people heartily wish that the King's Instructions were fairly and justly put in execution etc. They want no arguments to convince them that an equal distribution of the King's lands will add to the number of their inhabitants, bring them an accession of strength, increase their trade, and render them more useful to and consequently more worthy the consideration of Great Britain etc. Mr. St. John has acquainted your Honour of the disinclination of the people to register their titles according to the King's Instructions etc. From an exact account taken from the Auditor's Office, there have no more than 73 persons (who in all possess 61,046 acres) enter'd their titles to this day though notice has been given since 27th Nov. And yet the people of this province pay tax for 1,453,875¼ acres, exclusive of the lands lately taken up under the Crown etc. Encloses following reply to complaints against Mr. St. John, who is exposed to many difficulties on account of his faithful adherence to the interests of the Crown etc. P.S. This day John Stewart, a planter, told me that he was ordered by the Governor to petition him and the Assembly against Mr. St. John for taking a fee for his precept. Signed, Benja. Whitaker. Endorsed, as preceding. 7¼ pp.
475. ii. Mr. Whitaker to Governor Johnson. Charles Town. 21st Sept., 1732. As Deputy to Mr. St. John, Surveyor General of South Carolina, replies to complaint against latter for exacting higher fees per acre for running out land. The fee allowed by acts since 1685 was 1d. per acre; by the act of 1721, now in force, one penny Proclamation money, which according to the present exchange is five pence in paper currency, but Mr. St. John has never taken more than fourpence etc., etc. Signed, as preceding. 5½ large pp.
475. iii. List of fees taken in the Office of James St. John etc. Shows that the charges per 500 acres amount to £12 16s. 8d. Carolina money, =£1 16s. 8d. sterl. 1 p.
475. iv. Estimate of profits of Surveyor General's Office on running out 200,000 acres (though there has not been so great a quantity surveyed and returned into his office), £590 9s. 6d. sterl. Endorsed as preceding. 1 p.
475. v. Resolutions of Assembly of S. Carolina relating to Mr. St. John's fees etc. 25th Jan.—21st Feb., 1731/2. Copy. 2½ pp.
475. vi. Proceeding of Assembly against Edward North. 4th Feb., 1731/2. v. covering letter. Endorsed, Recd. Read 5th Dec, 1732. Copy. 3 pp.
475. vii. Governor Johnson's Warrant to Mr. St. John for admeasuring 500 acres in Colleton County unto the three daughters of William Wallace deed., lying within the bounds of the lands of Mr. Bellamy, Moses Martyn and Edward Cliff, purchased by John Wallis in 1717 of the Lords Proprietors and by him sold to William Wallace. 24th March, 1731/2. Signed, Robt. Johnson. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 1 p.
475. viii. Extracts from Acts of 1685, 1693, 1694, 1698 and 1721 for ascertaining fees etc. Same endorsement. Copy. 8 pp. [C.O. 5, 362. ff. 100, 101 v., 105–114, 115–118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 125 v.]
Dec. 6.476. Mr. Fane to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Has no objection to eight acts of the Massachusetts Bay, 1731, 1732. Signed, Fran. Fane. Endorsed, Recd. 7th Dec, 1732, Read 18th Jan., 1733/4. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 876. ff. 20, 20 v., 23 v.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
477. Mr. Popple to Mr. Fane. Encloses, for his opinion in point of law, Act of Nevis, 1732, for establishing the Court of King's Bench etc. [C.O. 153, 15. p. 135.]
Dec. 7.478. Lease by the Trustees for Georgia etc. to William Reyner, John Salmon, Charles Harrison, Thomas Smith and John Coates of London, merchants, on payment of £5 5s. 1200 acres with a frontage of half a mile on the river Savanah (200 ft. being reserved for a towing path), for making potash, for ten years, paying yearly for the last three years £3 sterl. The grantees to clear and cultivate 60 acres of wood ground within three years, and thereon to plant 600 white mulberry trees, and 6000 on 600 acres before the expiration of ten years, and not to make more than 2000 lb. of soap without leave of the Trustees etc. These conditions being performed, the Trustees at the end of ten years to convey to said grantees and their heirs male etc. the said 1200 acres at a rent of £6 per ann. The grantees not to keep or employ without licence from the Trustees any person within the limits of Georgia being a black or negro etc. All grants during the said term of ten years made by the Trustees, shall contain a clause prohibiting the grantees from entering into any company or partnership for the manufacture of potash, but not prohibiting any persons from making it as best they severally may etc. C.O. 5, 670. pp. 31–45.]
Dec. 11.
Council
Chamber,
Whitehall.
479. Order of the Committee of Council for Plantation Affairs. The Lords Commissioners for Trade are to prepare a draught of an additional Instruction for Governor Lord Howe, empowering him to receive an additional salary, agreeable to that which was given to the late Lord Belhaven etc. Signed, Temple Stanyan. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 12th Dec, 1732. ¾ p. [C.O. 28, 23. ff. 32, 37 v.]
Dec. 11.
Council
Chamber.
Whitehall.
480. Report of the Committee for Plantation Affairs to the King in Council. Have no objection to the draught of Instruction prepared by the Council of Trade and Plantations for Governor Lord Howe and referred to them. Continue: But as to the Instruction which regards the settling an additional salary upon the said Lord Howe within the island of Barbados, the Lords of the Committee have thought proper to direct the Lords Comms. for Trade to prepare a draught of Instruction as preceding, and humbly offer the same to your Majesty for your Royal approbation etc. Before 1721 (the time when this additional Instruction was first given), notwithstanding the Governors of the Plantations were by their Instructions restrained from receiving presents of any kind whatsoever from the respective Assemblys, yet it was manifestly known that annual presents were constantly offered to and received by the Governors under a pretence that their salary s were not sufficient to support the honour and dignity of their employments. In order to prevent the ill consequence of this practice, which tended to put the Governors under the power and influence of the Assemblys and to make them in a great measure dependant upon the people, His late Majesty thought proper to give an Instruction to the then Governor of Barbados and to severall others of H.M. Governors in the Plantations whereby they were authorized to receive such sum or sums in addition to their salarys from the respective Assemblys as the said Assemblys should think proper, provided the same were settled upon them, and their successors in that Government, or at least upon them during the whole time of their government there, and provided the same should be settled by the first Assembly after their arrival etc. This Instruction had its effect in Barbados as likewise in several other parts of H.M. Plantations. But of late several merchants, planters and others concerned in the trade to Barbados and the Leeward Islands etc, have complained that the Governors had made an ill use of the said Instruction and that the methods they had taken to prevail on the Assemblys to settle such additional salarys had raised great animositys and divisions amongst the inhabitants and that the sums so settled were larger than the product of their Plantations could answer, and therefore prayed that your Majesty would be pleased to order that the said Instruction might for the future be discontinued. Notwithstanding these complaints when the merchants and traders to the Leeward Islands came to be heard before a Committee of Privy Council, they did admit that the salary of the Governors without some addition to it from the Islands was not sufficient to support the honour and dignity of their Government, and they seemed inclinable that such addition should be made provided the same were limited to a certain sum and that such sum were specified in the Instruction. The Lords of the Committee hereupon humbly observe to your Majesty that if the request of the merchants for wholly discontinuing the said Instruction should be granted, there is great reason to apprehend that the same pernicious practice of receiving presents will be revived, and that the same endeavours will be used as formerly to keep the Governors in a state of dependancy upon the people, which is the great evil this Instruction was intended to remedy. That as to the specifying in the Instruction the quantum to be settled upon the Governors, the Lords of the Committee upon a thorough consideration of this matter have reason to believe the Planters may look upon it as a prescribing a certain sum to them which without an appearance of undutifullness to your Majesty they can neither alter nor diminish and that they ought rather to be left at liberty to judge for themselves and to act freely and voluntarily, and as they shall find most suitable to the circumstances of their affairs. For which reasons the Lords of the Committee are humbly of opinion that it may be adviseable for your Majesty to approve of the Instruction which is hereunto annexed, (v. Nos. 481, 482). Signed, Temple Stanyan. Endorsed, Read 31st Jan., 1732/3. Copy.6 pp. [C.O. 28, 23. ff. 33–35 v., 36 v.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
481. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Committee of Privy Council. In pursuance of Order of 1lth instant, transmit following, "agreable to the instruction which was given to Lord Belhaven" etc. Annexed,
481. i. Draught of H.M. Additional Instruction to Governor Lord Howe. Whereas it has been represented to us, that the salary of £2000 pr. annum which we have heretofore thought fit to allow to our Governors of Barbados payable out of the duty of 4½ pr. cent arising in that island is not sufficient for the support of our said Governors and the dignity of that our Government, we etc. are graciously pleased to permit and allow, that the Assembly etc. may by any act, or acts, settle upon you such sum, or sums, in addition to your salary of £2000 pr. ann. as they shall think proper, and you are hereby allowed to give your assent to any act or acts of Assembly for that purpose, provided such sum or sums be settled on you and your successors in that Govt. or at least on you, during the whole time of your Governmt. there, and provided the same be done by the first Assembly after your arrival in that Island. [C.O. 29, 15. pp. 414, 415.]
Dec. 14.
St. James's.
482. Order of King in Council. Approving draft of Instructions and aditional Instruction for Governor Lord Howe (v. 11th and 12th Dec. supra). Signed, Temple Stanyan. Endorsed, Read 31st Jan., 1732/3. 12/3 pp. [C.O. 28, 23. ff. 38, 38 v., 43 v.; and (without endorsement) 5, 195. ff. 174, 174 v.]
Dec. 14.
St. James's.
483. H.M. Instructions for Governor Lord Howe. v. preceding and 29th Nov. Signed, George R. [C.O. 5, 195. ff. 176–207 v.]
Dec. 14.
St. James's.
484. H.M. Instructions for Same, relating to the Acts of Trade and Navigation. Signed, G.R. [C.O. 5, 195. ff. 209–221 v., 222 v., 223.]
Dec. 14.
St. James's.
485. H.M. Additional Instructions for Same, relating to his salary, (v. 29th Nov. etc). [C.O. 5, 195. ff. 225, 225 v.]
Dec. 14.
St. James's.
486. Order of King in Council, appointing Henry Dawkins to the Council of Jamaica in the room of Alexander Henderson decd. Signed, Temple Stanyan. Endorsed, Recd. 29th Jan., Read 4th May, 1733. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 137, 20. ff. 83, 83 v., 86 v.]
Dec. 15.
Charles Town.
487. Governor Johnson to the Duke of Newcastle. In my last to your Grace, I had the honour to acquaint you, that I had appointed a Chief Baron of the Exchequer, etc. (v. 21st Nov.). Everything is very quiet upon the borders of North and South Carolina; Governor Burrington was indeed some time ago apprehensive that our Indians would have disturbed those under his government; but it afterwards appear'd there was little room to suspect any commotion of that kind, and if any thing material shall happen on that or any other occasion, your Grace may be persuaded I shall always acquaint you etc. It is with great satisfaction that I have the honour to acquaint your Grace, that the Assembly have admitted Mr. Amy and to be their Clerk, by which admission one of H.M. prerogatives here can suffer no future disputes. The great sickness which raged in this Province last summer and carried off many whites and blacks is now quite over, and the Province is now very healthy. Mr. Purry is lately arrived with about 120 Swiss, 50 of which are men, and the rest women and children; they like the country very well, and are very chearfull; I have taken care they should be provided with all necessarys, and doubt not but the accot. they will send to their friends of the reception they have met with, will encourage many more to come and settle here, which will in time greatly redound to H.M. honour and service. I cannot forbear just hinting to your Grace the behavour of the Surveyor General, Mr. St. John, who has a head so unfortunatly turn'd, that he has not only brought a great deal of uneasiness upon himself, but has also given H.M. Council and me a great deal of unnecessary trouble, he has had the weakness to reject the advice given him by myself, Council, and sevl. other worthy Gentlemen, and to pin his faith intirely on one Whitaker, late Attorney Genl. (and the Craftsman amongst us), who leads him into the most ridiculous and absurd measures, encouraging him to despise the authority of H.M. Governor and Council, who design to make a representation of his conduct to the Ministry, which has been of manifest disservice to H.M., and disturbed the peace and quiet of this Province, but the unthinking man believes and brags that his interest in England is so great, that, let him behave as he will, all his actions will pass muster. Signed, Robt. Johnson. Endorsed, R. March 7th. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 388. ff. 55, 55 v., 56 v.]
Dec. 15.
Charles Town.
488. Same to Same. I had the honour of your Grace's letter by Mr. Frewin recommending him to me, as I shall allways have the greatest regard to your Grace's commands and recommendations, I should with great pleasure have embraced all opportunitys of serving him; but I believe your Grace will be of opinion with me, that he has put it now out of my power to do him any good, and in respect to your Grace will never do him any disservice, provided he keeps himself within moderate bounds: I will only say thus much of his behavour that he has used me with such unparralled insolence that he may thank your Grace's recommendation if I have not provided for him as he deserves, which I believe would not have been very agreable to him. I shall not trouble your Grace any further on this worthless subject. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 388. ff. 57, 58 v.; and (abstract) 5, 406,f. 15 v.]
Dec. 15.
Charles Town.
489. Governor Johnson to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Repeats preceding mutatis mutandis. Signed, Robt. Johnson. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd Feb., 1732/3, Read 27th Aug., 1735. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 364. ff. 160, 161 v.]
Dec, 15.
Charles Town.
490. Governor Johnson to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I did myself the honour to answer your Lordsps.' letter of the 16th of June relating to laws made, manufactures set up, and trade carried on in Carolina, which may affect the trade of Great Britain; I likewise in Council have acquainted his Grace of Newcastle and your Lordsps. of my having appointed a Chief Baron of the Exchequer, and desired H.M. further Instructions therein. I have before me your Lordsps. of June 21st relating to a paragraph of Governor Burrington's letter, intimating apprehensions he is under that our Indians are expected to make some attempt against those of North Carolina; I pretty much wonder he should be uneasy at the thoughts of that happening, because by the copy of his letter, he seems to think they deserve chastisement; and Mr. Watis's Journal, which I inclose, who we sent our agent, to demand justice of the Tuscorora Indians, will fully aprize your Lordsps. of all that affair. A nation of Indians called the Catabas living within the limits of this Government, have a long time been at war with the Tuscororas of North Carolina, and it is allways the maxim of our Governmts. upon the Continent to promote war between Indians of different nations, with whom we trade, and are at peace with ourselves, for in that consistes our safety; being at war with one another prevents their uniting against us. If any material action had happen'd on this affair, I should have been sure to have given your Lordsps. a particular accot. of it, but the Tuscororas not having since Mr. Watis's parley with them before Mr. Burrington done us any damage, and the Catabas having made no expedition upon the Tuscororas, I thought what your Lordsps. might find mentioned in the journals of Council and Assembly formerly sent your Lordsps. was sufficient. It is true the 5 Nations are in amity with the Tuscororas, and some of them were with the party who carried our slaves and horses away; but we hear only from Mr. Burrington of so furious a war being likely to be carried on; they seldom attack one another in such large bodys; partys of 30 or 40 men go out, and if they can steal anything, and kill 2 or 3 old women or men, they soon return contented. 'Tis only such a war that we hear of yet. Indeed if again the Tuscororas had insulted and robbed our planters, I believe we should have been obliged to have headed their enemys the Catabas against them, and then your Lordsps. should have had an accot. of it. The great sickness which has reigned among us is now quite over, and particularly in my family, excepting my Secretary who is still very weak by a relapse, which has prevented my sending so soon as I design'd the last Journals of the Upper and Lower House of Assembly which I now do. The Assembly met the 12th of this month, and admitted Mr. Isaac Amy and to be their clerk by my Commission, agreable to H.M. sign manual; and adjournd till after the holydays. I should have been very glad to have received your Lordsps.' objections to the Quit-rent Act, that I might have endeavoured to have got such alterations made as your Lordsps. thought necessary. Repeats part of letter to Duke of Newcastle. All H.M. officers in this Governmt. as well as the Capt. of the men of war have desired to have land in this Province at the usual annual quit-rent of 4d. Proclamation money p. 100 acres; Some of them are not strictly qualifyed by having the number of persons in their familys in proportion to the land granted, but the Council and myself thought this mark of favour to H.M. officers would not be thought amiss, since H.M. revenue is no way hurt thereby, they paying the same quit-rent that others do for such lands; except the Surveyor General who has a warrant for 6000 acres, no other has above 2000 acres, some 1000 and some 500, the Council have 6000 each but all except 2 or 3 of them have souls in their familys to qualify them for so much; they all take it at the same rent as others do. I gave your Lordsps. an accot. that I had advice the Spaniards from St. Augustine were about resettling the Province of Apalacha; we have since an accot. from our Indian traders that a party of Spaniards upon their march there with a good many horse loads of necessarys for that settlement were fallen upon by the Indians and destroyd; but we know not what nation did the mischief. About five months ago we had two white men kill'd in the road to the Creek Nation, not certain yet by whom; and six days ago I had an accot. three white men are kill'd in the road to the Chikesaws, we suppose by the French Indians called the Chocotaws; the last accident we don't so much wonder at as the first, those white men venturing too far; but the other gives us great pain, because it is what we can't acct. for the reason of it. I aquainted your Lordsps. with Governor Burrington's way of construing H.M. Instruction relating to the boundaries of the two Provinces, which is very necessary should be settled; I must therefore beg your Lordsps.' explanation of the said Instruction; I shall only observe that it will be very inconvenient, Wacamaw River should be the boundary, for the mouth of it comes into Wynea Bay, where we have a great settlement and a collector of the Customs, who can't prevent illegal trade if that be; for a ship may go a little way up Wacamaw River, and then is in North Carolina Government, and out of his jurisdiction, as has already been a plea; I inclose his advertisement and mine. Your Lordships send your packets for Governor Burrington to me, but I apprehend they will get to hand sooner by way of Virginia, for we have very little correspondance with North Carolina, and they may lie a great while. Signed, Robt. Johnson. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd Feb., 1732/3, Read 27th Aug., 1735. 4½ pp. Enclosed,
490. i. (a) Advertisement by Governor Johnson in reply to following. Announced that the Government of S. Carolina are awaiting H.M. decision as to the boundary with N. Carolina, apprehending that the omission of the word "mouth" of the Wackamaw river from the Instruction was a mistake in the wording of it etc. Cutting from S. Carolina newspaper, Nov., 1732.
490. i. (b) Advertisement of Governor Burrington. N. Carolina, Sept. 11, 1732. Quotes H.M. Instruction, 104, to himself and Governor Johnson, relating to the boundaries, and gives notice that the rights of purchasers of lands from the late Lords Proprietors on the north side of Wackamaw river, or in any other part between Cape Fear River, and the line given by H.M. to this Government, will be deemed good by this Government etc. Cutting from S. Carolina newspaper, 21st Nov., 1732. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd Feb., 1732/3.
490. ii. Governor Johnson's Instructions to William Watis, 10th April, 1732. Depredations having been committed by the several parties of Tuscorora Indians of N. Carolina, Watis is to acquaint Governor Burrington with the particulars, and request him to send for the Head men to meet him in order that he may obtain satisfaction etc. Signed, Robt. Johnson. 2 pp.
490. iii. Journal of Mr. Watis' mission to the Indians in North Carolina. At Edinton, 10th May, 1731, he spoke with William Blunt, the intended King of the Tuscaroras, and Capt. George and six other Indians who has been sent for by Governor Burrington to meet him. He told them that he was instructed by the Governor, Council and Assembly of S. Carolina to ask why they came into that Province and took away their slaves, killed their cattle and free Indians living there. They replied that it was not they, but the Senecas who had done it. He replied that this was false, he had seen their tracks all along the path to Cape Fair etc. They admitted that they had promised to come no more into the S. Carolina settlements, but said that last fall some Indians came to the head of New River and killed Capt. Jacks and one more of their people, and a party of Senecas coming to their town, to go against the Catabos's, they went out with them, and coming to that place followed the track to the head of Wacamaw River, and did believe they came down that river into our settlements, and that they found a small fort with some Indians, between Santee and Winyaw rivers, at a white man's plantation, and in the night they went up to the fort and fired in, but could not tell if they killed any or not, and so returned directly. Taxes them with other depredations. They said they did not want war with us: it was the Senecas who had done these things etc. The Governor said it was evident it was they who had done it. They refused Watis' demand that they should pay for the damage they had done and deliver up the slaves they had taken. They refused, saying the Senecas who had done it must pay for it. On being threatened with punishment and war with the Catabas and white men, they asked why we could not let them that were Indians alone to make war against Indians without our meddling with it. Replied that they might, so long as they did not come into our settlements and raid our slaves and cattle etc. The Governor said that the people of S. Carolina had all the reason in the world to be angry with them, and invited them to pay the damages demanded, for if the S. Carolina Indians came against them, he would give them no assistance, and if the white people came against them, he himself must be against them. They replied that they would not pay anything, but would not come into our settlements any more, but could not engage for the Senecas not coming etc. 7 1/3 pp.
490. iv. Governor Burrington to Governor Johnson. N. Carolina, 11th May, 1731. Acknowledges letter by Capt. Watis. Continues: We are all very certain in this country that the Tuscarora Indians are very great scoundrels, they have been before we in Council examined, and interrogated by Capt. Watis, most of the facts charged on them fully proved, yet they absolutely refuse to make any satisfaction. The good people in this Province are far from liking the vile practises of these fellows, and will not assist them on any occasion, but rather favour any men you send against them. These Tuscaroras were in a very peaceable and quiet way before Sr. Richard Everard was Governor, but they are absolutly at this time without any Government among themselves etc. Signed, Geo. Burrington. Copy. 1 p. Nos. ii.–iv. endorsed, Recd. 22nd Feb., 1732/3. [C.O. 5, 364. ff. 162–165, 167–168 v., 169 v., 170 v.–172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181 v.]