America and West Indies
September 1735, 1-15

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Year published

1953

Pages

49-59

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: September 1735, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 42: 1735-1736 (1953), pp. 49-59. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72829 Date accessed: 15 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

September 1735, 1-15

Sept. 1.
Blackheath.
87. Duke of Montagu to [? Mr. Delafaye]. This is to beg the favour of you to lay the inclosed before the Duke of Newcastle, it is in relation to one Mr. Dandrige a gentleman of a good estate in Virginia and one of the Council there : he was formerly a Lieutenant of a man-of-warr, and being desirous to be again employ'd in H.M. service he came last year to England for that purpose and he is at presant a Lieutenant on board the fleet at Spithead; as I am in hopes of getting some better preferment for him, I beg you will make my compliments to the Duke of Newcastle and tell him I shall be extreamly obliged to him for one year's longer leave for him to be absent from Virginia. His presant leave expires the 11 of Agust. Holograph. Signed, Montagu. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1337. f. 183.]
Sept. 3.
Whitehall.
88. Mr. Wood to Mr. Popple. The traders of London, Bristol and Liverpool to Carolina, in negroes, being informed by letters of the 9th of June, from that Province, that a law was just passed there for applying the whole negro duty of ten pounds per head, mony of that Province, without limitation, for bringing in Protestant settlers etc., desire that you will move the Lords for a copy of the said Act and copy of the Journal of the Assembly relating to the continuing this heavy duty, so great a discouragement to the trade of this kingdom, and the better settlement of the Province itself etc. I am likewise directed to desire you will move the Lords etc. to take the said Act, or the consequences, which the continuing of this duty is also to H.M. trading subjects, in negroes, to Carolina, into their immediate consideration, and report their opinion thereupon to H.M., since the traders conceive that, by their taking any other step of application on this Act, or relating to the continuance of the duty on negroes, it will take up so much time (as they have experienced on other occasions) that the mischief will, probably, be remediless to almost every particular trader, which has been sensibly felt by all traders in their turn where dutys have been imposed on negroes in other H.M. Colonys, notwithstanding the disapprobation of the Acts imposing them. And therefore they have judged proper to direct me to make this application by you, to the Lords, which, they are informed, was originally the way of proceeding, when any Acts were passed, in any of the British Colonys in America, prejudicial to the trade, manufactures, or navigation of this Kingdom. Signed, Wm. Wood. Endorsed, Recd. 9th Jan., 1732/3, Read 17th Sept., 1735. Addressed. Postmark. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 364. ff. 236, 240 v.]
Sept. 4.89. Mr. Popple to Mr. Willes, Attorney General. The Lords Commissioners desire him to appoint some time to meet them at their office. Encloses extract from Governor Johnston's letter with his Case of the Blank Patents, for his opinion thereon in point of law. [C.O. 5, 323. f. 108 v.]
Sept. 4.
Whitehall.
90.Council of Trade and Plantations to President Ayscough. We have received your letters of the 15th of May and 22nd of June last with the 5 Acts, the Address to H.M. and the Representation to our Board, which you mention to be inclos'd. We are sorry to see that you are oblig'd yet to continue martial law in force in Jamaica, but we hope you will put an end thereto as soon as the exigency of affairs will permit you. We have consider'd the reasons of the Council of Jamaica for advising you to give your assent to the law entitled An Act for raising several sums of money and applying the same to several uses for subsisting the officers and soldiers of the eight Independent Comps. and preventing the exportation of several commodities into the French and Spanish Islands, with a clause laying a penalty on any of the officers of the King's troops there, who shall inlist any of the inhabitants of Jamaica therein altho' their reasons may be politically good, with regard to Jamaica, yet that clause is a very great restraint upon H.M. Prerogative and therefore we have sent that law together with the others before mention'd to Mr. Fane, one of H.M. Council at Law, for his opinion thereupon, and when we shall have received the same we shall consider farther thereof. We have laid before Her Majesty the address from yourself, the Council and Assembly of Jamaica, which you inclos'd to us, desiring stores of war for the service of that Island: and as the supply thereof is now under the consideration of the Lords of the Council, we hope you shall soon receive what shall be found wanting upon that head. We have likewise laid before H.M., the representation sign'd by the Council to us, and we shall always endeavour to do the most effectual service to the people of Jamaica. In this representation the Council have remark'd a mistake, which they say we made in ours to the House of Lords, in relation to the number of forts in Jamaica; and they may be right in that respect, but you must observe that our information proceeds from such intelligence as we receive from the Governor in his annual answer to Queries, and what we have said in regard to forts tallies with his information to us in that particular. Upon the subject of the Councils' complaint against the forming of the logwood trade at Campeachy, we have been attended by the Secry. of the S.S. Company, and we are informed by him, that the contract which was made between that Company and some private persons will be at an end in two or three months, the King of Spaine disputing the Company's power of licencing any person to trade under their name; and as we have desir'd to be particularly inform'd, when any alteration is made in this trade; when that comes to our knowledge we will give you notice thereof. In your next letter we desire you will give us a particular account of the computed strength and number of the rebellious negroes. You will likewise inform us what is their particular manner of fighting; what number of towns there may be of them; what number of inhabitants in each town and in general whatever information you can give us upon this subject, as we are convinc'd, from the nature of these inquiries, that you cannot give us a certain account, so what we desire is only such particulars as you may in general have obtain'd. We likewise desire that you will not omit to send us your annual answers to the Queries we formerly sent you, etc. [C.O. 138, 18. pp. 50–53.]
Sept. 4.
Whitehall.
91. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lt. Governor Gooch. Acknowledge letters etc. of 18th July, 9th Aug., 1732, 8th Feb., 15th July, 12th Sept., 1733, and 14th March, 24th and 30th May, 13th July, 27th Aug., 14th Sept., 20th Nov., 1734 etc. Have sent the Acts therein enclosed to Mr. Fane for his opinion etc. Continue: We observe what you have wrote concerning the two petitions you inclosed for grants of land, to the westward of the Great Mountains; and altho' you may be right in your opinion that those lands are within the bounds of Virginia, yet as the[y] are controverted by the Lords Baltemore and Fairfax and the Proprietor of Pennsylvania, we think those bounds ought to be settled prior to the granting of any land within them. And this we conceive can best be done by Commissrs. to be appointed on the spot for that purpose. This method we have long since proposed, and the Lord Fairfax being gone to Virginia for this purpose, we are in hopes the dispute may soon be adjusted. In your letter of the 24th May, 1734, wherein you give an account of the Laws, manufacture and trade of Virginia, you mention an air furnace, without describing what particular manufactures the same is applicable to; we therefore desire that in your next letter you will inform us thereof; as likewise of the lead mine you mention to be discovered; you will Likewise inform us what quantities of ore are found therein, and to what uses it is applied. We also desire you would inform us what other mines, if any, have been found in Virginia. In your letter of the 14th of Sept. last, you say it wou'd be great advantage to Virginia, if that Colony was allowed to import salt directly from Portugal, as the Northern Colonies are: upon this occasion you will observe that this liberty was only given to the Northern Colonies on account of their fisheries; and the provisions with which they supply those to the Southward: however we will consider further, of what you have proposed to us upon this head. We are very glad to find by the Treasurer's accounts that the revenues of Virginia are in so flourishing a condition, and we desire you will continue to give us constant accounts thereof, and of the other transactions in your Government and that you will not neglect to transmit to us, annual returns to the Queries we have formerly sent you. [C.O. 5, 1366. pp. 131–133.]
Sept. 4.
Office
of Ordnance,
Tower.
92. George Armstrong to Mr. Popple. Col. Armstrong is prevented by a previous appointment from waiting on the Board as requested. Signed, George Armstrong. Endorsed, Recd. 4th, Read 5th Sept., 1735. 1 p. [C.O. 23, 3. ff. 135, 136 v.]
Sept. 4.
Middle Temple,
London.
93. Charles Worsley to Mr. Popple. Forwards following, received from Mr. Wavell Smith from St. Christophers. Signed, Cha. Worsley. Endorsed, Recd. 10th Nov., 1735, Read 25th Nov., 1736. Addressed. Sealed. ½ p. Enclosed,
93. i. Minutes of Council of St. Christophers [?], June 1734. After Debate, set out, whether Mr. Smith ought to be paid by the public for transcribing the Minutes to be sent to the Lords of Trade, it was carried that he ought to do it ex officio, Messrs. George Thomas and George Lucas dissenting for reasons entered in the Council Book, 5th June. True copy, Signed, Patrick Wilson, D. Secretary. 5 pp. [C.O. 152, 22. ff. 221–224, 226, 226 v.]
Sept. 4.
Whitehall.
94. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen, Guardian of the Kingdom etc. We have received a letter from Governor Belcher etc., dated the 28th day of June last, in which he acquaints us that the Assembly of the Province of New Hampshire have passed an Act to give a bounty for encouragement of the raising of hemp there; and as labour is dear in that Province and the farmers poor, Mr. Belcher humbly proposes that H.M. would have the goodness to make them a present of five hundred bushells of the best Riga hemp seed, and that two or three persons, skillfull in the management of hemp, should be sent over to New Hampshire for two or three years at H.M. expence, to instruct the people in this manufacture. He informs us likewise in another letter, dated the 14th day of July last, that the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, who had before setled a bounty upon this commodity, have for a further encouragement given a liberty to the inhabitants to pay their taxes for the two succeeding years in hemp, whereupon as it is probable that the example of the people of the Massachusetts Bay may lead those of New Hampshire to apply themselves with industry to the raising of hemp, which if done with success would render Great Britain less dependent on the Northern Crowns for a supply of this commodity so essential to the support of our navigation; we are humbly of opinion, that it may be for H.M. service, if he shall be graciously pleased to gratify the people of New Hampshire in their request. [C.O. 5. 917. pp. 135, 136.]
Sept. 5.
Whitehall.
95. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Cosby. Acknowledge letters etc. of 6th and 7th Dec. and 10th and 19th June last. As soon as they have received Mr. Fane's opinion in point of law, will consider the Acts therein enclosed. Continue:—We have considered what you write concerning the Court of Chancery, as also the resolves of the Assembly of the 25 Nov., 1727, with the report of a Committee of Council thereupon dated the 5th of Decbr. following, and we are not a little surprizd at your informing of us; that some of the members who compose that Committee, should now make any opposition to the holding of that Court, however different they may be in opinion, from what they formerly were of. We think you did very well not to admit the arguing of any exceptions against the jurisdiction of that Court; a Court establish'd, in the very infancy of that Colony, by the Crown's undoubted right signified to the then Govr. under the Broad Seal of this Kingdom successively confirm'd under the Broad Seal in every Governor's Commission, that has been appointed since, and which must therefore consequently be deemed an essential part of the constitution of that Province; you will therefore do well to pursue the directions of your Commission and Instructions by holding that Court whensoever there shall be occasion, and if the Assembly of that Province shall for the future yet presume to dispute the King's authority in this respect you may very properly signify to them, that they and the Court of Chancery meet and act by virtue of the same power, vizt. H.M. royal licence, granted under the Broad Seal of this Kingdom etc. Inform him of their recommendations of new Councillors for New York and New Jersey (v. 28th Aug.), and request him to send annual answers to their queries concerning the state of these Provinces etc. [C.O. 5, 1126. pp. 16–18.]
Sept. 9.
Whitehall.
96. Mr. Popple to the Commissioners of H.M. Navy. Encloses extract of a letter from Col. Dunbar, Aug. 25, 1732, relating to the preservation of the woods in New England and the difficulties the King's Officers there labour under in the discharge of their duty. [C.O. 5, 917. p. 137.]
Sept. 10.
Whitehall.
97. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen, Guardian of the Kingdom etc. John Baptiste Ashe, lately a member of H.M, Council in N. Carolina, being dead; and James Stallard and Richard Evans Esqre. who were appointed in 1730, not having yet taken up their residence etc. propose in their room William Forbes, James Innes and Thomas Wardroper etc. [C.O. 5, 323. f. 109.]
Sept. 10.
Nevis.
98. Governor Mathew to Mr. Popple. Encloses two Acts of Montserrat (i) for repealing an Act for the more speedy and effectual dispatch of the public business, and (ii) for reducing of interest from ten to eight per cent., to be laid before the Board for H.M. confirmation. Signed, William Mathew. Endorsed, Recd. 7th, Read 12th Dec., 1735. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 22. ff. 33, 34 v.]
Sept. 10.
Whitehall.
99. Mr. Popple to Mr. Attorney General. Having in my letr. of the 28th of Augt. last inclosed to you by order of my Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, a scheme for emitting a large sum of mony in paper bills, in the Massachusetts Bay, my Lords Commissioners command me, to desire that when you have considered the same, and are ready to give your opinion thereupon, you will please to give me notice thereof, that I may acquaint their Lordships therewith, in order that a day may be appointed, my Lords being desirous of an opportunity of talking with you thereupon. [C.O. 5, 917. p. 145.]
Sept. 10.
Whitehall.
100. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Belcher. We have received your letters of the 13th Nembr. 1733, 8th of May, 11th of June, 1st, 2nd and 12th of July, 9th of Aug., 6th and 12th of Novembr., 3rd, 9th, 14th and 31st of Decembr. 1734, 9th of January 1734/5, 5th, 9th and 28th of June, and 14th of July last, with the publick papers you therein mention to be inclosed, and we did lay before Her Majesty the Address from the Council and Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, desiring cannon and other stores, upon which we imagine Her Majesty will soon come to some determination; the people of the Massachusetts Bay are dayly asking favours from the Crown whilst they show no inclination to make any return, by giveing their Governor's salary in the manner, so often propos'd to them. Now we are upon the subject of your salary, we must inform you, that Her Majesty has been pleased to referr to our consideration, the Petition of your Agents, desireing leave for you to give your assent to the last bill passed by the Council and House of Representatives, for granting your salary, as likewise that you might have a general licence to receive what the Assembly should annually give you; and we have consider'd the same together with what you have wrote concerning the great zeal of the Assembly for the King's service and have made our Report thereupon. Notwithstanding the King has had sufficient reason to resent the behaviour of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, who have constantly refused doing what the Crown has desired of them, yet they have not desisted asking favours, which have as constantly been granted to them, and as a recent instance thereof, the thousand bushels of Riga hemp seed, which was askd. for by you for them have been granted, and we have also recommended to Her Majesty a gift of 500 bushels more to the Province of New Hampshire, as likewise the sending over two or three persons well skill'd, in the manufacture of that commodity, as proposed by you. This last Article you may say is no favour done to the Massachusetts Bay, but it is an instance of all the disposition imaginable here of doing whatever may be thought of real advantage to the Colonies in America. Upon the subject of hemp, you have propos'd a larger bounty to be given upon the importation of it into this Kingdom which may well deserve some further consideration, tho' the generality of the Merchants who we have hitherto discours'd upon this subject, when that matter was under consideration at this Board, seem'd to apprehend the present bounty sufficient. We have had under our consideration the scheme you sent us for issuing out bills, upon the credit of some private persons, who were to give security for the repayment thereof in silver. This being a matter of very great consequence, wherein the trade and interest of the Province is much concerned, we have thought it proper to take the opinion of H.M. Attorney General thereupon in point of law, the scheme now lies before him, and when he shall have given us his opinion upon it, we will take the same more particularly into our consideration. There is one observation, that must naturally occur to everyone who reads the aforementioned scheme, and which seems at first view, to be a very strong objection to any scheme whatsoever for emitting paper mony, which is, that by this scheme, the paper bills are to be repaid at the completion of their term, in silver, as the want thereof, is the only plausible reason that ever has been given for emitting bills in any shape; and as it has always been represented, that silver was not to be procured, sufficient to serve as a medium in trade, we find now, that silver may be procured, even so large a sum as £110,000, or else the scheme set's out with a falsity in fact. But if silver can be procur'd, there then seems no longer, any the least reason for emitting paper at all. We therefore desire you will immediately upon the receipt of this, send us your thoughts at large, upon what we have now wrote to you upon this subject. We have considered what you have wrote about the quantity of Rhode Island paper mony, now current in the Massachusetts Bay, and of the ill consequences you say attend it: but we have at the same time consider'd, that let the Rhode Isld. mony be never so bad, as it can never be deemed a legal tender in the Massachusetts Bay, any ill consequence attending the currency thereof in that Province, may be remedied by the Assembly, or they must be answerable to the people for it. We are sorry to find from all lands that more effectual measures have not been taken to put a stop to the destruction of the King's woods, and that any proposals for that purpose should meet with opposition in the House of Representatives. But if they will give no countenance nor protection to those who have the inspection thereof, nor will lend a helping hand for the protection of them, they are of too great consequence to the Royal Navy to be totally neglected, and other measures, it may be, not quite so agreeable to the people of the Massachusetts Bay, must be put in execution. And as this would have been another proper subject upon which they should have shewn their zeal for the King's service, we cannot help observing that all their shew of zeal amounts only to words; and we can't but wonder that you should continue to set it out in such colours, since no good effect has attended it. You tell us, that in case of any disturbance from the French or Indians, you shall be ready to send a detachment for the protection of the mast cutters, but that as their pay and subsistence must depend on the Assembly: their consent must be had for that service. We therefore desire you will inform us whether you have propos'd this to them, and what disposition you find in them, in case of any occasion. We have read what you write about the Naval Officers having been appointed without your approbation; Mr. Pemberton the present Naval Officer was not recommend'd by us nor does that affair properly ly before this Board. If you think yourself aggriev'd you may apply to the proper place. We have recommended to Her Majesty what you have proposed relating to Majr. Mascarene's being sent to superintend the repair of your fortifications. We have likewise considered the reasons you gave in your letter of the 5 of June last, why you have not sent regular accts. of the rects. and payments of publick mony; but you misunderstand your instructions if you imagine those articles which require accts. of the Revenue relate only to such Colonies, where the King has a standing Revenue. You are one of the King's Governors, and as such, according to the powers given to us by our Commission, we do require them at your hands, and by virtue of special directions in your Instructions you are to send them to us. In your same letter you inform us that no mony has been raised in New Hampshire, we therefore desire you will let us know what you judge may be the real reason why the Assembly of that Province have refused granting the necessary annual supply, having had reasons assign'd to us, why the Province did not receive the same, quite different from what you have asserted of Col. Dunbar's encouraging any opposition to you, or any measures you may have thought proper to engage in, for the service of that Government. But now we mention that gentleman, we must inform you that having some time observed the height to which the difference between you and him is risen, upon the subject of the right of government, and to the profits thereto belonging, when you are not in the Province, we think H.M. service, and the interest of the Province is very much injur'd thereby, therefore having thoroughly considered the affaire, as likewise the several clauses thereto in your Commissn. and Instructions, we shall in a few days lay a state thereof with our opinion thereon, before Her Majesty for her Royal orders thereupon. [C.O. 5, 917. pp. 138–144.]
Sept. 11.101. List of Representations by the Council of Trade and Plantations since March 25, 1715, relating to the state of the British Colonies in America, their trade and commerce, and their danger from the growing power of the French. [C.O. 5, 4. ff. 325–359.]
Sept. 11.
Whitehall.
102. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Newcastle. Enclose lists of French able to bear arms in the French Charibbee Islands etc. (v. 18th June). Continue: Altho' His Majesty has an undoubted title to St. Vincent's, Sta. Lucia and Dominico, yet upon the French having pretended a right thereto, H.M. did in 1730 agree with the Court of France, and Instructions were accordingly sent to Governor Worseley etc. that the said Islands should be entirely evacuated, until the right to the said Islands should be finally determined; notwithstanding which solemn agreement, and of the said instructions having been complied with, on our part, it now appears that the French have 117 men able to bear arms on the said Island of St. Vincent's, 100 families on Dominico and six families on Sta. Lucia. Should these people be left on the said islands without notice taken of them, on the part of H.M., they may in time pretend a new claim from their quiet and uninterrupted possession; and as there is little doubt but that their numbers will encrease, they may grow too powerfull easily to be removed; we therefore desire your Grace will please to receive H.M. orders upon this subject; and the rather since any acquisition of strength to the French, in the West Indies, will greatly add to the danger our Sugar Colonies must be exposed to, in case of any rupture with France. We might yet add another reason, which is, that the French settlements on the islands will in time be a great increase of their sugar trade, and a diminution of our own, which already lies under several difficulties that of the French is not exposed to. Autograph signatures. 2 pp. Enclosed,
102. i. Extract of letter etc. from Governor Mathew to Mr. Popple, 18th June, q.v. [C.O. 152, 40. Nos. 42, 42 i. and, covering letter only, C.O. 153, 16. pp. 25–27.]
Sept. 12.
Whitehall.
103. Mr. Popple to Governor Mathew. I have received your letter of the 18th of June last with the several papers you inclos'd to me, which I have laid before my Lords Commissrs, for Trade and Plantations with your said letter, and their Lordships have particularly directed me to return you their thanks for the account you have sent, of the numbers of men able to bear arms on the French Islands and on St. Vincent's, St. Lucia and Dominico. Their Lordships have sent an extract of what you write upon this subject to the Duke of Newcastle, etc., in order to be laid before Her Majesty together with their remarks upon the proceedings of the French in not having totally evacuated the last three mention'd Islands according to their agreement. With regard to the bill pass'd at Nevis to continue the duty on liquors imported; I am commanded to acquaint you, that their Lordships very much approve your caution, in being tender how you give your assent to any law that may in the least contradict your Instructions; in all cases where you are diffident you may give your consent to any law provided the suspending clause be therein inserted; But if in the passing a new law for this purpose you take care that there be an exception made of any strong liquors imported from this Kingdom, my Lords do not at present forsee any objection thereto. Upon this occasion I must remind you of your letter to me of the 14th of April last, which acknowledges the receipt of mine of the 13th of Febry. preceding, wherein among other things, I desired by their Lordships' order an authentick collection of the laws pass'd at Nevis since September 1715. This collection I have not received, and therefore it is impossible for my Lords to judge of the present bill, as it re-enacts a law not hitherto sent to the Office. My Lords having received from the Admiralty the copy of a Commission of Marque, and of the Instructions given therewith, I send you a copy thereof, for your information according to your desire signified to my Lords in your letter dated the 19th March, 1733/4. [C.O. 153, 16. pp. 28–30.]
Sept. 12.
Whitehall.
104. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Johnston. Abstract. Acknowledge letters and are glad the trade of the Province has so fair a prospect. But when he mentioned 42 sail going loaded from Cape Fear River, he should have given a more particular account of their ladings etc. Agree with his opinion as to the manner of making tar, and think he should move the Assembly to enact rules accordingly, and an inspector of the kilns. For though the people at present endeavour at quantities upon account of the bounty, yet if the quality of their tar be brought into disrepute by its burning quality, none of it will be exported etc. Continue:—It is with pleasure that we read the account you have given us of the industry of the people settled on Cape Fear River, and of the attempts they are making towards the manufactures of wine, oyle and silk, for which you have desired us to prevail with the Legislature to grant a bounty. We are always ready to do whatever in us lies for the encouragement of industry in any of the Colonies, but before we know what progress the people are able to make in these manufactures, and have seen specimens thereof, it would have but little effect, was we to propose what you desired. Are awaiting opinion of the Attorney General on the Blank Patents before sending his directions upon that subject. Hope that he will have better success the next session in getting the Assembly to pass an Act for a rent roll and regulating quit rents. Without the payment of H.M. quit rents and a general registry of all the grants and patents, "the people are to understand their arrears of quit-rents to the time His Majesty made the purchase are not to be remitted. You have therefore done very right to erect a Court of Exchequer in which any disputes about quit rents or titles to land will properly be adjusted; and we desire to have an account of the proceedings of that Court." He ought to have sent a full description of the boundary line between N. and S. Carolina and an authentic copy under the seal, as determined by the Commissioners etc. Will recommend Messrs. Forbes, Innes and Hardroper to supply the vacancies in the Council he mentions (v. Sept. 10) and hopes he will be more cautions in recommending persons for Councillors than his predecessor. Enclose copy of Circular Queries, to which an annual answer is required. Set out, N.C. Col. Rec. IV, 16. [C.O. 5, 323. ff. 109 v.–111 v.]
Sept. 14.
St. Christophers.
105. Governor Mathew to Mr. Popple. Abstract. Has received both the Orders of the Board of 17th June. Is getting as fast as possible the accounts from the islands. Has at last brought the inhabitants to provide for their safety by an inland fortification, which he has begun to lay out for them. Those works are actually now in hand, and being carried on with all the strength that the island can well provide. Continues: I have also succeeded in an attempt to introduce something of a Legislature in Anguilla, Spanish Town and Tortola, and in the last two of those islands their new Councills and Assemblys are now preparing laws (on models I have furnishd them with) as agreable to those of these four islands as the air of those four islands will admitt of, and from hence I hope murthers and the greatest crimes will hereafter not be committed there with impunity for want of proper laws and Courts of Justice for trying offenders, as heretofore, and the inhabitants will become more usefull, as better taught their duty to H.M., their country and one another. Encloses an Act of St. Christophers to enable the publick to cut turf and sodd out of lands adjoining to Fort Londonderry, for repairing and finishing the said fort etc. Prays him to inform the Board that "the whole island is a gravel except about this fort, that no sod was to be had elsewhere to finish it, that this fort covers from an enemy this gentleman's estate more than any other, that we Commissioners for sale of the French lands sold him the whole estate for about £6 10s. sterling pr. acre of which this is a fagg end, that we shall take the sodd off of not about two acres, and those two acres would hardly keep a cow alive, yet this gentleman was so unreasonable as to insist with me for £1000 sterling for these two acres, a poor return for the indulgence he meets with (as a Roman Catholick) among us. Signed, William Mathew. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 12th Dec., 1735. 2 1/3 pp. [Duplicate. The MS. is dated 1734, with an Office note that it should be 1735.] [C.O. 152, 22. ff. 36–37 v., 42, 42 v. (with abstract).]
Sept. 15.106. List of persons proposed by Lt. Gov. Gooch to supply vacancies in the Council:—Henry Armistead, John Allen, Francis Willis, Henry Fitzhugh, Benjamin Harrison, John Lewis, Armistead Churchhill (so he spells his name), Nicholas Meriwether, Lewis Burwell junr., Charles Carter, George Braxton, John Robinson. Signed, William Gooch. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Leheup), Read 3rd Feb., 1735/6. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1323. ff. 182, 187 v.]