America and West Indies
December 1735, 1-15

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1953

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'America and West Indies: December 1735, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 42: 1735-1736 (1953), pp. 123-139. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72836 Date accessed: 24 July 2014.


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December 1735, 1-15

Dec. [ ].
Georgia Office.
184. Mr. Martyn to Lt. Governor Broughton. The Right Honble. Earl of Egmont having communicated to the Trustees for establishing the Colony of Georgia in America your letter to his Lordship of October last, together with a Memorial of the several merchants of Charles Town concerning the Indian trade, the affidavits of several traders to the Creek nations, and also copies of two letters from the Govr. of St. Augustine, and one from the Commandant of Mobille relating to the conduct of Captain Patrick Mackay; The Trustees immediately took the same into consideration, and they have order'd me to acquaint you, that it do's not appear to them, that the said Patrick Mackay himself claims to have acted under any Commission or Instructions relating to trade, but what were given him by his Excellency Robert Johnson, Esqr., late Govr. of South Carolina ; which Commission and Instructions not having been produced to the Trustees, they leave the said Patrick Mackay to answer for his conduct therein to those from whom they issued. The Trustees find the Commission and Instructions given to the said Patrick Mackay by James Oglethorpe, Esqr., relate only to the building of a Fort in the Indian Country, and the command of a Company in garrison there. They have given instructions to Mr. Oglethorpe to inquire into the several crimes laid to the charge of the said Mackay, and on proof of any such as are cognizable by them, they will take care that such punishment shall be inflicted on him, as he shall appear to deserve. And they hope that no misbehaviour of his (which will never receive any countenance from them) shall give any interruption to the friendly and generous assistance given to their infant colony by the Province of South Carolina. The Trustees, being justly sensible Sr. of the ill consequences that would unavoidably happen to the Provinces of Carolina and Georgia on a rupture with the French and Spaniards, have all along given such directions to their Magistrates and Officers as tend most to cultivate a friendship and good understanding with them : and hope they need not assure you that it was with the utmost grief and concern they heard of the murder committed on a Spaniard by Licka ; as soon as that fact came to their knowledge (which was previous to the receipt of your letter) they immediately gave directions that a strict inquiry should be made after the offenders, in order for their punishment, and sent the enclosed letter to Mr. Oglethorpe to dismiss the said Patrick Mackay from their service. As to the privilege and liberty of trading with any nation of free Indians under H.M. protection, the Trustees direct me Sr. to acquaint you, that they pretend to no exclusive right : But they apprehend that you must agree with them in opinion that no trade with the Indians can be carried on to any good effect. unless under some proper regulations ; and H.M. having by an Act lately passed in Council in his great wisdom determined what those regulations within the Province of Georgia shall be, the Trustees for your information have herewith inclosed the said Act. As to the militia of the Province of Georgia the Trustees, not imagining they should have people in Georgia capable of commanding in Chief, desired, that in their Charter, on all extraordinary occasions, where a Commander in Chief of the Militia of both Provinces should be necessary to take the field, that the command might be placed in the Governor of South Carolina for the time being, for the common safety of two Provinces so closely united. But in all ordinary cases, the command of the Militia by the antecedent clause in their charter is placed in the Trustees, and such person or persons as they shall appoint; and therefore it is not without the utmost concern, that the Trustees observe the order you was pleased to send to the Militia in Georgia, and cannot but reflect with great uneasiness on the ill consequences that might have attended the execution thereof, which so directly tended to the dissolution of civil government, and might have exposed the Colony defenceless to the greatest dangers ; and might even have proved of the greatest ill consequence to South Carolina itself, if what was then expected (a rupture between Great Britain, France and Spain) had happen'd. The Trustees have inclosed with this their annual account from the 9th of June, 1734, to the 9th of June, 1735, which was (pursuant to their Instructions in their Charter) lately deliver'd to the Rt. Honble. the Lord High Chancellor, and to the Honble. the Master of the Rolls ; by which account you will see, Sr., the just sense the Trustees have of the obligations which the Colony of Georgia has receiv'd from the Province of South Carolina, and their desire to perpetuate the remembrance of the same. Signed, Benj. Martyn, Secretary. Endorsed, Recd. [by the Board of Trade and Plantations] (from the Georgia Trustees), Read. 18th Dec, 1735.* 3½ pp. Enclosed, (fn. 1)
184. i. Copy of letter from Mr. Martyn to Capt. Mackay, 10th Oct., 1735. Same endorsement. 1 p.
184. ii. Lt. Governor Broughton to the Earl of Egmont. Charles Town. Oct. [—], 1735. Encloses Memorial of Merchants and affidavits of Indian traders (v. Oct. [—] encl. iv.), complaining of the conduct of Capt. Mackay. Copy. Same endorsement. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 365. ff. 62, 63–64 v., 65 v.–67 v.]
Dec. 1.
Newport on
Rhode Island.
185. Governor and Company of Rhode Island to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to enquiry of 17th June as to laws in force laying duties on British trade and shipping etc. :— We had not then [1731], nor have now any act or law in this Colony that lays any duty or imposition on the trade or shipping of Great Britain : or on the importation or exportation of any goods, wares or merchandizes whatsoever. But some few years before that time, we had only a duty of three pounds this currency pr. head on negroes imported from the West Indies (and then exempted therefrom all directly from Africa), which Act was imediately repealed upon the receipt of an Order from your Honble. Board. Signed, By order and in behalf of the Governor and Company etc., John Wanton, Govr. Endorsed, Recd. 4th Feb., Read 20th Oct., 1736. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1268. ff. 208, 209 v.]
[Dec. 3.]186. Mr. West to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Abstract. Reports objection to Act of St. Christophers, 1723, to prevent abuses in importation of wheat, flour etc. and bottled liquors, that, as it creates a forfeiture of liquors imported otherwise than according to the directions therein prescribed, it affects the trade of Great Britain. He has no objection to the provisions of the Act, "but as our merchants may lose their goods, who have no notice of the Act, I submitt to your Lordshipps what remedy ought to be taken to prevent it." Has no objection to two other Acts of the island in 1723. Signed, Richard West. 29th May, 1725. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd Dec., 1735, Read 3rd Dec., 1735. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 22. ff. 5, 8 v.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
187. Mr. Popple to Mr. Kay. Acknowledges the receipt of letters in relation to the Acts passed in Rhode Island for emitting of paper mony and for raising of powder on the tonnage of shipping. Continues:—My Lords Commissioners are not yet come to any resolution about these laws, but desire you will be very watchfull and give me the earliest intelligence, for their Lordps.' information of any law they may pass, which may in the last degree contradict any law of this Kingdom. [C.O. 5, 1294. p. 82.]
Dec. 4.
Barbados.
188. President Dottin to the Duke of Newcastle. Abstract. Refers to letter of Oct. 21 recommending Abel Dottin for the Council, but since finds that Charles Dunbar was appointed to succeed to the first vacancy. Represents that it has been lately discovered John Ashley is much more encumbered than the value of his estates, though he is well qualified in every other respect, but since that discovery he has neglected to attend his duty. Submits whether he ought to be continued as a Councillor. Othniel Haggatt is dead, and there are now only seven Councillors besides himself residing in the island, Messrs. Colleton, Peers and Dunbar being absent, recommends Abel Dottin and Col. John Maycock to fill vacancies. Encloses duplicates of Minutes of Council formerly transmitted, and copy of the last six months' Minutes. Continues: As I observe that an account from time to time was directed by H.M. Order to be transmitted how the agreement for evacuating the Islands of St. Lucia, St. Vincents and Dominico was observed on both sides, your Grace will perceive by looking over the Minutes of Council of the Twenty-eighth of October last wherein is incerted a long report of the members of that board on an enquiry made by them of the state, condition and trade of this and the rest of the West India settlements in pursuance of H.M. Instructions, how very little the French have regarded that order and what improvements have been made by foreign nations of all the West Indies settlements while the British are so far from improving theirs that they decline daily more and more. There are several things in this report that may be improved to the advantage of the Nation, if your Grace will be pleased to consider it, tho' I fear the length will take up more of your time then can be well spared for that purpose. I have likewise sent your Grace a twelve months accounts of the Treasurer and also the copy of a letter which I order'd to be wrote to Capt. Reddish concerning St. Lucia, and as this Island was at considerable expence in having H.M. Order publish'd in that Island which has produced no other effect then dispossessing our own subjects to the advantage of the French, the Legislature here has done nothing therein since the third of October one thousand seven hundred thirty-three where your Grace will find the letters pass'd between his late Excellency and the General of Martinico enter'd in the Minutes of Council of that date, and had those orders been publish'd in the other Islands, it is probable they wou'd use the same means to evade it there, as they have done at St. Lucia. I have not yet been honour'd with any of your Grace's commands, which I shall always take great pleasure in executing in the best manner I am able, etc. Signed, James Dottin. 1¾ pp. Enclosed,
188. i. President Dottin to the Governor of Martinique. Pilgrim. Dec. 4, 1735. The Orders of the Kings our Masters for evacuating the Islands of St. Lucia St. Vincents and Dominico being duly published according to their tenor in the first of those Islands, I imagined the subjects of both nations residing thereon wou'd punctually have complyed therewith by the time limitted in those orders, and not have ventured by their disobedience to incurr their Sovereign's highest displeasure, and at the same time that it gives me great satisfaction to be inform'd that the English readily complyed and obeyed, I am concern'd to find from several depositions laid before me, that the subjects of His Most Christian Majesty, only for form sake lock'd up all their doors but moved none of their effects and went over to Marteneco, and in a few days afterwards return'd back again to St. Lucia, where they still abide, are more numerous than ever, improve more land, grow very rich, take upon them to sell the lands in fee, employ English shipwrights to build vessells there for their own use, and that a very profitable and advantagious trade is carry'd on between them and the people under your Excellency's government. As it plainly appears to be the intention of the Kings our Masters that all these Islands shou'd remain neuteral till the right to them was absolutely determin'd, and that none of the subjects of either Sovereign should have a better right to remain thereon than the other till that was finished, it greatly surprized me to hear that St. Lucia was better settled by the French after the order had been publish'd there then it had been before, when the English so readily quitted it, so that the order instead of having the intended effect proves only to the disadvantage of the latter, and profit of the former etc. I doubt not but from your Excellency's known honour and probity you will take such methods as shall be proper to compell the persons still remaining there immediately to remove from thence, especially since some of them had the assurance to pretend what they have done was by your Excellency's order, alledging you told them they had fulfill'd their King's order in removing thence for a time, as I am commanded to transmit an account to my Master from time to time how these orders are comply'd with, my duty oblig'd me to send him this information and I have also acquainted Capt. Reddish Commander of H.M.S. the Fox thereof, who will do me the favour of delivering you this ; and be ready to act in such manner as is proper to have these orders duly complyed with. Had any of the English subjects presumed to have acted in this manner, I should not have look'd on them as under my protection since they voluntarily chose to continue in a place which was directed to be evacuated and therefore they were necessary to any mischief that befell them there, and I question not but your Excellency will think the same of the others who are still on that Island. I shall be exceedingly concern'd that anything should happen to disturb the good agreement that has subsisted between your Excellency and myself since I have had the honour of administering the government of this place, but as this is a matter I cou'd not avoid taking notice of without being guilty of a breach of my duty, I thought myself obliged to acquaint your Excellency therewith and hope on Capt. Reddish's return, to be inform'd that the Island is entirely evacuated in the manner it was directed by our Masters to be, otherways such methods must be taken as are necessary for the enforceing a punctual complyance. Signed, James Dottin. Copy. 2 pp. For these enclosures see also above No. 183, encl. i–iv.
188. ii. Deputy Secretary William Duke to Capt. Reddish, R.N. Dec. 4, 1735. Secretary's Office, Barbados. President Dottin thinks it necessary for H.M. service that he proceed to Martinique and inform the Governor as in preceding. He agrees with Capt. Reddish that it will be improper to take violent measures till further directions are received from home. Signed, William Duke. Copy. ¾ p.
188. iii. Same to Same. Nov. 29, 1735. Encloses copies of H.M. Orders for evacuating of the above islands, acquaints him with depositions showing French action in St. Lucia. Asks his opinion whether they may not with right be plundered and dispossessed of what they now have there, for the sake of which he may possibly meet with as many volunteers as he may wish. Suggests that he consult the other officers of the Squadron for this purpose. Signed, William Duke. Copy. 2 pp.
188. iv. Capt. Reddish to Wm. Duke. Fox in Carlisle Bay. Dec. 1, 1735. Reply to preceding. Will be ready to meet and consult on that affair and the trade of the island, whenever the President thinks fit to call a Council. Proposes to sail for Sta. Lucia in two or three days and will examine the state of affairs there, and will leave orders for H.M.S. Diamond to follow him. Signed, H. Reddish. Copy. ¾ p. [C.O. 28, 45. ff. 337, 337 v., 339–340, 341–342.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
189. Mr. Popple to Mr. Fane. Encloses an Act passed at St. Xtophers in June 1735 for regulating seamen and sailors and obliging all masters of ships to take care of their sick seamen, for his opinion in point of law. [C.O. 153, 16. p. 33.]
Dec. 5.
London.
190. Richard Coope, Agent for St. Christophers, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. A scheme and reasons for the settlement of Crabb Island. Above 300 familys have lately retired from Antigua, St. Christophers, Nevis and Montserrat for want of land and encouragement there, to Anguilla, Tortola and Spanish Town, 3 barren islands, and about 100 more familys for the same reason or for debt have fled to St. Martins, Sta. Crus and St. Thomas's. All these gathered together and settled might be of great service to the Leeward Islands as well as to Great Britain. We have a very fine island called Crab Island close to Puerto Rico about the bigness of St. Christophers where these dispersed familys would unanimously go, settle and fortifie if they could obtain protection for one year from the Spanish piracy and murders from Puerto Rico. The protection and other supplys necessary on this occasion, and which it's apprehended wou'd effect their settlement are (vizt.) two small men-of-war on the Leeward Island station to attend them, four companys of the Regiment stationed there with a field officer to command them, 20 dozen of shovels, spades and pickaxes, with some mattock hoes, four eighteens, four twelve and twelve six-pounders well mounted, and six four or three-pounders with rammers etc. and ammunition proportionable, and 200 barrels of beef etc., etc., for the soldiers for the first year. This will be but a trivial expence to the Crown, if the great advantages be considered:—the pirates of Puerto Rico would be prevented from coming among the Leeward Islands; ships bound to Jamaica would be protected, the French in case of war prevented from carrying prizes into Sta. Crus and St. Thomas's, and the persons would be discovered who carry provisions and stores to those neutral islands to enable the French to destroy us and our trade. The Sugar Islands would be relieved from an unsufferable want of timber for mills, houses etc. occasioned by ye Danes settling at Sta. Crus. This might be a proper time to begin this settlement, while there is a Governour of the Leeward Islands, whose knowledge of the Colonys, skill in military affairs and zeal to pursue everything to render them safe and flourishing may make the attempt most likely to succeed. Endorsed, Recd. Read 5th Dec., 1735. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 22. ff. 14, 17v.]
Dec. 5.
Edenton.
191. Governor Johnston to the Duke of Newcastle. Encloses Journals of the Council and Assembly. Continues: According to my Instructions I have erected a Court of Exchequer in order to do His Majesty justice in his revenue which has been very much lessen'd by the fraudulent practices of several persons, who hold vast quantities of land by false tenures at low quit rents, and by the help of that Court I look upon myself to be in a fair way of making them glad to hold their lands at the full quitrent requir'd by H.M. Instructions. I have been obliged to appoint a Reciever of H.M. Quitrents who resides within the Province, he has already collected £1,200 sterl. of arrears, and before Lady Day I don't at all doubt but he will collect three times that sum, which is more than was collected in this Province during all the time it was held by the Lords Proprietors. I am now doing all that lyes in my power to settle and retrieve the affairs of this Colony, particularly with regard to its trade, of which I hope to be able in a few months to give your Grace a more particular account. Signed, Gab. Johnston. Endorsed, R. 5th May. 1 p. Enclosed,
191. i. Minutes of Council, N. Carolina, April 23—13 Sept., 1735. 20 pp. [C.O. 5, 309. Nos. 7, 8.]
Dec. 5.
Edenton.
192. Governor Johnston to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Your orders of the 17 of June last did not come to my hands before the latter end of Octr. and this is the first opportunity by which I could inform your Lo. that there is not now, nor has been in any former time that I know of, any duty in this country upon any sort of goods imported, except a small impost upon wine, beer, cyder, rum and arack not imported from Great Brittain, of 18 per gallon this currency, that is about 2½d. sterling, which was laid on last Sessions of Assembly for defraying the charges of Government. There is likewise a duty upon shipping which is called powder money of 3s. this currency per ton. I send your Lordships by this conveyance the register of the Upper and Lower House last Sessions of Assembly, as also a copy of the laws which were then passed, a list of the officers' fees in currency and sterling money, and also a copy of the laws of this Province or what they call their laws, for except six there was never any of them ratifyed as the Charter directs, upon which account whenever I found any of them which incroached upon H.M. prerogative or revenues, I took advantage of that defect and would not allow that they were laws, some of them are so very gross, and invade the rights of the Crown so plainly, others are so unjust in matters of private life, that I could not help pointing them out to your Lordships, and I hope you will with the first opportunity advise H.M. to[? repeal] them for untill that is done they will be eternally . . . . about them. [? Since I ha]d the honour to write to your Lo. the collection [? of the first moi]tie of the arrears of quit rents for Albemarle County was not finishd. I find the Reciever and his assistants then collected £1,200 ster. They are now about the second moietie of arrears, which I am satisfied will amount to double that sum and in March next they proceed to collect the whole arrears for the county of Bath; notwithstanding Hammerton's insolent attempt the people pay very quietly, and as we make them show their deeds by which they hold their lands, I believe we shall have a very exact rent roll, tho' it costs a good deal of trouble and charge; the collecting H.M. rents with so much spirit as has been done in this Province, is not only the best method of getting a good quit rent law next Assembly, but is really in some respects better than if we had got a good one last Sessions, because it shews the people that the King will have his right, whether they or their Assemblys consent to it or not, which is a very new sort of doctrine to them. The only remains of faction in this Colony is kept up by Mr. Mosely and the Moors the principal proprietors of the blank patents, they have burnt the light wood and box'd the trees of most of the poor pine land, and consequently rendered it unfitt for anybody to take up, and now they want to hold the rich land at 6d. per 100 acres. I hope your Lo. have sent me before this time full directions how to proceed in this affair in answer to my two last, and to the state of the blank patents; I should be glad to know if my predecessor sent home the Proprietors' Seal, after H.M. purchase, because I have heard of some quires of Blank patents lately seen in a private person's custody all subscribed wt. the names of the Proprietors Council, but [? not] sealed, now if the seal be still in the Province, there will be [? no] end of the patents. Signed, Gab. Johnston. Endorsed, Recd. 10th May, Read 21st Oct., 1736. Holograph. 2 pp. Enclosed,
192. i. Lists of Governor's and Officers' fees in N. Carolina. Same endorsement. 5 pp. [C.O. 5, 295. ff. (with abstract) 23–24, 25 v.–28 v.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
193. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. I am commanded by my Lords Commissrs. for Trade and Plantations, to desire that you will please to move the Lords Commissrs. of the Admiralty, that my Lords may have an account of the number of ships of war, stationed in America, of what strength, and in what ports they are stationed. [C.O. 324, 12. p. 126.]
Dec. 5.
Portsmouth,
New Hampshire.
194. Lt. Governor Dunbar to the Duke of Newcastle. As this part of H.M. Dominions is more immediately under your Grace's direction, and as I have the honour to be Leiut. Governour here, I beg leave to address your Grace in behalf of a great number of the inhabitants who are so well inclined to the Church of England, and so resolved, that they have built a handsome church and steeple by a voluntary contribution, which is now soe near finished that it is fit for divine service, it is the first that ever was attempted in this H.M. province; the people thus disposed were encourag'd to build a church upon presumption that the Society for Propagating the Gospel, would, upon application allow a missionary, and accordingly they sent home a petition, and I at ye same time had the honour to write to my Lord Bishop of London to both which we have had obligeing answers, that the Society were concerned they were not able to grant our request; the people here have exerted themselves in building the church and are not really able to maintain a minister without assistance, I therefore beg leave to intercede with your Grace to recommend to H.M. that he would be graciously pleased to extend His Royal Goodness to this his owne province in allowing a minister or chaplain here as at Boston, and H.M. wonted bounty in books and ornaments for the communion table and pulpit, and Govr.'s seat; I would not presume to mention such, but that there have been two instances of such bounty at Boston since I have been in America, and I hope as this is the first that ever was in New Hampshire I may have the pleasure and honour of succeeding in my petition to your Grace. Some of the Society's missionarys have been so kind as sometimes to visit us from the neighbouring provinces, and to administer the Sacrament to several who never had ye like opportunity before; among those gentlemen, one Mr. Arthur Brown, missionary from Providence near 120 miles from hence, is exceedingly liked and desired by the people here, who in their petition to the Society, earnestly intreated a new one might be sent to Providence and Mr. Brown removed hither, and if H.M. is graciously pleased to grant an allowance for a chaplain here, I humbly pray yt. Mr. Brown may be appointed, it will be an honour and extraordinary favour to me and I have now intreated my Lord Bishop of London to recommend him to your Grace, he is knowne to his Lordship who I hope is satisfied of sufficient reasons for Mr. Brown's being here. I cannot say that the Chief Governour is privy or consenting to my petition, but I dare promise he will not trouble your Grace wth. any of the kind, he is so great and so open an enemy to the Church, that many men here industriously conceal their inclinations for it, for fear of his displeasure, his treatment of me is layd before your Grace, which is more grievous to me than my sufferings at Malaga, and from which I please myself with immediate reliefe. Capt. Thomlinson, our Province Agent, has the honour to wait upon your Grace with this, from, my Lord, your Grace's most dutyrull and most obedient servant. Signed, David Dunbar. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 10. ff. 104–105.]
Dec. 8.
Annapolis
Royal.
195. Lt. Governor Armstrong to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I did myself the honour to write to your Lordships in January last in answer to your letter concerning Mrs. Campbel etc. since which time I have not been honoured with any of your Lordships' commands. According to my design formerly communicated to your Lordships, I took a tour up the Bay of Fundy, and to Canso, which took up my time all last summer; from which, I make no doubt, your Lordships will expect an account of the state of the Province; and this I can do in a few words: for as we have no trade carried on, nor manufactures set up, your Lordships from thence will be convinced, that our French inhabitants answer the charracter that I, several times, gave of them: they indeed multiply very fast and grow exceeding numerous; but this does not induce them to industry, as might naturally be expected; tho' it much contributes to feed that spirit of rebellion that reigns amongst them, which can never be quel'd unless a strong blockhouse was built, and a good number of soldiers placed in it, to keep them in awe; for it is impossible that, at this distance, we can keep them in any order; and they look upon the garrison of Annapolis with such contempt, that they seem not to be in the least afraid of anything that can be done or said here; and they are daily inciting the Indians to give us trouble, and to make them beleive that the King of Britain has no right to the lands up the Bay of Fundy, whatever he may pretend to those about Annapolis; and those ignorant creatures make use of this argument upon every occasion; and tho', by fair words and promisses, I endeavour to keep them in temper, yet I must observe to your Lordships that unless the Government follow the same method that the French King takes to secure them to his interest, no other will prevail; and that is by sending over annual presents, which I have so often mentioned to your Lordships, and must beg leave to continue my remonstrances untill such time as your Lordships will be pleased to favour me with an answer. As for Canso, I begin to despair of ever seeing that place put in a state of defence. I have so often represented the consequences that may attend it, that, I hope, none will blame me if any accident should happen: And indeed I am surprized that the Government does not take more notice of that important place, which, not only, increases the yearly revenues of the Crown, but is the key to this part of North America; and if this should fall into the hands of the French, as it certainly must some time or another, unless care be taken to prevent it, nobody knows of what fatal consequence it might prove to H.M. interest in this part of the world. I submit the whole to your Lordships' judgment etc. Signed, L. Armstrong. Endorsed, Recd. 12th March, Read 6th May, 1736. 4 pp. [C.O. 217, 7. ff. 165–166 v., 167 v.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
196. Order of Committee of Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Signed, Temple Stanyan. Endorsed, Recd, (from Mr. Hucks), Read 16th Dec, 1735. 1 p. Enclosed,
196. i. Petition of Trustees for Georgia to the King. Petitioners are well informed that endeavours are useing to obtain from the Lieut. Governor of S. Carolina, grants of lands to the South of the River Alatamaha, and being apprehensive that any attempt of making such settlements will necessarily involve both the Provinces of Carolina and Georgia in a warr with our Indian and other neighbours etc., pray that said Lt. Governor may be instructed by H.M. not to permit the running out of any lands, or making any such grants to the southward of the River Alatamaha. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 365. ff. 58, 59, 61 v.]
Dec. 8.
Admiralty
Office.
197. Mr. Corbett to Mr. Popple. In reply to Dec. 5th, encloses following. Signed, Tho. Corbett. Endorsed, Recd. 9th, Read 10th Dec, 1735. ¾ p. Enclosed,
197. i. List of ships stationed in America, their rating, stations, men and guns. v. Admiralty lists, ¾ p. [C.O. 323, 10. ff. 43, 44, 45 v.]
1735.
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
198. Order of Committee of Privy Council. Referring Act of Pennsylvania, for the more effectual vesting certain lands in George McCall etc. to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report thereon. Signed, Temple Stanyan. Endorsed, Recd., Read 18th Dec, 1735. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 1268. ff. 180, 183 v.]
Dec. 8.
Annapolis
Royall.
199. Lt. Governor Armstrong to the Duke of Newcastle. Altho' I have not been honoured with any of your Grace's commands this long time past, yet I thought it my duty to let you know that the Government and regiment under my control enjoy health and tranquility. All last summer I employed in visiting Canso and other parts of this Province, and am sorry that I can't give your Grace a satisfactory account of that place, from whence the Crown of Britain yearly receives considerable sums by the returns for the fish; and I am perswaded if there was a fortification built at Canso, it would be very flourishing; it is true indeed that there is a very good blockhouse of late erected there; but this only is good against the Indians, but of no manner of use, in case the French should take it in their heads to give us disturbance. As for the French inhabitants up the Bay of Fundy, and upon all that coast, I found them, upon my arrival there, very submissive, tho' I have great reason to beleive it proceeded only from policy; for I know them to be a very rebellious crew, if any opportunity offered to favour their designs; and they are always inciting the Indians to give us trouble. And those poor ignorant wretches are so guided or led by the French, that they will not scruple to do any base action at their desire; and nothing can secure them to our interest, but annual presents, which I beg your Grace would be pleased to move H.M. to send us, for without that, we can never expect to depend upon their friendship; and it is by such means that the French King has got them over to favour his cause. I make no doubt but your Grace knows of Governor Hart's designs to make a settlement in this Province, to forward which I made out a Patent in his favour, of some lands up the Bay of Fundy, according to the Minute of Council I received for that purpose. If any manufactures or other branch of trade is set up in any part of this Province, I will not fail to send your Grace an account thereof; but as yet I am sorry to say there is none: the fishery at Canso is the only thing of value in this Province, which, if encouraged, will turn to good account. Signed, L. Armstrong. Endorsed, R. 12th March. 3 pp. [C.O. 217, 39. ff. 173–174 v.]
Dec. 11.200. Mr. Fane to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Report upon Act of Jamaica, 1735, for the more effectual directing the Marshall's proceedings etc. Continues: I have been attended by Mr. Forbes, the Provost Marshall of this Island who complains of this Act as greatly affecting the employment which he now enjoys by vertue of a grant from the Crown both as to the execution and the profitts of it etc. Refers to enclosure. Continues: Tho' regulations of this sort may be very useful and necessary, yet such regulations should in my opinion be so contrived as not to make ineffectual a beneficial grant from the Crown; But if there had been any just foundation for the complaints mentioned in the preamble of this Act agst. the Provost Marshall, the law was open, and a proper redress might have been had in a due course of law. I beg leave further to observe to your Lordships, that an Act was passed in this island for regulating fees in 1711, and confirmed in 1715. This Act with regard to the fees of this office is so much a repeal of that law which has been confirmed by the Crown. But I do not observe that there is the least mention made of that law in any part of this, nor is there a clause suspending the execution of it, till H.M. pleasure is known thereupon. Signed, Fran. Fane. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 16th Dec, 1735. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
200. i. Remarks upon the Provost Marshall's Bill. [By Mr. Forbes.] Explains the difficulties and hardships imposed upon the Provost Marshall by this act of Jamaica, which at the same time reduces his fees and obliges him to be "at very extraordinary trouble, risque and expence in the execution of his office" etc. 3½ pp. [C.O. 137, 22. ff. 15–17 v., 18 v.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
201. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Newcastle. Enclose following. [C.O. 195, 7. p. 403.] Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
201. i, ii. Extract from Capt. Lee's answer to Heads of Enquiry No. 5, and account of ordnance stores and garrison at Placentia. v. Sept. 29. 5 pp. [C.O. 194, 23. ff. 221, 224, 226–227 v.]
Dec. [12].202. Address of the President, Council and Assembly of Barbados to the King. Dread Sir, The ordnance your Majesty was graciously pleas'd to direct for the use of this island, consisting of 57 peices of cannon, with their carriages and necessary utensills, being arrived, we chearfully embrace the first opportunity of returning our most humble and hearty thanks for the same, as also for the seasonable alteration that has been made in the severe method of collecting the duty of four and half p. cent., and could we so far prevail on the royal favour as to obtain likewise in due time ten small field peices to compleat our train of artillery with a proportionable quantity of small arms and other accoutrements, we shou'd not doubt being able to protect this your Majesty's Colony from all hostile attempts etc. Continue:— What we have in all humility now mentioned, as to smal arms, is what ought to be furnish'd by and amongst ourselves; but so unfortunately backward are we in our circumstances, and so incumber'd already with publick and private debts, by reason of a declining trade, and the low prices our commoditys have yeilded of late years, that it is morally impracticable to raise new funds, or even to put our municipal laws in force, relating thereto, without the hazard of incurring very great inconveniencys; and shou'd there consequently happen any sudden turn in the affairs of Europe which may affect these parts, in the condition we now are, numbers of your Majesty's able subjects would be found to have zealous hearts only without anything else to oppose the enemy etc. Signed, James Dottin, Prt., 17 Councilors, Hen. Peers, Speaker, and 14 members of Assembly. 2 large pp. [C.O. 28, 45. ff. 343 v., 344.]
[? Dec. 12.]203. Address of the Grand Jury of Barbados to the King. Humbly acknowledge with deepest gratitude their share in the benefits of H.M. most auspicious reign, especially for the stores of war referred to in preceding, and the alteration with regard to the collection of the 4½ p.c. "The difficultys we labour'd under on account of certain modern instructions to the Officers of the Customs wou'd hardly have been tolerable another year" etc. Signed, George Forster, Jon. Holloway, Elf. Goulding, Steph. Butcher, Anthony Archer, Jon. Pile (?), Phil. Jackman, Geo. Bishop, Wm, Smith, Saml. Wood, Joseph Bayley, John Rawlins, Benja. Smith, Jona. (?) Francklin, Peter Bascom, Jos. Palmer, Edward Henery. 2 large pp. [C.O. 28, 45. ff. 345 v., 346.]
[? Dec. 12.]204. Address of President, Council and Assembly of Barbados to the King. Return thanks for the several laws in favour of the Sugar Colonies to which H.M. has given his assent etc. Represent that Barbados was the first settled and is the mother of all H.M. Sugar Colonies, and has for many years been a very profitable Colony to Great Britain as well by producing and importing sugar, rum, mollasses, cotton, ginger and aloes into Great Britain, as by taking off from thence great quantities of woollen and other manufactures, which by means of the Barbados trade are not only consumed amongst the inhabitants here, but are also exported from Great Britain to Affrica, Madeira and the Northern Colonies for the purchase of negroes, wine, fish and other commodities for the use of this Island, whereby numberless hands have been employed in H.M. kingdoms and territories and great revenues accrew to the Crown, and the same commerce has been a great support to H.M. Northern Colonies, and given a large and profitable vent to their fishery and other products and also to the products of Ireland, besides employing a great number of shipping and seamen etc., and after all leaves a considerable ballance in England to the benefit of the national stock etc. Represent "our melancholly apprehensions of new taxes being imposed on our staple commodities when the excise on spirits extracted from British mollasses is already doubled, while other spirits do not pay above one half of what those spirits do, and should any new spirit be imposed on British sugars upon their importation into Great Britain, we conceive such a duty added to those already existing will render it impracticable for your Majesty's subjects of this and the other Sugar Islands to bear up any longer against the encouragements given to and improvements made by their rival neighbours in the sugar trade. Those neighbours pay much easier taxes upon their products etc., which advantage with other indulgencies has enabled them to wrest the sugar trade of the foreign markets of Europe out of the hands of your Majesty's subjects. A trade, which formerly after supplying Great Britain and Ireland with sugar brought back to Great Britain from its surplus near half a million sterling per annum, and which now brings into France annually double that sum from a surplus of sugar that they spare to those foreign markets." From these considerations etc., it will appear that any new taxes laid on the products of H.M. Sugar Colonies will tend to their utter destruction, and consequently be hurtfull to all H.M. Dominions etc. Pray H.M. wisdom, sovereign power and paternal care to prevent any new burthens being laid upon their products, and to ease them of the burthens they now labour under, as soon as the exigencies of the government will permit. Signed, James Dottin and 7 Councillors, W. Gibbons, Speaker, and 13 Members of Assembly. 2 large pp. [C.O. 28, 45. ff. 347 v., 348.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
205. Mr. Popple to Mr. Fane. Encloses, for his opinion in point of law, three Acts of St. Xtophers, 1735. [C.O. 153, 16. p. 34.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
206. Mr. Popple to Mr. Fane. Encloses, for his opinion in point of law, eight Acts of Antigua, 1734, 1735. [C.O. 153, 16. pp. 35, 36.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
207. Mr. Popple to Mr. Fane. Encloses, for his opinion in point of law, six Acts of Montserrat, 1734, 1735. [C.O. 153, 16. pp. 37, 38.]
Dec. ½2/3.
Martinique.
208. Marquis de Champigny [? to President] of Barbados. Abstract. In reply to his letter demanding the evacuation of Sta. Lucia, states that he has sent a French man-of-war thither with orders to notify again the French who remain there of the King's intention to evacuate it. Dec. 29 (n.s.). The French ship found there two English warships, and an agreement was made with the officer deputed by the President of Barbados, upon representations made by the subjects of both nations, that they should be given till 31st May to evacuate the island, in order that they might have time to harvest their cotton. Proclamations to that effect were published etc. Endorsed, Rd., from M. de Chavigny, 15th March, 1735/6. Copy sent ye 18th to the Presidt. of ye Council of Barbados and to Govr. Mathew. Copy. French. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 152, 40. No. 44.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
209. Mr. Popple to Governor Belcher. My Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations having had under their consideration, an Act published in the Massachusetts Bay the 4th of January, 1734/5, entituled An Act to encourage the raising of hemp and flax within this Province, command me to acquaint you with their desire of knowing what effect the said bounties have had; whether the bounty upon flax was given with any view to the establishing a linnen manufacture in the Province? And whether the report my Lords have heard, of some Irish skill'd in the linnen manufactury, now going, or gon, to instruct the New England people therein, is true? My Lords desire you will send me your answer to these queries, and any observations you may have to make upon this subject, as soon as conveniently you can. [C.O. 5, 917. p. 153.]
Dec. 13.
Bermuda.
210. Lt. Governor Pitt to the Duke of Newcastle. This is the first oppertunity I have had of doing myselfe the honour of acquainting your Grace of the receipt of H.M. additional Instruction dated at the Court of St. James's the 30th day of November, 1733, which received the 30th June, 1735, therein constituting and appointing Charles Dunbar, Esqr., who is Surveyor General of H.M. Customs in these Islands to be a Councillor Extraordinary at this Board which with all other orders mention'd in H.M. Instruction bearing date as above shall take due care to obey, I am with great respect, etc. Signed, John Pitt. Endorsed, R. 19th March. ¾ p. [C.O. 37, 29. No. 20.]
Dec. 13.
Bermuda.
211. Lt. Governor Pitt to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have now the honour to acquaint your Lordships of the receipt of your Lordships' letters dated the 17th June and 5th August, 1735, by Capt. James Dickenson commander of the sloop Ann belonging to this place who arrived the 24th of Novem66ber last, and in ob6edience to your Lordships commands, have sent in the fullest manner I can, an account relating to all dutys and impositions that was payable on the trade and shiping of Great Britain on the 25th day of March, 1731, as also an account of what dutys or impositions are now payable on the importation and exportation of negroes, wines, or other kind of liquors, or on any goods, wares, or merchandize, and shiping. It gives me a great deal of concern that I should make such an omission in my letter of the 26th May last, relating to the Councillors, my whole intention being to inform your Lordships of the state of the Councill, and the necessity I was under at that time, the three deceased into whose places I desired Mr. Darrell, Mr. Hunt and Mr. Spofferth might succeed, were Samuel Sherlock, Leonard White senr. and John Jennings, Esqrs., and the three then violently indisposed were John Trimingham, Esqr., president, Henry Tucker, and Richard Jennings, Esqrs., the two former are deceased, so that the Board now consists of Richard Jennings, Andrew Auchinleck, Francis Jones, John Butterfield, Nathaniel Butterfield, Leonard White and Robert Dinwiddie, Esqrs. I now do myselfe the honour of recommending to your Lordships two more gentlemen, which makes five, Mr. John Darrell, Mr. Richard Hunt, Mr. Samuel Spofferth, Mr. Perient Trott senr., Mr. Perient Trott junr., which I think the most capable of having the honour to be at that Board and doing H.M. service, who I hope will meet with your Lordships' approbation; the return of Francis Jones, Esqr., from England, who went only for three months and nothing extraordinary happening made me defer calling the three beforemention'd gentlemen to the Board till I know H.M. pleasure, which with the other two I hope your Lordships will be so good as to recommend to H.M. Signed, John Pitt. Endorsed, Recd. 15th March, Read 25th Aug., 1736. 1 pp. Enclosed,
211. i. Account of Acts in force 25th March, 1731, laying duties on liquors, negroes and trade and shipping of Great Britain. Endorsed, Recd. 15th March, 1736. 2 pp. [C.O. 37, 12. ff. 185, 186, 186 v., 187 v.–188 v.]

Footnotes

1 From the Journal, 17, 18 Dec. 1735, p. 82, we learn that this was a letter which the Trustees for Georgia designed to send to Lt. Gov, Broughton and which they submitted for the information of the Board.