America and West Indies
June 1737, 1-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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K. G. Davies (editor)

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1963

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174-192

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'America and West Indies: June 1737, 1-30', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 43: 1737 (1963), pp. 174-192. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72908 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


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June 1737, 1-30

June 1.
Boston.
324 Governor Jonathan Belcher to Duke of Newcastle. [In substance same as No. 288.] Signed. 4 small pp. Enclosed
324. i Proclamation of Governor Belcher, 14 April 1737. See No. 288 ii. Printed. 1 large p. [C.O. 5, 899, fos. 267–269d.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
325 Alured Popple to Francis Fane enclosing the following twenty Acts passed in Virginia in September 1736 for his opinion in point of law,vizt Act for duty on liquor and slaves. to declare the right to vote in election of burgesses and to serve in the assembly; for amending the Act for amending the staple of tobacco; for obliging apprentices to serve their time; for altering laws for sale of goods taken in execution; for preventing persons contracting small debts to remove their effects out of the county; for greater ease of sheriffs; for better regulating certain officers' fees; to prevent cutting up tobacco suckers; for regulating fees of practisers in physic; for regulating office of surveyors of land; for raising a public levy; for confirming titles to lands in the Northern Neck held under Lord Fairfax; for lessening allowances to witnesses in county courts; for paying wages of burgesses; for relief of inhabitants of parishes of Raleigh and Dale; for relief of sufferers in the loss of records of the county of Nansemond; for building a bridge over Nottoway river; concerningferries; for making reparation for tobacco burnt in Gray's Creek warehouse. Entry. 4 pp.[C.O. 5, 1366,pp. 142–145.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
326 Council of Trade and Plantations to Committee of Privy Council. We have considered your order of 5 May [No. 267], Lord Baltimore's petition [No. 267 i], and also the petition of the president, council and assembly of Pennsylvania relating to a boundary dispute with Maryland and complaining of violence committed by persons claiming authority under Lord Baltimore, together with Lord Baltimore's answer and several papers accompanying the same. We have been attended by Lord Baltimore and the proprietors of Pennsylvania. Upon which, we acquaint you that from the time Pennsylvania and the three lower counties were possessed by the late William Penn they have been governed either by the proprietor or by deputies appointed by him and his successors with the approbation of the crown. On every appointment of a deputy governor, the proprietors have signed an instrument declaring that H.M.'s approbation shall not be construed to diminish the crown's right to the three lower counties. What the right claimed by the crown is, as also the claim of Lord Baltimore, appears very distinctly in a report to the king of 21 October 1717 from Sir Edward Northey and Sir William Thomson, then Attorney-and Solicitor-General; copy enclosed.
There having been disputes between Lord Baltimore and the proprietors of Pennsylvania touching boundaries, articles of agreement were made between them on 10 May 1732. As these articles were never executed, the proprietors of Pennsylvania have preferred their bill in Chancery against Lord Baltimore for specific performance thereof; which dispute being yet depending, we do not advise any alteration in the usual manner of appointing the deputy governor of the said three lower counties. The Pennsylvania petition and other papers are returned. In order to prevent disturbances on or near the boundary in dispute between Lord Baltimore and the Penns, we propose that H.M. lays his injunction on the governor of each province to preserve peace. Entry. Signatories, Fitzwalter, M. Bladen, J. Brudenell, R. Plumer. 7 pp. [C.O. 5, 1294,pp. 105–111.]
June 3
Whitehall
327 Duke of Newcastle to Governor William Mathew. I transmitted to you in my letter of 30 April a copy of the memorial delivered here by M. Hop, Envoy Extraordinary from the States General, complaining that several ships belonging to the Dutch inhabitants of St. Eustatius had been seized by your order and carried to Montserrat where they had been condemned. I also sent you a copy of the representation of the Lords Commissioners for Trade, to whose consideration the said memorial had been referred, setting forth that as the vessels mentioned in M. Hop's memorial to have been seized by the sloops acting under your commission do not appear to have been any way concerned in trade to or from the Leeward Islands their lordships are of opinion that the seizure and condemnation of the said ships cannot be justified because an actual trade with some of H.M.'s subjects must have been proved in order to make them liable to confiscation. H.M. has therefore commanded me to acquaint you with his pleasure that you should forthwith restore to the proper owners the Dutch ships taken by your order, provided the allegations in M. Hop's memorial upon this subject be true, vizt. that the said ships were taken purely by virtue of the Montserrat Act of June 1736 for having sailed within a league of the coasts and without any proof of their having been concerned in any illicit trade. But if you should have any other good reasons for causing the Dutch ships to be seized and confiscated you will in that case immediately transmit to me an account of your proceedings and of the evidence upon which the said ships were condemned that H.M. may be able to judge of the whole and give such orders thereupon as he shall think proper. I send you enclosed for your further information and direction a copy of the answer which the king has directed Lord Harrington to return to M. Hop's memorial. H.M. doubts not but you will take care that these commands be punctually and effectually obeyed; and that you may have the earliest notice of H.M.'s pleasure I shall give a duplicate of this letter to M. Hop to be by him transmitted to you. Draft. 3 pp. Enclosed,
327. i. Answer of Lord Harrington to M. Hop's memorial; Whitehall, 20 May 1737. M. Hop's memorial of 11/22 February past complaining of seizures by Governor Mathew of Dutch ships going to and from St. Eustatius having been laid before the king and the king having examined the same as far as is possible at such distance from the place where the seizures were made, H.M. commands me to reply that he has sent copies of the memorial and other papers to his governor with orders to release all such ships and cargoes that have been taken under the Montserrat Act of June last, to which the king has never given his approval; and that if he has other valid reasons for the seizures, the governor is to send an exact account of his proceedings in order that H.M. may do justice. French. Copy, 2 pp. Endorsed, Copy sent to Governor Mathew, 3 June 1737. [C.O. 152, 44, fos. 110–113d; entry in C.O. 324, 37,pp. 67–71.]
June 3.
Bristol.
328 George Whitefield to Harman Verelst. The things I shall want are as follows: 6 shirts, 4 pair of stocking, 2 pair of breeches, 1 waistcoat,1 close coat 1 great coat, 1 nightgown, 1 wig, 1 hat, 6 handkerchiefs,4 pair of shoes, 6 pair of socks, 4 pair of shoes [sic] and a watch. I am not yet informed what the schoolmaster stands in need of but as he is very pious and very well qualified for so good an employ I think it is but reasonable that as he leaves all for the glory of God and good of others he should have the charges of his passage borne and be provided for as one upon the mission. Pray inform the Trustees of this that I may not take any person at uncertainties. I thank you for your kind answer about the countrymen and should be glad to know whether there might not be a lot of 50 acres assigned to one of them and the other by a private contract go shares in it and so join together in cultivating it. If so what do [you] think will be the expense ? I know not whether the collection will proceed at Bath as we desire. The surmise of the Spaniards' taking Georgia is a sad obstacle. Lady Cox is gone from Bath and we cannot get persons to take out commissions; so that I know not what to say to it. I went thither in order to preach and another friend had a sermon ready but providence seems to thwart it. However I will not give it over yet and if there be any probability of success I hope nothing will be wanting on the part of your humble servant. Signed, G.W. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 639, fo. 250,250d.]
June 6.
Palace Court.
329 Minutes of Common Council of Georgia. Read, a grant of 300 acres of land in trust to William Horton, Thomas Hawkins, Willes Weston and Thomas Hird of Frederica, to be cultivated to raise a maintenance for a minister at Frederica and other religious uses; sealed the same, secretary to counter-sign it. Read, a petition of John Vat praying for payment of the balance of 46l. 8s. 7d. Carolina currency due for provisions for his servant and for an allowance for his service as secretary in Georgia for Salzburgh affairs; resolved, that Mr. Causton be directed to pay the said balance to Rubrecht Kalcker in Georgia, and that 60l. sterling be paid to Mr. Vat which with 27l. 15s. already paid him is in full for his services in Georgia and his attendance here. Resolved, that skins imported from Georgia by the Two Brothers weighing 3068 lbs. be sold to Mr. Simond for 415l. 9s. 2d. being 2s. 8½d. a lb. Sealed articles of agreement with Samuel Smallwood to serve as clerk to the storekeeper at Frederica for three years; secretary to countersign. Received from Mr. Causton a bill of parcels amounting to 188l. 8l. 4d. made payable to William Clay dated 22 February 1736/7. Resolved, that any five of the Common Council be empowered to draw on the Bank of England after 9 June to pay the said bill in case Messrs. Knight & Shuttle-worth will give their note to be answerable for the same in case sola bills shall appear hereafter to have been given in payment for the said account upon or since 22 February. Received from Robert Ellis three accounts which by his letter of 21 March 1736/7 amount to 372l. 19s. 2½d. sterling; referred the same to committee of accounts. Resolved, that it be referred to a committee to consider of a plan for the churches to be built in Georgia, any three of the Common Council to be of the said committee. 3½ pp. [C.O. 5,690,pp. 85–88.]
June 6.
Palace Court.
330 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Received, receipt from the bank for 20l. paid in by Sir Hans Sloane, 22 October last (being his first payment on the renewed contract with the botanist) to be applied for encouraging and improving botany and agriculture in Georgia. Ordered, that circular letters be sent to such Trustees as have subscribed for the building of churches in Georgia to desire them to pay in their subscriptions. Resolved, that it be referred to the committee of correspondence to appoint a fast to be held in Georgia.1.p.[C.O. 5, 687,p. 21.]
June 6.331 Benjamin Martyn to Bailiffs and Recorder of Savannah, directing that an enquiry be made into the state of Joseph Watson's mind. If he is of sound mind, judgment is to be given against him according to the verdict of the court before which he was tried. Entryp. [C.O. 5, 670,p. 310.]
June 6.332 Grant by Trustees for Georgia to William Horton, Thomas Hawkins Willes Weston and Thomas Hird of 300 acres of land in Georgia in trust for the religious uses of the colony. Entry. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 670, pp. 350–351.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
333 Alured Popple to Francis Wilks. (fn. 1) Mr. Yeamans, Mr. Sharpe and Mr. Coope having returned their answer to my letter of 20th of last month about English and French navigation in America, if you have any observations to make thereon their lordships will receive them to-morrow or Friday morning between 11 and 12. Entry. 1 p. [C.O. 324, 12, p. 230.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
334 Same to Francis Fane enclosing seven Acts passed in Massachusetts in 1736 for his opinion in point of law, vizt. Acts for apportioning taxes of 29,953l. 7s. 6d., 3135l [ILL]s. (for payment to representatives at General Court of 1735) and 140l. (fine on towns for not sending representatives); for granting duties on shipping; for granting 3000l. for support of the governor; concerning surviving trustees of the first 50,000l. loan; to prevent multiplicity of lawsuits; to enable overseers of the poor and selectmen to take off idle and disorderly persons; for rebuilding Miles Bridge. Entry. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5,917 fos. 99d-100d.]
June 10.
Savannah.
335 John Wesley to Harman Verelst. I have received the four boxes of which you was so kind as to give me advice as well as the bundle for Mr.Causton. I cannot imagine how you can support yourself under such a weight of business as lies upon you. May He who alone is able so support you that in the greatest hurry of temporal things you may never forget that there are things eternal. Signed. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 639,fo. 306, 306d.]
June 10.
Inverness.
336 John Hossack to Harman Verelst. We have received your letters of 23, 30 April and 7, 14, 28 May. We could not propose a fitter person to recruit servants than MacBean: it is a very fatiguing task, some of them making their escape and others carried off by their friends who will not allow them to go abroad. The Trustees' allowance for engaging money and clothing is already exhausted. Had the ship come a month ago the number had then been furnished and money saved. MacBean ought to be rewarded; we have not let him know how little is proposed for him lest he abandon the service. We have not yet heard who the Alexander Grant is that furnished six servants for the gentleman in London though we have wrote to the country for information. The reports which Lieut. Hugh Mackay gave of the colony has created some jealousies among the commons though it did not ascend higher. In the character which MacBean gave we think he meant to distinguish between his and Capt. George Dunbar's recruits. The plaids if they are all had will not be so much to satisfaction as if the time which will probably pass had been allowed us for having them made by direction. Signed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 639,fos. 255–256d.]
June 11.
Georgia Office.
337 Harman Verelst to Thomas Causton. The Trustees on 6th inst received your letter of 24 March with enclosures. The next day Mr. Simond presented a bills with your certificate of having received the value of Messrs. Samuel Montaigut & Co. to the amount of 1017l. which with the 433l. you before advised of having paid away makes together 1450l. of the 1500l. sent over. The certified accounts already received without sola bills attending them will therefore now be examined and reported upon for payment, and as it may be hoped you have before this time received from Capt. Dymond the 1000l. in sola bills sent you by him you will thereby be supplied for making payments for provisions and the absolute necessities of the colony without having occasion to send over any more certified accounts for payment in England. Yet copies of accounts must continue to be sent to satisfy the Trustees of the particulars for which their sola bills are paid. The Trustees will continue to send over their sola bills for payments in Georgia and your corresponding by every opportunity will inform them of your foreseen occasions in order that you may be regularly supplied with them. Directions relating to Mr. Watson's affair are enclosed. Entry, ¾ p.[C.O. 5,667, fo. 21d.]
June 14.
St Christopher's.
338 Governor William Mathew to Alured Popple, enclosing No. 339. Signed. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd. 20 August, Read 24 August 1737. [C.O.152,23,fos.35,35d,39,39d.]
June 14.
St. Christopher's.
339 Same to Council of Trade and Plantations. The account of the city of Panama being wholly burnt except one church coming hither round about by Curaçao may possibly be an old story in London. But Ibelieve I shall be the first to inform you that Brasovant, the famous Spanish garde-côteswith two others in company with him, has been taken (himself killed) even on the Spanish coast by three Dutch privateers fitted out from Curac,ao wholly for that purpose. Their further intention it seems was to find out a row galley which the Biscay Company keep along the coast of Caracas to prevent all illicit trade and to destroy her too. Yesterday a new governor arrived at St. Eustatius and with him Mr. Phillips who comes out to repossess himself of his government of the Dutch part of St. Martin's from whence he was driven by the inhabitants. But these gentlemen come in very bad plight, having been met with by the Spaniards who stripped them very bare, carried their vessel well-laden to Havana, and left these two gentlemen to get to their governments as they could. It is said they were even twice taken by the Spaniards. But a worse piece of news is that Capt. Hinslow bound hence from this island full laden with sugars was taken by a Spanish vessel very near to Bermuda and was carried to Havana: his chief and second mate are now at St. Eustatius. There is likewise a Bristol ship bound to Jamaica carried into Porto Rico; I can't learn the ship's or the master's name as yet.
Mr. Arbuthnot in his way up hither from Tortola touched at St. Eustatius in distress; he was in a schooner formerly one of the garde-côtes I fitted out to protect our trade. Germa, the Venetian, and Sageran, the Frenchman, immediately got her seized in reprisals for the French seizures she had made and they pretended some interest in. But with much persuasion and out of regard to Mr. Arbuthnot, she was permitted to proceed with him. But they took some of her guns out of her, so little did they wait for having their pretensions, which they know to be false ones, supported at home. Mr. Arbuthnot tells me that though I have called in my garde-côtes which pretty sufficiently broke through the illicit trade between the French and Rhode Islanders at St. Eustatius, yet as theirsupplies do not come as plentifully from Martinique and Guadeloupe as formerly, they have thought it worth their while nevertheless to bring up great quantities of French sugars even from St. Domingue, that the St. Eustatius bay is covered with them, and persons of best distinction there without the least reserve averred to him that no fewer than 6000 cask shifted into English hogsheads were designed through these islands for the British markets. It is said a Spanish man-of-war took Hinslow. Signed. 3 small pp.[C.O. 152, 23, fos. 36–38d.]
June 14.
Boston.
340 Governor Jonathan Belcher to Council of Trade and Plantations. Since my last of 12 May, in answer to a proclamation I issued for that end (as per enclosed print), I have received yours of 8 February last, the purport whereof was answered by what I wrote you 10 May. I shall in all things (within my power) pursue such orders as I may receive from time to time respecting the settlement of the boundaries betwixt this province and New Hampshire. The assembly here has been sitting three weeks but are hardly come to any results of a public nature. I herewith send you their journal so far as it has got into print. Nothing shall be wanting on my part to promote H.M.'s authority and honour with the welfare of his subjects. Signed. 2½ small pp. Endorsed, Recd, 1 August, Read 7 September 1737. Enclosed,
340. i. Journal of House of Representatives of Massachusetts, 25 to 28 May 1737. Printed. 12 pp.
340. ii. New England Weekly Journal, No. 529, Tuesday, 24 May 1737, containing Governor Belcher's proclamation of 23 May requiring a packet, supposed to have been secreted by evil-minded persons, to be sent immediately to him. Printed. 2 pp.[C.O. 5, 880,fos 40–48d.]
June 14.
Whitehall .
341 Council of Trade and Plantations to Committee of Privy Council. We have considered the petition of Alexander Skene and James Abercrombey for payment for surveying the boundary between South and North Carolina. [See No. 266 i.] In 1729 Lieut.-Governor Gooch of Virginia desired our directions in a similar question, instancing payment in 1711 for the same service out of the quitrents by warrant from the Treasury. We are informed a warrant was accordingly directed to Mr. Gooch. We conceive the same method to be proper in this case. Entry. Signatories, Fitzwalter, James Brudenell, Arthur Croft, R. Plumer. 3 pp. [C.O. 5,401, pp. 216–219; draft in C.O. 5, 381,fos. 246–247d.]
June 15.
Palace Court.
342 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. The accountant acquainted the Trustees that the following bank receipts came to his hands since last meeting and were exchanged with the bank 13th inst. vizt. for 21l. 13s. 4d. for James Oglethorpe's subscription for botany and agriculture; for 11l. 13l. 4d. for George Heathcote's subscription for the same; for 2l. 15l. l0d. which, with 412l. 13s. 4d. accounted for, makes 415l. 9s. 2d. received of Messrs. Peter Simond & Co. for 7 cases of deerskins imported from Two Brothers weighing 3068 lbs. sold to them at 2s. 8½ d. a lb.; for 352l. 15s. 2d. paid in by George Heathcote to balance his imprests. Received, receipt from the bank for 30l. paid in by Duke of Richmond for encouraging and improving botany and agriculture. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 687, pp. 22–23.]
June 15.
Georgia Office.
343 Benjamin Martyn to Rev. John Wesley. Rev. Mr. Burton has this day laid before the Trustees a letter from you to them dated at Savannah, 4 March 1737, wherein you express a concern that they should receive an accusation of your embezzling any part of their goods and likewise a desire to know the name of your accuser. The Trustees have ordered me to assure you that they are very much surprised at any apprehension you have of such accusation being brought before them. No complaint of any kind has been laid before them relating to you. They have never as a board nor any of them privately heard of one, nor have they the least suspicion of any ground for one. They would not (if they had received any) form a judgement of you without acquainting you with the accusation and the name of your accuser. At the same time they believe you will think it reasonable to let them know who has informed you that any such accusation has been brought before them and that for the future you will only regard what may be sent to you from them and that you will not believe nor listen to any private informations or any insinuations that must make you uneasy and may lead you to distrust the justice of the Trustees and the regard they have for you. They are very sensible of the great importance of the work you are engaged in and they hope God will prosper the undertaking and support you in it, for they have much at heart not only the success of the colony in general but the promotion of piety amongst the people as well as the conversion of the Indians. They are very glad to find that Mr. Causton has seconded your endeavours to suppress vice and immorality and that a reformation gains ground as you observe it does. Entry. PS. The Trustees will consider your application in favour of Robert Hows, 1 p. [C.O. 5, 667,fos. 21d-22.]
June 15.
Boston.
344 Josiah Willard to [? Alured Popple]. By the New Cambridge, Capt. Morris, I have sent the following public papers of Massachusetts: minutes of council, September 1736 – April 1737; minutes of assembly, November 1736; the laws then made; treasurer-general's account for 1735. Signed. PS. This letter should have gone with the public papers but was casually left behind. 17 September 1737. 1 small p. Endorsed, Read 21 September 1737. [C.O. 5, 880,fos. 69, 69d,72, 72d.]
June 15.
Hawk in
Frederica River.
345 Capt. James Gascoigne to Benjamin Martyn. Your favour of 13 January reached me (at this place) the beginning of April which being about the time of the height of the alarm of the Spaniards' intentions prevented its being answered in due time, I being obliged to keep all the colony boats employed (for intelligence) to the southward. I own the greatest satisfaction to myself in the good opinion the Trustees have of my discharging my duty. Signed. PS. I am lately come in from cruising between this place and St. Augustine where everything seems quiet at present. Rose and Shark are returned to Carolina and the people at Frederica returned to their work. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 14 September 1737.[C.O. 5, 639,fos 365–366d.]
[June 15 (O.S.)]
June26(N.S)
Rotterdam.
346 John Mathias Kramer to [Harman Verelst (fn. 2) ]. Immediately after my arrival in this town I endeavoured to pick out from the great number of Palatines now in town 60 able-bodied servants for Georgia according to the orders given me, and I have employed Mr. Hope for the same end. But I have not as yet been able fully to succeed therein by reason that everyone is inclined to go to Pennsylvania and is in hopes that the captains of ships will take them on board and carry them without paying for their passage. But since the number of such poor as cannot pay for their passage is very great, it is doubtful whether they will be all carried over. Consequently when they at last shall know not how to shift they might possibly be persuaded to go to Georgia. I have thought it necessary to give the speediest notice thereof to the Trustees that in case they should resolve upon my attendance on this occasion they might send over their commands, upon which I shall remain here till all ships for Pennsylvania shall be gone. But as it is not to be presumed that any persons of substance shall be left behind by the captains for Pennsylvania but only such as cannot pay for their passage, and as Messrs. Hope cannot send a ship to Georgia with 60 persons but require 140 to 150 at least, it will be necessary to have orders whether I might increase the first required number of 60 to 140 or 150 servants in order to have a full loading. But as this will require two months time or more, I hope the Trustees will send without delay sufficient money towards my necessary expenses and subsistence here. German.,Signed. PS. Letters directed to me under cover of Mynheer De Heere Peter de Kocker, Koopman, Rotterdam, will come to hand. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 639, fos.277–278d. English translation, 2 pp.,at fo. 274, 274d.]
[June 16.]347 The Case of the British Northern Colonies, representing the advantages of the molasses trade between the British colonies and the French and Dutch sugar islands. Printed. 3 pp. Endorsed, Recd, from Mr. Wilks. Recd., Read 16 June 1737. [C.O. 323, 10, fos. 110–111d.]
June 17.
New York.
348 Lieut.-Governor George Clarke to Council of Trade and Plantations. On the 15 th the assembly met and chose their speaker. I made a short speech to them and yesterday they addressed me. The majority is of those who opposed me before I was appointed lieut.-governor. But if appearances do not deceive me I have reason to hope they will make good the deficiencies of the revenue and give another. They will expect from me at the same time such laws for the good of the province as I can pass. More than that, the speaker tells me, they will not insist on. If they keep within those bounds, provide for the deficiences, and give a further revenue, the province will soon raise its head and become a flourishing country. The house seems to be in very good temper: we met and now part well satisfied with each other. The speaker is very open with me and gives me room to think that I shall at their next meeting be able to give you a very good account of them. The harvest drawing nigh, I have directed the house to adjourn to the fourth Tuesday in August and am this day going to Albany to meet the Six Nations. Signed. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 26 July, Read 7 September 1737. [C.O. 5, 1059, fos 28,28d 31,31d]
June 17.
New York.
349 Same to Duke of Newcastle, enclosing copy of No. 348. I think I have a fair prospect of getting this assembly to support government and to make good the deficiencies of the revenue. Signed. ½ small p. Endorsed, Recd. 26 July. Enclosed,i. Copy of No. 348. [C.O. 5, 1094, fos. 30–32d.]
June 17.
Whitehall.
350 Duke of Newcastle to Council of Trade and Plantations, directing that drafts of a commission and instructions be prepared for Sir Orlando Bridgeman to be governor of Barbados. Signed. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 17 June 1737. [C.O. 28, 14, fos. 216–217d.]
June 17.
Georgia Office.
351 Harman Verelst to Thomas Causton. The author of the benefaction to the third transport of Salzburghers has extended it to supply a cow and calf to every five heads of the 55. The Trustees desire you will provide them. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 22d.]
June 19.
Savannah.
352 John Brownfield to Trustees for Georgia enclosing the whole account of improvements in this township excepting what has been done on the trustees' lots and that shall be sent very soon. It was not in my power to mention the exact time when each person became possessed of his land, the surveyor having kept no certain account and the people in general being unable to form any near computation of the time their lands were snowed to them. Several in Percival and Heathcote ward but especially the latter do not yet know where their farms lie, otherwise they would have made some improvements on them and more particularly those whose garden lots consist of poor land. Many people who have cleared land complain of their neighbours for not clearing because the vermin and insects bred in uncultivated lands destroy the crop of those who have planted and the trees standing upon unimproved lots overshade and prevent the corn from growing on such cleared lands as are adjoining to them. Neglect of fencing is likewise an article of great consequence; several lost their crop last year because those whose lands lay next them had either made no fence at all or but imperfect ones, and it is very disheartening for a person to fence the side of his neighbour's land as well as his own. If all were to join in fencing their lots it would not lie so heavy upon particular men as it does now, for then each person must bear his proportion in labour, whereas now several who have planted are obliged to fence more than comes to their share in order to prevent cattle from devouring their crop.
I have throughout this account of improvements mentioned the lots which belong to such women who after their husband's death became possessed of lands and married again under the name of those womens' last husbands. Sometime in May before Mr. Jones went to mark out the town of Augusta I enquired of him concerning such lots as have been exchanged, forfeited and elapsed. He acquainted me with most of the alterations which have happened since the deed of conveyance from Christie and Calvert, and those things that Mr. Jones could not satisfy me of I have learnt from the persons now in possession of the lots where such alterations have been made and from the constables of those wards to which the respective lots belong. But as to the circumstances of time very few could set me right.
You will observe that several people have cleared and fenced but not planted their lands. The reason which they give for it is the want of provisions, and some who have hired men to work with them upon their lots were obliged to leave off and discharge their hands, they not having victuals to support them whilst the planting season lasted. Our fort took up a great deal of time and the reason we had daily to expect an attack kept our men chiefly in town and was consequently a large stop to their improvements. I am glad to find that the making out this account and the expectation of its being continued has already inclined some people to enlarge their improvements. I should have finished and sent you the enclosed papers eight or ten days sooner but that a few who were desirous of having their improvements set forth desired me to stay, one till his garden lot was quite cleared, another till he had finished his fence, and a third told me that if I could but stay a week he did not doubt being able to get his house raised. To all these I gave assurances of my willingness to oblige them but yet seemed very uneasy lest you should think me dilatory. What appeared most extraordinary was that upon making a close enquiry of indifferent people concerning the accounts which had been given me, I found scarce any overcharge.
It would be failing in my duty should I not acquaint you with the great hardships which those people labour under who have only pine lands to employ their industry upon. Such lots may indeed be soon cleared but then the crop they produce is so very small that it discourages the most painstaking people amongst us and is a strong reason why men do not cultivate those lands. For the timber growing upon them being sawed out will yield a better maintenance than the land can do. I need not take up your time by mentioning many instances since the following one may be sufficient. Count Zinzendorff's people who live in Savannah have for two or three years past been endeavouring to improve the farm lot belonging to Mr. Spangenberg which consists of pineland. They cleared and planted 30 acres the first year and it produced near 20 bushels of corn. Last year they planted 20 acres (leaving the rest to grow up again) and their crop was not above 12 bushels. I could mention several besides but am persuaded that you will judge this a sufficient instance since Count Zinzendorff's people are truly industrious and a great many of them were employed upon Mr. Spangenberg's farm.
Several of the pine garden lots in this township being cleared makes the enclosed account seem more considerable than it would otherwise do, but when the little difficulty of clearing and smallness of the crop comes to be considered it will plainly appear that half an acre of good land requires near as much labour to clear it and will yield more grain than five acres of pine. Had the inhabitants of Savannah built less in town they might have made large improvements in the country and would not at this time be in want of bread. But a general error has prevailed amongst us, that of getting up houses before we had anything in the ground. From thence proceeds our having a large town without provision to support it and the people having been accustomed to live here had but little inclination for the country. This evil at first sprung from their want of lands and several still labour under the same necessity.
The Jew family named Nunes intend to plant vineyards if they can obtain leave from you to exchange their swamp lots for such as are dry. I have in the references to Deckers ward mentioned Isaac Nunes Henriques improvements more particularly than the rest because he has expended more in attempting to drain a swamp lot than anyone here besides. But all the family are equally desirous with him to plant vineyards and each has made preparations for it, having vines ready to transplant and some in great forwardness. Since the enclosed account was made up I have been informed that James Dormer's garden lot in Vernon tithing and Heathcote ward stands leased to Austin Weddall who took the same because he had no land of his own marked out. I am also told that Weddall has since assigned the said lease unto Joseph Wardrop, but the papers cannot yet be found. I perceive by Mr. Jones's book that the garden lot No. 54 lying southwest of the town is Ed. Parkers's but neither a house lot nor farm is annexed to it, so that one of the vacancies does certainly belong to him. I am not well assured whether one or two lots in the Lower New ward mentioned to be granted by James Oglethorpe were so or not.
If any little omission should appear amongst the enclosed papers it has proceeded from my not being able to get thorough information, but if there should happen to be any mistake I hope you will order it to be amended. My utmost care has been used to prevent errors in this account; the taking it first rough by going from house to house, then writing the same fair, getting it signed and copying the leases has kept me in fulle mploy ever since the latter end of April till very lately. Some few people being out of town have not signed to the enclosed account, which I am unwilling to lose this opportunity of sending and therefore hope you will excuse me; for as those people have made little or no improvements their signing could not be very material. I beg your acceptance of this small trifle as an earnest of my gratitude and duty. Had not the bearer gone away so soon I should have wrote more fully concerning the state of improvements here but that must be done in my next letter. I am very thankful for your goodness in allowing my sister to come over. Signed. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 659, fos. 367–368d.]
June 20.353 Lieut.-Governor William Gooch to Council of Trade and Plantations. The inconsiderable progress made in any trade or manufactures in this colony since the last time I wrote on this subject affords me very little new to trouble you with.
Laws: none subsisting whereby the trade or manufactures of Great Britain can be anyway injured.
Trade: our trade besides tobacco, lumber, pitch, tar, skins and fur to Great Britain, is a little tobacco, beef, pork, wheat, Indian corn, lumber and candles made of myrtlewax to the British West Indies, for which we have in exchange sugar, rum, molasses and sometimes money. To Madeira we send wheat and Indian corn with some candles and bring back their wine, but in this commerce the balance, much against us, is paid in bills of exchange.
Iron works: we have four furnaces in this colony for making what is called pig and sow iron, all which till very lately has been sent to Great Britain. But the undertakers have had such poor encouragement that I question whether they would continue their fires if they could turn their hands to anything else.
Forge: we have one forge for making bar iron for our own use only. None of it has been yet exported but what has been made more than the people want lies in hopes of a suitable encouragement from the Parliament for shipping of it to Great Britain discharged of the present duty; and if that can be obtained a much greater advance may be made therein for it is found to be very good and equal in toughness to the best Swedish iron.
One Air Furnace: here they run pots, backs for chimneys, andirons and boxes for cartwheels, sold about the colony and exported by the undertakers to other parts of the continent and to the British Islands, who I believe have gained nothing considerable by their trade.
Potter's work: the potter continues his business (at Yorktown) of making pots andpans with very little advantage to himself and without any damage to trade.
Vineyards: as to our hopes of wine, notwithstanding the severity of the last winter than which a longer and colder was never known here, there is at present a prospect of a pretty plentiful vintage for the number of vines planted out, chiefly of the burgundy and frontiniac grape. But as it is the moisture or drought in the season of July and August that will determine their fate I must wait till then to inform you of this year's success. The same gentleman, Col. Armistead, has attempted the making of Verina tobacco of which he sent to London the last year about 5 cwt., and this year he tells me he shall ship about 80 cwt. of it. As he manages it with great secrecy for fear of followers, I am apt to suspect the complaint he makes of the poor price the 5 cwt. is sold for is artifice; but whether it is so or was owing to the unskillfulness of his merchant or to the difference of the climate is a point I cannot determine, though it is certain even here it exceeds in fineness of scent any tobacco that has ever been made before, and the same sort made in the Spanish West Indies, I am told, yields a pistole a pound in Holland.
I must now give you notice of a late discovery in the physical way which has made some noise here. One Tennant, a surgeon, observing the effects of an herb called the rattlesnake root in the cure of such as have been bitten by the snake of that name and judging it might be as effectual in other maladies proceeding from coagulations of the blood, has for some time used a tinctum thereof with great success in the pleurisy, an epidemical distemper among the negroes every winter and what the white people are very subject to. He goes this summer for London, and I have ventured to recommend him to Dr. Mead for I make no question it will be serviceable not only here but there.
The export of tobacco this year will be much larger than for some years past and the season hitherto proving very favourable there is a very great crop on the ground. This letter is committed to the care of Col. William Randolph, one of the council, who comes home for the advice of physicians and the use of the Bath. I have desired him to inform Mr. Popple where he may be found in town in case you should be willing to ask him anything concerning this country. Signed. 3 pp. Endorsed, Recd. 16 August, Read 14 September 1737. [C.O. 5, 1324,fos. 59–60d.]
June 20.
St. James s.
354 Commission to James Oglethorpe to be general and commander-in-chief of all H.M.'s forces in South Carolina and Georgia. Entry. 2½ pp.[C.O. 324, 37, pp. 71–73; another entry in C.O. 324, 49, pp. 126–128.]
June 20.
St. James's.
355 Commission to the same to be captain of the independent company in South Carolina. Entry. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 324, 37. pp. 74–75.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
356 Duke of Newcastle to Council of Trade and Plantations, directing that drafts of a commission and instructions be prepared for Edward Trelawny, appointed governor of Jamaica. Signed. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 21 June 1737. [C.O. 137, 22, fos. 129–130d.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
357 Same to same directing that drafts of commission and instructions be prepared for Lord Delawarr to be governor of New York and New Jersey Signed. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 21 June 1737. [C.O. 5, 1058,fos. 175–176d]
June 21.
Whitehall.
358 Alured Popple to Attorneyand Solicitor-General. In 1735 H.M. assented to an Act passed by the Trustees for Georgia for maintaining peace with the Indians in Georgia, now enclosed. Such parts of this Act as lay restraints on the Indian trade are become matter of contest between South Carolina and Georgia which makes it necessary for the Council of Trade and Plantations to have your opinion upon the following queries: whether an Act of the Trustees of Georgia or of any assembly passed in the colonies abroad and confirmed by the crown can grant to any of the said provinces an exclusive trade with the Indians dwelling within their respective provinces; does the Act above mentioned exclude all persons whatsoever whether inhabitants of Georgia or not from trading with the Indians settled within the bounds of Georgia as described by the charter except such as shall take out licences according to the directions of the said Act. Entry. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 401, pp. 219–221.]
June 22.
Palace Court.
359 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Read, a memorial to the Treasury for directions for the issuing of the 20,000l. granted the last session of Parliament towards securing and settling Georgia. Secretary to sign the same. Received of Mr. L'Apostre, 10l. subscription towards building two churches in Georgia and other religious uses. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 687, p. 24.]
June 22.360 Benjamin Martyn to Commissioners of the Treasury praying for directions for the issue of the 20,000l. granted by Parliament for Georgia. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 670,p. 310.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
361 Council of Trade and Plantations to President John Hamilton. We should have answered your letters of 2 November 1736 and 25 March 1737 but H.M. has appointed Lord Delawarr governor of New York and New Jersey. We desire that until his arrival you will do your utmost to preserve the tranquillity of the province under your command. Entry. Signatories, T. Pelham, James Brudenell, R. Plumer. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 996,p. 399.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
362 Same to Lieut.-Governor George Clarke, informing him of the appointment of Lord Delawarr as Governor of New York and New Jersy We desire that until his arrival you do your utmost to preserve the tranquillity of the province. Entry. Signatories, T. Pelham, James Brudenell, R.Plumer. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1126,fo 21.]
June 11.
Georgia Office.
363 Trustees for Georgia to Sir Robert Walpole. Having in April last presented a memorial to you, and as there was then a great hurry of business and this is a time of more leisure, we hope you will permit us to remind you of it since every day's advices confirm the necessity of having a speedy resolution taken thereupon. We therefore give you a copy of that memorial which is as follows: The colony of Georgia being entrusted by H.M. to our care we think ourselves obliged to inform you of the situation of it and that the 20,000l. granted by Parliament this year will not maintain the colony farther than Lady Day 1738. The expense of the colony at first looks large but if you consider that the Trustees have hitherto protected as well as improved the colony out of the parliamentary and other money you will find that it has not been so expensive as other colonies. The military defence of Nova Scotia and Annapolis stands the king in 13,000l. yearly though there is no improvement made in that province. Most of the American colonies are at least as expensive as Nova Scotia and Annapolis, the charge of which is either paid by the king for troops, artillery etc., or by taxes raised upon the people of the colony or by both. Thus Jamaica stands the public in 14,000l. a year upon the estimate besides the governor's salary out of the civil list and the taxes raised by the country; so that the whole expenses of Jamaica are near 30,000l. yearly.
Seven thousand pounds a year will be necessary to defray the expense of the civil government, maintaining persons newly arrived, preserving a good harmony with and supporting the Indians and carrying on the other improvements of the province such as raising of silk, wine, oil and other produces, the expense whereof private persons are not able to bear and which the Trustees apprehend is the reason why English America has not yet produced any quantity of them though their climate and soil are very proper for them. It will be expedient also that the sum intended to be granted to the Trustees be put into the estimate laid by the crown before the Parliament for it will be impossible for the Trustees every year to take upon them to proceed by petition nor can they be expected to hazard the making contracts for men, provisions etc. (which is necessary to be done the year before) upon the precariousness of their petition's being received or a sum voted upon it.
Carolina and Georgia are almost surrounded by the French and Spaniards (who lie upon the same continent and can march into the former through the latter by land). The many improvements there made and the harbours now discovered occasions those powers to be covetous of them and the more those provinces improve the stronger their desire will be of getting them, for Georgia is the key of all North America. And if they possessed those ports they could by cruising from thence search all the Carolina and Virginia homeward-bound ships and would probably confiscate many of them since they generally bring Spanish silver home which is the only coin current in America. For these reasons the Trustees humbly apprehend that it will be expedient for H.M. to order a regiment of 700 men to be raised which being properly posted upon the islands and along the river will protect both those provinces from the Spaniards; which seems to be more immediately necessary since the Trustees have information from eye-witnesses and men worthy of faith that the Spaniards are fitting up barracks at St. Augustine for a regiment of 500 men which they daily expect and which with those already there will make up 1100 regular troops, and that the French have 2500 regular troops in their province next adjoining to Georgia and Carolina. Signed, Robert Tracy, James Vernon. T. Archer, Robert Cater, J. Page, Edward Digby, R. Holland, Stephen Hales, Henry Lapostre, John Laroche, Robert Hucks, George Heathcote, William Sloper, Thomas Tower, Christopher Tower, William Heathcote, Thomas Frederick, Shaftesbury, Egmont, Talbot, Tyrconnel, Carpenter, James Oglethorpe, H. Archer, R. Chandler. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 654, fos. 109–110d; entry in C.O. 5, 667,fos. 23d. 24.]
June 23.
Morrisania.
364 Lewis Morris to Duke of Newcastle. On 22 October 1756 I gave you an account of my arrival in Jersey and the reception I there met with. I have not received H.M.'s directions. I send a print I published on Mr. Hamilton's Reasons. Signed. 1 small p. Enclosed,
364. i. Observations on. the Reasons given by Mr. Hamilton's advisers for detaining the seals of the province of New Jersey. The substance of Mr. Morris's case is his seniority in the council and a royal instruction to him as president of New Jersey dated 1 June 1736. Printed. 11 pp. [C.O. 5, 983, fos. 83–90d.; another copy of the 'Observations' in C.O. 5, 980, fos. 114–119d.]
June 24.
Frederica.
365 Thomas Hawkins to James Oglethorpe. By Capt. Symonds I had yours with the commission. I return hearty thanks. We have lost no people since my last at either settlement and have but few ill at present, most of which are on the recovery. On 11th instant Dr. Lassell's son was unfortunately drowned being in the river with many other boys; he was found 14th and buried by his father; there is about 4l. 10s sterling lodged in my hands which shall be remitted his brother or defray the charges of the funeral etc. as you shall advise. The account of the public building is so bad that I dread mentioning it to you, there not having been a brick made since your departure from Savannah or a board sawed. My house is yet unfinished but hope in a month's time to do it on my own expense if they do not proceed. We have a good assortment of drugs remaining in the chest and have occasion only for the enclosed catalogue to Mr. Verelst. There is and has been for near two months since a great want of provision and great complainings amongst the people so that we dread the consequence. What can be done to pacify them will not be wanting from Mr. Horton or town-magistrates. A more particular account of the present state of affairs is apparent from Mr. Horton's advices. Signed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 639,fos. 370–371.]
June 24.
Georgia Office,
366 Harman Verelst to John Mathias Kramer at Rotterdam. I will lay your letter of 26th inst. (N.S.) before the Trustees next Wednesday. I believe they not increase your instructions which are confined to 60 servants; and if that certain number cannot be complied with for Mr. Hope to engage in to send a ship to Georgia, your solicitation will be at an end and therefore improper for you to stay at Rotterdam at expense. I shall write to you again this day sevennight which may be sent after you if you go from Rotterdam before. Entry. ½ p.[C.O. 5, 667, fo. 23; draft in C.O. 5, 639, fo. 275.]
June 25.
S.Carolina
367 Samuel Eveleigh to Harman Verelst. Yours of 24 March came by Capt. Dymond who arrived at Cockspur Island the 5th current; thank you for your promise to pass my certified accounts as soon as possible which I hope will be this month and then some part of it will be 13 months after I had paid for the same: the interest whereof is 11l. whereas I charge but 5 commission and besides I charge nothing for storage etc. by which you may see that I get nothing by it. I have supplied Mr. Causton since Mr. Oglethorpe's departure with provisions and other necessaries to a considerable sum; but he writes me he must keep the sola bills for others and therefore cannot pay me so that I am weary of supplying him. I forwarded a packet from Georgia to you by Capt. Ayers and shall forward another by Capt. Paul now ready to sail. Herewith you will receive the Carolina Gazettes to this day. I desire you will acquaint Mr. Oglethorpe that Mr. Wood and several other traders are come down from the Creeks who inform me that the Indians and others give them an account that the French design to attack the Chickesaws about the middle of next month when the corn is ripe, that the Chickesaws are strongly enforted, that the French design to bring up great guns and mortars against them, and that the traders in general are afraid the French will rout them. Here is no news of any moment stirring but a general complaint throughout the province of the want of Indian corn which is now sold for 30–35 s. per bushel. Signed. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 21 September 1737 [C.O. 5, 639, fos. 373–374d.]
June 25.
Inverness.
368 Capt. William Thomson to Harman Verelst. After a tedious passage and bad weather I arrived here 21 inst. and received your letters of 27,28 May and 11 inst.I received on board yesterday 10 menservants for the Trustees; about 17 more are to come next week which MacBean engaged some time past. He goes to the country for them to-morrow. Provost Hossack and the other magistrates say he has been very diligent and frugal and that the allowance you have limited him to will not answer the expense of those servants already got; without the assistance of the Trustees he will not be able to pay me the money laid out for him in London by your order. Several gentlemen here are trying to get servants written for by their friends in Georgia which I hope will facilitate our departure. My deck is already raised and everything relating to it will soon be finished. I find it is more expensive and troublesome to get servants here than I imagined. Whilst in London I remember to hear you speak about servants for one Wheeler on which you have given me no instructions. Signed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 639,fo. 258, 258d.]
June 28 (O.S.).
July 9(N.C)
Windhausen.
369 Philip George Frederick von Reck to James Vernon. All the time I have been in Germany I waited for an opportunity of writing some news about another transport for Georgia. But the appointed time of bringing the people in the river of Thames approaching I take the liberty to acquaint you: (1) that it seems as if no more Salzburghers are to be expected out of their country; (2) that Count Zinzendorff is gone himself to England to treat about his people;(3) that since the peace is made with France and the people living on the Rhine and Neckar who were expelled from their farms and vineyards being now re-established I do not hear of any thereabouts that incline to go to Georgia; (4) that the preparations of war against the Turk still continuing the levying of soldiers takes away men and boys; (5) that not finding good people and fit for labour I would not engage any idle, lazy, criminal or indebted persons who do more harm than good in a new colony. If therefore you should be pleased to employ me otherwise any further in the service of the Trustees in Georgia and to enable me to subsist there without land, having no family and which I never shall have, I shall always be ready to show you that I am with so much zeal as respect your most humble, obedient servant. Signed, Reck. PS. I wrote Mr. Oglethorpe some time ago; pray, my humble respects to him. Direct any letters for me to Mr. Urlsperger at Augsburg. The enclosed to Mr. Wesley (fn. 3) I recommend to your care. 2 small pp. [C.O. 5, 639, fos. 308–309d.]
June 28.
Ebenezer.
370 John Martin Bolzius and Israel Christian Gronau to James Vernon. Mr. Ziegenhagen acquainted us in his last letter of your continued favour to us and how zealous you are to remove all difficulties our people laboured under at the new settlement; we see already the good effects, in the Trustees' orders to Mr. Causton for redressing some difficulties. Ten families are provided with cows, the others are destitute of them and unable to buy even a calf. The people's corn is so damaged by worms that their crops will be lost if not prevented by providence. The reduced allowance is ordered to be given the Salzburghers to September next which we believe will be continued longer if the people should be disappointed by losing their crops. The surveyor Ross will begin running out the farms in September but the most part of the lands will happen to be barren, and if not, few acres could be of better soil to gain their bread from but they shall be forced to make it good by dung in the first time. It will be their ruin and they shall be constrained to hire themselves out like servants to a great detriment of their souls and to a destroying of our congregation. There was no order sent over for having leave to exchange the bad garden lots with better grounds. As for the building of our houses there is no hope for the present seeing the Trustees have allowed only 16l. sterling for three houses and hogs and poultry should be bought for the third Salzburghers of the same 16l. We ask you to lay our necessity to heart seeing that our living in huts not only hurts our health but is a very great hindrance to the right performance of our ministerial office. May God reward you thousand times for all the favours you heaped upon us and our flock. Signed, 2 pp. [C.O.5,639,fos.376–377d.]
June 29.
Savannah.
371 John Pye to Harman Verelst, notifying arrival in Georgia after a voyage of 10 weeks and requesting an increase in wages, things being so dear in the colony Signed. PS. Pray send the enclosed to my mother. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd. 21 September 1737. [C.O. 5, 639, fos. 379–380.]
June 29.
Palace Court.
372 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Received, a receipt from the bank for 10l. paid in by Henry L'Apostre. [See No. 359.] Received by Dr.Hales, 10l. 10s. the benefaction of a gentlewoman towards the expenses of Rev. George Whitefield and the schoolmaster going to Frederica for the service of the mission. Received by the same, 4l. 4s. the benefaction of Rev. Mr. Vallois, Rector of East Tisted near Alton, Hampshire, towards the expenses of Mr. Whitefield and the schoolmaster. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 687,p. 25.]
June 29.373 Petition of Trustees for Georgia to Council of Trade and Plantations. They understand that, following the hearing of a dispute between Georgia and Carolina, certain queries have been put to the Attorneyand Solicitor-General, one of whom has been employed and instructed at the said hearing as counsel for Carolina. They have entered a caveat with the Attorney-General that no report maybe made until they have been heard by counsel before him, and they now petition for a copy of the queries. Signed, Ferdinand John Paris, solicitor for the Trustees, ¾ p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 29 June 1737. [C.O. 5, 366,fos. 1–2d.]
June 30.
Georgia Office.
374 Harman Verelst to Rev. George Whitefield. I have received orders for clothing for you and the schoolmaster. [Details given.] The Trustees desire to know if the schoolmaster expects a salary or only food and raiment or if he can subsist himself. As to the countrymen, one of them may have a lot of 50 acres at Frederica and the other may live with him; they may make what arrangements for sharing the crop as they think fit. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 22d.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
375 Council of Trade and Plantations to Duke of Newcastle, enclosing the following representation upon the new proposal from the French ministers. Entry. Signatories, Monson, T. Pelham, M. Bladen, R. Plumer.1 p. Enclosed,
375. i. Same to the King. The French ministers pretend to desire nothing but a perfect equality but we are of opinion that the abolishing the 3rd article of their edict of 1727 and making the others, which they call explanations of the treaty of 1686, together with that treaty, the rule of navigation will not answer that end; since, though the 3rd article should be repealed, yet by the 4th, 5th and 10th articles the French subjects are enjoined and commissions are directed to be given by the Admiral of France to fall on, seize and reduce by force of arms all ships whatever found within a league of any of the French islands or within any of their ports, creeks or roads, and by the 11th ships even in distress are confined to certain ports specified by name and excluded under pain of confiscation all others.
We are also of opinion that the edict, in the 12th 13th , 14th , 15th and 16th articles all relating to the subject of the nth and in those beforementioned, takes away the equality that subsists between the two crowns by virtue of the Treaty of Neutrality of 1686 in the fifth article of which it is expressly stipulated that the navigation for the subjects of both crowns ought in no manner to be disturbed where nothing is committed against the genuine sense of that treaty, which is explained by a prohibition clearly specified to drive any commerce or trade or to fish in the havens, creeks, roads, shoals or places possessed or which shall be possessed by each other in America; and in the 6th that in cases of distress either from weather, pirates or enemies or any other urgent necessity, the ships of war or merchantmen of either nation shall not only be permitted to enter into any of the rivers, creeks, bays, havens, roads, ports and shores of either's dominions in America, but shall be received and treated there with all humanity and kindness stipulations of a very different nature from the regulations of the articles in the edict abovementioned; and particularly so in the case of ships in distress on which we observe that there is no such thing as choice of ports and that a ship in any of the distresses specified cannot consider what ports are open to them by virtue of the nth article of the edictof 1727 but what are most immediately necessary for their preservation; and this seems to have been the sense of the French ministers at their conference with Lord Waldegrave although the words of the edict are express against it.
We cannot advise you to agree to the French proposal of repealing and abolishing the 3rd article of the edict and letting the other articles which they call explanatory of that treaty remain as a rule of navigation. As we are very apprehensive that any new regulation may tend to enervate the treaty of 1686 which seems to us to have been very maturely considered and wisely calculated to prevent all depredations and causes of misunderstanding in America, we repeat what we said in the conclusion of our report to you of 21 April last and are still of opinion: that all matters continue upon the foundation of the said treaty with the addition only of a specification of what shall be deemed sufficient proof of illegal trade and what shall be the form of proceedings thereon, that the French should repeal their edict and that mutual restitution should be made not only of the vessels named in the French proposals but of all others on both sides taken since the French edict of 1727 where there has not been substantial proof of illegal trade made against them. Entry. Signatories, as covering letter. 5 pp. [C.O. 153, 16,fos. 59–61d; originals of both documents in C.O. 5,5,fos. 137–141d.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
376 Council of Trade and Plantations to Duke of Newcastle transmitting drafts of commissions to Lord Delawarr to be Governor of New York and New Jersey with representation thereon. Entry. Signatories, Monson, T. Pelham, M. Bladen, R. Plumer. 1 p. Enclosed,
376. i. 30 June, Whitehall. Same to the King enclosing drafts mentioned in covering letter. They are in the usual form. The necessary instructions will be prepared with all possible dispatch. Entry. Signatories, as covering letter. 1 p.
376. ii. Draft of the commissions to Lord Delawarr. Entry. 22½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1126,fos. 21d-31d.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
377 Same to same, enclosing draft of commission for Edward Trelawny to be governor of Jamaica, with representation thereon. Entry, Signatories, M. Bladen, Monson, R. Plumer, T. Pelham. ½ p. [C.O. 13818,p. 108.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
378 Same to the King, transmitting draft of a commission for Edward Trelawny to be governor of Jamaica, which is in the usual form. We shall prepare the necessary instructions for him with all possible dispatch. Entry. Signatories, Monson, T. Pelham, M. Bladen, R. Plumer. 1 p. Enclosed,
378. i. Draft of the commission mentioned in covering letter. Entry. 19½ pp.[C.O. 138, 18, pp. 109–129; original of covering letter in C.O. 5, 196, fos. 218–219d.]
June 30.
London.
379 Edward Trelawny to Duke of Newcastle. What condition Jamaica was in before H.M. sent to its relief six independent companies from Gibralter appears by the address which the governor, council and assembly transmitted to the king in February 1734. [See Cal. S.P. Col., 1734–35 No.55.]What the present condition is will best appear from the last address of the president, council and assembly transmitted in November last. [See No. 156 ii.] These two addresses set forth the distressed condition of the island with regard to the rebellious blacks only. But when I consider the situation of Jamaica, that it is a frontier place surrounded as it were with the settlements of France and Spain, as also its importance to Great Britain(the sugar-trade and indeed the whole trade of the West Indies chiefly depending upon its preservation) I am fully persuaded that you will not be of opinion to take a step of such consequence to Jamaica as the withdrawing half the forces from thence without being moved to it by the legislature of the island, who you may be assured will be glad to save the subsistence money they pay to the soldiers as soon as their safety will allow them to do it. Signed. 4 pp. Enclosed,
379. i. Memorial of same to same. An application having been made for the removal to Georgia of the forces now in Jamaica, the memorialist represents the distressed condition of Jamaica resulting from the rebellious negroes. The negroes were much emboldened by their success before the arrival of these troops, and the government of the island being unable to send forces against the rebels was obliged to put the colony under martial law with many inconveniences. Following the address of the governor, council and assembly to H.M. in February 1734, six companies of 100 men were sent, with consequent improvements in the condition of Jamaica. Much, however, remains to be done, and to reduce the number of troops now would be to deliver the island to the blacks. There is nowhere that wants troops more than Jamaica and no place of such importance to this kingdom. The negroes in many of the British plantations have of late been possessed of a dangerous spirit of liberty. They have actually risen in Antigua and have threatened to do it in the rest of the sugar-plantations. Should the negroes in subjection at Jamaica fall into the same way of thinking, Jamaica must instantly be lost to the whites if they have not some forces upon whose assistance they can rely, there being no manner of proportion between the blacks and whites in this island, there not being in the whole island above 8000 whites of which not above 1000 are masters of families or have any property; and the negroes in the exactest computation exceed 80,000 besides those in rebellion whose numbers are not less than 2000. 8 pp.
379. ii. Anonymous, undated paper 'Reasons for continuing the companies at Jamaica'. [In same hand as covering letter.] Even if the dangers from the rebels are not as great as have been apprehended, the presence of the soldiers relieves the inhabitants from going out against the negroes in parties and takes away the necessity of martial law. The fact that the soldiers have committed insults on the inhabitants, which may occasion two or three planters to be against them, is owing to the want of power of holding courts-martial extending to death, without which it is impossible for the officers to retain the soldiers as they ought to be. This may be remedied by making the governor a field-officer. 2½ pp. [This document is filed with the two preceding but may not be an enclosure.] [C.O. 137, 56,fos. 74–84d.]

Footnotes

1 This entry is wrongly addressed to John Yeamans.
2 See No. 366.
3 MS: Wese le.