America and West Indies
November 1737

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Institute of Historical Research

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K. G. Davies (editor)

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1963

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270-288

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'America and West Indies: November 1737', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 43: 1737 (1963), pp. 270-288. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72914 Date accessed: 17 September 2014.


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November 1737

November 2.
Jamaica.
558 President John Gregory to Council of Trade and Plantations, transmitting journals and minutes of council and assembly. I likewise send the answer of the four gentlemen who withdrew from the council to the letter of admonition which was sent them; since which time no council has sat to advise upon it. Nor indeed shall I proceed any further in it since Mr. Trelawny is daily expected; and, since it has been under consideration of you and H.M.'s Council and I have received no instructions either approving or disapproving that conduct, I wish it may not give countenance to such proceedings here for the future. By Mr. Needham's declining to be of the council, Mr. Mill's long illness, and Mr. Campbell's great distance, I have it seldom in my power to get a council. And I not only lose that assistance but the public suffers by delay of justice. For several writs of error are depending before the council; they cannot be heard without a quorum of five and as the attorney-general is concerned in most of them we are still less able to form a council for that particular.
I thank God the country is pretty quiet at present. But the rebels who were formerly driven from the north-east parts are again returned; they have begun to stir and I fear will again grow troublesome. That part of the country is very weak in inhabitants: to remedy that misfortune I have placed two entire companies and one-half of another there. But as I have often acquainted you, the soldiers are only fit for the open ground and not able to pursue them in the woods. I do not say this as if I would join with those that would insinuate the soldiers were useless; I am so far from that opinion that I really think there should be an addition, at least these companies always kept complete and some better regulation as to the trial of such as misbehave. When the large extent of this country is considered, the small number of white inhabitants, in the whole little exceeding 8000, and the disproportion of the slaves, being above 80,000 besides those in rebellion, our being encompassed with powerful neighbours, it is matter of surprise that it should admit of a dispute whether the soldiers are necessary to be kept there. There is no accounting for the humours of particular persons who may represent otherwise, but I hope such private informations will not influence, and that proper regard will be had to the representation of the person who is entrusted with the government especially when he happens to receive no profit from the soldiery but is at a good deal of trouble in hearing their complaints and keeping them in order. As this affair will probably have received its determination long before this can have reached you I shall not enlarge upon it or add to the reasons which have been given at home for continuing the soldiers otherwise than by saying it would be a real hardship and injury to recall those troops since by express instructions from H.M. communicated by you they have had the liberty of recruiting here and a third of these companies do now consist of people properly belonging to this country. Signed. Endorsed, Recd. 26 January, Read 7 February 1737/8. 2½ small pp. Enclosed,
558. i. Edward Charlton, Henry Dawkins, William Gordon and Temple Lawes to Samuel Williams, clerk of the council of Jamaica, 15 August 1737. We shall not trouble to enquire whether the president has power to suspend us nor shall we enter into any fresh detail of his extraordinary conduct. We have represented our case to H.M.'s principal secretary of state; we intend neither disrespect to the council, the obstruction of public affairs, nor anything to incur H.M.'s displeasure. With submission to H.M.'s commands, we determine never to give our attendance at the board during Mr. Gregory's administration. Copy, certified by Samuel Williams, clerk of council. 1 p. Endorsed, as covering letter. [C.O. 137, 2.2, fos. 160–162d.]
November 2.
Savannah.
559 William Stephens to Trustees for Georgia. I wrote you 26th ult. From Charleston a short account of my proceedings so far comprehending very little action m so long a space of time. By reason of Capt. Reid's coming in I was glad to wait one day longer there than I designed in order to take what packets he might have for Georgia (as I then wrote) and having those delivered to me by Mrs. Jenys I set sail on Friday 28th in the morning but by reason of little winds and those southerly we made it yesterday (1 November) before we could reach this place, where having landed all our people and delivered your several packets safely I take the opportunity by the return of the schooner which is upon haste to send this by way of appendix to my former hoping it will come timely enough to Charleston to go by the same ship. The few hours I have been here have already plainly shown me that a spirit of discord or discontent (I scarce know what to call it) is spread among these people who under colour of divers hardships which they allege they sustain meet in parties and cabal how to rectify and reform matters according to their several caprices. Some of these complaints I presume may already appear before you in different lights as I hear they are set forth, and I promise myself that I may in due time receive your opinion thereon for my better guidance. In the meanwhile I shall do all that is in my power to reconcile such contentions and endeavour by all means to come at the truth of those springs which have occasioned them, when I shall lay them before you with the utmost impartiality. I expect to hear shortly of another ship sailing for London from Carolina when I foresee I shall not want matter to be more copious. I shall forward the dispatches and recruits for Frederica etc. in the south by a perriagua which is going hence in a day or two. We hear no news yet of Capt. Thomson. Signed, 1 p. [C.O. 5, 639, fos. 418–419d.]
November 3.560 Letter from Thomas Pelham. I am directed by my lord duke to send you the enclosed petition of Mr. Shirley which you are desired to take with you into Norfolk and there show it to his grace that he and Mr. Pelham may find an opportunity of conversing with Sir Robert on the subject of it. I wish you would remind my lord duke of Mr. Whitmore's request, vizt. that his brother, Roger Whitmore now on board Capt. Smyth under the command of Commodore Clinton may succeed to a lieutenant on board the same ship who is willing to quit the lieutenantship provided the commodore will recommend him to be put on the half pay. I am just now setting out for Sussex. Signed. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 752, fos. 318–319d.]
November 4.
Georgia Office.
561 Harman Verelst to Thomas Hawkins at Frederica. Major William Cook having presented the colony with 16 different sorts of vine cuttings from prance [particulars given], General Oglethorpe directed me to send them to you. If the soil is strong, white grapes are proper; but for blue, a white sand. Entry. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 44d.]
November 5.
Georgia Office.
562 Same to Thomas Causton, by the King George, Capt. Jacob Ayers. The Trustees now not only repeat their directions for your being very kind to the German families mentioned in letter of 17 September but order you to acquaint the said families of the instructions you now receive, which are that all the said German families bound to the Trust who can within six weeks after their arrival on your receipt hereof repay their passage and the charges amounting to 6l. 2s. 6d. sterling for each head, either by their own ability or by procuring themselves masters who will pay it for them (provided that each family do continue to remain together and are not proposed to be divided) shall be discharged from their indentures and be at liberty to settle themselves in Georgia or to go from thence as they shall think fit; and the Trustees direct you to be very careful in your conduct to them that they may have no cause of complaint. These families were by compulsion contracted with Messrs. Hopes at Rotterdam to carry them to Philadelphia, were ill-used in their voyage to Cowes and complained thereof to H.M., copy of their petition herewith sent. The king referred this petition to General Oglethorpe to examine into the allegations thereof who took great pains therein and made a report, copy herewith. Whereupon the merchant having consented to alter the voyage and several of the Germans being inclined to go to Georgia, Capt. Dunbar was sent to Cowes to indent so many of them as were willing to go to Georgia with an agreement for such families to be discharged from their indentures as could repay their passage and charges as above.
The other families on board the Three Sisters go to settle in Carolina, among which there is Hans Jacob Ham and his family who had paid a considerable part of his and his family's passage in Holland consisting of four heads whereof John Jacob Vanomaker, his servant, was one who with his master's consent indented himself to the Trustees and for whom you are to pay the said Ham 2l. 12s 6d. sterling for half-freight of his said servant which he paid in Rotterdam and which the Trustees will deduct from the owner here out of the freight they are to pay; and you are to discharge the said Ham from being liable to the owner for the other half of the said freight, which the Trustees are liable for in case the said servant arrives in Georgia. Herewith you receive translated copies of five receipts for money paid Messrs. Hope at Rotterdam in part of their passage; the sterling money of each receipt is set against each sum and you are to repay the said sums to the persons who have paid the same and certify that you have done so that the Trustees may deduct such sums from the owner. The whole sum of the five receipts is 32l. 13s. 10d. sterling.
By the Georgia pink, John Evan was sent over as a servant bound to the Trust and his indenture was also sent you. If John Burton at Savannah can pay you for the Trustees' use 6l 5s. sterling for the passage, bedding and clothing of the said Evan you may let him have him, Mr. Burton's wife having applied for two servants to be sent for him to pay the charge of on their arrival in Georgia, whereof the said Evan may be one; and if you can help Mr. Burton to another manservant on his paying the expense thereof the Trustees would have you supply him. Herewith you receive memorial of Robert Hay's grant mentioned in letter to you of 10 October. The memorial of Mr. Amory's grant is enclosed to him, he having paid for it. John West when he was in England gave his note to the Trustees for 10l. which was due 29 September last being the consideration money mentioned in the grant of 500 acres of land to Elizabeth West, his wife, the widow of the late Joseph Hughes, who surrendered to the Trustees her right in the 50-acre lot of her said late husband. Copy of that note is herewith sent you; you are to demand payment thereof or discount it in Mr. West's account of work and let the Trustees know when you have so done that they may send Mr. West his note and enter the receipt in their books. The Trustees have lately heard of William Harris's behaviour to Mr. Plumsted his master in London and therefore think it necessary to direct you to dismiss him from any service under you in the Trustees' store or otherwise, and that you do not on any account whatsoever employ or trust him any more wherein the Trustees are concerned. [Orders concerning the provisioning of the inhabitants at Frederica and the Darien in No. 522 are repeated.] David Zeizberger goes by this ship to his father, David Zeizberger, one of the Moravians at Savannah; he and John Michael Schaub, his acquaintance, are to be sent to the rest of the Moravians and put under the direction of their chiefs. These boys with the following parcels are consigned to Messrs. Crokatt and Seaman to be forwarded to you (Mr. John Crokatt going in the ship with them): a case with linen, medicines and books to be sent to Mr. Bolzius for the Salzburghers; a bale containing 1511½ yards of lindseys for clothing for German and other servants belonging to the Trust (except the Scottish who are other ways clothed); a bale containing 150 blankets for the said servants; a box directed to John Platrier, servant to William Stephens; a case directed to Charles Carter, servant to Mr. Wesley; a box directed to you containing 300 sola bills of 1l., A. 2001–2200 and 2401–2500, to be issued by you for the use of the colony according to the established allowances and the orders you have received, which Gen. Oglethorpe has on the back of each directed you to issue; a basket of vine-cuttings to be sent to Thomas Hawkins at Frederica. Messrs. Crokatt and Seaman have instructions to draw on the Trustees for the expense of sending these boys and parcels from Charleston. Entry. 3½ pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 45–46d.]
November 5.
Georgia Office.
563 Harman Verelst to Messrs. Crokatt and Seaman, merchants at Charleston. The parcels in the enclosed bill of lading are to be forwarded to Thomas Causton, together with the two German boys, David Zeizberger and John Michael Schaub. Draw on the Trustees for expenses. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 66j, fos. 46d, 47.]
November 5.
Charleston.
564 Elizabeth Jenys, widow and executrix of Paul Jenys, to [Trustees for Georgia], acknowledging receipt of goods consigned to Mr. Jenys, also five recruits and some servants. These people sailed from here 28th ult.: I have this day drawn on you for 23l. 16s. 8d. sterling payable to Thomas Jenys 30 days after sight for disbursements for them as by enclosed account. On 25 th ult. arrived the Charles, Capt. James Reid, by whom I received a letter from Mr. Verelst and a box and paper parcel which I gave into Mr. Stephens's hands to deliver to Mr. Causton. It is with great pleasure I observe that Mr. Jenys's conduct in the unhappy disputes between the two colonies is approved by you. I hope you will make the like use of this house as you did in Mr. Jenys's lifetime. Signed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 640, fo. 2.]
November 7.
Boston.
565 Governor Jonathan Belcher to Council of Trade and Plantations, complaining of having received no reply to his letters of 28 December 1736, 2 March, 10 May, 12 May, 14 June, 11 July 1737. H.M.'s commissioners appointed to settle the boundaries between the two provinces met at Hampton the 14th of last month, at which I met the assemblies of the two provinces. Massachusetts entered their appeal from the judgment of the commissioners but the assembly of New Hampshire could not agree to enter any appeal or to raise any more money to expend in this affair. The secretary of the province is now making out under the seal all the proceedings of that assembly which I shall transmit by the next ship to you, as also the journal of the house of representatives of this province which, together with the return H.M.'s commissioners will make of their doings, will fully inform you of all that has passed here relating to the boundaries of the two provinces.
I have letters from some of my friends at Whitehall that say some busy person or other has been complaining to your Board of my consenting to the issuing bills of credit in this province of a new tenour for the support of the government and that it was an elusion and infraction on my 16th instruction. As this has been lodged some time at your Board I suppose you have not thought it worth notice or I should have heard of it. Yet that it may make no impression on you to my prejudice I must set this matter in a true light. And in order to it I must go back to the time of my receiving my instructions from your Board in January 1729/30. Before they were fully completed and when I returned them I well remember that the late Lord Westmoreland, then President at the Board, asked me what money might be necessary to defray the yearly charge of the Massachusetts government. I answered that for some years before my coming away it had been commonly 20–25,000l. a year. He said to issue 30,000l. a year in bills of credit would be fully sufficient: the secretary was accordingly directed to put down that sum. And then I was asked what might be enough for New Hampshire: I said I was not much acquainted with the circumstances of that province but thought 6,000l. a year might be sufficient, which was accordingly put down. By this it must plainly appear that H.M.'s instruction always intended there should be issued from time to time bills of credit sufficient for the annual support and service of the government, but no more; nor have I exceeded such a sum (communibus annis) and at New Hampshire I have never issued a third part of the sum mentioned in H.M.'s instruction, the support and service of the government not requiring it. While there is no silver or gold in these provinces it is impossible the governments can subsist without bills of credit.
I think what I have said must clear up the sense of this instruction; and as to the words which are 'For striking bills of credit and issuing out the same in lieu of money etc' and again, 'not exceeding 30,000l. in such paper bills', I think I have kept myself within the words, which do not at all say what sort of bills or of what value they must be, but only 'bills of credit'. Besides, when I arrived to the government, 30,000l. in bills of credit would go as far to defraying the charge of the government as 45,000l. of those bills will now, so much are they sunk in their value; or to take the other way what was 30,000l. then is now hardly 20,000l.; and yet the government must be supported. And as the province has constantly been growing so has the charge of it in proportion, and to tell the people the government must be supported and the charge of it paid without letting them have wherewith to do it I could really expect no other answer from the assemblies but that I was an Egyptian taskmaster commanding them to make brick without straw. The weak and insufficient foundation of the bills of credit before this new sort has been such that they have been one continual fraud and oppression on all the officers of the government and a flagrant injustice to all persons trading hither from Great Britain as well as to the inhabitants of the province and to the affairs of it in general; and this has been the constant complaint of H.M.'s governors for near 25 years past, who have frequently recommended the serious consideration of these evils to the several assemblies and the taking of some proper methods to deliver the province from the embarrassments they were under; and thereupon committees have been raised from time to time who have reported various projections for effecting this important end, but in nothing of this kind could the two houses agree till the last year when they laid the foundation of their bills of credit for the future in silver and gold, the want of which in the first bills was generally allowed to be the cause of their losing their value. Yet a number of persons who were commonly great debtors found their particular account in this public calamity by their creditors being defrauded of one half at least of their just due. But as to these new bills the possessors at their periods will be entitled to their value in silver or gold, and from this good groundwork these bills have already operated to the lowering of the exchange betwixt London and this place 50 or 60 per cent., and this advantage will gradually increase till the time that the bills may be paid off. The generality of the people in this province (especially the wealthiest and most prudent) are well satisfied in this change of the bills and those that are dissatisfied are such as will hardly ever be pleased with the proceedings of any good government. It seems to me a high presumption that a few private persons of restless spirits should complain to H.M. of the public Acts of the legislature of the province which are duly transmitted and submitted to the consideration and correction of much wiser heads than their's.
This is what occurs to me at present for justifying my proceedings in the affair of the bills of the new tenour; and if I were knowing of the particular exceptions taken against me or against them I believe it would give me no great trouble to make a very good answer. But as I am entirely ignorant of what is objected it is not possible I should particularly obviate everything that may be devised by disaffected persons. I hope for your full approbation of what I have done towards a reform of the vile bills of credit that have been issued in this province for about 30 years past; and no governor before has been able to provide any remedy for this evil. Signed. 14 small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 19 December 1737, Read 10 February 1737/8. [C.O. 5, 880, fos. 114–121d; abstract at fo. 113, 113d.]
November 7.
Boston.
566 Governor Jonathan Belcher to Duke of Newcastle. [In substance same as No. 565.] Signed. 12 small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 20 December. Enclosed, 566, i. Journal of House of Representatives of Massachusetts, 12 October 1737–25 October 1737. Printed. 16pp. [C.O. 5, 899, fos. 280–293d.]
November 8.
Virginia.
567 Lieut.-Govemor William Gooch to Council of Trade and Plantations. Lord Fairfax about the end of September very privately embarked in Rappahannock river in the very last ship bound from thence for London, leaving behind him a letter to be sent me notifying his departure but without communicating the report drawn up by his commissioners or giving me or the king's commissioners a view of the map of his boundaries prepared by his surveyors, though in point of decency towards H.M. I expected it, whose interest is concerned; and with regard to myself, considering his lordship's own expedition in this affair, since it has been a standing rule well-known and long observed by you to receive no representation from abroad relating to any matter of government or public concernment but through the hands of the governor for the time being, unless such representation contained matter of complaint against the governor or that he refused to convey it, neither of which I am sure his lordship will tax me with. I would not be understood as if I desired he should not be admitted to a hearing on his pretensions without a previous communication made to me of his commissioners' report and surveyors' map; but I hope I shall be excused if I caution you against giving too easy credit in points where the reports and maps differ, because it is doing justice to the gentlemen employed for H.M. to allow them an opportunity of vindicating their conduct.
I am further to beg you that in case H.M. shall extend his favour so far as to include any of the bounds in dispute in a new grant to his lordship, a just regard may be had to the possessors of those lands who held by surveys and patents under the crown so as to leave them the quiet enjoyment of their possessions on the same terms they now hold them.
The crops of tobacco and corn have suffered very much by the drought of last summer, especially the latter, insomuch that it has been judged necessary to prohibit the export of Indian corn until June next, without which the labouring people especially the slaves could not be subsisted; and Col. Armistead has not made above 60 gallons of wine. Account of revenue of 2s. per hogshead enclosed. Signed. 2 pp. Endorsed, Recd. 28 February, Read 1 March 1737/8. Enclosed,
567. i. Account of H.M.'s revenue of zs. per hogshead arising within this colony of Virginia, 25 April 1737–25 October 1737. Balance brought forward, 4244l. 2s. iid. Receipts, 4012l. 5s. 10½d. Disbursements, 2833l. os. 7d. Balance remaining, 5423l. 8s. 2½d. Signed, John Grymes, Receiver-General. Audited by John Blair, Deputy Auditor, 3 November 1737. Passed by William Gooch. 2 pp. Endorsed, as covering letter. [C.O. 5, 1324, fos. 100–103d.]
November 9.
Palace Court.
568 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Mr. Paris presented a copy of the report of the Council of Trade and Plantations to the Privy Council on the hearing of the cause between the Trustees and the government of South Carolina. Resolved, that Mr. Paris prepare a petition to the Committee of Privy Council for the Trustees to be heard by counsel against the said report. Received, from Major William Cook, 16 different sorts of vine cuttings from France being his benefaction for the colony. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 687, p. 44.]
November 9.569 Memorial of President, Council and Assembly of Bermuda to the King, praying for supply of powder and ammunition. That ordered nearly 40 years ago is now spent and the inhabitants so reduced by taxes paid for repair of the castle and several forts that they are not able to raise money to purchase the same. We embrace this opportunity to offer our congratulations on the birth of the princess. Signed, Andrew Auchinleck and five councillors, Nathaniel Bascome, speaker, and 25 assemblymen. 1 large p). [C.O. 37, 29, fo 79.]
November 9.
Whitehall.
570 Council of Trade and Plantations to Duke of Newcastle transmitting drafts of instructions for the Earl of Albemarle, Governor of Virginia, with representation thereon to be laid before H.M. Entry. Signatories, Monson, T. Pelham, J. Brudenell, Arthur Croft, R. Plumer. 1 p. Enclosed,
570. i. 9 November 1737. Same to the King enclosing draft of instructions for the Earl of Albemarle, Governor of Virginia. We have made no alterations or omissions from such general instructions as you have already approved to your other governors in America, except leaving out the 14th article relating to the salary of assemblymen which we omitted because it has been settled by an Act passed there in 1730. Entry. Signatories, as covering letter. 1 p.
570. ii. General instructions and instructions relating to the Acts of Trade and Navigation for the Earl of Albemarle, Governor of Virginia. Entry. 117 pp. [C.O. 5, 1366, pp. 169–287.]
November 12.
St. Christopher's.
571 Governor William Mathew to Alured Popple. I have delivered to Capt. Cottingham a box containing duplicates of papers sent by Capt. Snelling. [See No. 546] I send witn tnese fa minutes of assembly of St. Christopher's, 5 April 1736–5 March 1736/7. Signed. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 27 January, Read 15 February 1737/8. Enclosed,
571. i. Duplicates of No. 546 i.–viii. above. [C.O. 152, 23, fos. 99–123d.]
November 12.
Charleston.
572 Robert Bathurst to Lord Bathurst. I acknowledge myself in fault for not writing to you before. But being in Georgia I was sure that all my letters would have been stopped especially by reason that I am obliged to let you know of the ill treatment our family has received in that colony. For when my dear mother lay on her deathbed we had no boat to go down to Savannah to get necessaries for her and I wrote to my sister to go to Mr. Causton to get something for my mother but he would let her have nothing but one bottle of Madeira wine which you must think was poor comfort for a woman on her deathbed. After her death my father was persuaded to marry again to an old gentlewoman of kin to the Duke of Chandos and was told she had a great deal of money and such other falsities; but on the contrary she brought us much in debt which after my father's death I and my brotherin-law Piercy were obliged to pay. After my mother's death we very often wanted necessaries, and when my dear father lay upon his deathbed we sent to Mr. Causton but he would let us have nothing. But when he heard that my father was dying he came to him to sign the bill that was sent to you and according to my father's desire I signed it but against my will; for there were several things charged in it that we never had of him, of which I made him give me a copy, here enclosed; and then he desired we would let my father want for nothing that he could help us to when he knew it was too late.
After my father's death Causton would never let me have anything nor had I ever a farthing's worth of him by reason I had no money to pay for it which I must lay to Causton's charge. For the first year we planted, the Trustees' horses broke into the plantation and destroyed all our corn although our fence was judged by all that saw it to be lawful; and when I went to complain of it to Mr. Causton (because there was nobody else to complain to) he laughed at it and said he would not be troubled about it, which you must know was no honest part of a chief magistrate who ought to do everybody justice. The second year we planted, [we] were served the same by the postman Mr. Elbert's horses, and Causton served us the same again; and the third and last year we were served the same again by the Indians who Causton encouraged to do me all the mischief possible for they destroyed my corn and hogs, and although it was in Causton's power to send them away he would not. My father died 19 December 1736 and on 21st Causton sent and took from me a maid-servant whom I had by my motherin-law although she had a long time to serve to me, which you may judge whether that was honesty or not by her indentures, here enclosed. So I finding that I was never likely to get anything by staying in that place (to have everything I had destroyed), by the persuasion of those friends I had there I resolved to leave it; in order to which I tried to dispose of my household goods and servants to buy me common necessaries and carry me away from Georgia, which when Causton understood he said that everything we had belonged to the Trustees. I told him that could not be, for you gave us the servants and that you paid for everything else. He said it was no such thing, for every pennyworth we had belonged to the Trustees (but you very well know the contrary) and he bound my brother Piercy in a bond of 30l. sterling to appear the next court to answer for the selling the Trustees' servants (for so he termed mine). But my brother-in-law seeing before so many examples of injustice done by Causton, by the persuasion of our friends we left the place. For although he could justly have answered that offence (as Causton termed it) yet he feared as he had reason that Causton would contrive something or other to make him stay in the colony which we can call no other than a prison; for Causton has stayed a great many people in that place pretending they owed money or had done some great fault or other.
I was told by a gentleman in Georgia that Mr. Oglethorpe told him that you had paid 50l. for us for the first year, 20l. for the second, and would pay 10l. for 7 years after. But if you do pay it I cannot tell what it is for; for since my father's death I never had anything. I never heard from you since I have been from England but when you sent us the other servant which Causton also calls the Trustees'. However things may be misrepresented to you I cannot tell, but I am sure I had just reason to leave it to save my life, for I really believe my father and mother both died for want of proper necessaries and had I stayed, perhaps my own had been the same case; for when I lay ill the time my father married I had nothing to eat or drink or to take but bread and water. So after all this ill usage, as I think I may well call it, I left Georgia with my brother-in-law and sister Piercy, and on 30 September 1737 we came to Charleston in hopes to better ourselves leaving a good plantation behind me in Georgia with nobody to take care of it for Causton said it belonged to the Trustees, but I very well know to the contrary. Had you known the place to be such as I to my sorrow find it is I am very well assured you would never have sent us there and the money that you spent upon us there would have put me into a way whereby to get my living, and now I have nothing to depend upon to get my bread but the hard labour of my hands. I am sorry that whatever you have yet done for our family has had no success, and if you please ever to do any more for me (but I am ashamed to ask it for I very well know those things you have done for us are too many and to no effect), but if it please you to bestow anything upon me be it never so small value, it will be most gratefully acknowledged. Copy. PS. If you write or send anything you may direct to R. Bathurst to be left at Mr. Eveleigh's, merchant, on Charleston Bay, S. Carolina. 4 pp. Endorsed, Recd. Feb. 1737/8. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 4–5d.]
November 15.
Frederica.
573 John Mackintosh Moore to James Oglethorpe, congratulating him on his new honours. All the people of Darien are now in very good health and all alive except Hugh Clerk the tailor who died of a fever October last, and notwithstanding the false alarms they had last spring they have a very good crop, abour 370 bushels of corn besides pease and other things, though the hard duty and working at the fort brought them very low yet they went through with great courage and with intention never to quit the place alive. I have taken care that your orders should be punctually obeyed, as also of giving out the provisions as frugally as I could for the interest of the Trust without wrong done the people. Our being confined in such a small place as our fort brought great number of rats and mice which have destroyed some corn etc. with belts and cartouche boxes etc. Your usual fatherly care of us still appears and we all are very thankful. The servants you have ordered by the Two Brothers on their arrival shall be disposed according to Mr. Veriest's directions and what remains undisposed of shall be employed in sawing of boards for the public use. The arms shall be taken care of when they are sent to this place. I am here at Frederica with Mr. Horton in clearing my accounts which I believe will be finished this day: he is very careful of our place in visiting us, sending us what he can spare us, and in a word doing everything to keep up good harmony between us and the other settlements. The news of your soon setting out gives great encouragement and all join in prayers for your happy arrival. The cwt. of cheese Mr. Verelst advises me of I have now received and when I go up shall divide amongst the people as he directs. Signed. 2½ small pp. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 8–9d.]
November 15.
Frederica.
574 John Mackintosh Moore to Harman Verlest acknowledging letter of I2, August last. Darien is very much obliged to the Trustees for the care they seem to have about it The servants when they come shall be employed as you direct in every particular and the clothing that Mr. Causton has orders to send shall be given as you mention. Arms and ammunition are the soul of any place that wants to defend itself as we do. Those arms you intend to send for us shall be taken care of for the defence of the place: we want a smith very much, our arms being much out of order and many of them useless for want of a little help, which if convenient pray think of. I have received of Mr. Causton's sending the cwt. of cheese you advise and when I get home shall divide among Darien people. For your direction I have written by this opportunity to Mr. Oglethorpe. Mr. Horton and I are busy now about clearing Darien accounts which I hope will be finished this day. Signed. 1 small p. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 6–7d.]
November 15.
Frederica.
575 Harry Buckley to James Oglethorpe. I have fenced in my town-lot and built a clapboard hut upon it which encourages me to beg you to Speak to Mr. Towers for me for a servant and likewise for him to speak to my cousin Buckley which he told me he would do when I left England if I behaved myself well. Work and I cannot as yet rightly agree but hope that time with a little help will make it very agreeable to me. Signed. 1 ½ small pp. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 10–11d.]
November 16.
Palace Court.
576 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Received by Dr. Hales, 5l. 5s. benefaction of a gentlewoman for the use of the missionaries in Georgia. Read, a petition to the Committee of Privy Council praying for a day for hearing the Trustees by counsel against the report of Council of Trade and Plantations on the dispute between the Trustees and the government of South Carolina. Seal was affixed thereto, secretary to countersign. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 687, p. 45.]
November 16.577 Petition of Trustees for Georgia to Committee of Privy Council for Plantation Affairs praying for a day to hear them by counsel against the report of Council of Trade and Plantations of 14 September last. Entry, ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 670, p. 332.]
November 17.
Whitehall.
578 Thomas Hill to John Adams. Your petition was recommended as long ago as 1732 to Sir William Strickland, then Secretary at War, in the most favourable terms; since then nothing has been heard. I believe it will be necessary for you by some agent to remind the Secretary at War of it. Entry. 1 p. [C.O. 218, 2, pp. 343–344.]
November 17.
Whitehall.
579 Council of Trade and Plantations to Committee of Privy Council. Pursuant to your order of 29 July last we have considered the petition of John Hamilton. [See No. 429 i.] He has given us further explanations of his scheme. [See No. 5 50.] The usual quitrent to H.M. being 4s. proclamation money for 100 acres, it seems a little extraordinary that the people should submit to give onefifth part of the produce or 5l. a year for 100 acres to the petitioner. Besides which, as all the other propositions are too general and Mr. Hamilton does not think it convenient to explain to us how he shall carry the design into execution we cannot see any reason why H.M. should comply with the petition. Entry. Signatories, Monson, T. Pelham Arthur Croft, R. Plumer. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 401, pp. 241–244; draft in C.O. 5, 381, fos. 255–257d.]
November 17.
Falmouth.
580 John Savy to Duke of Newcastle. [In substance repeating claims and allegations of Spanish desigis on Georgia contained in Nos. 588 i. and ii.] patino promised 100 pistoles, a captain's commission and 1000 pieces-of-eight a year. Being at Havana I saw so much villainy against the interest of my God, my king and country that my conscience would never let me rest till I could get to England. Signed. 5 pp. [C.O. 5, 654, fos. 118–120d.]
November 17.
Jamaica.
581 President John Gregory to Duke of Newcastle. I hoped not to trouble you; but there is at present such clamour here against the hostilities lately committed by the Spaniards that my duty must not permit me to be silent. We have advice from Havana that a vessel of 24 guns under the King of Spain's commission has carried into that port several ships belonging to British subjects, particularly three laden in this island and homeward bound, the Loyal Charles, George and Dispatch. The pretence for seizing these ships was that they were in sight of Havana; and upon searching them, the first had on board some logwood (which was purchased in this island and is at present a growing commodity of the country), the second had some bar gold (which was taken in payment from the South Sea factors for slaves purchased by them for the Spaniards), the third likewise upon pretence of some Spanish dollars on board. It is very certain these ships were on their voyage from this place and had touched nowhere else for those commodities. But the least pretence is sufficient for the Spaniards; and they make no scruple of seizing whatever they can master. Our case is unhappy, our hands are tied up, we must tamely submit and have no remedy but complaining which is not always effectual at the court of Madrid.
The country has been likewise alarmed at some military preparations said to be making at Havana. But upon enquiry I find no other foundation for it than that they have lately received 400 soldiers from Old Spain. It is true we have reason to be easily alarmed after such hostilities. We have a large country very thinly inhabited; we cannot trust the generosity of the Spaniards and have cause to believe they would think a war will begin with a surprise of some offpart of this country. And we are the more liable to such apprehensions from the steps lately taken by such as have the command of H.M. ships on this station, which at present only consist of a 60-gun and 50-gun ship and a small sloop of 12 guns. To let you into my meaning I must inform you that the gentlemen of the Navy have made very different representations, according to their opinion or humour, of the harbour of Port Antonio. It was at first represented that the fortifying that place was of the greatest importance, as it certainly is for the security of the north side part of the country and the protection of our trade to windward. Upon this H.M. was pleased to purchase a place called Lynches Island which helps to form this harbour; great pains and expense have been bestowed on this place in erecting buildings and raising a line of guns for defence of the harbour. Here several navy stores were kept and H.M. ships did sometime careen. But of late it has been totally neglected, the workmen drawn off, the stores taken away, and the place so abandoned that it may become an easy reception to such as will think fit to possess it. This place lies within 24 hours sail of St. Jago de Cuba, and if the Spaniards should be disposed from thence only to land 500 men and tempt the rebel negroes who lie in the mountains within six miles of the place to join them, all the forces of this island could not possibly dislodge them; and it might cost H.M. the hazard and expense of a new conquest at least of this part of the country. It would have been much safer to the country it had never been settled than thus left exposed. You will be pleased to take in good part what I have said on this subject and make such use of it as you may judge advisable; it is certainly of consequence and such a contingency as should be carefully guarded against. Signed. 3½ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 2 March, duplicate received February. Duplicate (at fos. 67–68d) has following postscript dated 25 November 1737: Since the above, I have been attended by some of the merchants and enclose their representation. Whatever may be obtained in their favour must be by H.M.'s interposition. However, as soon as H.M. ships on this station come in (none being at present in harbour) I shall give it as my opinion to Capt. Fox who now commands to sail to Havana to demand restitution. How far his instructions in case of refusal will warrant him to proceed further, I am not a judge; for those gentlemen look upon themselves as under a distinct province and seldom think fit to consult ashore. I am very sorry to acquaint you there has been an exceeding great mortality among the inhabitants. We have also the misfortune of losing two gentlemen of the council, Mr. Hals and Mr. Garbrand. The number of acting councillors is now reduced to four, Campbell, Mill, Concanen and Philp. The first lives near 100 miles from the seat of government, the next is grown very infirm. If Mr. Trelawny delays coming there is an absolute necessity either to oblige those gentlemen who have withdrawn to act or supply their places. It is impossible for me upon the present footing to make a quorum pursuant to H.M.'s instructions, which must consist of five. And as the dispute between the council and myself lies before H.M. I shall not presume to determine it myself unless anything very extraordinary lays me under that necessity. Signed. Enclosed,
581. i. Representation of merchants of Kingston, Jamaica, to President Gregory. [See No. 595 iii.] 1 large p. [C.O. 137, 56, fos. 65–69d.]
November 19.
Whitehall.
582 Order of Committee of Council for Plantation Affairs, referring the enclosed to Council of Trade and Plantations. Seal. Signed, Tames Vernon. 1 p. Endorsed, Read., Read 23 November 1737. Enclosed,
582. i. Memorial of Governor Edward Trelawny to Committee of Council for Plantation Affairs. Desiring to encourage the exploitation of royal mines of gold and silver in Jamaica and doubting whether the words in his commission justify his making grants thereof, the memorialist submits whether it may not be proper for him to be given some further instruction thereon. Copy. 1½ pp. [C.O. 137, 22, fos. 147–149d.]
November 20.
London.
583 James Wimble to Duke of Newcastle, seeking letters of reprisal to retrieve losses sustained at the hands of the Spaniards, and also relief in the matter of a ship lost as a result of being pressed by Governor Woods Rogers. Illiterate. Signed. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 75 2, fos. 320–321d.]
November 21.
Whitehall.
584 Order of Privy Council directing that the names of Frederick, Prince of Wales and other members of the royal family be included in prayers in public services and occasional offices in the Plantations. Council of Trade and Plantations to prepare drafts of instructions. Signed, James Vernon. Seal. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 23 November 1737. [C.O. 323, 10, fos. 113–114d.]
[November 21.]585 [Duke of Newcastle] to all consuls and governors of Plantations, communicating news of the death of the Queen yesterday, 20 November. Draft. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 5, fos. 145b-146d; entry in C.O. 324, 37, pp. 89–92.]
November 23.
Palace Court.
586 Minutes of Common Council of Georgia. The accountant acquainted the Common Council that 770l. had been drawn for upon the Bank 26th last month for payment of 5 00l. in bills from Ireland on account of provisions bought there, 210l. for the sawmill and 60l. for 300 pairs of shoes; 430l. drawn the 9th inst. for payment of provisions, Indian guns and other things provided for this year's service in Georgia. Received certified accounts as follows: 166l. 19s. 4d. sterling stated to be due to Samuel Lacy for pettiaugua hire and provisions dated 22 August 1737; 381l4s. 5d. due to Francis Johonnot for provisions and necessaries dated 23 July 1737. Read a letter from Mr. Causton dated 10 August 1737 advising of two certified accounts dated 10 August 1737 to Messrs. Minis and Salomons for 141l. 18s. 10½d. and 317l. 15s. 11d., total 459l. 14s. 9½d., whereof the account for 317l. 15s. 11d. is come for payment. Read a letter from him dated 26 July 1737 advising of certified account to Benjamin Appelbe dated 26 July 1737 for 148l. 2s. 11½d. Received certified accounts as follows: Samuel Montaigut & Co. for 76l. 5s. 10d. for necessaries dated 21 July 1737; William Bellinger for 147l. for steers dated 1 August 1737. All which certified accounts received and advised of amount to 1379l. 7s. 4d. Ordered that they be examined by the accountant and paid if truly computed. Ordered that a draft be made on the Bank of England for 1379l. 7s. 4d. payable to Aid. Heathcote for payment of said bills; draft signed.>
Ordered that it be an instruction to the committee for sending over to Georgia the sola bills ordered to be made out 10 August last that they be careful of keeping back so many sola bills as the amount of any certified accounts that may hereafter come to hand and be dated after the arrival of William Stephens in Georgia who sailed the middle of August last with the established allowances; of which sola bills 1800l. part of 4850l. have been already sent and 3050l. remain; and that the said committee do also consider whether the supply of provisions and necessaries received in Georgia from July last to the time of William Stephens's arrival which is or shall be known will not be so far assisting to the colony as to lessen the necessity of sending the whole sola bills remaining, 500l. per month being the computed expenses abroad one month with another.
Sealed a grant of 500 acres of land in Georgia to George Preston junior of Valyfield in the county of Perth; secretary to countersign and sign a memorial thereof to be registered with the auditor of the plantations. Resolved that the said George Preston have leave to be absent during pleasure in consideration of his sending over ten servants to cultivate his land.
Sealed grants of 500 acres of land in Georgia each to Lieut.-Col. Cochran and Major Cook. Resolved that each soldier of Col. Oglethorpe's regiment shall have an allotment of five acres of land in Georgia to cultivate for his own use and benefit and shall hold the same during his continuance in H.M.'s service in Georgia. Resolved for a further encouragement to the said soldiers' good behaviour that each soldier who shall at the end of seven years' service from enlisting in the said regiment desire to quit H.M.'s service and shall have his regular discharge and shall settle in Georgia, shall on his commanding officer's certificate of good behaviour be entitled to a grant of 20 acres of land to hold to himself and his heirs male for ever. The said two resolutions to be sealed and the secretary to sign the same. 5½ pp. [C.O. 5, 690, pp. 113–118.]
November 23.
Palace Court.
587 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Received, a receipt from the bank for 5l. 5 s. by Dr. Hales. [See No. 576.] Received, same for 14l. 15s. 6d.paid in by William Tillard for the S.P.C.K. being so much expended in England by the Trustees for the Salzburghers in Georgia between 8 March 1736/7 and 3 November 1737. Read, a letter from Andrew Stone with a letter from John Savy dated Cadiz 22 October 1737 to the Trustees transmitted by Mr. Keene to Duke of Newcastle. [See No. 588 i.] Read, another letter from John Savy dated Falmouth 17 November 1737. [See No. 588 ii.] Ordered that the last letter and a copy of the first be immediately laid before Duke of Newcastle. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 687, pp. 46–47.]
November 23.
Georgia Office.
588 Benjamin Martyn to Duke of Newcastle acknowledging receipt of John Savy's letter dated at Cadiz 22 October 1737. The Trustees have since received another letter from John Savy dated at Falmouth 17th inst. giving a further account of the designs of the Spaniards against Georgia. Copies of both letters enclosed. The Trustees submit to you how a person who can give intelligence of such great importance to H.M.'s dominions may be brought up safely to London for his speedy examination. Signed. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
588. i. John Savy to Trustees for Georgia, Cadiz, 22 October 1737 (N.S.). I am married to Capt. Daniel Green's daughter in Charleston. Through debt I was obliged to go to Georgia. In June 1735 I sailed in the Two Brothers, Capt. William Thomson, in company with Mr. West and Mr. Sterling, the first vessel ever to come loaded from Georgia. In the English Channel, according to agreement, I was put on a French fishing boat who carried me to Dieppe, 19 August 1735. In Paris, being destitute, I applied to the Spanish Secretary who sent my letter (which was an account of the colony of Georgia) to Don Joseph Patino who brought me to Madrid to give a larger account and sent me away to Havana in order to go against Georgia. Last August the Spaniards sent 400 men for St. Augustine, and there is an order to the Viceroy of Mexico to send 1000 more. They have sent artillery, provisions and everything necessary to attack the said place in May next. I have surrendered myself to the captain of the Grampus who will carry me to the commodore of Gibralter from where I shall proceed to London. I go here by the name of Miguel Wall but my name is John Savy, nephew to John Lewis Paulham in Tokenhouse Yard, exchange broker. Copy. 2½ pp.
588. ii. Same to same, Falmouth, 17 November 1737. In my letter of 22 October (N.S.) I forgot to acquaint you of a ship that went away 20 October for Havana with two more engineers for St. Augustine and also a new governor that arrived in the two ships that brought the soldiers from Spain to Havana; nor did I give you an account of several English and Dutch ships taken by the Spaniards. One thing material I had forgot which is an order for four ships of war to be sent to the West Indies to join other four that are there, and said ships are to alarm the coast of Carolina or to attack Port Royal in order to stop succours from going to Georgia; one of the two I am sure is their intention but cannot say which for certain. This was all to be put in execution by 1 May next. The Grampus did not go to Gibralter; I shipped myself to Lisbon and there surrendered myself a prisoner. All I did with the Spaniards was only to know their secrets and to make the use I now do of them. Should you of your charity save my life I shall acquaint you how to take St. Augustine or Havana in case of a war with them. Copy. 3 pp. [CO. 5, 654, fos. 121–126d.]
November 23.589 Grant by the Trustees for Georgia to Lieut.-Col. James Cochran of 500 acres of land in Georgia. Entry. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 670,pp. 334–335.]
November 23.590 Same to Major William Cook of 500 acres of land in Georgia. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 670,p. 338.]
November 23.591 Same to George Preston junior of Valyfield in county of Perth, esquire, of 500 acres of land in Georgia. Entry. ¼ p. [C.O. 5, 670,p. 335.]
November 24.592 Petition of Chaloner Jackson, Collector of Customs at the Bahamas, to Council of Trade and Plantations. Petitioner has been to South Carolina to collect evidence and is now ready to deliver the depositions of several witnesses to the truth of the allegations in his complaint. He prays for relief for himself and also for consideration of his fellow sufferers, the whole colony of the Bahamas, and especially H.M.'s garrison, some of whom are since deprived of their lives by colour of case. Signed. 1½ pp. Endorsed, Recd. Read 24 November 1737. [C.O. 23, 4, fos. 19, 19d, 21, 21d.]
November 24.593 Observations submitted to the Council of Trade and Plantations by John Yeamans and others on the French proposals concerning trade in America. [See No. 552 ii. and iii.] Some of the most material points we put before you are passed over by the French, particularly the method of proceedings. We cannot ever agree that an intention only of carrying on illicit trade should be a sufficient cause to confiscate ship and cargo unless the intention is made manifest by some overt act: what constitutes an overt act we apprehend is sufficiently explained in articles 5 and 6 of the treaty of 1686. The French proposals do not touch upon the illicit trade between French and English at St. Lucia and at the neutral ports of St. Eustatius, St. Thomas and Curagao: unless this is stopped other remedies will be of little consequence. The French governors should be forbidden to grant permission to trade contrary to the treaty, and English and French governors should be directed to give notice to one another of vessels carrying on illegal trade at neutral ports. As to the ports to be open to English vessels, we offer it as the sense of the merchants and traders that the treaty of 1686 ought not to be altered in this particular. But if any alteration be thought proper, we hope that the ports of Donna Maria Bay and Tiburon otherwise Allagatta or Irish Bay in St. Domingue be among those specified in the agreement. The French proposals make the freedom to enter other ports in case of necessity fruitless by the absurd condition of having leave in writing; the distress may be too urgent. And if the governor refuses permission it is really giving him notice to come and take the ship. The treaty of 1686 makes full provision for such accidents and we hope you will not advise any alteration. The repeal of such parts of the edict of 1727 as relate to British trade ought to be part of any convention to be made. We have already laid before you the sense of the merchants on the restitution of vessels taken under the Montserrat Act and the French edict. Governors on each side ought to have the same powers and be under the same restraints. Signed, John Sharpe, John Yeamans, Thomas Butler senior, Richard Coope. 2½ pp. Endorsed, Recd., Read 24 November 1737. [C.O. 152, 23,fos. 65–66d.]
November 24.
Whitehall.
594 Council of Trade and Plantations to the King, transmitting the follow ing. Entry. Signatories, Monson, James Brudenell, T. Pelham, R. Plumer. 1½ pp Enclosed,
594. i. Draft of additional instruction to all H.M.'s governors in America prescribing form of prayer for the royal family. Entry. 2½ pp. [CO. 324, 12, pp. 232–236.]
November 25.
Jamaica.
595 President John Gregory to Council of Trade and Plantations, transmitting a representation of merchants, likewise laid before the Duke of Newcastle. I think it carries so much truth, reason and justice that I can add nothing to it but my good wishes that it may have its proper effect. About four months since I sent you an information on oath referring to the St. James [See No. 395 i.]. What success it had I have not yet heard. These things represented at a great distance from the place and four or five months after the facts are committed may perhaps lose their force and make no great impression, but to us who have them immediately in view it is a terrible and shocking circumstance to see the effects of our labour and toil so violently torn from us in times of (an imaginary or at best of a pretended) peace, and not be at liberty to make ourselves reparation, no remedy but complaining which has not always proved effectual at the court of Madrid. But this may perhaps be a subject too great for me, and therefore shall not venture to go further in it.
There has been an exceeding great mortality among the inhabitants: I have been credibly informed there has been buried in the town of Kingston within these four months 500 white people, some indeed of them sailors but the greatest part dwellers ashore, though the whole number of the inhabitants of that place are not computed above 2000. We have likewise had the misfortune of losing two gentlemen of the council, Mr. Hals and Mr. Garbrand. The number of acting councillors is now reduced to four, Mr. Campbell, Mr. Mill, Mr. Concanen, and Mr. Philp; the first lives near 100 miles from the seat of government, the next is grown very infirm. If Mr. Trelawny delays coming there is an absolute necessity either to oblige those gentlemen who have withdrawn to act or supply their places. It is impossible for me upon the present footing to make a quorum, pursuant to H.M.'s instructions, which must consist of five. And as the dispute between the council and myself lies before H.M. I shall not presume to determine it myself unless anything very extraordinary lays me under that necessity. Signed. 2 pp. Endorsed, Recd. 6 February, Read 7 February 1737/8. Enclosed,
595. i. Capt. Benjamin Way to Edward Manning in Kingston, Jamaica; aboard Loyal Charles, Havana, 26 August (o.s.) 1737. On 5th inst., being 5 or 6 leagues northwest of Havana, we sighted a ship and sloop which came up with us. The ship carried English colours, but half a mile off hoisted Spanish colours. We were forced to bring to and were boarded and searched. They found nothing of the produce of New Spain which they sought. The ship has 24 guns and 350 men and the sloop 8 guns and 12 swivels with 100 men. They also boarded the Dispatch, Capt. Philip De La Motte. Parties were put on both of us and they brought us here under the ignominies of our colours at half-mast and the union downwards. For further account I refer you to the bearer, Dr. Wright. Everybody says we shall be condemned though we have nothing they object to but 20 tons of logwood. Here ate now about 60 prisoners from the four English ships this privateer has taken. I hope Commodore Dent will send a ship to demand us. Copy. 1½ pp.
595. ii. Unaddressed letter from Capt. Henry Weare, Havana, 5 September (n.s.) 1737.1 was taken by a guarda-costas 21 May (o.s.) six days after I left Port Royal, off Donna Maria Bay, and brought here. I sent you letters at South Keys and by St. Jago de Cuba, by both which I acquainted you of their proceedings with me and of the money they found on board, for which I desired you would get a certificate from Messrs. Merewether and Manning for the gold and silver which I had aboard. This is the only method can prove to my interest in having the vessel or restitution. They have taken the Loyal Charles and Dispatch, as likewise a ship from St. Kitts bound for London in lat. 33 N.; so that we are four English and two Dutch prizes. They are now discharging me; they have sent away all my officers and people to Spain; they have in short deprived me of everything but what I stand in, I shall make the best way home or to Jamaica as soon as I can get my condemnation without which I can get no insurance. They have taken the boy Dick from me and it will be impossible for me to get him as he is a mulatto: was he a negro the factor could demand him paying 140 pieces-of-eight, which I would gladly do to get him again. Copy. PS. We are at loss which way to get away from this place so should be obliged if you would lay our case before the commodore who I hope will send us some relief. The ship from St. Kitts is called the Prince William, John Kinselagh, commander. Endorsed, as covering letter. 1½ pp.
595. iii. Representation of merchants of Kingston to President Gregory. We have advice of the Spaniards having taken three ships belonging to British subjects, the Loyal Charles, Capt. Benjamin Way, the George, Capt. Henry Weare, the Dispatch, Capt. Phillip De La Motte, all laden in this island either with the produce thereof or with money received of the agent of the South Sea Company for negroes legally sold and exported to Spanish settlements; all were bound for Great Britain. These captures affect in the highest degree not only us but the general welfare of this island, Great Britain and our colonies being our only markets and the only navigation thither being almost within sight of Spanish ports and always within reach of their cruisers. They seek relief. Copy. Signatories, Edward Becker, James Rodon, William Jones, Jona. Hurst, James Taylor, Ambrose D[uany (fn. 1) ], Richard Moore, John Hamilton, James Graham, Gibson Dalzell, Henry Hutchinson, Robert Bfanny1], Grisley and Sandford, Mark Davis, John Willson, Robert Turner, Henry Cruger, James Woodcock & Co., John Du Commun, John Danvers, Mainwaring and Winder, Alexander McFarlane, Matthias Philp, Nathaniel Lloyd, Samuel Dicker, Peter Organ and John Turnell. Endorsed, as covering letter. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 22, fos. 164–170d; copies of extract of covering letter and of enclosures in C.O. 137, 48, fos. 30–35d, 39–40d.]
November 28.
Frederica.
596 Thomas Hawkins to Benjamin Martyn. I remitted the few occurrences from 6 November to the ensuing January by Mr. Dunbar in June. There are differences of no kind subsisting among the people in commission here and no people live in greater harmony than we at present enjoy. I presume the information the Trustees received arose from a trivial dispute which happened in March last when, by a general desire of the inhabitants, Mr. Calwell and self proposed holding H.M.'s town-court, which Mr. Perkins opposed but soon joined our opinion to the general satisfaction of the people. Since which time we have been as regular as possible either in holding or adjourning as business [? Offered (fn. 2) ]. As this half-hour's dispute was of no prejudice to anyone and unattended with consequences I thought it needless to trouble the Trustees with matters of so little moment.
The following is the most particular account of Frederica. Of buildings: one [Sinclare (fn. 3) .], formerly servant to Mr. Houston at Savannah, has built a small [timber house (fn. 3) ]; William Moor, tanner, is about building and fitting up [conveniencesd (fn. 3) ] for his trade; Henry Michel, a Dutch servant of the Trustees, and [Henry Myers (fn. 3) ] a Dutch freeholder, have built them houses of squared timber logs; [I (fn. 3) ] finished my house at my own expense in great measure. The brickmakers have about 40,000 bricks [of good clay (fn. 3) ].
Of improvements of lands: the following cleared and planted their [home1] acres last season but the overdry autumn destroyed all expectations: Andrew Walset, Archibald Sindare, Elisha Dobree, Miles Weston, Thomas Hird, John Smith, Levi Bennets, Thomas Walker, Michael Wilson, John Levally senior, Mark Hird, John Levally junior, William Addison, Daniel Parnell, Ambrose Telsnere, John Robinson, [Thomas Hawkins, Thomas Loop, Daniel Cannor, Thomas Prochter, Richard White (fn. 3) ].
The following six have fenced, cleared and planted their [5 acres (fn. 3) ]: William Germain, (blank) Davy, Henri Myers, William Abbot, (blank) Allen, [other name lost by damage to MS.).
The undernamed [. . . (fn. 2) ] on their 50-acre lots and have met with the same [success (fn. 3) ]: [some names lost by damage to MS.], Davidson, Hird senior, [Hird junior, Abbot, . . ., Bennet (fn. 3) ], Hawkins. Michel, a servant belonging to the Trustees, has been very industrious on his 20-acre lot as time and opportunity allowed him. (Blank) Griffith, John Welch, John Pauvry, Richard Lawly, Robert Paterson, William Forster, Harry Buckly and John Humble have no manner of improvements either in building or cleared lands more than palmetto or clapboard huts.
Deaths and births: we have had 13 born this year of which three have died within 14 days after their birth; we have buried but one since my last, vizt. Mrs. Harding, wife of John Harding, blacksmith to the Trustees' stores, who died in a consumption in June; at Darien, (blank) Cleark, suddenly; at St. Andrews, Amelia, scoutboats and of strangers, none. Assure their honours that my endeavours shall not be wanting in forwarding the inhabitants in their improvements by frequent admonitions and wish my strength would allow it by example, which at present I cannot having but two small boys. I have been as particular in my accounts as illness will admit and what I have neglected in this, please assure their honours shall be forwarded as soon as my health will permit. Signed. 2 pp. Endorsed, Recd. 12 April 1738. [CO. 5, 640,fos. 12–13d.]
November 28.
New York.
597 Lieut.-Governor George Clarke to Council of Trade and Plantations. A severe fit of sickness of which I am now recovering has left me so weak that I cannot make use of my own hand or hardly my own thoughts to say much. In a word, the assembly, having resolved to make good the deficiencies of the last revenue, are upon ways and means, which I hope they will go through before they break up, if their impatience, which the season of the year makes very great, will suffer them to sit long enough to do it. I hope by that time I shall be able to give you a more particular account of their proceedings. I am giving out the necessary orders to enable me to answer your queries sent to me by Mr. Popple. Signed. 1½ small pp Endorsed, Recd. 5 January, Read 15 February 1737/8. [C.O. 5, 1059, fos. 34–35d]
November 28.
New York.
598 Same to Duke of Newcastle. Having at length brought the assembly to make good the deficiencies of the last revenue, they are now on New York. wavs and means both for that end and for providing a fund for the future support of government. I will not give you the trouble of a long narrative of the many hardships and difficulties I have met with ever since I have had the government; but if I dared I would, now I have surmounted those difficulties and restored quiet to the province. I implore your protection that I may reap some fruits of my labours and under your influence be continued in the government. But as it is my greatest unhappiness to be unknown to you, I know not with what face I dare hope for it. I throw myself at your feet both for pardon and protection. My son will present this to you: I beg leave to recommend him to your notice and protection. Signed. 3 small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 9 January. [C.O. 5, 1094, fos. 33–34d.]
November 29.
Whitehall.
599 Order of Council approving drafts of instructions to governors in America for including the names of Frederick, Prince of Wales, and other members of the royal families in prayers in public services and occasional offices. Copy, certified by James Vernon. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 28 March, Read 13 April 1738. [C.O. 323, 10, fos. 118–119d.]
November 30.
Whitehall.
600 Duke of Newcastle to Lord Delawarr transmitting copy of letter from Lords Commissioners of Admiralty enclosing extract of one from governor of Gibralter with several other papers giving an account that Edward Burrows, master of the sloop Happy of New York, took on board his said sloop at Safi a cargo of goods belonging to some Moors of Sallee at which place he was to deliver them; but instead of proceeding thither he put in at Gibralter, being forced to it as he pretended by stress of weather, from whence he soon after sailed in the night with the said goods on board and is supposed to be gone off with them to the West Indies. As the British merchants at Sallee and the consul there who, as is alleged, was bound for the said Burrows will not only, it is feared, be obliged to pay for the said goods but be liable to other hardships and the trade of the king's subjects in those parts exposed to many inconveniences from the Moors in resentment for this fraudulent proceeding, you are to give proper orders for seizing and detaining the said Burrows with his vessel and cargo in case he should come into any port within your government till he shall have restored the said goods or the value of them and given a just satisfaction to the Moors for the loss and damage they may have sustained by their detention except upon the strictest examination it shall appear that the charge against him be not well founded; you will transmit by the first opportunity hither whatever you shall receive from the said Burrows on this account to be delivered to the Moors, sending me at the same time an account of your proceedings. Entry. 2 pp. Enclosed,
600. i. Admiralty Office, 30 September 1737; Lords of Admiralty to Duke of Newcastle, communicating the above case. Entry. Signatories, Charles Wager, H. Powlett, J. Campbell. 1½ pp.
600. ii. Extract of letter from Lieut.-General Sabine, governor of Gibralter, to Sir Charles Wager, Gibralter, 26 July 1737, communicating the above case. Entry. 1 p. [C.O. 324, 37, pp. 93–97.]
601 [The document provisionally allocated this number was subsequently found to refer to 1738 and will be found in the next volume.]

Footnotes

1 Edge of document missing, names supplied from CO. 137, 56,fo 69.
2 MS. torn.
3 MS. torn: supplied from Georgia Records, Vol. 22 (Part I), pp. 15–18