America and West Indies
December 1737, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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K. G. Davies (editor)

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1963

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288-299

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'America and West Indies: December 1737, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 43: 1737 (1963), pp. 288-299. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72915 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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December 1737, 1-15

December 1.602 Petition of Chaloner Jackson to Council of Trade and Plantations to have a copy of Governor Fitzwilliam's answer to the complaints now lodged against him. Signed. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 1 December 1737. [C.O. 23, 4, fo. 20, 20d.]
December 1.
Whitehall.
603 Council or Trade and Plantations to the King recommending confirmation of an Act passed in Jamaica in May 1736 for introducing white people into the island. Neither we nor Mr. Fane have any objection thereto. Entry. Signatories, Arthur Croft, R. Plumer, T. Pelham, James Brudenell. 1½ pp. [C.O. 138, 18,pp. 273–274.]
December 2.
South Carolina.
604 Samuel Eveleigh to Harman Verelst. I have lately received several letters from you and the enclosed I forwarded by the first opportunity to Mr. Causton at Georgia. By the last letter you sent me the Daily Advertisers which were to me very acceptable and which I forwarded to Mr. Causton in a short time after. I have by every opportunity from Bristol the Gloucester journals which (after perusal) I generally forward to Mr. Causton or others to Georgia, from whence Capt. Stuart is lately come who informs me that all is well there and that Capt. Thomson is arrived from Inverness with 115 servants about twelve days since, and that Col. Stephens was gone to Frederica. Herewith you will receive the Carolina Gazettes all that are due to this day. Here is a letter come to Mr. Saxby from Mr. Tassells who came lately from Havana intimating that the Spaniards are making preparation for an invasion and (as he supposes) on Georgia. Here is a flying report that the French had attacked the Chickasaws in their garrison which they had undermined and destroyed, a great many of them; but I can find no foundation for it. If I should hear further I shall inform you thereof. Signed. 1 small p. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 14–15d.]
December 2.
Whitehall.
605 Thomas Hill to Attorney-General Ryder, transmitting a case relating to royal mines in Tamaica for his opinion thereon. Entry, ½ p. [C.O. 138, 18, p. 274]
[December 2.]606 Grant of gold and silver mines in Jamaica made in 6 Geo. I to Charles Long and others, one-fifth part of the proceeds clear of all charges being reserved to the crown, the grant to be void if a mine is not worked within three years. Copy. 3½, pp. Endorsed, Recd, from Mr. Sharpe. Reed., Read 2 December 1737. [C.O. 137, 22,fos. 150–152d.]
December 3.
Whitehall.
607 Council of Trade and Plantations to Duke of Newcastle, enclosing the following representation on the proposals made by Mr. Amelot to Lord Waidegrave for adjusting disputes in the West Indies. Entry. Signatories, T. Pelham, R. Plumer, J. Brudenell, Arthur Croft. 1 p. Enclosed,
607. i. Same to the King. As the proposals delivered to Lord Waldegrave by Mr. Amelot are offered to explain the Treaty of 1686 everything ought to be expressed in the clearest manner: we cannot be of opinion that any ships ought to be liable to confiscation upon so uncertain an evidence as may be given of an intention to trade. We have already set forth in our representation of 21 April what we think should be deemed sufficient proof and we cannot see why the French may not come into it. We are of opinion all ports ought to be open to ships in distress agreeable to the Treaty of 1686: if any alteration be thought necessary we repeat what we formerly said that the ports of Donna Maria and Cape Tiburon in the island of St. Domingue should be added to the others named by the French as necessary to ships in their passage to and from Jamaica. We are likewise of opinion that the sending to the governor in order to obtain his leave in writing when ships in distress shall put into any ports will also be attended with great inconveniences: but if this should be thought proper, strict orders should be given on both sides that such leave shall not be refused. The edict of 1727 should be repealed, and restitution of prizes on both sides be made where there has not been sufficient proof of illegal trade. Entry. Signatories, as covering letter. 3 pp. [C.O. 153, i6,fos. 66–67d.]
December 5.
Frederica.
608 Robert Paterson to Harman Verelst. I have received no answer either to my letter to you of February last or to the letters that were therein enclosed. I had written to several to send me servants which I intended for the colony after I had got one for myself: if any come for me I beg you to get passage for them on account of the Trust. I have several friends in your neighbourhood who have opportunities of meeting with good people who would be willing to come on getting their passage discharged. By that means we would not be obliged to employ strangers who only stay with us for a time for what they can get. If this proposal should take, we could get strong, robust people fit for plantation work which was always the beginning and basis of all new places. We ought to think of the example of the Swiss who make their barren country produce more than the most fertile country of Italy. Many folios might be written on this subject very profitable for succeeding ages. I am apt to imagine that our agreeable country suffers much for want of its being truly represented for it is capable of being improved to infinite advantages; for a man with one good servant for four years might lay a lasting foundation for the comfortable support of a large family and live vastly more happy than the freeholders at home who wait with impatience for the end of a parliament to get new bribes for making members to oppress the country, a rare liberty. Signed. PS. From other hands no doubt you will hear that our town increases daily by births. I must beg you to cause forward the three annexed letters. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 18–19d.]
December 5.
London
609 Peregrine Fury to Thomas Hill. As I shall very soon apply for the confirmation of an Act passed in South Carolina on 29 May 1736 for emitting and making current the sum of 210,000l. in paper bills of credit, which Act may possibly meet with some opposition from the merchants here and at Bristol, I send you herewith some printed reports on the state of the paper currency of the said province for the use of the Council of Trade and Plantations. Signed. 1 small p. "Endorsed, Recd. 5 December, Read 7 December 1737. [No enclosure found.] [CO. 5, 366,fos. 27–28d.]
December 5.
Frederica.
610 Thomas Hird to James Oglethorpe congratulating him on his promotion to chief command over Carolina and Georgia. The chief difficulties are shortness of provisions, last summer's crop being entirely destroyed by vermin or drought; our hogs are chiefly run wild for want of food. I find we have been much misrepresented to you. I never see any appearance of mutiny amongst us. All I can suppose to have given birth to this report was a difference in opinions in March last about holding a town-court then or deferring it longer, but by the accord of our three bailiffs and to the satisfaction of the whole town it was held on 25 April last and continued every three months since in good order although our disputes are but small and chiefly determined before court day. This harmony pray God continue amongst us. I hope Mr. Horton's letters by this occasion will give you entire satisfaction. We obey his orders with pleasure which are conducing to our safety and advantage, the which no well-wisher to this place can or ought to refuse.
I return you my most hearty thanks for your care and goodness in forwarding my affairs in England. I wish my friend Mr. Gilding could finish them, though to some disadvantage, that we might have a return to enable self and son to buy livestock which we are in great want for. I will assuredly use my utmost endeavours to promote a good understanding amongst us agreeable to your commands as it has hitherto been my chiefest care. Several of our people are busy in building houses, others improving on their lots. The brickmakers are constantly making bricks of a much better composition than formerly and we all enjoy perfect health, preferably I believe to any other part of Georgia. Mr. Horton informs me that 15 of those Scottish servants lately arrived at Darien remain to the use of the Trustees: it would be a great favour done me if you would spare me and son each of us one on our credit to assist us in our improvements, my own time being much interrupted in public business: such are watch duties and other incidents belonging to my office. I wish you a safe and speedy arrival in this colony. Signed. 2 pp. Endorsed, Recd., Read 12 April 1738. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 16–17d.]
December 7.
Place Court.
611 Minutes of Common Council of Georgia. Received the following certified accounts: Messrs. Woodward & Flower, 3 August 1737, for 266l. 14s 7d sterling for provisions and necessaries; Samuel Montaigut & Co., 17 August 1737, for 285l. 3s. 9d. sterling for provisions and necessaries; Mr. Eveleigh, 9 September 1737, for 197l. 13s. 4d. for provisions and necessaries; Messrs. Minis & Salomons, 7 October 1737, for 393l.18s. 4d. for provisions and necessaries; Robert Ellis, 6 August 1737, for 494l. 1s. for provisions and necessaries; Robert Williams & Co,, 8 August 1737, for 48l. 15s. 4d. for provisions and necessaries. Read letters of advice from Mr. Causton of certified accounts of Messrs. Minis and Salomons for 78l. 9s. 6d. sterling for provisions and necessaries, and of William Clay for 149l. 16s. 2d. for provisions and necessaries. Ordered, that the said certified accounts be paid.
Resolved that 500 whole deal boards be bought and sent to Georgia for building the church at Savannah. Mr. Burrington (late governor of North Carolina) attended and desired the Trustees would pay to him here in England such sums as may be due to him in Carolina and order their officers in Georgia to receive the same sums there in lieu of what may be paid to him here; resolved, that Governor Burrington be acquainted that his request is inconsistent with the method the Trustees have prescribed for their conduct. Ordered, that a bill drawn by Thomas Causton on James Oglethorpe for 20l. dated 10 August 1737 in full of 200l., ordered by the Common Council 29 April 1737 to be placed to the account of Mr. Causton's four years' service, be paid.
Resolved, that a grant of 500 acres of land be made to Capt. William Wood recommended by Lieut.-Col. Cochran; seal to be affixed, secretary to countersign and sign memorial of the same to be registered with the auditor of the plantations. Ordered, that a draft be made on the Bank of England for 2583l. for payment of above certified accounts (1914l. 12s.) and for residue and freight of the Irish cargo (668l. 8s.); signed the same. Read, a memorial of Hugh Anderson desiring a lot of 50 acres for his younger son, a minor; resolved, that a lot of 500 acres be granted if he desires it. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 690, pp. 119–122.]
December 7.
Palace Court.
612 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Received by Dr. Hales, 5l. 5s benefaction of a gentlewoman towards the support of orphans in Georgia or the missionaries there. Read, several letters from Mr. Williamson at Savannah to the Trustees complaining of Rev. John Wesley's having refused the sacrament to Mrs. Sophia Williamson with Mrs. Williamson's affidavit thereupon, and two presentments of the grand jury of Mr. Wesley for the said refusal and for several other facts laid to his charge. Ordered, that copies of the said letters and affidavit be sent over to Mr. Wesley desiring his.answer to the same as soon as possible; and that a letter be sent to Mr. Williamson to acquaint him of the said copies being sent to Mr. Wesley and that if he has anything new to lay before the Trustees he should show it first to Mr. Wesley and then send it over to them, and that the Trustees think he should not have made his application to the world by advertising his complaints before acquainting the Trustees with them. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 687, pp. 48–49.]
December 7.
Kingston.
613 Robert Millar to [Trustees for Georgia (fn. 1) ] notifying them of his intended departure for Vera Cruz and Mexico in the next few days, following a long and serious illness. No expense will be begrudged in the purchase of a valuable quantity of julap roots fit for cultivating. Signed. 2 small pp. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 20–21d.]
[December 7.]614 Memorial of Governor Alured Popple to Council of Trade and Plantations. The inhabitants of Bermuda have lately been at such expense in repairing their fortifications that they cannot buy ammunition. It appears that there are but two barrels of powder in H.M.'s magazine there and those so damaged as to be not fit for use. There are neither match, cartridge paper, ladles, powder horns, priming wires, partridge nor langrel shot, and very few grenado shells in the magazine. Memorialist hopes a sufficient supply will be sent, none having been sent since 1701. 1½ pp. Endorsed, Recd., Read 7 December 1737. Enclosed,
614. i. Memorandum of sundries wanting in H.M.'s magazine at Bermuda, 29 October 1737. Signed, S. Smith, storekeeper. 1 small p.
614. ii. Memorandum of ammunition wanting in same, 29 October 1737. Signed, as preceding. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 8 December 1737. [C.O. 37, 13, fos. 21–24d.]
December 8.615 James Oglethorpe to Andrew Stone enclosing the following. I hope his grace will be so good as to allow the alteration desired. Signed. 1 p. Enclosed,
615. i. Samuel Wragg to James Oglethorpe; 1 November 1737. Having seen a copy of the Duke of Newcastle's letter to the lieut.-governor of South Carolina in relation to the money to be paid me for transporting and the demurrage due for the Palatines by the Three Sisters now sailed for that province, I must acquaint you that the same is not sufficient to procure the payment agreeable to my proposal and agreement when I ordered the ship for Carolina instead of Pennsylvania, and I expected an absolute order for payment of the sum stipulated. You are well acquainted with the proceedings of assembly in that province and how ready they are to take hold of any the least pretence to evade parting with money, and as his grace has left them at liberty to make any reasonable objection I am well satisfied they will not want excuses for not paying any money for this service. Wherefore I must beg you will procure me in lieu of this letter a proper and sufficient one answerable to my agreement and just expectation for the heavy charge I have been at from these people. Signed. PS. Extract of Appropriation Law and account of further expenses enclosed. 1 p.
615. ii. Further expenses for the Palatines. Passage of 29½ head deserted etc. so that so many less proceeded in the ship at 5l. 5s.: 154l. 17s. 6d. Demurrage 14 September to 12 October at 10l. a day: 280l. Total, 434l. 17s. 6d. ½ p.
615. iii. Extract of Appropriation Law stating the uses to which public moneys of South Carolina may be applied. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 654, fos. 115–117d; 127–128d.]
December 8.
Whitehall.
616 Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. We have received a memorial from Governor Popple representing that the inhabitants of the Bermuda Islands have been at so great charge in repairing their fortifications that they are not now able to buy enough ammunition to render the fortifications useful. Mr. Popple has laid before us accounts from the storekeeper of the magazine there by which it appears that there is no powder, several other stores wanting, and that the magazine has not been supplied from this kingdom since 1701. We represent that it will be for your service that the magazine be immediately supplied with 50 barrels of powder, 50 skeins of match and 16 reams of cartridge paper and that the governor be directed on arrival in Bermuda to send over a state of the magazine there and an account of what other stores are wanting. Entry. Signatories, T. Pelham, James Brudenell, Arthur Croft, R. Plumer. 2 pp. [C.O. 38, 8, pp. 210–211.]
December 8.
Amboy.
617 President John Hamilton to Alured Popple. I received your letter of 24 August last with the circular queries, in obedience to which I ordered the sheriffs and clerks of the several counties to prepare lists of all the inhabitants of each county; as soon as they are finished I shall transmit them and at the same time give as particular an account of New Jersey as I can. I have received two letters from my lords commissioners, one of 18 February relating to the disputes between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, and did 2ll I could to obey them. But there are so few councillors and those that are being at that time in their harvest I could not possibly prevail upon any of them to go nor indeed was it proper, since there are but four that can meet, to spare one out of that number. The other letter is of 22 June acquainting me H.M. had appointed Lord Delawarr governor of New York and New Jersey. I have nothing to write but to inform their lordships the province is in perfect peace and tranquillity and the people infinitely obliged for their lordships' most favourable report in their behalf for a separate governor. Signed. 2½ small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 17 January, Read 15 February 1737/8. [C.O. 5, 973, fos. 107–108d.]
December 9.618 Additional instructions to Governors of Barbados, Massachusetts, Bahamas, Nova Scotia, North Carolina, Virginia, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Bermuda, New Jersey, Georgia, New York, Jamaica and Leeward Islands, directing the forms of prayer for the royal family to be used in the colonies. Entry. 5 pp. [C.O. 324, 37, pp. 98–102.]
December 10.
Custom-house,
London.
619 Commissioners of Customs to Duke of Newcastle. Robert Arbuthnot, collector of H.M.'s customs at Antigua, has lately purchased of the crown several lands in Tortola, being part of the estate of William Hill formerly collector at that place which were seized by extent towards satisfying the crown's debt. The said Arbuthnot having in the enclosed memorial represented the great difficulties he meets with in getting possession of the said lands and praying your orders to the governor of the Leeward Islands and the commanding officer of Tortola to give him immediate possession, we desire, as Arbuthnot has paid the crown a valuable consideration for the said lands, that you will give such orders. Signed, Robert Corbet, J. Evelyn, Robert Baylis, R. Chandler. 1½ pp. Endorsed, Copy sent to Governor Mathew, 7 January 1737/8. Enclosed,
619. i. Memorial of Robert Arbuthnot to Commissioners of Customs; London, 7 December 1737. The difficulties mentioned in covering letter are described in some detail. Signed. 2½ pp. [C.O. 152, 44, fos. 128–131d.]
December 10.
Charleston.
620 Thomas Stephens to Harman Verelst, notifying him of the Minerva having run aground a mile south of Charleston bar, though eventually got off after 26 hours. All the letters and the small box directed to Mr. Causton are safe; the other goods fare as other people's, I cannot say anything of them till they are inspected. Capt. Nicholson was not to blame. The Two Brothers, Capt. Thomson, had like to have fared worse than Minerva on the same spot, had she not luckily met with a skillful pilot when aground: lucky she was in meeting with a good one for I fear that some here are not so. Signed. PS. Please advise my friends of my being here for I have no time. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 22–23.]
December 10.
Charleston.
621 President William Bull to Council of Trade and Plantations. Lieut. Governor Broughton died 22 November, and President Middleton 6 September, by which means the administration of the government devolves on me as eldest councillor, in which station and all others I shall always endeavour to discharge my duty to H.M. And as there are two vacancies in council by the death of the gentlemen abovenamed, I beg leave to recommend Colonel Joseph Blake, one of the late Lords Proprietors, and Charles Pinckney, speaker of the present commons house of assembly, as gentlemen distinguished in this province by their integrity, fortune and ability. Signed. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd. 3 February, Read 8 February 1737/8. [C.O. 5, 366, fos. 42–43d.]
December 10.
Charleston
622 Same to Duke of Newcastle. [In substance same as No. 621.] Signed. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 7 February. [C.O. 5, 388, fos. 164–165d; duplicate, endorsed, Recd. 12 February, at fo. 166.]
December 10.
St. Christopher's.
623 Governor William Mathew to Alured Popple. The 25th past I received yours of 11 August and immediately dispatched to the lieut.-governor of Antigua and to the speaker of the assembly directions for their transmitting to me as soon as possible copies of all the evidence that was before the council and assembly upon their passing the bill for attainting Benjamin Johnson and William alias Billy Johnson. I have not yet received them and must therefore wait another opportunity for transmitting them. Enclosed is the only public paper I have to send. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd. 23 January, Read 15 February 1737/8. Enclosed,
623. i. Abstract of register of births, marriages and burials in the parish of Trinity Palmeto Point in St. Christopher's, 30 October 1736–30 October 1737. Born 20, marriages 2, burials 9. Signed, John Merac, clerk. 1 small p.
623. ii. Same, in parish of St. Thomas Middle Island in St. Christopher's for same period. Born 25, marriages 8, burials 32. Signed, as preceding. 1 small p. [C.O. 152, 23, fos. 124, 124d, 126–127d, 130, 130d.]
[December 12.]624 Representation of Company of Merchants Adventurers of Bristol to Council of Trade and Plantations. It appears [by No. 552 ii and iii above] that great alterations are proposed in the treaty of 1686 regulating French and British trade in America. What would be most beneficial to us would be the repeal of the edict of 1727 and no alteration in the treaty of 1686. But should any alteration be thought necessary, we entreat you to advise that the full force of the 5th and 6th articles of that treaty be preserved. Seal. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 12 December, Read 14 December 1737. [C.O. 152, 23, fo. 67, 67d.]
December 13.
Georgia Office.
625 Harman Verelst to Capt. James Gascoigne. The Trustees thank you for your letter to Mr. Martyn of 10 August last and enclosures and very much approve your conduct. It is a great satisfaction to them that so zealous and prudent an officer as yourself has the protection of their colony. As succours are now going from England to strengthen the colony by land, the Trustees hope they will arrive soon enough to prevent the designs of the Spaniards. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 47d.]
December 14.
Georgia Office.
626 Same to Thomas Causton by the Content, Capt. George Thurnam. The Trustees have received your journal from 25 April 1737 to 24 May, your daybook with the several copies of letters and papers therewith sent, your letter of 22 August with cashbooks from 2 November 1736 to 30 June 1737; but your cashbooks from the last of July 1736 for August, September and October 1736 have never been received, nor your diary mentioned in your said letter. Please send them or duplicates.
The Trustees, on reading your journal, approve of your conduct as you have there stated it and acquaint you that you are not obliged to take notice of any persons alleging they have a commission from the Trustees without their producing it to be recorded. Herewith you receive another copy of the agreement with Mr. Bradley whereby you plainly see he has no powers given him to act as you represent him to have done in the case of the cattle, and the Trustees have written to him that he has no other charge of the cattle but under your order and that you are to communicate the Trustees' orders to him, which he is to obey; which orders are that you take from him what cattle are necessary for the settlers at Highgate and such other settlers to whom the Trustees are under any promise to supply. But at the same time you are to leave Mr. Bradley sufficient cattle for the improvements of the Trust farm. It was very right in you to prevent the taking up land without the Trustees' grant and you are to take all proper measures to continue to prevent the like in any the least instance. As to Capt. Mackay's use of negroes, the Trustees direct that the Act for prohibiting the use of negroes be duly put in execution; and in that Act there are sufficient powers and penalties enacted to put an end to such proceedings of Capt. Mackay, for no one is to be spared that will not obey law nor anyone indulged in their endeavours to evade the law.
The several bills you drew on General Oglethorpe to enable you to settle your new farm are now all come to hand amounting to 200l. sterling, which the Trustees ordered to be paid in consideration of your services in the colony from February 1732 as storekeeper and one of the magistrates. The following advices of and certified accounts have been received by the Trustees amounting to 3293l. 19s. 4d. sterling, vizt. (dates when certified) 21 July 1737, Samuel Montaigut & Co., 76l. 5s. 10d.; 23 July, Francis Johonnot, 381l. 4s. 5d.; 26 July, Benjamin Appelbe, 148l. 2s. 11½d; 1 August, William Bellinger, 147l.; 3 August, Messrs. Woodward & Flower, 266l. 14s. 7d.; 6 August, Robert Ellis, 494l 1s.; 8 August, Robert Williams & Co., 48l. 15s. 4d.; 10 August, Messrs. Minis & Salomons, 459l. 14s. 9½d.; 17 August, Samuel Montaigut & Co., 285l. 3s. 9d.; 22 August, Samuel Lacy, 166l. 19s. 4d.; 6 September, William Clay, 149l. 16s. 2d.; 9 September, Samuel Eveleigh, 197l. 13s. 4d.; 7 October, Minis & Salomons, 472l. 7s. 10d. These accounts being for provisions and necessaries supplied the colony, and the Trustees having sent you since Capt. Dymond's arrival with 1000l. in sola bills the sum of 2450l. more in sola bills, vizt. in August 1737, by Capt. Shubrick, 650l., by Capt. Reid, 1000l.; in September, by Capt. Hewitt, 100l.; in October, by Capt. Nickleson, 400l.; in November, by Capt. Ayers, 300l.; and they have now sent you 200l. more in sola bills of 1l., A.2201–2400, and they are the last supply they can send you until a new grant is made by the Parliament, which 200l. with the former sent you as above and the beforementioned accounts certified since midsummer last amount in the whole to 5943l. 19s. 4d. The Trustees therefore now rest satisfied that you are fully supplied to answer the demands abroad to Lady Day next according to the established allowances and orders sent you, which demands you are to discharge with the said provisions, necessaries, and sola bills, without certifying any more accounts, for the Trustees will not nor cannot pay them. And they are resolved that no other method shall be used of supplying the demands abroad but by their sola bills, to prevent any larger purchases of provisions and necessaries being made or any larger expenses being at any time accrued than there are sola bills in the colony to pay for and answer; and thereby preserve their own credit and that of the colony at the same time in having the expenses thereof regulated agreeable to what the Trustees shall from time to time appropriate by sending their sola bills to answer.
In the Trustees' letter of 23 March last you were directed to expend 16l. sterling in building the minister's house and a schoolhouse at New Ebenezer exclusive of the expense of hogs and poultry. But Mr. Bolzius by his letter of 28 July last writes that you told him some of the 16l. should be applied for buying the hogs and poultry, which sure must be some mistake in him, for the letter makes the expenses distinct the one from the other, the benefactor having enabled the Trustees to do both. And the Trustees now direct you that the said 16l. be increased to 30l. to be expended in building the said houses as Mr. Bolzius shall approve of, besides the charge of the hogs and poultry which is no part of the said 30l. nor was intended any part of the 16l. And at Mr. Bolzius's request and General Oglethorpe's acquainting the Trustees of the rules prescribed to the people at Old Ebenezer before their removal, the Trustees have consented that the crop got at Old Ebenezer at their removal should not be accounted as part of their reduced allowance but shall remain to their own use over and above the said reduced allowance to September last.
The friends of John Stonehewer at Skidoway have applied to the Trustees for leave for his alienating his 50-acre lot and for his return home, his said friends being desirous to provide for him in England and his wife being here and unwilling to go to him, which the Trustees have consented to on Stonehewer's producing a proprietor for such lot not having lands in Georgia in possession or remainder, whom William Stephens shall approve of. The queen being dead, the Trustees have received an instruction from the king to cause his order to be published in Georgia for praying for their royal highnesses, Frederick Prince of Wales, the Princess of Wales, the Duke, the Princesses and all the royal family, and herewith you receive a copy thereof that the same may be complied with accordingly by all the ministers of the several congregations in Georgia. Entry. 3½ pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 48–49d.]
December 14.
Georgia Office.
627 Harman Verelst to William Williamson at Savannah. The Trustees received your letter of 9 September last with the affidavit and copies of papers therewith sent relating to John Wesley and have ordered copies thereof to be sent to him for his answers thereto, that the complaint and answer may be considered at the same time. It is very right that the Trustees should be acquainted with every proceeding but very wrong in you to order the presentments of the grand jury and your wife's affidavit to be printed, which is taking a remedy and appealing to the world at the same time that you are applying to the Trustees of the colony to consider your case. If you shall have any further complaint to send for the Trustees' consideration either against Mr. Wesley or anyone else, let the party complained against have a copy, that they may at the same time send their defence. For the Trustees cannot determine on hearing one side only. I delivered your letter to your uncle and sister as you desired. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 47d]
December 14.
Georgia Office.
628 Same to William Stephens, communicating the Trustees' decision about John Stonehewer and their orders for prayers for the royal family contained in No.626. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 49d.]
December 14.
Georgia Office
629 Same to Rev. John Martin Bolzius at Ebenezer. Your letters to Mr. Vernon of 28 June and myself of 28 July last were read to the Trustees; and this acquaints you that by a letter of 17 June last sent by way of Charleston to Mr. Causton by the Seaford, the third transport of Salzburghers were ordered the supply of a cow and a calf to every five heads. The Trustees are sorry to hear there is danger of the people's losing their crops this year and if there should happen so general a calamity you may be assured the Salzburghers will not be excepted from partaking of such general assistance as will be necessary on such an unhappy occasion. When the people's farms are run out at New Ebenezer you will then see how each family will possess a proportion as near as may be of some good land in their respective lots whereby they may raise their subsistence from. But as to have leave to exchange the bad garden-lots with better grounds, the Trustees cannot alter their plots but must leave it to the possessor's judgement to first cultivate that part of his lot which is good land; and if part of a 50-acre lot be good, whether laid out for the garden or the farm, such good land must be taken as it falls in the setting out. This removal to New Ebenezer was at the request of the Salzburghers granted and an indulgence given to none else in the colony. For were the Trustees to enter into or give way in the least to suffer the exchanging of lands, there would be no end of applications. [The orders given in No. 626 relating to benefactions to the Salzburghers at Ebenezer are here repeated.] These concessions the Trustees hope will fully satisfy and encourage the Salzburghers to that industry and content which naturally flow from a satisfied mind. Entry. PS. Mr. Vernon sends his service to you and Mr. Gronau. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 50, 50d.]
December 14.
Georgia Office.
630 Same to John Wesley at Savannah, enclosing copy of letter lately received from William Williamson at Savannah and an affidavit made by his wife. The Trustees hope that you will be able to justify yourself, having in the meantime suspended their judgement until they receive your answer that they may consider the complaint and answer at the same time. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 50d.]
December 14.
Georgia Office.
631 Same to John Pye at Savannah. I received your letter of 29 June last and am glad you like your situation. I am sure Mr. Causton will supply you as reasonably with either dowlass or thin clothing on account for your salary as it can be had. You will want no reasonable encouragement. Entry. ¼ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 51.]
December 14.
Georgia Office.
632 Same to William Bradley at Savannah. The Trustees are very much surprised to hear that you take upon you an authority which you are in no manner entrusted with, vizt. the care of all their lands, and that you pretend to engross the cattle as if you had a title to serve yourself first to the detriment of others who have the Trustees' orders for cattle. The charge of the cattle under your care is under the orders of Mr. Causton relating to the disposition of them; he is to communicate the Trustees' orders to you, which you are to obey. It is your's and everyone's duty in the colony to act in their proper stations and mind their own business to raise a maintenance for themselves and families and by a peaceful and orderly behaviour to be quiet with each other and enjoy the fruits of their labour with comfort which will best conduce to their own happiness and the favour of the Trustees. With respect to your own immediate dependence on the Trustees, they have ordered me to send you a copy of your agreement. They have personally to you very kindly given favourable orders relating to you, and they hope for a suitable return by being easy under government and setting a good example to others and applying to the Trustees in writing yourself when anything material shall require it. Entry. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 51.]
December 14.
Georgia Office.
633 Same to John Stonehewer at Skidoway, giving permission to alienate a 50-acre lot on condition of producing a proprietor who has not already lands in Georgia and is approved by Mr. Stephens. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5,667, fo. 51d.]
December 14.
Georgia Office.
634 Same to Hugh Anderson at Savannah, granting his request for 500 acres of land in Georgia for a younger son. Your own lot will descend to your eldest son, the 500 acres therefore cannot be granted to him. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 51d.]
December 15.
Boston.
635 Governor Jonathan Belcher to Duke of Newcastle. As the Plantations are more immediately under your care I know it to be my duty to apply to you as governor of Massachusetts and New Hampshire to claim your justice and protection while my friends inform me that some persons lately gone from hence have been making their utmost efforts to have the king's royal commission to me superseded and that they have endeavoured this by getting complaints into your office with design to have them acted upon without my being served with copies and having time given to answer. This shows a consciousness of guilt in my adversaries and that they would willingly stab me in the dark. But I have a great dependence on your justice and honour that you will suffer no such thing to be practiced on the king's servants against whom no complaint has ever been made out and whom the king has hitherto justified in the whole of his administration. I am told Col. Dunbar has taken a vast deal of pains to malrepresent me: I only wish for an opportunity to make answer to anything he can say, and I have no doubt to make it appear that falsehood and malice are the basis of his whole attempt. Instead of giving you a trouble of this nature it would be well for him he could wait on you and make out one single service he has ever done for the crown in this part of the world. Instead of that he has acted so wildly and imprudently as has tended to alienate the affections of the king's subjects. When the king honoured me with the government of these provinces I quitted all other ways of life to serve H.M. to the utmost of my power and I have made it my constant care to adhere to H.M.'s instructions and to support his authority and honour as well as to have a tender regard to the rights and liberties of his subjects. And I am told one great reason my enemies have pleaded for my removal is that I have been in some time; that should seem a much better reason for the continuance of a good servant than for his removal, for the longer he is in office the better qualified he will be for the king's service. And if a governor must be changed to satisfy the disgust and malice of every private person the king's ministers may be followed with solicitations of this kind every day. I therefore pray that I may be continued in the governments and also that you would cast a favourable eye on the bearer, my son Mr. Belcher of the Temple. Signed. 7 small pp.). Endorsed, Recd. 30 January. [C.O. 5, 899, fos. 294–297d.]
December 15.
Whitehall.
636 Order of Committee of Privy Council for Plantation Affairs directing that a copy of the report made to the Council of Trade and Plantations by the Attorneyand Solicitor-General on the dispute between South Carolina and Georgia relating to the Indian trade should be transmitted to this Committee. Signed, Temple Stanyan. Seal. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 19 December 1737. Marginal note, A copy of the said report was sent to the Council Office, 19 December 1737. S.G., G.B. [C.O. 5, 366, fos. 29–30d.]
December 15.
Charleston.
637 Thomas Stephens to [Harman Verelst (fn. 2) ]. The ship being detained till now gives me an opportunity of writing you a line with more deliberation than mine of 10th. The smallarms have received little damage, the gunpowder more, several casks having a good deal of wet powder in them, though in the whole I hope the loss will not be great, for the herrings are judged to be hardly the worse for what has happened. To-morrow I shall sail with it all for Savannah with Mr. Amory and Gibbs's families. I am afraid Wathy's thoughts are bent too much upon something else from an evil report brought upon that good land by one that came passenger with us. Indeed it had such an effect with them all that I found them somewhat staggered in their belief and that to such a degree that both masters and servants did say at one time that they would not go further than this; but I prevailed with them at last to go and see the place lest they should be imposed upon and I do not despair of Mr. Wathey's recovering his senses too. John Rigby alias Platrier has been very troublesome and very busy in dissuading them from their good purposes. It seems he is kin to Capt. Rigby that commands the Normington and was one of his mates. I find that he is a sailor and acted as such when aboard the Minerva. The bedding for a servant and things mentioned in mine of 10 October were afterwards found on board though now they are lost in the hurley-burley. People are big with hopes of seeing the general here shortly. Signed. 1½ small pp. [C.O. 5, 640, fo. 24, 24d.]

Footnotes

1 Egmont Diary, II, 503.
2 Inferred from first sentence.