America and West Indies
May 1738, 1-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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K. G. Davies (editor)

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1969

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74-94

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'America and West Indies: May 1738, 1-20', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 44: 1738 (1969), pp. 74-94. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72945 Date accessed: 23 July 2014.


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Contents

May 1738, 1-20

May 1.
Palace Court.
176 Minutes of Common Council of Georgia. Read report from committee of accounts: having examined several accounts from Georgia they find that large credits had been given to several persons by Mr. Causton for which no order had been sent and were of opinion that he must be called upon to give an account to the Trustees. They had likewise considered of the list of servants transmitted by Mr. Stephens, wherein the first article consists of 40 servants on account of the Trust brought into the colony by Capt. Thomson in November last and ordered to the Darien for sawing plank under the direction of Lieut. Moore Mackintosh, which being a charge on the Trust they submit whether it is not necessary to appoint some other inspectors to take care that the servants under his direction be so employed and an account taken of what they have done and shall continue to do and how the produce of their labour has been applied for the benefit of the Trust. Fifty-six more servants on board the Two Brothers (though brought into the colony at the owner's risk and 44 of them contracted for by private inhabitants settling at their own expense) have been placed by Mr. Causton to the account of the Trustees and have all but 12 been distributed by him to private persons without any authority, and therefore the committee were of the opinion that the charge of the said 44 servants must be answered for by Mr. Causton. By the Three Sisters, Capt. Hewitt, 120½ heads of foreign servants were brought into the colony 24 December last, whereof 67 heads were put under Mr. Bradley, and the committee submit whether it is not necessary to appoint some other inspectors to take an account how those servants are employed and how the produce of their labour shall be accounted for to the Trust. 9½ heads more of the said servants were indented to Mr. Causton without any authority, whereof the charge must be answered for by him. They had examined the sums paid in and applicable for building churches in Georgia amounting to 843l. 15s.4d. besides 65l. more subscribed for, making 908l. 15s. 4d. and submit it to the council to desire Capt. Tomas the engineer on his arrival in Georgia to make an estimate for building a church at Savannah and send it to the Trustees. The report was approved. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 690, pp. 140–142.]
May 1.
Horn Tavern.
177 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Resolved, that an application be made for a ship for Capt. James Gascoigne and that that ship be the stationed ship for Georgia, if not, to get the next vacancy on the Virginia or Carolina station ships which first drop in order to become the station ship for Georgia. Received by Mr. Vernon 50l. benefaction towards building church at Savannah. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 687, p. 70.]
May 1.
Georgia Office.
178 Trustees for Georgia to Sir Robert Walpole. Whereas H.M. has provided for the defence of Georgia and Carolina on the military establishment and Parliament has this year granted 8,000l. for the civil establishment of the colony, the Trustees acquaint you that until the province is better settled the yearly sum of 8,000l. will be necessary towards the defraying the expenses of the civil government, affording a provision and maintenance to such persons as shall settle in the colony, preserving the friendship of the neighbouring Indians (of great service in time of peace and much more in case a war should break out in that country), for carrying on such improvements as the province is capable of producing such as silk, wine and oil (the expense whereof private persons are not able to bear without some assistance). As these expenses for the civil government etc. will be necessary to be defrayed by the public until the province is settled and in a capacity to support them themselves (which in their present circumstances they are utterly incapable of doing) the Trustees earnestly desire that these expenses may in future sessions be put into some estimate to be laid by the crown before the House of Commons since it will be impossible for the Trustees every year to take upon them the labour of proceeding as petitioners nor can it be thought reasonable that they should hazard the making contracts for men, provisions etc. which is necessary to be done the year before upon the uncertainty of their petition's being received or the sum they expected being granted them. Entry. Signatories, John Laroche, F. Eyles, James Oglethorpe, Robert Hucks, R. Eyre, William Sloper, George Heathcote, T. Archer, Egmont, Jacob Bouverie, Christopher Tower, Thomas Tower, Shaftesbury, Tyrconnel, William Heathcote, H. Archer, Robert Tracy. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 54d.]
May 1.
Georgia Office.
179 Same to same, commending the services of Capt. James Gascoigne, commander of H.M.'s sloop Hawk in Georgia. We desire you to recommend him to H.M. for command of a ship of war. Entry. Signatories, as No. 178 without William Sloper. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 55.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
180 Thomas Hill to Francis Fane enclosing an Act passed at Nevis 5 January last to prevent negroes and other slaves from selling anything without a ticket from their masters, for his opinion in point of law. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 153, 16, fo. 68d.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
181 Same to same, enclosing copy of an Act passed in New York in December last for frequent elections of representatives to serve in general assembly and for frequent calling to meeting of the general assembly so elected, for his opinion thereon in point of law. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 1126, fo. 34d.]
May 3.
Palace Court.
182 Minutes of Common Council of Georgia. Resolved that Robert Gilbert be appointed third bailiff of Savannah in the room of John Dearne, deceased; that a lot of 50 acres in Savannah be granted to Andrew Logie and the same in Frederica to Holliday Lawes; that John Clarke be appointed secretary for Indian affairs in the room of Rev. Charles Wesley. Seal to be affixed to these appointments. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 690, p. 143.]
May 3.
Palace Court.
183 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Received receipts from the Bank for 10l. paid in by Robert Tracy and 50l. paid in at last board by Mr. Vernon. Resolved, that it be referred to the committee of correspondence to prepare an Act to enable the Trustees to appoint commissioners for the more effectual execution in a summary way of an Act to prevent the importation and use of rum and brandies in Georgia, 1 p. [C.O. 5, 687, p. 71.]
May 3.
Georgia Office.
184 Harman Verelst to Bailiffs of Savannah, William Stephens and Thomas Causton, ordering that a 50-acre lot at or near Savannah be granted to Andrew Logie. Entry. ¼ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 67d.]
May 3.
Georgia Office.
185 Same to Bailiffs of Frederica, William Horton and Thomas Hawkins, ordering that a 50-acre lot at Frederica be granted to Holliday Lawes. Entry. ¼ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 67d.]
May 3.186 Appointment by Common Council of Georgia of John Clarke to be secretary for Indian affairs in Georgia in succession to Charles Wesley. Entry. Signatory, Benjamin Martyn. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 670, p. 348.]
May 3.187 Appointment by Common Council of Georgia of Robert Gilbert to be third bailiff of Savannah in succession to John Dearne, deceased. Entry. Signatory, Benjamin Martyn. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 670, p. 349.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
188 Order of Committee of Council for Plantation Affairs directing Council of Trade and Plantations to consider and report on the sum proper to be allowed to Alexander Skene and James Abercromby for running the boundary between North and South Carolina over and above the 50l. already paid to them. Signed, James Vernon. Seal. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd, from James Abercromby; Recd., Read 10 May 1738. [C.O. 5, 366, fos. 56–57d.]
May 5.
Antigua.
189 Lieut.-Governor Edward Byam to Council of Trade and Plantations. In accordance with Order in Council of 15 February last I have administered the oaths to and taken security from George Thomas as deputy governor of Pennsylvania. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd. 27 June, Read 28 June 1738. Enclosed,
189. i. 14 April 1738. Bond whereby George Thomas, Benjamin King and Walter Sydserfe of Antigua oblige themselves to the king in the sum of 2,000l. The condition is that George Thomas observes the Acts of Trade in his office of deputy governor of Pennsylvania. Latin and English. Seals. Signed. Witnessed, William Williams, John Leacock. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1269, fos. 15–18d.]
May 6.190 Petition of Major William Cook to Trustees for Georgia for permission for his daughter Ann when of age to surrender her interest in a house and land in Savannah to her sister Susanna, so that she may hold a house and land in Frederica. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 670, p. 347.]
May 6.191 Thomas Hawkins to [James Oglethorpe]. All the people belonging to Capt. Thomson's vessel have been under my care, four of whom could not be cured by any means but a course of mercurials with which I had success. I have had many ill but few lost since the account in November. At Darien now called New Inverness two of the Trustees' servants, one manservant by being scalded on the belly and privy parts and a woman of the bloody flux, and a child in a consumption, have died; thirty have recovered from fluxes and fevers and inveterate scurvies. At Frederica a servant belonging to the bricklayers died in an atrophy. Two have died at St. Andrew's and Amelia, both dropsy. It is no small uneasiness to me that I cannot meet with the same success with the men under your command of which I have lost five since November, all which died in atrophies; but any person will allow that all endeavours must be fruitless while they spend their whole or the major part of their subsistence in liquor. In order to prevent the loss of more men I have taken the sick to town and procured such little necessary refreshments as this place afforded at my own expense, which method has always proved successful, they having immediately recovered. I shall continue the same till further orders from you or the person that shall command till your arrival. As I hope for a supply of medicines with the companies which we daily expect, I desist from repeating the invoice transmitted in November. The people have 95 acres of corn planted but the season as yet proves excessive dry and everything is at a stay for want of rain. Signed. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 640 fos. 101–102.]
May 7.
St. James's.
192 Royal appointment of Lieut.-Col. Robert Carpenter as lieut.-governor of Montserrat in the room of William Forbes, deceased. Entry. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 324, 37, pp. 122–123.]
May 8.
Bermuda.
193 President Andrew Auchinleck to Council of Trade and Plantations transmitting minutes of council and journals of assembly together with some Acts. We have had a report here for some months that the Spaniards are making warlike preparations at Havana and it is apprehended that they intend a descent upon Georgia to hinder that settlement, but when they are to set out upon the expedition we have not heard. Governor Popple is daily expected here: it is hoped he will bring with him powder and other warlike stores whereof we are at present in great want. Signed. 1½ small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 17 June, Read 21 June 1738. [C.O. 37, 13 fos. 51–52d.]
May 8.
Bermuda.
194 Same to [Duke of Newcastle] transmitting copy of votes and journals of the house of assembly together with the Acts made since I presided. We are alarmed here with a report which we have had for some months past that they are making warlike preparations at Havana: it is thought that the Spaniards intend a descent upon Georgia to hinder that new settlement, but we have not certain intelligence when or where they design. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, (i) Recd. 17 June 1738. (ii) Recd. 17 July. [C.O. 37, 26, fos. 210–211d.]
May 8.
St. James's.
195 Draft instructions for James Oglethorpe to be general and commander-in-chief of forces in or to be in South Carolina and Georgia. You are immediately to proceed to South Carolina and enquire into Spanish military preparations. Copies of several letters reporting an intended attempt on Georgia will be given to you. You will dispose the forces for the defence of both provinces and put forts in good order. You will not give offence to the Spaniards, nor suffer encroachments on Spanish territory, and you will use your endeavours that our Indians commit no hostilities against the Spanish Indians. But if any part of the territories included in the charters of 1663, 1666 or 1730, possessed by British subjects in 1670, is attacked you will defend it and act offensively. If you suspect an attack, give notice to commanders of ships stationed in those parts that they may act for the defence of the said territories. Early notice will be sent you of the outcome of the negotiations between us and Spain. You will correspond with one of the Secretaries of State. Signed, George R. 7 pp. Annexed,
195. i. List of papers annexed to General Oglethorpe's instructions. Extract of letter from Havana, 7 September 1737. Extracts of letters from Consul Cayley to Duke of Newcastle, 21 January, 4, 11, 18, 25 February 1737/8. Copy of letter from Mr. Jenkins to Roger Drake, Bristol, 8 April 1738 enclosing copy of letter from Kingston, Jamaica, 20 February. Copy of letter from Carthagena, 10 February. Copy of letter from Governor of Havana to President of Council of Jamaica, 12 January 1738. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 654, fos. 133–138d.]
May 9.
Jamaica.
196 Governor Edward Trelawny to Duke of Newcastle. I arrived at Port Royal in this island on 29 April where I was received by the president of the council and other principal persons with the usual ceremonies and my commission was published. The next day in council I took and administered to each councillor the oaths required by law. Copies of my declaration, the council's answer and my reply are annexed. The next council was appointed to meet on 5 May. In the meantime pursuant to my first instruction I informed myself concerning the disputes which had passed between John Gregory, commander-in-chief of this island before my arrival, and the four councillors who had withdrawn their attendance. After all proper enquiry I judged it proper to summon them to resume their places in council; this I was the more ready to do by Mr. Gregory's giving up the matter without any difficulty. Three of those gentlemen, namely Edward Charlton, Henry Dawkins and William Gordon, came to me before that day and excused themselves from reaccepting that office, but with the strongest expressions of duty to H.M. and civility to myself. The fourth, Temple Lawes, took his seat again that day. In order to supply the three vacancies with all expedition I proposed to several persons of the best characters, fortunes and interest my recommendation of them to you and the Council of Trade and Plantations. But I found a strange reluctance in general to accept of that office; so that of all those whom I offered to recommend, none but the three following gentlemen, Sir Simon Clarke, Bart., Edward Garthwaite, and Samuel Whitehorne, were willing to be councillors. And therefore I beg you to propose them to H.M. as persons very proper for that trust and zealous to promote his service. I shall lose no time in enquiring into the characters and abilities of twelve other persons best qualified for that trust and will transmit their names with all convenient speed to you, pursuant to my 5th instruction. The present assembly being as far as I can judge composed of as proper persons as any others who may be chosen in a new one, I have continued it; and a proclamation has been made for its meeting on 15 June next in order to proceed upon business. Signed. 3 pp. Endorsed, Recd. 21 July. Enclosed,
196. i. Governor Trelawny's declaration to the Council of Jamaica, 30 April 1738, the Council's answer, 1 May 1738, and Governor Trelawny's reply. Copies. 3 pp. [C.O. 137, 56, fos. 95–98d.]
May 10.
Spanish Town.
197 Letter of John Baillie. No addressee. Governor Trelawny arrived here 29th ult. when he delivered me your's to Mr. Inglis enclosing your deputation to him dated 31 January last. Mrs. Inglis has also had one from Messrs. Feads of 21 February, they at that time having heard of the death of Mr. Inglis. I did advise them of it in December last and at the same time did presume to send you my proposals for your office. I should be glad to have your answer and hope ere this can reach you that my friends have settled the affair, and the more so that Mr. Jones who came with the governor acquaints me that you have not as yet had any benefit from your patent. If you have given me the deputation, my brother has my orders to be punctual with you and to have 50l. ready for you every three months. Upon Mr. Inglis's death I gave security to the country here in 4,000l. for my fidelity in office, and Mr. Trelawny has continued me until I should hear from you, which I hope will be soon. Sigied. 1½ small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 21 July. [C.O. 137, 56, fos. 99–100d.]
May 10.
Palace Court.
198 Minutes of Common Council of Georgia. Read report from committee of accounts dated 23 March 1737/8 that the accountant had acquainted the committee that by accounts received from Georgia the expenses for the colony in America for seven months from November 1736 to midsummer 1737 amounted to 5,905l. 5s. 9½d. which is 843l. 12s. 3d. per month, and for nine months from midsummer 1737 to Lady Day 1738 including the sola bills sent for defraying the said expenses to that time they amounted to 5,729l. 19s. 7¼d. which is 636l. 13s. 3d. per month. Besides these expenses paid and appropriated for payment there are demands for certified accounts of stores, necessaries and pay still due and unpaid to the amount of 2,228l. 15s. 5d., which when paid out of the 8,000l. granted this session of Parliament the said stores, necessaries and sola bills now in the colony will be more than sufficient to supply the expense thereof upon the foot of the last established allowances sent over with Mr. Stephens until the end of July 1738, the said allowances not amounting to 500l. a month. Which established allowances, being twice read over, the committee were of opinion ought to be immediately struck off and be no longer defrayed by the Trustees, they relating to the defence of the colony which the Trustees are no longer concerned in the providing for, because the money granted in this session of Parliament is only towards settling the colony, which several articles are as follows: the expenses of officers, rangers and men at the several forts, expenses of crews of pettiaugua and scoutboat etc. amounting to 2,203l. 7s. 2d. The committee were further of opinion that the persons employed in the store at Frederica and the storekeeper and cattlekeeper at the Darien (amounting in all to 74l. a year) ought to be struck off, the time of maintenance of the inhabitants in the southern division of Georgia expiring in February last, and that for the keeping of such stores as may be necessary hereafter the care should be under the direction of one storekeeper for the whole province.
The committee afterwards took into consideration the future expenses of the colony and were of opinion that they should be limited to the following articles and sums for one year to commence from midsummer next: bailiffs and recorder at Savannah and Frederica, 80l.; constables and tithingmen, 300l.; storekeeper and clerk, 48l.; two more clerks, 36l.; an overseer for services in looking after the millwright, 10l.; secretary of the Trust's affairs in Georgia, his son and servants, 120l.; four ministers in Georgia, 200l.; support of sick, widows and orphans, 150l.; messenger between Savannah and Charleston, 50l., between Frederica and Savannah, 80l.; two millwrights at not more than 4s. a day till conclusion; Mr. Auspourger the surveyor, 54l. 15l. with an assistant as required at 12d. a day; two smiths, 50l.; the Italian silkwinders, 70l. 12s. 11d.; gardener at 1s. 6d. a day, 23l. 9s. 6d.; cowkeeper at Ebenezer, 24l. 12s. 7d. and 1s. per cow for all to 100, but all above to be sent to Ebenezer; seaboats at Tybee and Frederica instead of pettiaugua hire, which amounted to 113l. 9s. 5d.; contingencies, 120l. Which several expenses the committee were of opinion should be defrayed by issues of sola bills in Georgia to be sent over under the Trustees' seal and to be filled up to William Stephens, Thomas Causton and Henry Parker, to each of whom an account of the said expenses should be sent, and any two of them should be empowered to issue the said bills for these expenses and that they should be directed to send the Trustees an account signed by both of them on every issue showing to whom and and for what each issue was made. Resolved that the council agree with the committee in every article.
Ordered that 500l. be appropriated out of the 8,000l. granted in this session of Parliament when received to answer the like sum in 100 sola bills of 5l. each to be immediately sent over to Georgia (being part of the 2,850l. residue of the sola bills ordered to be made out 10 August last and still unsent) towards defraying the above established allowances for one year from midsummer next; and that by endorsement on the said bills Col. Oglethorpe be desired to order the same to be issued by William Stephens, Thomas Causton and Henry Parker or any two of them. Resolved that Col. Oglethorpe be indemnified against the endorsements of the said 100 sola bills and the seal affixed to such act of indemnity, secretary to countersign. Resolved that when any of the said sola bills shall be returned to England for payment any five of the council be empowered to draw on the Bank for payment.
A further report was made from the committee of accounts that they had considered the service of Thomas Causton, the storekeeper employed upwards of five years at 40l. a year, and that the business of the storekeeper being now much reduced and Mr. Causton being also otherwise employed, he should have a month's time after the receipt of the Trustees' next letter to make out the remain of stores and his accounts of cash and stores to be forwarded to England and that his salary be continued from February last to the end of a month after the receipt of such letter, and that he should be assisted by the clerks whom the Trustees have sent over till his accounts are perfected; which when perfected and received, if allowed, he should be further gratified for his past service. Resolved that the council agree with the opinion of the committee.
A further report was made from the committee of accounts that they proposed Thomas Stephens to take possession of the remaining stores at Savannah and care of the remaining stores at Frederica, to be allowed 30l. a year and a clerk at 10l. a year and 8l. a year more in lieu of provisions for the clerk. Resolved that Thomas Jones be appointed storekeeper with a clerk and allowances, to take possession one month after the receipt of the Trustees' next letter in Georgia.
Read petition of Major William Cook for leave for his daughter Ann when of age to surrender her interest in the lot at Savannah whereby she may hold as her property the house and lot at Frederica which he shall build and cultivate for her; resolved that the council agree. Read letter from Mr. Whitefield desiring stationery; ordered that it be sent. Col. Oglethorpe's account towards discharging balance of 1,093l. 0s. 9½d. stated to be due from him 9 June last was delivered in; referred to committee of accounts. 10½ pp. [C.O. 5, 690, pp. 143–153.]
May 10.
Palace Court.
199 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Read letter from Rev. George Whitefield dated Gibraltar, 20 February 1737/8, intimating that since his departure from England he hears Rev. John Wesley is returned to England and is therefore desirous, if the Trustees think proper for him to alter his measures, they would send their orders to him. Ordered that a letter be sent to Mr. Whitefield permitting him to perform all religious offices as deacon of the Church of England at Savannah as well as Frederica until another minister is provided for Savannah. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 687, p. 71.]
May 10.
Savannah.
200 Captain Hugh Mackay to Trustees for Georgia. The affidavits transmitted to you by Mr. Causton will show you the necessity that obliged me to act against common form by compelling the ship I was in to endeavour first to make the river Savannah (contrary to the order of Capt. Fanshaw, commander of H.M.S. Phoenix), where I brought safe to anchor within the bar 6th inst. Besides the reasons contained in the affidavits, every man, woman and child I had on board was then or had been lately sick, of which the people of Carolina knew very well how to use to our hurt. As I could have no reason or view to act as I did but the good of the king's service and that of the colony's, I hope I shall meet with protection against the clamours of those that endeavoured to hurt both and will use specious pretences of forms of service to colour their bad intentions. Notwithstanding the universal sickness in the ship I was in, we lost but two infants of all those that came from England. Poor Mr. Whitefield did not escape the common distemper. As Gen. Oglethorpe will ere now be in his passage hither I thought it my duty to have said affidavits transmitted to you and to send you this account. Ensign Mackay from St. Andrew's came here to-day who tells me that all to the southward are in high spirits. Signed. P.S. The other two ships that had the people from Gibraltar had little or no sickness. 2 small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 15 July 1738. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 103–104d.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
201 Council of Trade and Plantations to Committee of Privy Council. Pursuant to your order of 13 January 1734/5 we have considered the representation of the Governor and Company of Rhode Island about the boundary disputes between them and Massachusetts. It appears that this matter has been contested since 1664. In 1733 the two colonies each appointed three indifferent persons to decide the matter but the commissioners failed to agree. We are of opinion that H.M. should appoint commissioners from out of the neighbouring provinces to mark out the said boundaries and in the meantime should order the governors of the two colonies that the people continue in peaceable possession of their property without molestation. Entry. Signatories, Monson, Edward Ashe, R. Plumer, R. Herbert, 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 917, fos. 109–110d.; draft in C.O. 5, 896, fos. 94–95d.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
202 Same to same. We have considered the petition of Benjamin and William Johnson of Antigua setting forth that they have been accused by some negroes (of whom part were under sentence of death) of being concerned in a conspiracy to destroy all the white inhabitants in Antigua; that, the testimony of heathen slaves not being allowed to be good evidence against them (who are freemen and Christians), a bill was brought in and passed by the council and assembly to attaint them of high treason. The governor refused his assent until the king's pleasure should be known, and the petitioners pray that the king's assent thereto should be denied.
We have been attended by the petitioners' solicitor and the agent for the assembly and his solicitor, and have considered the bill of attainder and the governor's letter relating thereto. We have also had before us Mr. Kerby, speaker of the assembly when the said bill was passed, and Messrs. Vernon and Arbuthnott, two of the justices who took the first examination concerning this conspiracy, who informed us that the two Johnsons were so far from being suspected during the examination that they were employed by Mr. Arbuthnott to make further discoveries concerning the same, and that there had been no mention made of the Johnsons during the space of more than two months while Mr. Vernon and Mr. Arbuthnott were concerned in the said enquiry until a day or two before the finishing of it when one of the blacks under examination said that "If we should say anything of the Johnsons?", which expression seemed then of so little moment that no notice was taken of it. Mr. Kerby declared to us that the evidence was in no sort satisfactory to him and he produced a letter written to him by the attorney-general (who was a member of the assembly though not able for want of health to attend the whole progress of the bill) by which it appears he was of opinion that the evidence as far as he went through with the remarking of it was nothing but a heap of inconsistencies and incoherencies. We have likewise been informed by one Mr. Lyons, a man of character and substance in Antigua, that he saw them do their duty during the time of the conspiracy as the white men did and that they did not fly or absent themselves on account of the accusation. Notwithstanding all which we must acquaint you that Mr. Arbuthnott and Mr. Vernon, one of whom was of the council and the other of the assembly and present during the whole affair, were still of opinion that the petitioners were guilty. But upon the whole, as the matter seems to us at least to be doubtful, the evidence being almost entirely that of blacks, some of whom were under condemnation and consequently under a double incapacity both as slaves and persons under sentence of death, we are of opinion it would be more advisable to incline to the side of mercy and therefore recommend that H.M. direct the governor not to give his assent to the bill. Entry. Signatories, Monson, M. Bladen, Edward Ashe, R. Plumer, R. Herbert. 4½ pp. [C.O. 153, 16 fos. 68d-70d.]
May 11.
St. Jago de la
Vega.
203 Governor Edward Trelawny to Council of Trade and Plantations. I arrived at this island on 29 April. Pursuant to my first instruction I made no delay to inform myself concerning the disputes which had passed between John Gregory, commander-in-chief of this island before my arrival, and the four councillors who had withdrawn their attendance. After all proper enquiry I judged it expedient for H.M.'s service and the good and welfare of this island to permit them to resume their places. Three of those gentlemen, namely Edward Charlton, Henry Dawkins and William Gordon, declined reaccepting of that office; the fourth, Temple Lawes, resumed his seat in council on 5 May. In order to supply the three vacancies I earnestly recommend to you the following gentlemen, Sir Simon Clarke, Bart., Edward Garthwaite, and Samuel Whitehorne. I shall lose no time in enquiring into the characters and abilities of twelve persons more, best qualified for that trust, and transmit their names with all convenient speed to you pursuant to my 5th instruction. I found at my coming here that Mr. Gregory had put into the council Rose Fuller and Samuel Dicker in order to fill up the vacancies to the number of seven; the latter I recommended to you before I left England, the other is a gentleman of character and fortune to whom there can be no objection. Signed. 2 pp. Endorsed, Recd., Read 21 July 1738. [C.O. 137, 22, fos. 195, 195d, 198, 198d.]
May 11.204 Instructions by Trustees for Georgia to John Mathias Kramer. You are to acquaint foreigners who apply to you for land in Georgia to settle at their own expense that the Trustees will grant to each man of 21 and upwards 50 acres in tail male, with an additional 50 acres for each son except the eldest. The Trustees will grant 500 acres in tail male to gentlemen whose birth, honour, reputation and ability they approve of, they to carry over 10 menservants and mark out the land within three months of arrival. They will grant to menservants at the end of five years service 20 acres in tail male. You may engage as far as 60 heads for servants who will work for five years; if they can pay their passages within six weeks of arrival they can be free. Children under six to stay with parents; boys over six to serve till 25, girls till 18. During service they will be fed and clothed; and at the end of service granted 20 acres of land. Persons born in Georgia will have liberties of natural born subjects within any British dominion. Liberty of conscience is allowed to all, free exercise of religion to all but Papists so they give not offence and scandal. Entry. Signatory, Benjamin Martyn. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 670, pp. 369–370.]
May 12.
Boston.
205 Governor Jonathan Belcher to Duke of Newcastle, enclosing copy of letter received from President Bull of South Carolina with the papers it covered. This day I have had the master of a sloop and his mate examined who are come from Jamaica in thirty days, by which you will see that it is probable the Spaniards have a design to make a descent on the infant colony of Georgia. I wish Mr. Oglethorpe may be there to receive them. Signed, 2 small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 19 June. Enclosed,
205. i. Affidavit of William Lyford, William Hodge and William Patterson, 6 April 1738. Copy, of No. 158. ii-iii, certified by J. Belcher. 1 p.
205. ii. President Bull to Governor Belcher, 8 April 1738, enclosing copies of letter and affidavits suggesting Spanish design of attacking Georgia. Copy, certified by J. Belcher. 1 p.
205. iii. Affidavit of Capt. Theophilus Bradford, master of the sloop Bathsheba, sworn before Jacob Wendell and Anthony Stoddard, justices of the peace, at Boston, 12 May 1738. In Jamaica on 9 and 10 April deponent heard of a Spanish fleet of six large ships and twelve other vessels bound from Havana for Georgia. 1 p.
205. iv. Affidavit of Daniel Greenell, mate of Bathsheba, sworn as preceding. In Jamaica on 10 April deponent heard Mr. Simmons, a merchant at St. Anne's Harbour, give news of a Spanish fleet of forty vessels, seven being large, sailed from Havana for Georgia. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 899, fos. 327–334d.]
May 12.206 Memorial of Henry Popple on behalf of Col. George Thomas of Antigua, to Council of Trade and Plantations, requesting that Thomas may be restored to his seat in the council of Antigua. When he attempted to take his seat last February he was prevented by Governor Mathew on the grounds of being governor of Pennsylvania. Col. Thomas has been appointed to that government by the proprietors of Pennsylvania, but owing to a dispute between them and Lord Baltimore, has not yet kissed the king's hand or given the usual security. It is presumed Governor Mathew's objection can therefore be of no weight. Signed. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 12 May 1738. Enclosed,
206. i. Abstract of minutes of council of Antigua, 24 February 1737/8, recording refusal of Governor Mathew to admit George Thomas. Copy, certified by De la Court Walsh, deputy clerk to council. ¼p. [C.O. 152, 23, fos. 135, 135d, 140–141d.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
207 Council of Trade and Plantations to Duke of Newcastle enclosing representation on the case of James Wimble, late master and part-owner of Rebecca brigantine. Entry. Signatories, Monson, M. Bladen, Edward Ashe, R. Plumer. 1 p. Enclosed,
207. i. 12 May 1738. Same to King. We have considered the petition of James Wimble and the paper annexed, called a commission from Governor Woods Rogers to protect the rakers of salt at Exuma. We have been attended frequently by Mr. Wimble. But he laid no evidence before us to show what share he had in the said brigantine nor any relating to the value of the same, neither did it appear to us from any evidence or papers produced by him that the brigantine when lost was on your service; wherefore we cannot recommend him as a proper object of your bounty in respect to the loss he may have sustained. Entry. Signatories, as covering letter. 2 pp. [C.O. 24, 1, pp. 326–327.]
May 15.208 Francis Fane to Council of Trade and Plantations, reporting on an act passed at Antigua in 1737 for the trial of John Coteen, a free negro man, and Thomas Winthorpe, a free mulatto man, for an intended insurrection to destroy the white inhabitants of this island, and declaring the same to be high treason etc. This act is intended upon a particular purpose to alter what has always been the unvaried law of this country: that is, not to admit slaves to give testimony in courts of justice against free persons. And by the preamble it seems to have arisen upon a supposition that the two persons who are the objects of this act were concerned in a most horrid conspiracy with slaves to murder all the white persons upon this island. If the facts were true upon which this act is grounded, I think it might be matter of doubt whether it might be expedient or even just to pass this law, which is to establish an illegal method in this particular case of trying and condemning persons after the crime had been long supposed to be committed. But what I shall chiefly rely upon in my observations upon this act is that this method of proceeding is highly unjust unless the facts recited in the preamble of this act were very fully proved: whether that was the case abroad I cannot pretend to say, but I must observe that no one circumstance of guilt against these persons has been laid before me. And as the act is passed upon that foundation I think it was incumbent upon this examination to have had the same evidence appearing to you as had been produced before the legislature abroad. But as that has not been done I must consider it merely as it stands upon the act itself, and in that light it appears to me to be an act of a very extraordinary and unprecedented nature and highly dangerous to the lives and properties of H.M.'s free subjects. For if once the testimony of slaves is occasionally to be introduced in criminal cases against free men it may open a door to the greatest oppression and injustice; and it is to be observed that the very slaves whose testimony, as I am informed, was made use of upon the trial of these two persons were actually then under conviction for the crimes of treason and rebellion and therefore in point of law incompetent witnesses, supposing they had been free men. Signed. 2¼ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 15 May, Read 16 May 1738. [C.O. 152, 23, fos. 136, 136d, 139, 139d.]
May 15.
Chelsea.
209 Edward Mann to Council of Trade and Plantations. As I have no design of returning soon to St. Christopher's, I thought it necessary to acquaint you of it that my seat in council may be supplied with another that the service may not suffer by my absence. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 17 May 1738. [C.O. 152, 23, fos. 137–138d.]
May 16.
Antigua.
210 Governor William Mathew to Alured Popple. I have delivered to Capt. Wage a box containing three bills for Montserrat, vizt. Acts for raising a levy etc., for more speedy and effectual dispatch of public business, and to explain and amend an Act for repairing highways etc. I send also a Nevis bill entitled Act for raising a poll-tax on negroes and other slaves etc. Enclosed is testimony of Capt. Ignatius Semmes relating to his ship being taken by the Spaniards out of Puerto Rico. [Continues as in No. 247.] Signed. 4 small pp. [C.O. 152, 23, fos. 151–152d.]
May 16.
St. James's.
211 Royal appointment of William Bull as Lieut.-Governor of South Carolina in the room of Thomas Broughton, deceased. Entry. 1 p. [C.O. 324,37, p. 111.]
May 16.212 Petition of David Dunbar to Council of Trade and Plantations, praying that his case and sufferings may be recommended to the Duke of Newcastle for H.M.'s determination and that his licence of absence be renewed for one year or until the matters depending are determined. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 16 May 1738. [C.O. 5, 880, fos. 273–274d.]
May 16/17.213 Lease and release by Trustees for Georgia to Bailiffs of Savannah of 3,000 acres of land in Georgia. The bailiffs shall grant to every man of 21 years or upwards being Protestant who arrives in Georgia within three years from the date hereof lands not exceeding 50 acres. Entry. 5½ pp. [C.O. 5, 670, pp. 352–357.]
May 16/17.214 Same by same to Bailiffs of Frederica of 3,000 acres of land in trust for grants of 5-acre lots to soldiers of Gen. Oglethorpe's regiment. Entry. 4½ pp. [C.O. 5, 670, pp. 358–362.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
215 Council of Trade and Plantations to Duke of Newcastle recommending that Lieut.-Governor David Dunbar's licence of absence be renewed for a further year. Signed, Monson, M. Bladen, Edward Ashe, James Brudenell. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 932, fos. 1–2d; draft in C.O. 5, 896, fos. 96–97d; entry in C.O. 5, 917, fo. 111, 111d.]
May 17.
Palace Court.
216 Minutes of Common Council of Georgia. Resolved that the expense of the Georgia scout-boat, being 258l. 15s. 1d. stand part of the expenses of the colony from midsummer 1738 to midsummer 1739; and that it be referred to committee of correspondence to draw up an advertisement for a safe method of correspondence for the inhabitants of Georgia and their friends in England. A petition from the inhabitants of Highgate was read complaining of the sterility of their land; resolved that William Stephens and Hugh Anderson take a view and report. Read report from committee of correspondence 26 April 1738 that they were of opinion Henry Parker be allowed two menservants belonging to the Trust, that clothes to the value of 20l. be sent him in consideration of his services as second bailiff at Savannah, and that Thomas Christie in case he continues as recorder of Savannah be allowed two servants. Resolved that the council agree with this report. Read report from committee of accounts 19 April 1738 that Col. Oglethorpe be empowered to lend 200l. to Abraham De Lyon of Savannah to help with the improvement of vines; resolved that the council agree with this report. Ordered that a letter be sent to Thomas Causton acquainting him that the Trustees will allow no other expenses but those estimated, and that notice be taken in the said letter of the great expenses incurred by him for which he has given no satisfactory account and desiring copies of his daybooks and ledgers from Lady Day 1734 and that he send the same every three months.
Read report from committee of accounts 3 May 1738 that Col. Oglethorpe be desired to direct a remain of stores to be taken immediately on his arrival; that Mr. Wragg's account of freight and charges of 121½ heads of Palatine servants landed in Georgia being considered and Capt. Hewitt's protest to support extraordinary charges for want of a pilot at Tybee, the committee were of opinion that 100l. and no more be allowed for the ship putting in at Tybee and the claim to more than 100l. be kept open until Col. Oglethorpe's enquiry on arrival in Georgia. On Capt. Dunbar's memorial for primage for two voyages of the Prince of Wales in 1734 and 1735, the committee were of opinion that 28l. ought to be allowed and the balance of 13l. 5s. 7d. paid to Capt. Dunbar in discharge of all accounts; resolved that the council agree with this report. Resolved that it be referred to the committee of accounts to determine the application of the Trust's servants. Seal to be affixed to letter to Mr. Causton. Read report from committee of correspondence and accounts that the plan for the church at Savannah drawn by Mr. Flitcroft be put into the hands of Capt. Tomaz to make such alterations as he judges necessary and to send over an estimate of the expense and enquire what Trust servants can be spared. Resolved that the council agree with this report.
Read report from committee of accounts that they had examined into discharge delivered in by Col. Oglethorpe amounting to 578l, 17s. 10¾d. and were of opinion that 40l. 10s. should be accounted for by Capt. Cornish and Capt. Thomas, that 115l. 5s. was a reasonable charge in respect of 230½ heads of passengers on the Simond and London Merchant in 1735, and that when the 200l. has been advanced to Abraham De Lyon by Col. Oglethorpe the balance due from him will be 424l. 2s. 2¾d.; resolved that the council agree to this report. The accountant acquainted the council that Col. Oglethorpe desired to stand charged with the 40l. 10s. paid to Captains Cornish and Thomas; resolved that the council agree with Col. Oglethorpe and that there remains 464l. 12s. 2¾d. to be accounted for by him. Ordered that these resolutions be sent to Col. Oglethorpe, sealed and signed by the secretary. 8 pp. [C.O. 5, 690, pp. 154–161.]
May 17.
Palace Court.
217 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Received receipts from Bank for 1l. 1s. consideration money for grant to Capt. Alexander Heron, for 10l. paid in by Sir William Heathcote, Bt., his subscription towards building two churches in Georgia, and 10l. paid in by Col. Oglethorpe for the same purpose, ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 687, p. 72.]
May 17.218 Instructions by Trustees for Georgia to Capt. John Thomas to estimate the cost of building a church at Savannah. If any small alteration may make the said building a place of refuge and defence for the inhabitants, compute also that further expense. Enquire what servants of the Trust can be spared for the work, which will diminish the cost of labour. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 670, p. 365.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
219 Council of Trade and Plantations to the King, recommending Mathew Mills, junior, to be of the council in St. Christopher's in the room of Edward Mann, resigned. Entry. Signatories, Monson, M. Bladen, Edward Ashe, James Brudenell, R. Plumer. 1 p. [C.O. 153, 16, fo. 71.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
220 Order of Committee of Council for Plantation Affairs referring the following to Council of Trade and Plantations. Signed, James Vernon. Seal. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 1 June, Read 9 June 1738. Enclosed,
220. i. President William Bull to Duke of Newcastle; Charleston, 23 December 1737, reporting state of artillery in South Carolina. Copy, of Cal. S.P. Col., 1737, No. 648. 1½ pp.
220. ii. Report of Commissioners of Fortifications of South Carolina to President Bull; Charleston, 23 December 1737. Copy, of Cal. S.P. Col., 1737, No. 648 i. 5 pp. [C.O. 5, 366, fos. 78–83d.]
May 19.
Palace Court.
221 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Sealed the following: lease and release dated 16 and 17 May 1738 for 3,000 acres to bailiffs of Frederica in trust for granting 5 acres to each soldier and N.C.O. of Col. Oglethorpe's regiment; same of same date for 3,000 acres to bailiffs of Savannah in trust for granting 50 acres to men being Protestants of 21 and upwards who arrive in Georgia within three years from the date; minute of resolution of Common Council relating to Col. Oglethorpe's account; same indemnifying Col. Oglethorpe against the endorsement of the Trustees' sola bills; a letter to Mr. Causton dated this day and several lists and accounts and invoice annexed; instruction to Thomas Jones. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 687, p. 73.]
May 19.
Georgia Office.
222 Benjamin Martyn to William Stephens. The Trustees have received your letter of 19 January last with your journal and are very much pleased with your being so particular in your accounts and hope you will go on to communicate by all opportunities. In your letter you take notice of a dissatisfaction among several persons upon the tenure of their lots being confined to heirs male and you make an observation on the great advantages of their going to the heirs general. The granting of lots to the heirs general the Trustees are persuaded will appear to you on a second reflection to be impracticable as the colony will consist of people of so many different countries. And to convince you that the Trustees have always had and still have a disposition to make the people perfectly easy in this particular and to grant the lots, whenever there is a failure of male issue, to the daughters of any proprietor, they have ordered me to enclose to you a clause in the printed terms (which are always offered to such persons who go at their own expense) relating to females, which is as follows: "When the land reverts to the Trust on the determination of the estate in tail male it is to be granted again to such persons as the Common Council of the Trustees shall think most for the advantage of the colony, and the Trust will have a special regard to the daughters of those who have made improvements on their lots not already provided for by having married or marrying persons in possession or entitled to lands in the province of Georgia in possession or remainder. And the wives of such persons in case they should survive their husbands are during their lives entitled to the mansion house and one-half of the lands improved by their husbands, that is to say enclosed with a fence of six feet high." The Trustees think proper to adhere to the covenants which have been made in their several grants and are determined to take the forfeit of grants of those who neglect to cultivate their lands. Entry, 1 p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 55d.]
May 19.
Georgia Office.
223 Same to Rev. George Whitefield. In your letter to Mr. Verelst from Gibraltar dated 20 February you take notice of Mr. Wesley's return to England and desire to know whether the Trustees would have you alter the measure which they proposed. They are pleased with the zeal which appears in you and do by this permit you to perform all religious offices as deacon of the Church of England at Savannah as well as Frederica until another minister is provided for Savannah. They have no doubt but by your prudence every spirit of dissension will be laid amongst the people as far as you can contribute to it and that sobriety and industry and a due reverence to the magistracy will be constantly recommended by you to them as the most effectual means to make them quiet and happy and to qualify them for a just observance of the worship of God. The Trustees have ordered that another box of stationery be sent to you, as you desire, by the first opportunity. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 56d.]
May 19.
Georgia Office.
224 Same to Thomas Hawkins at Frederica. The Trustees are very well pleased with the account you give in your letter of 28 November last of the great harmony amongst the people of your part of the province. As this in some measure must depend on the conduct of the magistrates, they have no doubt of its continuance from your's and the other gentlemen's behaviour. They desire you will omit no opportunity of writing to them and that you will acquaint them with whatever occurs worth your notice; you cannot be too particular in writing to them since they can only govern themselves in their care of the colony by the accounts they receive from thence. The improvements in building and cultivation of lands, the births and deaths of the people, are what they want to be constantly informed of, as likewise of their behaviour in general. The Trustees are determined to show the greatest marks of their favour to those who shall be found to be the most sober and industrious. They have ordered the drugs, of which you sent an invoice, to be sent over to you, Entry. ¾ p, [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 56d, 57.]
May 19.
Georgia Office.
225 Same to Hugh Anderson. The Earl of Egmont laid your letter of 10 August 1737 before the Trustees who are very well pleased with the care you have already taken and the observations in your memorial concerning the state of the public garden. They are concerned that the garden has been so strangely neglected by those who had the management of it and that it has been so much prejudiced by the people's cutting down the trees which were a proper shelter of it from the winds. They have no doubt but by your care and industry it may soon be brought to answer their expectations, and they will give orders that you shall have necessary assistance. They have always designed it as a nursery for such productions as it is the interest of the province to cultivate, such as mulberries, vines, olives etc., which were to be delivered out to the people as they could get their grounds ready to receive them; they have still the same view and therefore desire that you will let them know by the first opportunity how many days a ditch surrounding the garden of four feet deep and proportionably wide together with a hedge on the inside of the pales will take up, also how many days in probability the making a pump or well in the garden will take up, and how many days to make proper divisions by hedges in the garden by two men. The Trustees hear that it is best to raise mulberries from seed; they recommend it to you therefore to raise as many as you can from the seed at the properest season as also plenty of vines and olive plants. In the meantime when the grapes are ripening the Trustees think it necessary that no person be admitted to enter the garden except the magistrates or other persons who have a right to inspect it, and they hope that due care will be taken for the preservation of all the trees and plants in it, and they recommend it to you that the growth from the stocks of the trees next adjacent to the garden on the north and north-west side be preserved in order for a shelter. You were acquainted in December last that Lord Egmont had communicated to the Trustees your desire of a lot for one of your younger sons, and that the Trustees thought it most for your's and your son's advantage that a grant should be made to your son of 500 acres of land which you may take care shall be improved for him. Entry. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 56.]
May 19.
Georgia Office.
226 Harman Verelst to Thomas Causton per Mr. Jones on Union, Capt. Moverley. The Trustees received your letter of 14 January last with the account of Capt. Thomson's arrival with servants for the Trust and others at his owner's risk, together with the particular dispositions of those at the owner's risk, whereof only 10 women, 1 boy and 1 girl are in that disposition charged as belonging to the Trust and all the others at the owner's risk, being 44 in number, are chargeable on other proprietors. Yet in another list of those servants you gave the captain with a receipt at the bottom, you acknowledge to have received them all for the use and account of the Trust and quote the Trustees' orders of 20 May 1737 for that purpose; which orders were that if any of the servants sent at the owner's risk should not be paid for at the end of thirty days from their arrival, the captain had leave to deliver such servants and their indentures to you for the Trustees' use to be employed in the public work. But such servants were not to be disposed of to private persons upon credit but were to remain the servants of the public for cultivating lands for the use of the colony and to save the expense of hiring servants for public work which has been so great a charge. As you have therefore without any authority brought this charge upon the Trust, the Trustees have determined that you must answer for the charge of the said 44 servants making 43½ heads at 8l. per head demanded of the Trustees by virtue of your receipt to Capt. Thomson, they being all by your disposition become the property of private persons on credit, which amounts to 348l. sterling, against which they will allow for the man sick at Savannah if he shall appear to remain the Trustees' servant, one woman-servant to William Stephens, and one woman-servant to John Browne of Highgate, on their certificates. As to all the others, the 8l. per head must be made good to the Trustees and not in the hire of servants to work it out, for that would be an extraordinary proceeding to pay for indented servants lent to private persons and be repaid by the hire of them out again to the Trustees themselves who paid for them.
You have further taken 9½ heads of German servants brought by the Three Sisters on your own account without any permission from the Trustees, for whose passage the Trustees have paid including the charge of delivering them at Tybee 6l. 2s. 6d. sterling per head amounting to 58l. 3s. 9d. which you are further chargeable with. And on inspecting the accounts current you lately sent them, they observe that large credits had been given to several persons for which they cannot find any orders sent by them to you for that purpose, and herewith you receive a list of the balances stated due from those persons on their said accounts current amounting to 890l. 7s. 8½d. sterling. They therefore call upon you to know the reason why such credits were given. The Trustees are very sorry to find all their endeavours hitherto so ineffectual for obtaining a regular and known expense of the colony and their providing a proper means of defraying it, which have been so much hindered by that surprising liberty you have taken of receiving every ship's cargo brought to Georgia and the certifying the receipt of them to demand payment in England even when their cargoes were not wanted, as in the case of Robert Ellis so lately certified as 3 February last, while at the same time the Trustees were calculating to provide for the expenses they ordered to be made and sending their sola bills to defray them. Yet they not only find these expenses defrayed in another manner but also their sola bills come to England for payment without any cash accounts of them showing when received and to whom and for what issued. This conduct of yours is so dissatisfactory that the Trustees find it high time to put an end to all credit whatsoever and have therefore given public notice in several different gazettes. [As in letter to William Stephens. See No. 228.] The Trustees have sent you the annexed account of the expense of the colony paid for in England and accrued since midsummer last of the sola bills sent you and also of the provisions and effects received by you since that time, amounting to 11,152l 2s. 1d. sterling, which surprising amount has been owing to this unrestrained method of your receiving of everything brought you and making the Trustees debtor for the conveniency and encouragement of ships to overstock the colony with their cargoes. These large quantities of provisions and goods must richly provide for all expenses of the colony before the receipt of this letter and produce a great surplus for the maintenance of the Trustees' servants who are the only persons now on the Trustees' expense to maintain and for which they appropriate this great remain of provisions and goods as their surplus fund to do so.
All the established allowances sent over by Mr. Stephens and directed to continue to Lady Day 1738 and every article of expense contained in the Trustees' letter by him do upon the receipt of this letter entirely cease and determine. [Orders to Henry Parker regarding expenditure and issue of stores in 1738–9 here repeated. See No. 229.]
Your cash-books for August, September and October 1736 are still wanting as also the particular answers to queries on sums not explaining the services they were paid for; and the most effectual way to come at the proper answers is by sending the Trustees copies of all your journals or day-books and ledgers from Lady Day 1734 from which time you are accountable, which they now direct you to do and to employ some of their clerks in making them out. For with those copies and the cash-books I have, the above three months cash-books when sent, and your accounts current of all the sola bills issued by you, wherewith you have never yet charged yourself, will enable me to clear up those blind entries of payments which do not specify the services for which they were made, and for want of which you are returned accountable for a very large sum of money. Your cash-books from i November 1736 to 31 December 1737, except for the first month, are more properly monthly books for taking receipts in for money paid than cash-books, there being no entries of money received or of sola bills which are equal to money.
The Trustees, having paid 250l. of bills you have drawn on General Oglethorpe at several times, have so paid them in discharge of your allowances of 40l. a year as storekeeper and 10l. a year as magistrate, which pay those allowances to February last. And they agree that you should have the allowance of 40l. a year as storekeeper continued until one month after the receipt of this letter and no longer, there being very little business for a storekeeper now excepting the proper care and issuing of what shall remain in the store; and that they do not intend to trouble you with because they think that your attendance upon the court and other avocations will fully take up your time. You are to make out an account of the remain of stores and of what demands, if any, there are upon the store and send it certified by William Stephens, yourself and Henry Parker. You are, further, to send your cash-accounts up to the receipt of this letter to be followed with the copies of your books beforementioned with all convenient speed that the Trustees may examine your whole accounts and judge of the reasons that may support your conduct. For on their approving of your accounts and thereby being enabled to satisfy the public in a clear and regular manner of the particular services that these great expenses have been consumed in, the Trustees will not be unmindful of the great burthen that has lain upon you for these several years past, and therefore only want an opportunity by your accounting for these expenses as you ought to do to further consider your past services as storekeeper when that is done.
Thomas Jones, now going over with General Oglethorpe, is to enquire into Mr. Bradley's demands upon the Trust and the Trust's demands upon Mr. Bradley. Mr. Jones is appointed storekeeper at 30l. a year to commence at the expiration of one month after the receipt of this, and he is to have one of the Trustees' clerks to assist him. Abraham de Lyon's petition is approved. [See No. 227.] The Trustees have approved Major William Cook's two daughters being joint proprietors and successors of the house, garden-lot and farm-lot at Savannah lately belonging to Peter Gordon and by him surrendered to the Trustees, leave being given for the eldest daughter when of age to surrender her interest to her sister. The rent of this house from Lady Day last therefore belongs to the said daughters. The Common Council have nominated Robert Gilbert to succeed John Dearne deceased as Third Bailiff. Charles Wesley's health not permitting him to return to Georgia with General Oglethorpe, the Common Council have appointed John Clarke (who goes over with the general) to be secretary for Indian affairs. John Coates, the constable and one of the trustees for the orphans, having deserted the colony, you are desired to move the town-court to name another trustee in his room and to call upon the trustees for the orphans to send an account of their proceedings to the Trustees from time to time.
The Trustees are much concerned that Savannah is at present destitute of a minister and they hope the magistrates will by good examples and a due care of the morals of the people do what in them lies to supply that present want which the Trustees are very anxious to have removed by the first opportunity, and that in the meantime the magistrates are desired not to absent themselves on Sundays but to assemble together and cause prayers to be read to the people by some decent person who can read. They direct that all unlicenced public houses be immediately suppressed. [Orders for Henry Parker and Thomas Christie regarding servants for themselves repeated here. See Nos. 229, 230.] Captain Thomas, an engineer going over with General Oglethorpe, has been desired to make an estimate when at Savannah for building a church there which he is to send over together with a plan for the same by the first opportunity, and you are to let him know what number of the Trustees' servants can be spared for that work. There is on board the transport ships 85 tons of flint stones, 5 tons of Danzig stones, 77 bars of Swedish iron containing 32 cwt. 2 qrs. 16 lbs. at 15s. 6d. per cwt., 100 bars of Russia iron containing 54 cwt. 3 qrs. 10 lbs. at 14s. 6d. per cwt., and 6 faggots of steel containing 4 cwt. 1 qr. 4 lbs. at 30s. per cwt., all for building the church at Savannah besides the deal boards used in building cabins on board the three first transport ships which sailed in January last and part of those used in building cabins on board the transport ships now departing for Georgia. [Orders to Henry Parker concerning parcels shipped for the Trustees are repeated here. See No. 229.] [Orders to William Stephens concerning lands for religious uses are repeated here. See No. 228.] There is another Trust grant now goes over for 300 acres more to be set out in the southern part of the province to be cultivated for the religious uses of the colony and in the first place to provide for the maintenance of a minister at Frederica. [Orders to William Stephens concerning 3,000 acres for grants to settlers of three years standing are here repeated. See No. 228.]
As this letter contains matters of the highest importance to the welfare of the colony and to the satisfying of the Trustees who take so much pains to establish it, they have affixed their seal hereto and the annexing of all the papers herewith sent you, and they expect a due obedience be paid to these their unanimous resolutions; and Thomas Jones who delivers you this letter has their orders to take your receipt for the same. Entry. P.S. Since the writing of this letter the Trustees have received advice of two more accounts certified by you 23 January 1737/8 for provisions and necessaries from 7 November preceding received of Messrs. Minis & Salomons amounting together to 532l. 14s. 6d. which being added to the 11,152l. 2s. 1d. (your receipts since midsummer 1737) will increase the same to 11,684l. 16s. 7d. 7½ pp. Enclosed,
226. i. List of balances stated due from the following persons on their accounts current sent by Thomas Causton to the Trustees for Georgia: Peter Appy, 39l. 14s. currency; Thomas Antrobus, 7l. 12s. 0½d. sterling; Sir Francis Bathurst, 623l. 18s. 7¼d. currency; Robert Bunnian, 209l. 5s. 7d. currency; Margaret Bovey, 776l. 19s. 2d. currency; Michael Bourghouter, 186l. 0s. 3½d. currency; Widow Bowling, 15l. 7s. 1½d. sterling; William Cookesey, 517l. 11s. 0½d. currency; Jacob Charles Charles (sic), 76l. 12s. 6¾d. currency; Peter Coble, 28l. 18s. 4d. currency; William Cross, 23l. 16s. 7d. currency; Thomas Christie, 317l. 14s. 6d. currency; James Campbell, 3l. 2s. 6½d. sterling; John Coates, 559l. 11s. 3d. currency; Peter Dechter, 58l. 10s. 2d. currency; John Davis, 51l. 19s. 1½d. currency; Andrew Duche, 114l. 6s. 10d. currency; Patrick Houstoun, 941l. 3s. currency; Richard Hughes, 237l. 2s. 10¾d. currency; William Harris, 75l. 18s. 7d. currency; Youst Henry, 36l. 1s. 2½d. currency; Roger Lacy, 1,542l. 8s. 7d. currency; David Peters, 39l. 5s. 8½d. currency; Rogers and Clark, 25l. 8s. 3d. currency. Total, translated into sterling, 890l. 7s. 8½d. Entry. 1 p.
226. ii. Account of the expenses of the colony of Georgia paid for in England and accrued since midsummer 1737, of the sola bills sent to Mr. Causton, and also of the provisions and effects received by him since that time. Total 11,152l. 2s. 1d., including 509l. remaining in Mr. Causton's hands at midsummer 1737. Entry, 2 pp.
226. iii. Account of the expenses in America estimated by the Trustees for the service of the colony of Georgia for one year, midsummer 1738–1739. Total: 1,676l. 5s. 1d. Approved by the Trustees, 10 and 17 May 1738. Entry. 1½ pp.
226. iv. Invoice of several parcels from the Trustees consigned to General Oglethorpe and shipped on the transports now on their departure for Georgia with the use of each: building materials for church at Savannah, tools for Trustees' servants, seeds, presents for the Indians of guns, paint and beads. Entry, 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 60d-67d.]
May 19.
Georgia Office.
227 Harman Verelst to Abraham de Lyon at Savannah. Your proposal for propagating vines in Georgia has been approved. You, Dr. Samuel Nunes and Mr. Moses Nunes are to sign a bond to the Trustees for Georgia in the penalty of 400l. sterling in six years from the date, without interest. On delivery thereof to General Oglethorpe, he will pay you the 200l. you desired to be advanced. The Trustees are confident you will perform every part of your proposition as well as the repayment of the 200l. and they wish you success therein. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 57.]
May 20.
Georgia Office.
228 Same to William Stephens. The Trustees received your letter dated 19 and 20 January last, as also journal etc. Your conduct being quite agreeable to the instructions they gave you, the Trustees very much approve of it. The present hurry on General Oglethorpe's departure has prevented the fully taking your journal into consideration. The Trustees in the strongest manner recommend to you to enquire and send them a particular account how and on what labour their servants are employed, for the benefit of their labour must appear not only to answer the great charge of them but also to produce a surplus benefit for the use of the colony which was the chief end of sending them. The Trustees, notwithstanding their endeavours to regulate the expense of the colony and provide the proper means of defraying it, have been greatly prevented therein by the number of certified accounts for cargoes received in Georgia which have been sent over to England for payment at the same time that their sola bills were sent to Georgia for defraying the expenses they ordered to be made. They have therefore given public notice in the London Gazette that all expenses they order shall be paid for in their sola bills and that no person has authority to purchase cargoes or contract any debt in America. Copies of notices signed by the secretary are sent to you to be affixed to the door of the storehouses at Savannah and Frederica.
Thomas Jones is appointed storekeeper in the room of Mr. Causton to take possession of the remain of stores in one month. He is to issue them pursuant to the orders he shall receive from yourself, Mr. Causton and Mr. Henry Parker, or any two of you, which issues the Trustees direct in the first place to be made for the maintenance and providing for the Trustees' servants who are the only persons now on the Trustees' expense to maintain. All the established allowances sent over by you and directed to continue to Lady Day 1738 and every article of expense contained in the Trustees' letter to Mr. Causton sent by you do upon the receipt of the letter now sent by Mr. Jones to Mr. Causton entirely cease and determine; and the Trustees will allow and defray no other expenses but those which by the copy thereof herewith sent you are estimated for the service of the colony from midsummer 1738 to midsummer 1739. And you together with Mr. Causton and Mr. Henry Parker or any two of you are directed to defray those expenses from time to time either with the remain of sola bills still in Mr. Causton's hands or with those which any two of you shall be empowered to issue. And as such expenses shall be defrayed those two of you who defray them are to sign the account thereof and send it from time to time to the Trustees specifying the services for and to whom such expenses were paid agreeable to the said expenses so estimated with a list of the bills as issued.
Mr. Bradley's account, demands and conduct are referred to Thomas Jones to examine and report. Abraham de Lyon's petition being granted, General Oglethorpe will advance him the 200l. sterling. Robert Gilbert is appointed Third Bailiff of Savannah; herewith you receive his constitution. The Trustees have desired Mr. Causton to move the town-court of Savannah to name a trustee for the orphans in the room of John Coates the constable, and that the trustees for the orphans may be called upon to send an account of their proceedings from time to time to the Trustees. [Permission to George Whitefield to perform religious offices at Frederica and Savannah repeated. See No. 223]. The Trustees have desired the magistrates in the meantime not to absent themselves on Sundays but to assemble together and cause prayers to be read to the people by some decent person who can read.
Seven of the Trustees' servants are to be employed immediately in the cultivation of the 300 acres of land granted 31 March 1736 for the religious uses of the colony. You, Henry Parker and Mr. Causton are to co-operate in their proper employment. [Orders to Henry Parker about servants for himself, clothing and necessaries; to William Bradley about servants for Mr. Christie; and to Henry Parker about the disposal of parcels shipped for the Trustees, are repeated. See Nos. 229, 230.] Entry. P.S. There is a trust grant sent you herewith the counterpart of which you are to get executed by the bailiffs of Savannah. It contains 3,000 acres of land in trust that every man of 21 and upwards being a Protestant who should within three years from the date arrive in Georgia should have an allotment of 50 acres of land granted to him as is therein mentioned; and those lots which are desired in the northern part of the province are to be set out by yourself and Mr. Causton and those in the southern part by William Horton and Thomas Hawkins, to whom please give notice. 3½ pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 59–60d.]
May 20.
Georgia Office.
229 Same to Henry Parker at Savannah. The Trustees, having been informed of your good behaviour and that your time has been greatly employed in the honest discharge of your duty of Second Bailiff of Savannah, have ordered me to buy for you clothing and necessaries to the value of 20l. sterling which I will do and send you by the first opportunity. They have also allowed you two menservants now under the care of Mr. Bradley who has directions sent him for that purpose. The Trustees have appointed Robert Gilbert to be Third Bailiff of Savannah in the room of John Dearne deceased. Mr. Causton's attendance on the court and other avocations fully taking up his time, the Trustees have appointed Thomas Jones (who brings you this) to be storekeeper in his room. The Trustees having estimated the expenses they have ordered to be made in the colony for one year from midsummer 1738 to midsummer 1739, the account thereof is herewith sent you. William Stephens, Mr. Causton and yourself, or any two, are to defray those expenses with the remain of the sola bills still in Mr. Causton's hands or with those which any two of you will be empowered to issue. Those two of you who defray these expenses are to sign the account thereof and send it to the Trustees specifying the service for and to whom such expenses were paid, agreeable to the said expenses so estimated with a list of the bills as issued. The parcels shipped for the Trustees and the uses they are to be put to are described in the invoice herewith sent you; William Stephens, Mr. Causton and yourself or any two of you are to direct the storekeeper in the application of them except the presents for the Indians which General Oglethorpe will dispose of. Entry. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 58, 58d.]
May 20.
Georgia Office.
230 Same to William Bradley at Savannah. The Trustees have received your letters of 1 December 1737 with the papers and accounts enclosed. As to their agreement with you, they were out of the produce of 100 acres cleared, cultivated and improved in one year with 30 or more of their servants under your care, to pay 100l. sterling and they were to furnish you on your arrival with 10 servants for your own use with tools and provisions for one year and also to maintain you, your wife and children for one year after your arrival according to the custom of the colony. As to the 40s. an acre you mention, that was a forfeiture deductible from you out of the 100l. payable from the produce of the land for every acre of the 100 acres uncultivated at the expiration of one year. Which agreement on the Trustees' part has been performed. Thomas Jones who brings this is to enquire into what you mention of servants employed in the Trustees' service not your own, into your demands and into the demands on you. He has copies of your accounts with the store.
The Trustees direct: seven servants to be employed in clearing and cultivating 300 acres of land in the northern part of the province for the religious uses of the colony, to be such of them and in such manner employed as William Stephens, Thomas Causton and Henry Parker, or two of them, shall think fit; two men servants under your care such as Henry Parker shall choose are allowed him by the Trustees in consideration of his services as second bailiff of Savannah, if married their wives to go with them; two servants more under your care in case Thomas Christie continues in his office of recorder of Savannah are allowed him for his own use. Entry. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 57d, 58.]
May 20.
Boston.
231 Josiah Willard, secretary of Massachusetts, to [Thomas Hill], transmitting public papers of the province for six months ending February last, vizt. Minutes of council and assembly, and Acts. Treasurer's general account is not yet passed. Signed. P.S. Your Christian name I cannot learn, therefore please excuse the omission. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd. 1 July, Read 5 July 1738. [C.O. 5, 881, fos. 2, 2d, 9, 9d.]