America and West Indies
August 1738, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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K. G. Davies (editor)

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1969

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177-188

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'America and West Indies: August 1738, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 44: 1738 (1969), pp. 177-188. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72952 Date accessed: 18 September 2014.


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August 1738, 1-10

August 1.
Whitehall.
384 Thomas Hill to Francis Fane, enclosing five Acts passed in Jamaica on 1 March 1737/8 for his opinion in point of law, vizt. Acts for raising money for subsisting the independent companies and preventing exportation of several commodities to French and Spanish islands; to oblige inhabitants to provide sufficient white people; for a duty on spirituous liquors; for better preserving the public records; for effectually settling the parish of Portland. Entry. 2½ pp. [C.O. 138, 18, pp. 291–293.]
August 2.
Palace Court.
385 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Read letter from Robert Millar dated 26 May 1738. Resolved that an application be made to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty for a protection for the Two Brothers brigantine, Capt. William Thomson, and 11 men, burthen 150 tons for Georgia with passengers to settle there. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 687, p.91.]
August 2.
Whitehall.
386 Council of Trade and Plantations to Duke of Newcastle, enclosing the following papers relating to seizure of Success by Spaniards. Signed, Monson, James Brudenell, R. Plumer. 1 p. Enclosed,
386. i. Extract of Governor Mathew's letter to Council of Trade and Plantations, 26 May 1738. See No. 247. 2¼ pp.
386. ii. Affidavit of Ignatius Semmes, sworn before Governor Mathew, 13 May 1738. Copy, of No. 247. i. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 40, fos. 330–336d; entry of covering letter in C.O. 153,16, fo. 73d.]
August 2.
Whitehall.
387 Same to President James Dottin, acknowledging letters of 2 October, 21 December 1736, 28 February, 14 May, 20 August 1737, and 24 January 1737/8, together with the several papers mentioned therein. But we find on a review of those which you have transmitted to us that there are several still wanting, vizt. minutes of council since those of 5 July 1737, journal of assembly from April 1734 to 23 September 1735, all those since 28 June 1737, together with the Naval Office list of ships entered or cleared since Michaelmas 1730. With regard to your's of 14 May 1737 relating to the French settlements at St. Lucia and St. Vincent's, we have laid all the papers which are come to our hands concerning that affair before the Duke of Newcastle, and having nothing to say to you on that subject, we shall at present content ourselves with commending you for the care you have hitherto taken and signifying our desire that you would continue to keep the same watchful eye over the proceedings of our neighbours there and transmit such accounts as you judge proper for our information. What you mention in the same letter with regard to Mr. Dunbar is not to be altered, it having been settled by H.M. in council; but as to the case of Mr. Colleton we shall make enquiry into it. At the same time we must inform you Mr. Harrison has been recommended by this board and, as we hear, approved of by H.M. We have the affair of the expenses of the court of grand sessions under consideration. We expect that once in six months you regularly send us a list of members of council taking notice of those dead or absent; and in regard to the last that you particularly remark from whom and for how long a time they have obtained licence of leave. Entry. Signatories, Monson, James Brudenell, R. Plumer. 3 pp. [C.O. 29, 16, pp. 71–74.]
August 3.
Georgia Office.
388 Benjamin Martyn to Josiah Burchett requesting a protection for the Two Brothers, 150 tons, Capt. William Thomson, eleven men and the passengers thereon. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 74d.]
August 3.
Philadelphia.
389 Deputy Governor George Thomas to Council of Trade and Plantations, transmitting deposition of Daniel Cheston. As Cheston may be supposed to have represented matters as favourably to himself as the nature of the case would allow of and yet appears to be very criminal, I have with the advice of the council committed him to gaol till he find security to answer such matters as shall be objected against him on H.M.'s behalf, as well as obliged him to return the two negroes to Lisbon at his own expense, that being the most likely place to find a conveyance for them to Bonavista. I have likewise written to H.M.'s envoy there desiring that he would direct the delivery of the two negroes as he should think most proper. Signed. 1½ small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 9 October, Read 12 October 1738. Enclosed,
389. i. Affidavit of Daniel Cheston, master of the sloop William of Philadelphia, sworn at Philadelphia, 22 July 1738, before Deputy Governor George Thomas. Deponent with Joseph Wheeler, master of Triumph of Southampton, went to Bonavista in Cape Verde Islands in April last to make salt. There they were badly treated by the Portuguese governor and others who levied an arbitrary tax, demanded presents, stole some goods and defrauded them. In reprisal deponent and Capt. Wheeler took off two slaves intending to drop them off at St. Jago and complain to the providore there. But Commodore Anson in H.M.S. Centurion at St. Jago advised them that they would probably be detained if they did so. They accordingly decided to make for British ports and disclose the whole proceeding. Signed. Attested, by George Thomas. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1269, fos. 24–28d.]
August 4.
Georgia Office.
390 Harman Verelst to Gen. James Oglethorpe by Charles, Capt. Reid, and Two Brothers, Capt. Thomson, enclosing copy of Trustees' letter to Mr. Causton by Col Stephens and of the allowances then established to Lady Day last which you desired. The Trustees sent you two letters returned from Portsmouth after you sailed. They have sent you a copy of their present letter to Mr. Causton whereby you will see the unhappy situation they should have been in had they not taken the measures they have done to destroy all credit and prevent any expense being made except what is immediately defrayed when they are in cash to direct any more expenses. In confidence of your not issuing any of the 500l. in sola bills you carried with you, which the Trustees desire you will not, and to prevent any further uneasiness from the merchants who possess the accounts Mr. Causton has certified and which amount now to 7,311l. 16s., besides the demands of Mr. Jenys's and Mr. Chardon's executors are very large, the Common Council have agreed to pay these accounts as far as they can; and what they are deficient in cash for so doing, some of those accounts received latest will be sent back to Georgia to be paid out of sale of the Trustees' effects there (whereof one for 772l. 4s. 7d. belongs to Mr. Simond which did not come to the Trustees' office until 24th of last month) and the balance due to Mr. Jenys's executors must be paid in the same manner.
You will observe by the account herewith sent you what large quantities of provisions and necessaries Mr. Causton has received in store since midsummer 1737 and the large amount of credit he has given the inhabitants, purchasing other provisions and necessaries from the same persons as he did and for which he has made the Trustees debtors in his certified accounts. These sums thereby due to the Trustees together with their effects in Georgia are the only fund to answer all expenses in Georgia to midsummer 1739 besides pay all outstanding demands there and what is deficient to answer the certified accounts sent over, the Trustees being in the first place obliged to provide for their expenses in England, the payment of the outstanding bill of 200l. you drew to Paul Jenys 27 April 1736 which has never been brought for payment and of the balance due to Mr. Chardon's executors which Mr. Simond desires may be paid him here. The Trustees therefore desire that you will give Mr. Stephens and Mr. Henry Parker such directions as you shall think necessary for receiving the moneys as are still due in Georgia and for the sale and application of the Trustees' effects there for these purposes. And the Trustees are very sorry there is so much occasion to trouble you hereupon, you having so full employment in your military concerns. As there is no establishment for this year to take place, for want of money to answer one, the Trustees recommend it to you in the directing the application of their effects after their debts are paid that the surplus may be used for defraying only the most necessary expenses which may best conduce to keep the industrious people from any real want until the Trustees can acquaint you what further supply they shall have in the next session of parliament.
The Trustees long for the news of your arrival in Georgia and an account of their affairs thereupon; which, when received, together with your opinion of what articles of expense in the civil concerns of the colony for the further settling it and the encouragement of produces from it to maintain itself hereafter shall be necessary (which is now the only business of the Trust), they will be furnished with proper materials for urging to the Minister that a sum may be put into the estimate in the next session to answer such expenses, which if obtained and voted the Trustees will on the credit of such vote make out their sola bills and send them for defraying the expenses they shall hereafter order; and the money for payment of them will be in the bank before their return from Georgia in order to have an early supply and to answer such expenses at the time of creating them, by reason no debts can be hereafter contracted to make the Trustees liable.
The Trustees cannot be at the expense of a church at Darien. [See No. 392.] Capt. Thomson will sail next week with foreign servants for Georgia at his own risk. Several of them come recommended to you by Mr. Van Riechen, the King's Hanover Secretary. Entry. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 79d-80d.]
August 4.
Georgia Office.
391 Same to Thomas Causton by Charles, Capt. Reid, and Two Brothers, Capt. Thomson. The Trustees received your letters dated 20 April and 26 May last and I received your letter dated 28 May last with copies of your journal from 24 May 1737 to 24 July following, whereby the Trustees have copies of your journal from Lady Day 1737 to the said 24 July and no other copies of it whatsoever. On my presenting your said journal to the Trustees they could not but observe that, instead of its being carried on to the date of your letter, some part of it contained matter of a year before. In your letter of 26 May you acknowledge receipt of the Trustees' letter dated 14 December last which came to your hands 30 March following by which you were directed to discharge the demands abroad with the provisions, necessaries and sola bills you then had without certifying any more accounts. Yet you have presumed to disregard the Trustees' orders and certified the following accounts, vizt. 7 April 1738 for 129l. 8s. 4¾d. to Capt. James Mackpherson, balance of his account to Lady Day 1738; 17th of same month for 349l. 17s. 6d. to Robert Williams & Co.; and 28th of same month for 241l. 19s. 9d. to Messrs. Ellis & Ryan, making together 721l. 5s. 7¾d.; thereby dispensing with the Trustees' commands at your discretion which it was your duty to have punctually obeyed. By this extraordinary conduct of yours, you have taken care to certify all the Trustees' money away without leaving any for the present year; what application you have made of the effects received and of the Trustees' sola bills which you have acknowledged the receipt of you have sent no account, nor so much as mentioned what bills remained unissued.
You acknowledge the receipt of the two other letters of 11 January and 17 February last whereby the Trustees renewed their former orders forbidding your certifying any more accounts, to which by your letter dated 26 May last you have promised an obedience. But you are quite silent as to what accounts you have certified and may be still outstanding. Two accounts came lately for payment since this letter was ordered; they appear certified 7 March 1737/8 for 57l. 17s. 0¾d. to recompense Standberry and 25 March 1738 for 772l. 4s.7d. to Messrs. Montaigut & Co. The certified accounts brought for payment since 12 June last (when the amount of effects and sola bills received by you since midsummer 1737 was 13,382l. 19s. 7d.) are as follows: Standberry, 57l. 17s. 0d.; Montaigut, 772l. 4s. 7d.; 27 March 1738, Benjamin Munro, 227l. 18s. 6d.; Mackpherson, 129l. 8s. 4d.; Williams, 349l. 17s. 6d.; Ellis & Ryan, 241l. 19l. 9d.; total, 1,779l. 5s. 8d., which increases the former sum to 15,162l. 5s. 3d., a very large amount come to your hands since midsummer 1737. You have therefore possessed yourself of what must answer all expenses of the colony to midsummer 1739. For the 8,000l. received from parliament this year, if the certified accounts yet unpaid of those sent over which amount to 7,311l. 16s. (besides that to Capt. Thomson of 469l. 1s. 1½d.) should be paid, and for non-payment whereof the merchants now grow very clamorous, there is not money sufficient to pay them and answer the charges in England. What is therefore deficient for that purpose, and to answer any outstanding demands, must be sent over to Georgia to be paid by the sale of some of the effects in store. For the debts are of your contracting, without the Trustees' authority, and must be paid with what the Trustees have abroad since they have nothing left in England by your most unaccountable management.
You mention your making up general heads of account for 1736 which would represent to the Trustees the reasons for the general expense whereby they might with more certainty fix their establishment. But you have not thought fit to send them that account and have by the debts you have contracted put it out of their power to establish anything and necessitated them to put it out of yours and every other person's power to contract any more debts for the future to make them answerable for. As to the extraordinary charges you mention on the arrival of Col. Cochran and part of Gen. Oglethorpe's regiment, the Trustees have nothing to do with it, the regiment being payable by the king and all charges relating thereto. The Trustees received their last money only for the settling the colony and they can bring nothing to account in their discharge which relates to the military part of the colony after the said arrival of Col. Cochran and part of the regiment. Therefore whatever these charges are, if paid by you, must be repaid by the regiment for the Trustees cannot be justified in allowing it.
The Trustees received your letter on the stating the late Mr. Jenys's account with his brother, wherein you mention that it stood blended in Mr. Jenys's books with that of the rum duty which occasioned delays so that the account could not be settled in Mr. Jenys's lifetime. And now you have sent the Trustees an account without taking any notice of the rum duty as if the money received from that duty was not to be accounted for. [Detailed objections to these accounts] I have also extracted from your certified accounts since midsummer 1737 the account herewith sent you of the different kinds of provisions and necessaries you have received and for which you are accountable, the amount whereof appears to be much more than sufficient to answer the ordinary consumption of the colony, which has alarmed the Trustees the more at your receiving provisions and necessaries in such large quantities and giving credit to persons without the Trustees' authority. You must in your discharge thereof therefore state to the Trustees to whom they have been respectively issued or how other ways applied. And in your remain of stores on Gen. Oglethorpe's arrival you are now directed to state the prime cost of each to let the value of the whole remain appear; and William Stephens and Henry Parker must join in the certifying the good or bad condition of the stores so remaining. The distance the Trustees are from you is so great and so much time lost in writing and receiving answers, you should always endeavour to bring forward as well your accounts as journal as near to the time of your letters as possible, your last journal being near twelve months in arrear; and in your letter of 1 March last you mention that Harris's behaviour will appear in your journal although such journal has never yet been received which ought to have come with the letter. You must be particular in your answer to the several matters herein taken notice of which at present appear so much to your disadvantage.
In your journal of 19 June 1737 you mention certain French prisoners brought down by four Chickesaw Indians in order to be paid for taking them. The Trustees desire to have the occasion of their bringing them and of their demand particularly explained. For they know no reason why they were taken or brought to Georgia and know of no orders given in relation to that matter, the king of Great Britain being at peace with France.
The Trustees cannot but observe in your said journal what they think very extraordinary: that in several places you mention the payment of money to persons without putting down the sums paid and yet leaving blanks for them. They desire to be informed with the occasion of such omissions, you having left the blanks, thus with a space for the sum.
The Trustees having been made acquainted with Mr. Ellis's bad cargo of beef which he deposited with you for sale 6 April last and which on 18th of the same month was discovered unfit for use by the return of several casks you issued which were not eatable, and that on a survey of the said damaged beef 280 out of 290 casks were obliged to be buried, they ordered me to let you know that this transaction is a matter between Mr. Ellis and yourself as his factor and which the Trustees have not nor will have any concern with. Richard Lobb was at the office the 21st of last month and says that you had no money left in Georgia when he came away in May last, not even so much as to pay him a small balance which he was obliged to come over without. What then is become of the Trustees' sola bills and for what services have they been issued? No account thereof has been ever yet received. The future support of the colony to mid-summer 1739 must therefore arise from the effects you have bought which must be applied or sold again for that purpose and from the credits you have given. For the Trustees have nothing left to answer any expense here.
There is lately received from John Brownfield two accounts signed by you 29 April last for the several amounts of particulars received by you of Messrs. Pitt & Tuckwell, the one for 102l. 5s. between 17 January 1737/8 and Lady Day 1738 and the other for 79l. 13s. 7d. between 10 and 26 April 1738; and he writes that you very soon expect sola bills sufficient to pay all the public demands and that you will then pay theirs. From what grounds could you expect such sola bills if you expected the great number of certified accounts you sent over would be paid? Consider the expenses you have created, far exceeding your authority and the Trustees' abilities; and consider also this method of receiving things in store in the Trustees' name to contract debts on their account without any direction from them. But that will be amply provided against before you receive this letter. It is only mentioned that these particulars so received from Messrs. Pitt & Tuckwell must be paid by way of barter or sale of other particulars which you have certified for and received of others without orders from the Trustees and more than the services they directed to be performed had occasion for.
Mrs. Watson has been with the Trustees desiring you would send her back a letter of attorney which she says she sent you to Georgia when she thought that her husband was dead, as also a defeazance of judgement; which the Trustees would have you send her back. And they desire to know whether Mr. Watson, her husband, has any account with the stores unsettled. The Common Council on 6 June 1737, on the application of John Vat, did direct that the 46l. 8s. 7d. South Carolina currency stated due to him should be paid to his servant Rubrecht Kalcker in Georgia, which direction not being then sent you, if the said sum has not been yet paid, it must be now paid out of the remain of stores. Entry. 7 pp. Annexed,
391. i. List of letters sent to and received from Thomas Causton since 12 January 1736/7 when Mr. Oglethorpe attended his first meeting after his arrival in England. Entry. 1 p.
391. ii. Account of provisions and necessaries received by Thomas Causton in Georgia and of the credits given by him since midsummer 1737 taken from the several certified accounts which have come over to the Trustees' hands to 4 August 1738. Entry. 18 pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 81–93d.]
August 4.
Georgia Office.
392 Harman Verelst to William Stephens by Charles, Capt. Reid, and Two Brothers, Capt. Thomson. This acquaints you of receipt of your letter to me dated 15 April last with duplicate of a letter to the Trustees dated 29 March last and your journal to 15 April; also your letter to me dated 27 May last and your journal continued. Enclosed is duplicate of last letter to you from me dated 12 June 1738. The particular and intelligent manner of your journals, your sensible letters and regular correspondence fully answer the Trustees' expectations and prove very satisfactory to them. They now send you by the Two Brothers a young gentleman well educated at the University of Dublin whose character has been strongly certified by the Primate of Ireland whereby he obtained ordination of deacon and priest, and is appointed by the Trustees to perform ecclesiatical offices in the room of John Wesley. He comes with well admonished dispositions and the Trustees recommend him to you for advice on all occasions, desiring your introducing him to the magistrates to have all due countenance agreeable to his function. The Trustees are well satisfied you will find him a man after your own heart, capable of doing good and whose behaviour it is to be hoped will excite a suitable return from the inhabitants.
Mr. Causton having by his certifying so many accounts made the Trustees liable to such surprising demands as have swept away the whole money granted by parliament and having in his settling the late Mr. Jenys's account omitted to charge him with the money he received at Charleston for the duty on rum, the said account is sent back and what shall appear really due to the said Mr. Jenys's executors must be paid by the sale of some of the Trustees' effects in the store, they having no money left in England to defray the expenses of the colony to midsummer 1739 which must therefore be defrayed by applying (or sale of) their effects in Georgia as well as all outstanding debts under your and Mr. Henry Parker's directions. The Trustees have written to Gen. Oglethorpe on that head also. The intended establishment for this year not being able to take place for want of money to answer it, the Trustees recommend that in the application of their effects after their debts are paid the surplus may be used for defraying only the most necessary expenses which may best conduce to keep the industrious people from any real want until they shall have a further supply in the next session of parliament.
Mr. Oakes, one of the king's coachmen, whose son was bound to the Trustees and sent to Georgia having attended the Trustees on a complaint of the cruel usage given to his son by Young the wheelwright (to whom the Trustees had assigned the said lad as most proper by reason he had served of his time to that trade in England), the Trustees desire you will send for the young man and enquire into the treatment he has received from his master and of his master's neglect in employing him in the business of his trade. And in case you shall find just reason for complaint the Trustees who are desirous that all masters should be duly punished who use their servants ill but particularly Mr. Young for using this lad ill who was a servant assigned to him from them for better purposes and as matter of favour, being bred to his business; and therefore they think him a proper example for punishment. If the lad desires to return home to his friends in England rather than serve his time out and have the benefit of settling on land for himself in Georgia, you have the Trustees' full authority to vacate the lad's indenture and send him home by the Two Brothers, Capt. Thomson, who sails for Georgia next week with a freight of foreign servants at his owner's risk.
In your journal of 20 April last you mention that the minister at Darien had desired your and Mr. Causton's opinion whether he might exceed the dimensions of the church intended at Darien, those given being too little. The Trustees acquaint you that they cannot be at the expense of building a church at Darien for the Scots, and therefore it must not go on at their charge. They, as you desired them, now acquaint you that the grand jury has no right by law to administer oaths. They desire to know whether the inhabitants have a prudent caution of saving the timber they fell from their lands in order when the sap is out to make proper use of, the Trustees finding that last year Robert Williams brought sawed timber from Carolina which it might have been expected from the number of sawyers in Georgia the inhabitants might have furnished themselves with. Entry. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 75–76.]
August 4.
Georgia Office.
393 Same to Thomas Jenys by Charles, Capt. Reid, acknowledging receipt of letter of 24 April last. The Trustees were always greatly obliged to your late brother and very sensible of his zeal for Georgia. The account you sent over should have contained all monies received from the treasurer of South Carolina for the duty of 3d. a gallon on rum payable to the Trustees and receivable by your late brother from 1 December 1733 by an Act of the assembly until the sum of 8,000l. current money was paid. To 1 March 1736/7 your late brother acknowledged to have received 7,361l. 0sd. currency of South Carolina in part of the said 8,000l. (excepting a difference of 7½d.) and the residue being 638l. 19s. 7½d. has been or may be since received. The payments out of which sum to 10 September 1736 amount to 4,296l. 14s., balance in favour of the Trustees (if or when the whole 8,000l. is received) is 3,703l. 6s. This balance will reduce the balance of the account you stated with Mr. Causton to 566l. 14s. 4½d. currency which at 740l. per cent, (the rate of exchange in 1736 when your late brother stated the balances due from the Trustees to amount to 594l. 6s. 10½d.) the sterling money will be 76l. 11s. 8d. The Trustees having passed a grant of 500 acres of land to your late brother and another to Mr. Baker his partner in 1735, the consideration monies and registers thereof with the auditor amounted to 3l. 3s. sterling which reduces the said balance due to your late brother to 73l. 8s. 8d. The Trustees have offered this to Messrs. Smith & Bonovrier. If the 638l. 19s. 7½d. residue of the 8,000l. currency is not received, the Trustees desire it may be paid you and your sister as executors to your late brother by the treasurer of the province in discharge of the whole sum granted.
The bill Mr. Bradley drew on me for 30l. is no affair of the Trustees. Mr. Bradley must answer for it, there being no effects of his received in England to pay it out of nor a speedy likelihood of any. Account of rum is annexed. There is an outstanding bill of 200l. sterling drawn on the Trustees by Mr. Oglethorpe 27 April 1736 to your late brother which has never come to England: your account states it drawn by Mr. Causton but your brother's own account states it as it was drawn by Mr. Oglethorpe. Entry. 2¼ pp. Annexed,
393. i. Account of duty of 3d. a gallon on rum imported into South Carolina for raising 8,000l. current money for the use of Georgia received by Messrs. Jenys & Baker of Charleston. Received from Treasurer, 1 December 1733–1 March 1736/7: 7,361l. 0s. 4½d. on 588,881½ gallons. To be received: 638l. 19s. 7½d. By drafts by Mr. Causton, 13 May 1735–11 August 1737: 4,296l. 14s. Balance, 16 April 1737, 3,064l. 6s. 4½d. Entry. 2 pp.
393. ii. State of account of late Paul Jenys with Trustees for Georgia, showing balance due to executors of 73l. 8s. 8d. Entry, 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 76d-79.]
August 4.
Georgia Office.
394 Same to Messrs. Crokatt & Seaman by Charles, Capt. Reid. I received your letter and have paid Mr. Pomeroy your account of the ozenbrigs etc In the enclosed Gazette you will see an article published by the Trustees for Georgia which Mr. Abercromby, the attorney-general, who sailed on the Samuel for Charleston undertook to have published in the South Carolina Gazette and to be continued for one month. In case he is arrived and it is published the Trustees' expectations are answered; but if he is not arrived the Trustees desire you will immediately cause the said article (which relates to credit) to be published as above, and the expense thereof shall be paid to Mr. Pomeroy on notice thereof. If it has been omitted by accident please remind Mr. Abercromby to have it done. The enclosed packet is to be forwarded to Georgia by first opportunity. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 74 d.]
August 5.
Antigua.
395 Governor William Mathew to Alured Popple. I send in a box [Note in another hand: Not recd, when the letter came.] under the care of Thomas Boyd the duplicates of minutes of assembly of Antigua for three years past to 1 June 1738; and to these I now add minutes of council of Antigua 1 February 1736/7–26 May 1738 [Recd.]; minutes of assembly of Nevis 15 July 1735–13 June 1737 and so to 27 June 1738 [Recd.]; minutes of council of Montserrat, 25 March-24 June 1738 [Recd.]; minutes of assembly of Montserrat, 29 March 1738–17 June 1738 [Recd.]. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd. 24 October, Read 25 October 1738. [C.O. 152, 23, fos. 162–163d.]
August 6.396 Lieut.-Governor William Gooch to Council of Trade and Plantations, enclosing the following papers. Signed. ½ small p. Endorsed, Recd. 19 September, Read 3 October 1738. Enclosed,
396.i. Account of H.M.'s revenue of 2s. per hogshead in Virginia, 25 October 1737–25 April 1738. Balance brought forward, 5,423l. 8s. 2½d. Receipts, 777l. 2s. 2¾d. Disbursements, 2207l. 8s. 9¼d. Balance remaining, 3,993l. 1s. 8d. Signed, John Grymes, Receiver-General. Audited by John Blair, Deputy Auditor, 15 June 1738. Passed by William Gooch. 2 pp.
396. ii. Account of H.M.'s revenue of quitrents in Virginia, 25 April 1737–25 April 1738. Balance brought forward, 4,535l. 18s. 2d. Receipts, 3,911l. 1s. 8d. (each county shown separately, how much land paid for etc.) Disbursements, 1,287l. 1s 11d. Balance remaining, 7,159l. 17s. 11d. Signed, audited (31 July 1738) and passed as preceding. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 1324, fos. 131–136d.]
August 8.
New Providence.
397 President John Howell to Council of Trade and Plantations. On Saturday last Mr. Fitzwilliam, governor of these islands, sailed from hence in a sloop bound to New York in order to get passage for London, whereby the administration of this government during his absence has devolved on me as eldest councillor, and I hope I shall have no manner of difficulty in keeping the country and garrison in the same tranquillity and good order the governor has left them, which I really did not believe the first year of his administration he would be able to accomplish so soon as he did because of the distracted condition he found the inhabitants in, occasioned by party disputes raised among them during the life of the late Governor Rogers and kept up by the contrivance of that Colebrooke so often mentioned to you until he fled the country. It is certain that the majority of the people of this island (who are not quite of so good an original as I could wish them) were at first greatly alarmed at the restraint put upon their loose, licentious inclinations by the governor; for before his arrival most men here did what seemed best in their own eyes without having any regard to the laws of God or man and this island was a safe refuge to every person that pleased to come hither who had committed piracy or barratry in any part of the West Indies. But I have now the pleasure to find that this place is grown odious to such vagabonds by means whereof the few people we have are much weaned from their former ill habits and greatly turned to industry and labour and our little town improved more within these three years past in building than it was in twenty before; and if the present spirit continues among the people I doubt not but they will gain a more comfortable subsistence than I have known them to have had these twenty years I have been among them.
The garrison has long laboured under difficulties by reason there is not such allowance from the government as is usual for fire, candle, bedding and suchlike contingencies as also in regard to their want of proper barracks and a sufficient proportion of provisions. For they have never had more or indeed constantly so good as since the present governor's arrival, yet to speak the truth I believe they heretofore took more liberties with people's plantations in the night than they dare venture at now: for that unjust practice became so intolerable to the poor planters that they began to withdraw themselves to the out-islands where they might be more certain of reaping the fruits of their labour themselves, which the governor observing soon after he landed, he set about to rectify that abuse and it was with great difficulty he accomplished his purpose for as the feuds increased in the country a spirit of mutiny was artfully raised in the garrison insomuch that they would scarce pay any obedience to the commands of their officers. But that spirit is quite vanished and they are become as orderly and submissive as any troops in H.M.'s service. This short detail of the present state of the country I judged not improper to give you at my admission to the government which I hope I shall conduct in such a manner as to gain your approbation and that the governor will find the country at his return in no worse situation than he has left us. Signed, 2 pp. Endorsed. Recd. 20 March, Read 21 March 1738/9. [C.O. 23, 4, fos. 59, 59d, 64, 64d.
August 8.
New Providence.
398 Same to Duke of Newcastle. [In substance same as first paragraph of No. 397] I am confident that a little encouragement from the crown towards increasing the number of our inhabitants would very well answer the expense. Signed, 2 pp. Endorsed, Recd. 19 March. [C.O. 23, 14, fos. 300–301d.]
August 9.
Kensington.
399Royal warrant to Governor William Mathew to admit Walter Thomas, clerk, appointed councillor of St. Christopher's in the room of John Garnett, resigned. Entry. 1 p. [C.O. 324, 37, p. 119.]
August 9.
Whitehall.
400 Council of Trade and Plantations to Lieut.–Governor William Gooch. Since our last of 15 October 1736, we have received your letters of 2 September, 5 December 1736, 8 January, 21 February, 16 May, 20 June, 19 August and 8 November 1737. Yours of 20 June 1737 gave us no small satisfaction from the several answers given therein to our queries relating to the trade and manufactures, of which we hope that you will continue from time to time to send us the best account that you are able and likewise that you will inform us whenever any alterations therein shall be made.
We have received your letters of 8 January and 19 August 1737 relating to the boundaries of Lord Fairfax's lands. My lord had some time since made application to be heard before us and a day was accordingly appointed; but before the time came the Treasury thought proper to take the affair under their own consideration and as the whole now lies before that board we have nothing further to say to you upon that head.
In the same letter of 19 August you mention the arrival of two factors employed by the French farmers to purchase 15,000 hogsheads of Oronoko tobacco in your government and in Maryland. At the same time you say the proposal they make is agreeable to the laws of navigation and attended with no inconvenience but rather on the contrary advantageous. As we have yet heard nothing of Mr. Kercher, one of these factors, who you say is upon his return to London, we shall expect from you by the first opportunity such further information as you shall be able to give us in this affair. We have received the papers you mention in the same letter as sent with it. We shall only add that we expect that once in six months you regularly send us a list of the members of council, taking notice at the same time of such as are dead or absent, and that you particularly specify in your account of the last from whom as well as for how long a time they have their licence of leave so far as you are able. Entry. Signatories> Monson, James Brudenell, R. Plumer. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1366, pp. 290–292.]
August 9.
Whitehall.
401 Same to Lieut.-Governor George Clarke. Since our last of 22 June 1737, we have received yours of 9 April, 9 May, 17 June, 14 October, 28 November 1757, 18 February and 2 June 1738, together with the public papers transmitted by you. As regards the several Acts, you shall hear further from us; but in the meantime we must acquaint you that notwithstanding your pressing instances in favour of the Triennial Bill, backed by your son's arguments, who has frequently attended us, we can by no means recommend it to H.M. for approbation. Nevertheless we must desire you to use your utmost endeavours to obtain a settled revenue agreeable to your instructions, in which undertaking we hope you will meet no difficulty but what you will be able to get over. Your son and Mr. Paul Richard have been recommended to the king to be of the council. We promise ourselves no small advantage from your intended meeting with the Six Nations. We are very much concerned to find that the French make such great advances but we hope that you will be able to prevent them from doing us any essential prejudice in regard to the Indian trade, especially if you obtain the liberty of building the fort you mention at Tierondequat. We commend your readiness to assist Carolina and your care in preventing provisions being sent to St. Augustine and doubt not but on every occasion you will use the same diligence thoroughly to defeat any sinister designs of the Spaniards. Your letter of 17 December 1737, mentioned in your's of 18 February last, never came to hand. We expect the remaining answers to our queries promised in yours of 2 June last by the first conveniency. We expect likewise that once in six months you regularly send us a list of the members of council, noticing those that are dead or absent, and particularly remarking from whom and for how long licence of leave was obtained. Entry. Signatories, Monson, James Brudenell, R. Plumer. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1126, fos. 35–36.]
August 10.
Whitehall.
402 Same to the King, recommending disapprobation of an Act passed in New York in December 1737 for frequent elections of representatives to serve in general assembly, as an infringement of the undoubted right which the crown has always exercised of calling and continuing the assembly of this colony at such times and as long as it was thought necessary for the public service. Entry. Signatories, R. Plumer, M. Bladen, Monson, James Brudenell. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1126, fo.36d.]
August 10.
Whitehall.
403 Same to the King. We have considered an Act passed in South Carolina in August 1731 for drawing jurors by ballot and for better administration of justice in criminal causes. We have likewise had the opinion of Mr. Fane who has the following objections: [see No. 377.] We have likewise received some papers from South Carolina relating to this Act and add as a further objection to it that in cases of escheats and inquests of office on special matters the Act confines the writ of venire facias (by which jurors are summoned) to issue only from the courts therein specified and takes no notice at all of the court of Exchequer; whereupon it has happened that summons have been disobeyed under a pretence that there was no law in the province to compel jurors to serve on such inquests. For which reason we lay the said Act before you for your disapprobation. Entry. Signatories, Monson, James Brudenell, R. Plumer, M. Bladen. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 401, pp. 302–304; draft in C.O. 5, 381, fos. 299–300d.]
August 10.
Whitehall..
404 Same to Governor William Mathew. Since our letter to you of 8 October 1736 and to you from our secretary of 11 August 1737 in which he acknowledges several letters from you, we have received two others from you dated 14 June 1737 and 31 March 1738, and have seen your's to our secretary of 18 July, 14 September, 20 October, 12 November, 10 December 1757, 23 February, 1 March, 15 April and 26 May 1738. In answer to the several letters relating to the French settlements at St. Lucia, St. Vincent's and Dominica, and to the Spanish and French depredations, all the papers upon those subjects have been transmitted to the Duke of Newcastle to be laid before H.M. and likewise everything you mention in your letter of 26 May 1737 has been before the Council. We make no doubt you have before this received H.M.'s pleasure relating thereto. We therefore think it not necessary to say anything more on those subjects. We have reported against the two Acts of Antigua, one attainting the two Johnsons and the other for trying John Coteen and Thomas Winthorp upon the evidence of slaves: we have been informed that orders have been already sent you not to give assent to that relating to the Johnsons. We shall take a proper opportunity to consider upon the settling the Virgin Islands. We expect that once in six months you regularly send us a list of councillors in the respective islands under your government, taking notice of such as are dead or absent, and particularly specifying from whom and for how long they have obtained licences of leave. Entry. Signatories, Monson, James Brudenell, R. Plumer. 2½ pp. [C.O. 153, 16, fos. 74–75.]
August 10.
Whitehall.
405 Same to Governor Jonathan Belcher. Since our letter of 23 September 1736 we have received your's of 28 December 1736, 2 March, 10 and 12 May, 14 June, 11 July, 8 August, 17 and 24 September, 7 November, 17 December 1737, and 28 January 1737/8, together with the public papers therein mentioned. In answer to all which in general, we shall only say that we have had the several matters contained in them under our consideration but are not yet come to any resolution so as to be able to communicate our thoughts to you on those heads. But to enable us to form a right judgment with regard to the paper money, we advise you to send us by the first conveniency the present state of that affair with an account of what bills are standing out, what provision is made for sinking the same, and with every particular relating to that head which may be of any service in giving us light into a matter of so much obscurity. For Mr. Wilks, your agent, has given no satisfactory account of that matter. We expect every six months a list of such members of the council of New Hampshire as are either dead or absent, and that particularly with regard to the last you specify from whom and for how long a time they have had licence of leave. Entry. Signatories, Monson, James Brudenell, R. Plumer. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 917, fos. 115–116; draft in C.O. 5, 897, fos. 149–150d.]