America and West Indies
August 1738, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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K. G. Davies (editor)

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1969

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188-206

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'America and West Indies: August 1738, 16-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 44: 1738 (1969), pp. 188-206. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72953 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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August 1738, 11-31

August 11.
Georgia Office.
406 Harman Verelst to General James Oglethorpe by Two Brothers, Capt. Thomson, and Minerva, Capt. Nickleson, enclosing copy of Trustees' last letter of 4th. inst. They now send you the following account of the disposition of their servants in Georgia as it appears to them and of the directions they have been given concerning them. The 40 menservants sent to the Darien under the care of Lieut. John Moore Mackintosh, the Trustees have directed an account of to be sent from him and certified by the magistrates at Frederica showing to which of the freeholders at the Darien any, and how many, of the said 40 servants have been disposed of; and also showing in what service the others of the said 40 servants and the 10 women, 1 girl and 1 boy (part of those at the owner's of the Two Brothers risk put under the care of Lieut. Mackintosh) have been employed and how the profit of their labour is accounted for to the Trust. And as the grant for 300 acres of land in the southern part of the province for the religious uses of the colony went over with you the Trustees desire that the said land may be set out and have directed that seven of the servants now under the care of Lieut. Mackintosh should be immediately employed in the cultivation thereof and that the then residue of all the said servants at the Darien should be offered for supplying the people at Frederica who want servants on their giving bond for 8l., the expense of each head to be paid in twelve months from the date unless the profit of their past labour (over and above the charges of their clothing and maintenance) being accounted for to the Trust can reduce that sum; and in that case the bond is to be given for so much less.
For the following servants the Trustees have paid 8l. per head to Capt. Thomson's owner which must be repaid to the Trustees by the several persons hereafter named, they having been credited with them by Mr. Causton or Mr. Causton must be answerable for what may be not paid, vizt. 6½ heads in service of Thomas Causton being 4 men, 2 women, 1 boy; 2 men in service of Archibald MacBean; 1 woman, wife of Laughlan MacBean; 1 woman in service of Alexander MacLean; 1 woman, daughter of Benjamin Mackintosh; 3 men, 1 woman in service of Lieut. John Moore Mackintosh; 1 man in service of William Mackintosh; 1 man in service of Kenneth Baillie; 3 men, 1 woman in service of James Anderson; 10 men, 1 woman in service of John Bradie. Total: 32½ heads at 8l., 260l.
The womenservants by Capt. Thomson's ship in the services of William Stephens, John Brown and John Vanderplank's widow, the Trustees bear the charge of. The womanservant to Nathaniel Polhill's widow by the said ship, Sir John Lade will pay for. And the Trustees have directed me to call upon Miss Lupton, the sister of Mr. Upton's wife, to try if she will pay the 8l. per head or any part thereof for the 3 men and 3 womenservants by the said ship Mr. Causton credited Mr. Upton with: otherwise he or Mr. Causton must be answerable to the Trustees for that 48l.
The servants by the Three Sisters amounted to 121½ heads, whereof 9½ heads Mr. Causton took into his own service for which he is debtor to the Trustees at 6l. 2s. 6d. per head, 58l. 3s. 9d. And 29 men, 27 women, 16 boys and 15 girls making 71 2/3 heads were put under the care of Mr. Bradley with leave for masters in Georgia to repay 6l. 2s. 6d. per head, the charges of sending them, within six weeks and thereby free them from the Trustees' service. The rest of the said servants were employed or disposed of as follows: 10 men, 10 women, 7 boys, 13 girls making 30 heads were appointed to work at the crane and in the garden; 2 men, 2 women, 2 boys, 2 girls making 5 1/6 heads were appointed to the millwrights at Ebenezer; 2 men, 2 women, 1 boy making 5 heads were assigned to Capt. Gascoigne. Mr. Wragg has received from the Trustees the balance of his account of the freight and the 100l. for delivering these servants at Tybee; but as to the extraordinary demand of 87l. 16s. (over and above the 100l.) for want of a pilot coming off from Tybee when the Three Sisters first arrived, the Trustees, without you can furnish them on enquiring into the case with further reasons than the captain's protest and certificate, cannot enter into it. The 37l. 7s. 9d. sterling received of the passengers in Holland and made good to them by Mr. Causton, Mr. Wragg is still answerable for; and Governor Horsey will be made acquainted therewith that it may be paid to the Trustees out of the money due to Mr. Wragg from the province of South Carolina by virtue of the Duke of Newcastle's letter now directed to Governor Horsey.
The Trustees have ordered that out of such of the 71 2/3 heads of German servants not freed within the six weeks granted for that purpose and who still remain under Mr. Bradley's care, seven of them should be employed in the cultivation of the 300 acres of land at Savannah for the religious uses of the colony; two more of them with their wives, such as Henry Parker shall choose, to be assigned to him from the Trustees in consideration of his services as bailiff; and two more to be assigned to Thomas Christie if he still continues in his office of recorder; and that the then residue of the said 71 2/3 heads should be employed in the cultivation of Bouverie's Farm which must be set out and cultivated to discharge the Trustees of Sir Jacob Bouverie's benefaction for that purpose. The Moravian Brethren having laboured in Georgia to the amount of 260l. 0s. 10d. sterling as certified by Mr. Causton in two accounts dated 10 August 1737 and 25 February 1737/8, and one of the brethren having delivered those accounts to the Trustees, they have balanced their bonds by that labour and the Trustees have delivered them up.
The incorporated Society in Scotland for Promoting Christian Knowledge being willing to bestow a sum on their missionary at Darien (over and above the annual 50l. paid to him) to enable him to procure servants to cultivate the land allowed him on condition that the land so improved be declared by the Trustees to belong to the said Society's missionary at Darien, the Common Council have resolved that on the surrender of John McLeod's 50-acre lot at the Darien to the Trustees it shall be granted for or towards the maintenance of a missionary minister at the Darien for so long time as the said Society shall continue to send and support a person to be missionary there, the said missionary to be approved of and authorized by the Trustees.
John West having named David Provoost jnr. of New York, merchant, to succeed to the lot at Savannah late Joseph Hughes's, and Capt. Thomson having consented thereto, the Common Council have agreed to the same. Whereby it is to be hoped Mr. West will be enabled to pay his 10l. note to me for the Trustees' use dated 26 September 1735 and payable in two years; and the Trustees have directed him to be called upon for that purpose and also to know if his draft on Mr. Causton to you 27 October 1735 for 60l. sterling has ever been paid; and if it has not, that it may be. William Norris having been very well recommended to the Trustees to succeed John Wesley at Savannah and having received the ordinations of deacon and priest comes over by the Two Brothers to take upon him the ministry at Savannah; of whose behaviour the Trustees have great hopes.
On 21st of last month the king signed the instruction to the Trustees relating to the trade with the Indians in Georgia, which will be taken into consideration as soon as Mr. Vernon comes to town, that if any part of it shall appear to want an explanation the Trustees may apply for that purpose. The Lords of the Committee present when that part of the report was settled were the Speaker, the Master of the Rolls and Sir Charles Wager. As soon as the Trustees have come to a resolution hereupon you will be acquainted with the result. Mr. Eyre and Mr. Thomas Tower met last Monday to consider of the most effectual method to enforce the execution of the Act prohibiting rum in Georgia, and they are of opinion that one proper method would be that on the summing up of the evidence to the jury on any trial it should be general, whether they should find it rum, brandy or any spirituous liquor, if they believed it to be a spirituous liquor sold, used or brought into the colony, it was within the Act and by virtue of their oaths they would be obliged to give a verdict and find the offence. The same gentlemen also considered of the most effectual way for preventing private credit and are of opinion that a law should be prepared by the Trustees on the foot of the Irish law for recovery of small debts which has been regularly executed and without any inconveniences; but that instead of confining the debtor there should be a clause giving the creditor power over his debtor to make him labour and work out his debt at certain times, computing a proper number of days labour per pound sterling, and on the debtor's non-compliance he should be obliged to work for the public or be confined. And something of this nature will be further considered of.
The Trustees have sent the surveying instruments you desired for Mr. Auspurgur, the surveyor, in a case and 1,000 gun worms in a box, the gun worms being part of the presents designed for the Indians. The 40 pieces of duffels and 6 pieces of strouds in 9 bales and a cask, with pocket knives, looking glasses etc. for the Indians and a box of matchets, will be shipped next week on board the Minerva, Capt. Nickleson, Capt. Thomson not having room for them and no other ship going to Georgia this year. They will be forwarded to Thomas Jones at Savannah or in his absence to William Stephens and Henry Parker with other parcels on board the said ship which are sent to John Brownfield by Mr. Tuckwell; and Lieut.-Col. Cochran's sergeant going over in the said ship will take care of them.
The Trustees received a letter from Mr. Whitefield relating to the building of a tabernacle, minister's house and schoolhouse at Frederica, which they think necessary to be done out of the fund for the religious uses of the colony. But as he is coming over for priest's orders there is time for doing it against his return. Charles Wesley thinks of returning as soon as his health will permit him. Mr. Whitefield writes that he desires an order from the Trustees to have money to bear his or Mr. Habersham, the schoolmaster's, expense in their voyage back to England when they shall have a desire of returning. As to Mr. Whitefield's coming back for priest's orders it is no doubt necessary but for Mr. Habersham's return the Trustees don't see any immediate necessity if he is of any use in Georgia, but they refer that to you who can judge better on the spot. The Trustees have paid for Mr. Brailsford's passage by the Two Brothers and the Common Council ordered him 25l. for his attendance on the dispute between South Carolina and Georgia, which has been paid him. Amos Callard sent to me this morning to attend him about the money for Georgia, and although he fully depended on 400l. it is reduced to 300l. which is ordered to be paid into the hands of the secretary to the Trustees; and I have given Mr. Martyn notice to go and receive it. Entry. 6 pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 94–96d.]
August 11.
Georgia Office.
407 Harman Verelst to Lieut. John Moore Mackintosh by Two Brothers, Capt. Thomson, and Minerva, Capt. Nickleson. In November 1737 you having 40 menservants put under your care and 10 women, 1 girl and 1 boy, the Trustees desire an account from you certified by the magistrates at Frederica to show them if any, and how many, of the 40 menservants have been disposed of and to which of the freeholders at the Darien and also to show them in what service the other of the 40 men and the 10 women, 1 girl and 1 boy have been employed and how the profit of their labour is accounted for to the Trust; which account you are desired to transmit them by the first opportunity. The Trustees also direct that seven of their servants now under your care should be immediately employed in the cultivation of 300 acres of land in the southern part of the province which Gen. Oglethorpe is desired to order to be set out for the religious uses of the colony, and that the then residue of all the said servants of the Trustees at the Datrien should be offered for supplying the people at Frederica who want servants on their giving a bond for 8l., the expense of each head, to be paid in twelve months from the date unless the profit of their past labour (over and above the charges of their clothing and maintenance) being accounted for to the Trust can reduce that sum; and in that case the bond is to be given for so much less. And the Trustees expect that those freeholders at the Darien who were supplied with servants in November last will be careful in repaying their 8l. per head when the year is up. Entry. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 100d.]
August 11.
Georgia Office.
408 Same to Rev. George Whitefield by Two Brothers, Capt. Thomson, and Minerva, Capt. Nickleson. I received your letters of 6, 16, 27 May last which I laid before the Trustees. They are very glad you had so pleasant a voyage and of the concurrent circumstances which made it so, but they are sorry that pleasure was superseded with your own and the passengers' illness. I received your letter from Gibraltar also, and the Trustees have sent you by the Two Brothers the stationery you desired. Gen. Oglethorpe sailed from Plymouth 4th of last month and I have written to him about the tabernacle, minister's house and schoolhouse at Frederica, for which there is time while you come to England for priest's orders and return. By this ship Rev. Mr. Norris comes to office at Savannah in the room of John Wesley, and very seasonably for the time you mentioned of your return to England. The expenses of your voyage back I have written to Gen. Oglethorpe and Col. Stephens about, but I hope Mr. Habersham will1 continue the care of the school until your return when he may remove with you to Fredenca, and the care of the school at Savannah will then be supplied by Mr. Norris if Mr. De La Motte should not return. Yet if it is necessary for Mr. Habersham's return with you the expense thereof, on that necessity being represented to Gen. Oglethorpe or Mr. Stephens, must also be defrayed. Charles Wesley intends to return to Georgia as soon as his health will permit him to be itinerant minister. Entry, 1 p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 100.]
August 11.
Georgia Office.
409 Same to Henry Parker by Two Brothers, Capt. Thomson, and Minerva, Capt. Nickleson. The Trustees have ordered you two menservants and, if married, their wives as well; you are to choose them yourself and they will be maintained by the Trustees until further orders. They have also sent you by the Two Brothers clothing and necessaries to the value of 14l. 15s. part of the 20l. they ordered me to lay out for you; the remaining 5l. 5s you may supply yourself with shoes, stockings and hats from Capt. Thomson and draw upon me for it, without you would have that sum paid here to Mary Cooper your landlady for half a year's rent of her house at Savannah from 16 June 1737 instead of your paying it under her letter of attorney, if it is unpaid; or in discharge of any future half-year. The two years rent from 1735 to 1737 the Trustees have at two different times advanced her, for Mr. Causton as her attorney to receive of you and place it to their account. P.S. China mug in the box you are to deliver to William Stephens. Entry. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 99d.]
August 11.
Georgia Office.
410 Same to Thomas Jones by Two Brothers, Capt. Thomson. By this ship comes consigned to Gen. Oglethorpe 24 half-hogsheads of molasses, 425 pairs of men's and 151 pairs of women's shoes, a cask of shoes for Mr. Carteret. Consigned to you (and if absent to William Stephens and Henry Parker) come the following parcels: [see list in No. 412] which I hope will arrive in good condition. The bill of lading for the said consignment I have enclosed to William Stephens. I gave notice to Mr. Edwards in Bucklersbury about Capt. Thomson's departure as you desired; and the two persons you spoke of go by this ship. I hope you had a safe, though I fear a very tedious voyage and that this finds you in good health. Entry. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 667 fo. 99.]
August 11.
Georgia Office.
411 Same to Thomas Causton by Two Brothers, Capt. Thomson, and Minerva, Capt. Nickleson. [Accounts and orders in No. 406 concerning servants by Capt. Thomson, the disposal of German servants by Three Sisters, the succession of David Provoost jnr. to lands in Georgia, and the execution of Act prohibiting rum in Georgia, are repeated hen.] Entry, 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fo 98, 98d.]
August 11.
Georgia Office.
412 Same to William Stephens by Two Brothers, Capt. Thomson, and Minerva, Capt. Nickleson, enclosing copy of Trustees' last letter of 4th. inst. [Orders in No. 406 concerning disposal of German servants, succession of David Provoost jnr. to lands in Georgia, and prohibition of spirits in Georgia, are repeated here.] There comes consigned to you and Henry Parker (if Thomas Jones should be absent from Savannah) parcels and boxes for the following: Mr. Carteret; Henry Parker at Savannah; William Williamson at Savannah; Mr. Auspurgur; Thomas Eyre, cadet in Gen. Oglethorpe's regiment; Thomas Young at Savannah; John Coolen at Savannah; Rev. Mr. Whitefield; the secretary for Indian affairs; Gen. Oglethorpe (to dispose in presents to Indians); mace for town court of Savannah; two boxes for yourself containing letters, Daily Advertisers and parcels for Lieut.-Col. Cochran and Francis Moore. Entry, 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 97, 97d.]
August 14.
Annapolis Royal.
413 John Adams to Thomas Hill, acknowledging letter and enclosing the following. Signed. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 12 October, Read 13 October 1738. To lie by until some agent applies Enclosed,
413. i. Annapolis Royal, 14 August 1738. Petition of John Adams to the King, setting forth his services in the taking of Port Royal in 1711 and in Nova Scotia since that time in the course of which he has become blind, and praying for a pension in the short time remaining for him to live. Signed. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 8, fos. 29–31d.]
August 16.
Whitehall.
414 William Sharpe to John Scrope transmitting order of Committee of Council for Plantation Affairs of 27 May 1738 referring to Council of Trade and plantations Lieut.-Governor David Dunbar's petition for reimbursement for his settlement in Nova Scotia and the report of the Council of Trade and Plantations thereon of 4 July 1738. The Lords of the Committee conceive it improper for them to lay such an affair before H.M. and therefore send the papers to be laid before the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Copy. 2½ pp. [see A.P.C, Colonial Series, 1720–45, pp. 611–612] Annexed,
414. i. Order of Committee of Council, 27 May 1738. Copy, of No. 251. ½ p.
414. ii. Report of Council of Trade and Plantations, 4 July 1738. Copy, of No. 327. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 10, fos. 108–109d.]
August 16.
Savannah.
415 Thomas Causton to Trustees for Georgia. By advices just now received from Mr. Horton dated 13th inst. I am informed that the Spaniards are in possession of St. George's Island; that he keeps one of the boats lately sent thither to give me further advices and has desired a supply of powder and bullets; and that I would engage a party of Indians which he is apprehensive may be serviceable on the main. I wrote the enclosed letter to the president of council of South Carolina. (fn. 1) I shall endeavour to procure what Mr. Horton desires but as we have very little powder or bullet in any of your stores, I very much doubt if any powder I can get from Carolina will be good. I shall not fail to transmit to you further advices when it shall come to my knowledge and to use my best endeavours for the public safety. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd. 19 March 1738/9. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 150–151d.]
August 16.
Savannah.
416 William Stephens to Harman Verelst, by Capt. Coe. On 25th ult. I sent a packet jointly with another from Mr. Causton containing various fetters to the Trustees, yourself and many others with intent it might go by a ship which my correspondent at Charleston had advised me was upon sailing; but by reason of my waiting some days longer than I would willingly have done till Mr. Causton was ready, the packet (as I feared) came too late to Charleston and the ship was sailed, which I was further advised of and that there was another would be going soon by whom he would send that packet. Whilst I was meditating to be timely enough with another letter that might possibly go by the same ship in company with my former, we are this instant informed by letters from Frederica that the Spaniards have actually taken post on St. George s Island, which by the late agreement betwixt Mr. Oglethorpe and them was to stand as a barrier betwixt the two provinces till the two crowns had farther stipulated what was to be done and to be possessed by neither, whereupon Mr. Oglethorpe in pursuance of that agreement withdrew what guard he had at that time upon the said island of St. George. But in violation of that agreement they have now possessed themselves of it, built a kind of barrack or hut for the present to cover their men and have a sloop lying near them as a guard-ship to command or annoy any vessels passing that way, which we are likewise informed they have begun to put in practice by firing on a boat of ours wherein were some people under the direction of Hugh Mackay, junior, who lately commanded at St. Andrew's and who was now going in search after two or three of our people that deserted and are supposed to be gone off to the Spaniards. Mr. Causton writes by this same conveyance to Charleston a full account of all which he thinks needful to be laid before the Trustees, which though I can add nothing to, I should expect to be thought asleep did I not also transmit such intelligence as comes to hand be it of more or less moment.
Our people are no ways startled at this enterprise but seem to put on an air of contempt; and I really think in case we were put to the trial we should find good hearts plentier than ammunition stores, whereof they write for a supply at Frederica and Mr. Causton writes for assistance of that kind from the government of Carolina at the same time that he advises them of this insult. Surely we shall know more shortly. At present (not having heard one word from England since in May last by letters dated in February) all that we can learn of what they are doing in Europe is by the way of the Leeward Islands or from the Northern Plantations, from both which places we hear that our general with the remainder of his regiment is on his passage hither. How welcome he will be you will easily judge and how acceptable a little good news from our friends in your part of the world would be to us, I leave you to guess. Time will not allow me to add more. This goes by a chance trading boat just setting off for Charleston and how long or short a while it may wait there for a conveyance to England I know not. Signed. 1½ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 19 March 1738/9. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 152–153d.]
August 17.
Jamaica.
417 Governor Edward Trelawny to Duke of Newcastle. About three weeks ago I received a complaint from Daniel Bloom, master of the brigantine Turtle Dove of New York, against Capt. Michel commander of a French guardacostas belonging to Hispaniola for seizing and plundering the said brigantine; as also at the same time another complaint from John Tristram, master of the Elizabeth of Liverpool, against the said Michel for seizing his ship and carrying it into Leogan where the council condemned it as a lawful prize but allowed him two months to come to this island and get security for the ship and cargo in case sentence should be confirmed in Old France. Copies of Tristram's deposition and Bloom's protest go enclosed. On 1st inst. I wrote to M. de l'Arnage, lieut.-governor of Hispaniola, by Capt. Douglas in H.M.S. Falmouth, copy enclosed. On his return I will inform you what success he meets with. Signed. 1½ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 21 November. Enclosed,
417. i. Protest by Richard Nicholls, notary public, on 9 June 1738 at New York at the instance of Daniel Bloom, master of the brigantine Turtle Dove owned by James Searle & Co. of New York. Bound from Jamaica to New York, the brigantine was attacked on 1 May last off Cape Nicola and about six leagues from the shore by a French sloop of 24 guns and 120 men commanded by one Michel. The Turtle Dove was seized and taken into Leogan in Hispaniola and her crew put in gaol. She was declared by the court there to have been unlawfully taken and Daniel Bloom recovered possession of her. He found gold and silver money missing and other damage to the value of 100l., together with personal effects of passengers and crew missing to the value of 159l. For all these he could obtain no redress. He sailed from Leogan on 15 May. Daniel Bloom, John Millow mate, William Burns and William Dawson, mariners, Peter Vallete and John Bell, passengers in the Turtle Dove, made oath on 16 June 1738 that the above facts were true. Copy. 5¼ pp.
417. ii. Governor Trelawny to M. de l'Arnage, Lieut.-Governor of Hispaniola; St. Jago de la Vega, 1 August 1738. Enclosed is copy of protest of Daniel Bloom against Capt. Michel. I make no doubt but you will cause the strictest examination to be made into the affair, so that all delinquents may be detected, justice done, and ample restitution made. I have likewise received another complaint from John Tristram whose deposition is enclosed herewith. Such actions tend to the breaking of the peace and treaties now subsisting between the two countries, liberty of navigation being one of the great ends that they are framed to establish. This letter will be delivered by Capt. William Douglass of H.M.S. Falmouth. Copy. 2½ pp.
417. iii. Affidavit sworn at Jamaica before William Henry North, 29 July 1738, by John Tristram late master of the Elizabeth of Liverpool. About 18 May last deponent sailed from Jamaica for London with a cargo of sugar, cotton and mahogany plank of the growth and produce of this island. Through calm weather and contrary currents he was 31 days before he came up to the west end of Hispaniola, the usual course taken by ships navigating through the windward passage, and had expended about one-third of the water on board. About 20 June, lying about one league from land near Donna Maria May, a place where ships from Jamaica to Great Britain usually take in fresh water, the Elizabeth was stopped by a guardacostas commanded by Capt. St. Michael, and taken to Leogan. There deponent and his crew were kept in prison for 10 or 12 days. Soon after their release deponent was informed that the Elizabeth and cargo had been condemned; but he was given two months to go to Jamaica to get security for their value so that he might have his ship and cargo again and the cause be tried in Old France. Copy. 2¼ pp. [C.O. 137, 56, fos. 122–131d.]
August 21.
Bermuda.
418 Governor Alured Popple to Duke of Newcastle. I landed 9th of last month and published my commissions in the usual form the next day. I likewise issued a proclamation for continuing all officers civil and military in their respective posts till further order and writs for calling a new assembly who met 7th of this month and passed three Acts, the one to settle 140l. this country money (equal to 100l. sterling) on me during my government here in lieu of such advantages as accrued to former governors from the liberty allowed them of granting licences for the fishery of whales, the second and third to make additions to my salary of 240l. a year during my government. As these Acts are entirely consistent with 26th and 27th articles of my instructions I hope they will meet with your approbation. I enclose copies of these Acts, of my speech to the general assembly and of the addresses of the council and assembly in answer thereto. As I have not been long enough here to be enabled to give you so exact an account of these islands as I hope to do, you will excuse my finishing this letter with an account I received from Mr. Brownlow, master of a sloop who lately came hither from Rhode Island. He informed me of Mr. Trelawney's arrival at Jamaica and that the Spanish guardacostas had pillaged four English vessels coming through the gulf who for fear of condemnation threw their money overboard on sight of the Spaniards. Mr. Brownlow likewise informed me that the French governor at Martinique had given the liberty of an open trade between that island and Rhode Island for one year, that French vessels traded openly at Rhode Island, and that the Custom House officers there did not intermeddle. I do not pretend to surmise what may be the consequence of a trade so contrary to the treaties between England and France. Signed. 1½ pp. Endorsed, Recd. October. Enclosed,
418. i. Address of Governor Popple to Council and Assembly of Bermuda. 1½ pp.
418. ii. Address of Council of Bermuda to Governor Popple, 8 August 1738. 1 p.
418. iii. Address of thanks of Assembly of Bermuda to Governor Popple, 8 August 1738. 1 p. [C.O. 37, 29, fos. 82–83d, 86–91d.]
August 21.
Bermuda.
419 Same to Andrew Stone. After a long passage of eight weeks from the Land's End I landed here 9th of last month and have not before now had any opportunity of writing to any friends in England. I hope therefore you will not have thought me forgetful when I assure you that one of my greatest pleasures here would be a more frequent correspondence than is possible to be kept up in this place because sloops from hence do not go directly to England more than twice a year. You will see by my letter to his grace what I have done since my landing or more properly speaking what the assembly have done for me. The cheerfulness and unanimity with which they made my settlement have given me much more satisfaction than twice the sum obtained by dispute and party. Every person who, as you must remember, threw up their commissions in my predecessor's time have taken them again, and I flatter myself with the prospect of a very agreeable retirement. The want of conversation of some friends I have left behind is a great alloy to the pleasures this place would otherwise afford. But as I am determined never to forfeit their friendship I hope the present distance between us will not put me out of their memories. If I should be guilty of any errors in my correspondence with his grace I rely on your good nature in putting a favourable construction upon them. This will be an addition to the many obligations I am already indebted to you for but I must yet add to the list by desiring you will allow my brothers to wait upon you when they have anything to trouble you with from me. Signed. P.S. Minutes of council and assembly not yet fairly transcribed. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 37, 29, fos. 84–85d.]
August 21.
Bermuda.
420 Same to Council of Trade and Plantations reporting arrival in same terms as No. 418 and enclosing three Acts passed by the assembly. The first is for laying a duty of 14l on every old whale and for paying to me 140l. per annum which with the exchange is equal to 100l. sterling and the surplus of the duty imposed by this Act is applied by the Act to the country's use. The second Act lays a duty of 3d. per ton on all vessels but English, 2s. on every bachelor above 21 years old, and 5s. on every horse, mare or gelding; and the treasurer by this Act is to pay me annually 140l., the overplus being applied as in the aforementioned Act. The tonnage duty commences in May 1739 and the other duties from May 1740 because by an Act passed during the late president's administration the same duties are laid and are to continue till the time these duties commence. The tonnage duty by the former Act is imposed equally on all vessels without excepting those belonging to England but as that duty expires in May next, as no English vessel has been here since excepting the ship in which I came and which was excused paying that duty, and as no ship is expected in that time, I beg that that Act may be suffered to expire. As I am no way concerned in point of interest, my salary being to be paid whether that Act be repealed or not, I have undertaken to represent thus much to you, and I do assure you that I will never give my assent to any Act contrary to my instructions either in this respect or any other.
The third Act for paying me another 100l. a year I must confess might as well have been included in the second Act I passed. But as the assembly desired to have two Acts and as by the 27th article of my instructions I am allowed to take such sums as the assembly should by any Act or Acts think fit to settle upon me, provided such addition be made for the whole time of my government and by the first assembly I should call, I made no difficulty in giving my assent to the Act. I hope therefore these Acts will meet with your favourable report upon them.
Mr. Dinwiddie who has been collector of the Customs here for many years has now obtained the office of surveyor-general for the southern part of the continent, Jamaica and the Bahamas. Mr. Walpole obtained this post for him, knowing him to be a man of integrity and a skilful officer. He is one of the council here where he is likewise very much concerned in point of property. As it will be very agreeable to him and the people here if Bermuda be made a branch of his district instead of Mr. Dunbar's, I beg to add my reasons why I think this change would be of advantage. Mr. Dunbar since his first appointment has never been here to discharge this part of his duty and by being one of the council in ordinary constantly occasions a vacancy at that board. Whereas if Mr. Dinwiddie should have Bermuda added to his district, his desire to discharge his duty in every place, the settlement of his family here and the property he has in this place would engage his attendance here about three months in the year when he could likewise discharge his duty as councillor. Mr. Dunbar is no way concerned in interest in what I have now proposed; if he was, I should not have mentioned the change. I enclose a proposal I received from Mr. Dinwiddie relating to the introduction of British coin in H.M.'s American dominions. The facts he mentions are so known that I have nothing to add to it but my wishes for its success. I send you a French bitt and half-bitt as they are called here, these and other foreign silver which passes for weight are the only silver pieces of money we have here.
The little time I have been here has not yet permitted me to acquaint myself so thoroughly with the people of this place as to be able to recommend to you six persons proper to be appointed councillors in Bermuda according to my proper instructions. I shall therefore for the present only mention three gentlemen whose characters here give them a title with your permission of sitting at the council board; their names are Nathaniel Bascome, William Riddell and John Harvey. The first is speaker of the assembly, the second is a justice of the peace here and a gentleman of a good family, and the third is one of the puisne judges. As soon as I am better acquainted with the characters of the people here I will send you a more complete list. Signed. 3½ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 17 October, Read 18 October 1738. Enclosed,
420. i. Address of Governor Popple to Council and Assembly of Bermuda. 1½ pp.
420. ii. Address of Council of Bermuda to Governor Popple. 1 p.
420. iii. Address of Assembly of Bermuda to Governor Popple. 1 p. Endorsed, as covering letter.
420. iv. Bermuda, 17 August 1738; Robert Dinwiddie to Governor Popple. It has for some time given me surprise and uneasiness to observe the introduction of French coin to the British colonies where they pass current by tale and undoubtedly is an obvious profit and gain to the importer, for they pass for very near ten per cent. more than the usual exchanges from this or Leeward Islands to London. I therefore having seriously considered the advantages that may accrue to this revenue if H.M. should think proper to honour his dominions in America with his own coin.
I observe by the annexed account that H.M.'s military appointments in America amount to 61,195l. 18s. 4d. or thereabouts. I therefore propose that this expense for one year may be paid by a new coinage to be sent to each colony where the appointments are and have made the following calculations on 60,000l. from the enclosed piece of money, which allow to be current here at 8d. and at Leeward Islands at 9d., shall draw my calculate from them. The piece of money weighs 42 grains. If 42 grains yields 8d., 480 grains or one ounce yields 7s. 7 3/7d., and if 5s sterling gives 7s. 7 3/7d., 240,000 ounces or 60,000l. sterling will give 91,428l. 11s. 5 1/7d., and 60,000l. sterling at the current exchange of 40 per cent. from this to London amounts to 84,000l. So that by a plain demonstration there will be a gain of 7,428l. 11s. 5 1/7d. Bermuda currency which is (the exchange being at 40 per cent.) sterling 5,306l. 1s. 10½d.
For Leeward Islands. If 42 grains passes for 9d. and if 5s. sterling gives 8s. 6 6/7d., 240,000 ounces or 60,000l. sterling will give 102,857l. 2s. 10 3/7d., and 60,000l. at exchange of 57½ per cent. from thence to London will give 94,500l. So by this it's plain there will be a gain of 8,357l. 2s. 10 3/7d. Leeward Island currency, which is (the exchange being at 57½ per cent.) sterling 5,306l. 2s. 5½d.
And am very well convinced if the money be coined of the value of the enclosed it will give general satisfaction, be a great ease to trade and service to each private family. I at the same time conceive it absolutely necessary to have each piece milled and laws to prevent clipping or defacing of the coin; if thought proper ½-bitts for change as also double bitts, quadruples and 8-bitt pieces; all coined in proportion to above estimate, which will be readily received among the Plantations and go current in proportion to the enclosed bitt. No doubt it will be judged proper on the adverse of H.M.'s head a designation relating to the British colonies and a proper distinction on each piece, vizt. figure 1 for one bitt, 2 for two bitts, 4 for four bitts and 8 for eight bitts or pieces of eight.
This for some time has been my earnest intention to lay before the proper boards at home. But as my friends have procured me an appointment that probably may keep me some years in America I give you the trouble of perusing it. I beg you will send it home. Signed. P.S. Military appointments and charges in the British colonies in America. Regiment at Leeward Islands, 9,775l. 18s. 4d.; regiment at Annapolis Royal, 9,830l. 13s. 4d.; garrison at Annapolis, Placentia and Canso, 2,539l. 1s. 8d.; 4 companies at New York, 7,141l. 16s. 8d.; 2 old companies at Jamaica, 3,841l. 12s. 6d.; 6 new raised companies at Jamaica, 11,524l. 17s. 6d.; 1 company at Bermuda, 1,003l. 15s.; 1 company at Providence, 2,466l. 15s. 10d.; 1 company at South Carolina, 3,071l. 7s. 6d.; 1 regiment at Georgia, computed 10,000l. Total, 61,195l. 18s. 4d. 2 pp. Endorsed, as covering letter. [C.O. 37, 13, fos. 54–65d.]
August 22.
Savannah.
421 Samuel Holmes to Benjamin Martyn. Having been in Georgia for twelve months I have carried on the bricklaying and brickmaking manufactory and brought it to that perfection that I make as good stock bricks as can be made in England. I have made more than 100,000. If the Trustees would furnish me with servants on credit I shall carry on the manufactory with courage and faithfulness. John West, jointly engaged in brickmaking, uses me ill. I have a great many good friends both noblemen and gentlemen but have not written to them by reason I would not give the Trustees any trouble. James Brown, the City bricklayer who lives in Crooked Lane, will give a character of me; Mr. Whitefield will not speak amiss of me. Mr. Causton is civil to me because he sees me inclinable to work. Signed. Illiterate. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 154–155d.]
August 23.
Georgia Office.
422 Benjamin Martyn to Andrew Millar at Kingston, Jamaica. The Trustees have received your letter of 26 May 1738; they think it: reasonable you should go to Georgia with the ipecacuana you have got. But as nothing appears to have been done for the money which they have already paid they cannot charge themselves with any further expense on that account. They are sorry to find that you don't mention any other plants but the ipecacuana for Georgia: they hope if you have any others the colony will have the benefit of them as well as your other subscribers since the principal intention of your going was for the benefit of that province. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 103.]
August 23.
Palace Court.
423 Minutes of meeting of Trustees for Georgia. Received receipt from Bank for 300l. paid in 15th inst., being so much received by hands of Amos Callard of New Inn, only surviving trustee under the will of Timothy Wilson, out of charity money to be disposed of by that will. Read H.M.'s instruction to the Trustees dated 21 July last to prepare a proper Act or ordinance for settling the trade carried on by the provinces of South Carolina and Georgia with the Indians on such a footing as may be for the mutual benefit and satisfaction of both the said provinces, H.M. having at the same time given an instruction to Samuel Horsey, governor and lieut.-general of South Carolina, to recommend to the council and assembly there to pass a law for the like purpose in that province. Samuel Horsey being since dead, resolved that a letter be sent to Gen. Oglethorpe to acquaint him therewith and that the Trustees are desirous of having proper measures concerted for preserving the peace with the Indians by licensing fit persons under the like reasonable securities and instructions for regulating their trade with the Indians in both provinces and that for that end he would consult with Lieut.-Governor William Bull for appointing persons to settle the boundaries of each province and the nations of Indians within each boundary, that the number of traders against the number of Indians in both provinces should be computed to settle the nations which one licenced trader can supply, and the nations which require more traders than one to supply them, and that one-half of the said traders might be licenced by the commissioners for South Carolina and the other half by the commissioners for Georgia, and that the plan of proper Acts might be prepared and sent over to the Trustees for their consideration to answer the purposes of H.M.'s said instruction; and that in the meantime the commissioners of South Carolina and Georgia may proceed in their respective provinces in concert with each other to carry on a mutual trade to the Indians in both provinces. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 687, pp. 92–93.]
August 25.
Georgia Office.
424 Harman Verelst to General James Oglethorpe by Minerva, Capt. Nickleson, with copy of No. 406. The Trustees acknowledge receipt of yours from Madeira. The 19th inst. Governor Horsey after a short illness died, and the Duke of Newcastle's letter relating to Mr. Wragg's demand on the province of South Carolina will now stand directed to Lieut.-Governor Bull, out of which demand the Trustees are entitled to 37l. 7s. 9d. sterling received of the passengers on board the Three Sisters in Holland and made good to them in Georgia, which Mr. Wragg agrees to be answerable for out of that money when received from South Carolina, whereof the Trustees desire you will acquaint Lieut.-Governor Bull.
Last Wednesday the Trustees met and considered of H.M.'s instruction relating to the trade with the Indians in Georgia and herewith you have a copy of their minutes and resolution thereupon; which they recommend to you to get adjusted with the present lieut.-governor that amity may be settled to the mutual interest and benefit of both provinces. Had Governor Horsey lived they did not doubt of that end being obtained nor have they less reason to doubt of the good will of Col. Bull to co-operate with you in those propositions which may be best conducive to an happy union with the provinces and preservation of peace with the Indians. The same day which Governor Horsey died the Master of the Rolls died also in Hertfordshire. As he was a great benefactor and friend to Georgia in his lifetime it is possible he may have remembered that province in his will which will be examined for that purpose when brought into Doctors Commons.
Lieut.-Col. Cochran's sergeant, Mackenzie, taking his passage to Georgia on board the Minerva by way of Charleston and taking care of those things shipped for the Trust, the following are the particulars under his care for Georgia to be delivered to Thomas Jones or in his absence to William Stephens and Henry Parker. Eleven chests. [Details of contents given.] Entry. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 101d, 102.]
August 25.
Georgia Office.
425 Same to William Stephens enclosing copy of No. 412, and copy of bill of lading of 62 parcels consigned to Messrs. Crokatt & Seaman at Charleston by the Minerva, Capt. Nickleson, who were desired to forward the same to Thomas Jones at Savannah or in his absence to yourself and Henry Parker. [Details of contents given] The Trustees condole with you for the loss of your sincere friend Governor Horsey. Entry. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 667, fos. 102d.]
August 25.
Georgia Office.
426 Same to Rev. George Whitefield sending duplicate of last letter and acknowledging receipt of letter of 2 June last advising of your draft to Capt. Whiting for the subsistence of the five heads on the Trust account amounting to 20l. 13s. 4d. which I have paid to his wife. The Trustees are very glad to hear of the willingness of the people at Savannah to attend your ministry and they with you hope for their edifying thereby. Entry. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 667, fo. 102.]
August 26.
Savannah.
427 Thomas Causton to Trustees for Georgia. The account mentioned in my letter of 25 July concerning the uneasiness of the Indians in the Creek nation has a better appearance, Thomas Wigan the trader having informed me that those Indians continue very well disposed towards the English notwithstanding they are closely courted both by French and Spaniards. I believe I may venture to say that there is more dependance on his accounts than what is related by others, and I can find by him that the traders from Carolina and those who claim their protection have done a great deal of mischief which probably may deserve punishment.
Capt. Roger Lacey died here 3rd instant, being returned from Augusta two days before. He had been a long time ill and subject to frequent fainting fits supposed to be nervous, occasioned by drinking too liberally. Mr. Lacey was incapable of giving any account of affairs at Augusta but Lieut. Kent advises that crops there will not answer expectation by reason of the excessive droughts, and believes they shall raise 100 bushels of corn, that the people are now in good health, and desires that the garrisonboat may return loaded with provisions and ammunition. Mr. Lacey being dead (at the request of the widow) I dispatched a messenger to the lieutenant to take care of his effects. At a general court held 7th July, Joseph Hetherington, Phillip Bishop and Francis Elgar, servant to Mr. Lacey, were indicted for killing and destroying sundry cattle and feloniously stealing the flesh thereof. The (now) widow Lacey was also indicted for receiving part of the said flesh, knowing it to be stolen. Hetherington, Bishop and Elgar, upon full proof, were found guilty on some of the indictments, and having requested that the rest might not be proceeded on till they should write to the Trustees and receive their answer, the court ordered proceedings to be stayed. Mrs. Lacey desired that the prosecution against her might be delayed, and the court considering the absence of her husband and the ill state of his health granted her request and admitted her to bail.
Believing it to be necessary you should be particularly acquainted with the proceedings of the court, I have (once more) assisted in drawing up those proceedings though I beg leave to say that the variety of business so much takes up my thoughts and time that I would willingly avoid acting in that manner, believing it more properly belongs to the recorder. Neither should I have mentioned thus much now, had not said Hetherington and Bishop lately broken gaol through the top of the privy and with them Thomas Wright, the Indian trader, who I lately mentioned to be in custody. The magistrate issued a warrant for a hue and cry to be published and a reward of 10l. sterling for retaking each of them, and as the fugitives would (very probably) raise reflections on the colony as a pretence for their leaving it I desired Mr. Alexander Rantoul to publish in the Carolina Gazette the fact relating to them. It is generally believed that this prosecution affected Mr. Lacey's health but my enclosed (fn. 2) to him on that melancholy occasion will show the care I took to prevent (as much as possible) the ill impression it might make. It is too notorious that the convicts were very bold in their practice of killing cattle and that Mrs. Lacey is also guilty of the charge and other ill-conduct. The killing of cattle (as appears by this and other prosecutions now depending) is most evidently brought into practice; the magistrates have therefore resolved to apply to you for remedies suitable to the circumstances of the people. I shall not fail to advise and comfort the widow in her affliction now truly felt, and (if possible) guard her from evil councillors.
On 16th inst. I thought it necessary to dispatch the enclosed to you and I now enclose an extract of Mr. Horton's letter to me as a reason for those dispatches as also those then sent to the president of H.M.'s council of South Carolina (fn. 2) . On 19th inst. I received from Capt. Gascoigne (who that day arrived at Tybee intending to wait the arrival of Gen. Oglethorpe) the enclosed copy (fn. 2) of Ensign Hugh Mackay's letter to Capt. Hugh Mackay containing an account of the Spaniard's behaviour, which letter was the sole occasion for what Mr. Horton had advised. And as it appears thereby that Mr. Horton was much mistaken I thought it my duty to transmit a copy. Mr. Horton himself arrived here 24th inst. and assures me that the report of the Spaniards being in possession of St. George's Island is wholly groundless, that the firing on Mr. Mackay by the Spaniards was from the main near their lookout, and that there is no appearance of breach of treaties or uncivil behaviour from them. I enclose also copy (fn. 2) of my letter now sent to the president of H.M.'s council at South Carolina. Signed. 2½ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 13 December 1738. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 160–161d.]
August 26.
Savannah.
428 William Stephens to Trustees for Georgia. My last was of 25 July, duplicate sent and continuation of journal to this day, to fulfil the promise as well as I can which I made of transmitting a particular account of the several plantations within the district of this town. I have now also enclosed a short list of the number of acres planted and by whom, which without doubt you will think a short list indeed. To me it is surprisingly so, but be it what it is I came here not to put false colours upon anything nor to represent matters otherwise than I find them, and the sure way to come at truth I saw was not to give too hasty credit to more than one seer in such things, which I have carefully observed and taken some pains to discover how easily I might otherwise be imposed on, for too many are ready and willing to set an equal value on their performances with those who have taken much greater pains. The distraction I found among all when I first came here, and such a grown indifference with it of meddling with cultivating land among too many, gave me sad apprehensions of the consequence till towards spring after that frenzy was abated, finding I went on to clear land with what strength I had, they began more readily to listen to my persuasions, when on a sudden a new spirit seemed to spring up and with great pleasure I observed a pretty many set heartily to work whom I had little hopes of any good from. This was so apparent that it soon grew to be the common opinion of such as I thought good judges we should see great things done; and from thence it was that I remember I was grown very sanguine in what I wrote you thereon. But now it's too plain that before they took up that good disposition winter was near over (the proper time for felling trees) and time lost was not to be recovered.
Thus far I thought necessary to say, partly in my own excuse for being at one time more credulous than I thought it would become me to be now, when we are come to facts. You will doubtless observe that in this list it does not appear above a fourth part in number of the freeholders lots have any plantations on them, and it is as easily seen likewise who began in good time, though it's but justice due to some of the occupiers to say that when a poor man has wrought by himself or perhaps with his wife or little boy to help him only, in such cases a few acres well planted I humbly conceive deserve equal commendation with those who have exceeded in strength. That you may have a thorough insight to the bottom of all pretensions of this sort among us, I shall in my next extract another list of such as have at sundry times cleared several acres of land, some of which has never yet been planted, some planted and for want of success thrown up and neglected, and some who may yet be deemed useful men in the colony divers ways, notwithstanding they are hitherto no planters, to which I shall also add a few who have made signal improvements by building, brickmaking or other laborious manufacture, and then leave the rest whom little can be said for to be ranked among the vacant lots, and better were it if theirs were such. Could a reasonable computation be formed of what might be expected from the produce of this list (short as it is) together with the several distant plantations which I have sent in my former, even from thence might be drawn an agreeable conclusion. But what I troubled you with in my last concerning the disappointments we were fallen under as well from the long drought as from our seed proving otherwise than we hoped, makes it needless to say more of it here, I wish I might have said less.
To pass from the plantations to your public gardens will give as little satisfaction, where I fear a relapse near to the state I found it in at my first coming, which with some care and pains was then altered much and gave hopes of seeing better things as the spring came on. But of late I think it is grievously neglected. I presume Mr. Anderson wanted no instructions in what he was to undertake, and as I observed he was pretty active for a season in directing what he thought needful, I am far from thinking his discontinuance of it would have been voluntary; but (poor man) he and all his family have been very long (some months) in a very weak and sick condition which yet so far continues as to call for the prayers of the church. But the principal gardener under him, one Fitzwalter, a freeholder of this town, deserves certainly the character of an idle fellow, and as he could never stick long to anything commendable he perseveres in the same loose way of life which I apprehend he will not easily break from now, having married the widow of one Wright who had a licence for keeping a public house where he naturally takes most delight. But I ought to beg pardon for offering such an insipid tale when I should remember that Col. Oglethorpe (as we hope) is near us who wants neither will nor power to rectify worse abuses than this, though the fewer he finds the better. I commit the care of this to Mr. Whitefield whom indeed I should be sorry, as well as many others, to part with were it not that we hope to see him in these parts again confirmed to make his abode where he is so much beloved and so capable of doing much good. Signed. 2¼ small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 13 December 1738. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 158–159d.]
August 26.
Savannah.
429 William Stephens to Harman Verelst. Since mine of 25 July to you wherein were enclosed divers letters and papers as specified in that letter, I wrote you again of 16th inst. a full account of such advices as we had just received from the south relating to the Spaniards and being a matter of importance (as was apprehended at that time) I desired it might be laid before the Trustees; though, had it proved such, probably our enemies might have done what they intended long enough before more help came from our friends maugre all the opposition that could be given them. Mr. Causton wrote at the same time to the like purpose and indeed it was universally believed in these parts that we were at last to expect such a visit from the Spaniards as had been given out often. But, behold once more, that story like some others ended in nothing and the truth very soon came out, even before our letters had been gone 24 hours, as you will observe by my journal of 19th and other accounts which you will receive of that tremendous affair. At this very time we hear from Charleston that a squadron of Spanish men-of-war of 50 or 60 guns from Old Spain are newly arrived at Havana and that it portends a design upon these provinces. But why so? Have not we got as good a squadron as they in the West Indies ? And in case of a rupture expected, it is but reasonable to suppose they will be on their guard at least. No doubt but these things will come to some ecclaireisment soon, for when there has been such a long smothering of fire it cannot well be expected not to break out at last.
What in the name of wonder is become of our general ? and those forces with him ? We hear both from the north and south that such aid is coming from the east, and the last account of them comes by a brig which spoke with them (as it is said at Charleston) at the Madeiras. So we prick up our ears and look out big with expectation every day what we may hear more or see before night. Would to God they would come and bring us a little good news from our friends in England and the Spaniards shall give me very little trouble. Surely I shall then meet with some token or other of the Trustees' sentiments concerning their secretary who has never yet been so happy. I will not doubt it after that very kind expression they were pleased to make use of when I last waited on them, that they expected I would write my mind freely and believe I wrote to my friends. I have sometimes thought that it would appear both by my journal and letters I was not mincing matters, which is an evident mark of my relying on their candour. But of these things I shall be better able to say more when I know more, wherefore I forebear troubling you with many words now but beg leave to bespeak the liberty of writing more particularly another day to you whom I have an entire confidence in. Only one little affair requires to be said something of, which is that by a letter my son received from Mr. Wragg lately, he made a demand of 50l. currency of him, being so much he had supplied him with on his coming ashore at Charleston in that manner he did last winter, which Mr. Wragg desires may be paid him in sola bills for that he cannot make charge of it to the Trustees. My son tells me that in the distress he then was he wrote you of it but did not presume to draw a bill (wherein he was right), not doubting but you would have been pleased to take proper notice of it. But such small things are easily forgot and therefore now I ask leave to remind you of it, promising myself that it was not meant my son or I should meet with such a welcome at first coming to Charleston, but from what Mr. Causton tells me he apprehends Mr. Wragg might very properly have made charge of it in his account. Herein you will be so good to advise me.
What can I say about my good friend Col. Horsey, not knowing where to find him ? Pray let all whom you see that have any share in his family know that the respect and value I have for him and his can never be extinguished. Possibly he may now be on the sea in his way to his government. Providence has not been unkind to him in keeping him so long back, for the smallpox has made such destruction at Charleston this summer that the place is almost abandoned and desolate, and the assembly lately met for the dispatch of necessary business at Port Royal. I am told they have at times buried 70 white people at Charleston in a week. I believe the season was never known hotter than of late here after a healthy summer so that agues and fevers begin to abound among us. But I hope the return of moderate weather will bring health again to both provinces and then how happy should I be to hear Col. Horsey himself tell me he left Mr. Verslst and all friends well. Signed. 1¾ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 13 December 1738. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 156–157d.]
August 28.
Savannah.
430 Patrick Grant to Trustees for Georgia Your concern for the welfare of this colony first induced me to apply to James Oglethorpe for lands. Though known to none of you besides him, I take upon me to represent to you some very great grievances and first those which only relate to myself. On 25 May last, being a grand juror duly sworn to enquire into the death of one Priest supposed to have been killed by John Brown of Highgate, having met Mr. Parker, bailiff, in the public street, he bid me adjourn the court; and upon my answering that it was not my duty he called me several ill names and threatened me, to which I made no reply, but finding Mr. Parker in a very unfit condition to be reasoned with, I civilly left him and directly went to acquaint Mr. Jenkins, whose duty it was, with whom I returned to witness the adjournment of said court. But before we got to the courthouse Mr. Parker informed us that the court was adjourned by Robert Hows, tithingman, and after insulting me in the presence of Mr. Jenkins, Mr. Ormston and several others with very opprobrious and scurrilous language without the least provoking answer upon my part he assaulted with a cane which he got out of the hands of Mr. Christie, recorder, who run in upon, seized and struck me at the same time. During all this time I only acted defensively and never struck a blow. I was then imprisoned, bail being refused. I was moved to another prison where all the lights were nailed up and confined there for 14 days without light. I fell sick there and my physician was debarred access for several days. The privilege of being in the custody of an officer at his house was refused me though given to Mr. Brown, committed for murder. Petitions to be examined and tried were rejected; I am informed private affidavits were taken against me by persons of infamous character. I was obliged to sign a recognizance for contempt of court in order to purchase my liberty. I undertake to prove the above propositions under pain of death. I am told that my refusing to adjourn the court in the public street is the same as if I had refused in the face of the court. My reasons for refusing were, first, there is an order of court that only the wards on guard where the court is held should be obliged to attend and no others; the ward to which I belonged was not on duty. Secondly, there is an order of court that no grand juror should be obliged to attend. Another reason is the bad usage I received from Mr. Parker who was then intoxicated with liquor.
I take it for granted that you have been informed of the general uneasiness and dissatisfaction which subsists among the people occasioned by the oppressive conduct and implacable temper of Thomas Causton, first bailiff, storekeeper and cashier, who by those latter offices in conjunction with the former has a dangerous power of alluring the minds of the weak by putting them under strong temptations to bias their judgments to gratify his passion and private resentments, and (upon the slightest affront, perhaps the tattle of some old woman) of punishing the most industrious by denying those necessary assistances to carry on their work. A very dangerous custom, I am informed, has lately obtained here, vizt. when Mr. Causton has any private quarrel with any person and in order to revenge the slightest affront, private affidavits are taken against that unfortunate though perhaps innocent person, which are sent home to England, by which means the character and reputation of that person is sullied in your opinion without the least knowledge of the person concerned. Whether this be true or false I cannot pretend to determine; several well-meaning men are of that opinion who think it almost impossible that you can be rightly informed by reason of these clandestine affidavits. Whether there have been any taken against me I am not absolutely certain. If there are such and they contain anything contrary to the above mentioned, they are false and calumnious. The usage which I have received was entirely owing to private resentment. I beg that you will order a fair and legal enquiry. Signed. 7 pp. Endorsed, Recd. 13 December 1738. With constable and tithingmen's and Edward Jenkins's certificates. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 164–167d.]
August 28.
Savannah.
431 William Horton to Trustees for Georgia. As I now daily expect the arrival of Gen. Oglethorpe into this colony and then to deliver up the charge which he was pleased to leave with me relating to the southward part of it, I think it my duty to acquaint you of the situation I left it in four days past. The people of Frederica have and I thank God still do enjoy an uncommon share of health and I have taken some pains to keep a good harmony amongst them and therein have succeeded to my wishes for no set of people in their circumstances live in a more peaceable manner than they have done for many months past; they have cultivated as much land as they can take care of themselves but for want of servants have not been able to clear so much as their neighbours at Darien. The crops of corn at both places are very bad, the seed was far from being good, and the season proving very dry it is generally parched up. The gardens at Frederica are very flourishing and are great helps to the people. Your storekeeper there has acted with great integrity and his accounts which are now going to be settled with Mr. Causton in order to be transmitted to Mr. Verelst will make it appear.
In June last a Spanish launch with an officer and 15 men arrived at my house at Jekyl with a letter for me from the governor of St. Augustine acquainting me that a party of mulattos and Spaniards had deserted with a large canoe and desiring me to assist the officer in taking them, desiring also the continuance of a good correspondence. The officer went thence by sea to Carolina in pursuit of the men and in his return attempted to come within land by Frederica, but as they never have seen that fort I sent the scoutboat with orders to carry them back and not suffer them to pass within sight of the town, which was accordingly done and the officer brought again to Jekyl when Col. Cochran sent the governor advice of his arrival with the regiment. I am informed that advice has been sent to you that the Spaniards had taken possession of St. George's Island. Such a report came to Frederica but that island still remains neutral as agreed upon between the general and the late governor of St. Augustine. Ensign Hugh Mackay who was sent in pursuit of three deserters from Amelia had some shot fired at him by a Spanish sloop in St. Juan's River after the Spaniards had sent out a boat with a flag of truce which he would not speak to. Signed. 2¼ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 13 December 1738. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 162–163d.]
August 28.
Savannah.
432 John West to Trustees for Georgia. For two years I have at great expense brought a brickwork to perfection so that I could now make 1,200,000 good stock bricks a year if there was call. I can deliver them to any part of Savannah at 25s. per thousand. I hope I shall have your encouragement as the first that ventured at it. I have this year made upwards of 200,000, with which several large stacks of chimneys are already built. We are pretty healthy now in general and want for nothing more than the sight of Gen. Oglethorpe. Signed. Illiterate. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 640, fo. 168, 168d.]
August 29.
Boston.
433 Governor Jonathan Belcher to Council of Trade and Plantations. The last letter I received from you bore date above eighteen months ago, since which I find eight of mine that had reached your hands. I shall esteem the honour of an answer when your more important affairs may allow. I have transmitted to you the journals of the House of Representatives of this province and the secretary has the several Acts and laws with the proceedings of H.M.'s council. I now enclose report of a conference with two of the tribes of Indians on the eastern frontiers of this province, where by the latest accounts I have received they remain peaceable and friendly though the inhabitants in some places have been frighted, as they have thought, by Indians about their houses in the night, upon which I expressed my orders to all the garrisons and to the people on the frontiers to be prudent and cautious as to themselves and yet to avoid as much as possible giving the Indians jealousy of their fears, for which I can't find they have any great reason. I could heartily wish that the affair of the settlement of the lines between this province and New Hampshire was expedited, that the borderers thereon might be quiet and easy in their possessions and labours. Signed. 3 small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 24 October, Read 25 October 1738. Enclosed.
433. i. Report of a conference with the Penobscot and Norridgewalk Indians in the Council Chamber, 28 June-6 July 1738. Present: the Governor and Council, Adeacunkee, principal of the Penobscot, Wiwurna, principal of the Norridgewalk, and eight others. The Indians complain of the commissions which make the Indians that have them exceedingly proud. They like the articles of peace. They complain of the truckmaster at George's and of the high prices of goods sold them; they would rather sell their beaver for money, even paper money, than for goods. They desire that supplies of rum should be limited to one quart a man and that Englishmen should keep to the lands within the bounds set. In reply the governor stated that he cannot control prices but that in other matters he will take care of the complaints and observe all treaties. Copy, examined by J. Willard, secretary. 25 small pp. Endorsed, as covering letter. [C.O. 5, 881, fos. 5–6d, 11–25d.]
August 30.
Savannah.
434 Edward Bush to Trustees for Georgia. Mr. West has told me he purposes to leave off the blacksmith's business. If you will send over iron, coal and two servants I will undertake the work. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd. 13 December 1738. [C.O. 5, 640, fos. 170–171d.]

Footnotes

1 Not found.
2 Not found.