Elizabeth
July 1561, 21-25

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Joseph Stevenson (editor)

Year published

1866

Pages

193-198

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Elizabeth: July 1561, 21-25', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Elizabeth, Volume 4: 1561-1562 (1866), pp. 193-198. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72997 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

July 1561, 21-25

July 21.325. Cecil to Throckmorton.
By his last letters the Queen understands that one [blank], a goldsmith, (fn. 1) means to come over with jewels. She wishes that he might rather stay, as he could not be here before her progress.—Ingatestone, 21 July 1561. Signed.
Orig. Hol. Add. Endd. Much mutilated. Pp. 2.
July 21.326. Richard Clough to Gresham.
1. Since his last letter, he has received Gresham's letter of the 12th inst., and perceives thereby of the arrival and discharging of divers ships. Two days ago Simon Lossone arrived here from Stockholm, who brought divers letters; amongst which were two letters from Captain Host to his brother, wherein there is not much written of the King's coming, but mention is made that lately five ships passed from Lubeck into some part of the Muscovite's country, who were met by the galleys of the King of Sweden, and a fight ensued, wherein one of the galleys was sunk; but in the end they took the five ships, and in discharging them found much munition aboard. The King takes it in bad part, and confiscates the said ships. No news from Dutchland and Italy. The controversy betwixt the Duke of Wurtemberg and another is ended, and the Duke has his castle again.
2. Trusts that Gresham has received Cecil's "pelers" before this, sent by Cornelius Jansone of Bergen, with whom Clough shipped them five days past. Concerning the payment, he hears by divers of the company here that he makes no reckoning to pay any here, and says the matter is not agreed upon; but yesterday upon the Bourse he spoke with the Master Governor, who asked the same question. He answered that Gresham wrote to him that the Queen's creditors shall be paid, and also of the order of the bargain made with the merchants at home. He intends to ship this day the six velvet stools, three green and three red; by his next he will write the ship's name and charges thereof; and next week he shall not fail to have Cecil's chairs, four leather and two velvet. He has received the three tuns of beer, and distributed it according to his commission; and whereas he wrote that he should give two hogsheads to Jasper Sketts, he has given them to Condratt Sketts, whom he thinks he meant, for Conrad spoke to him about them.
3. A marriage is concluded between John Fleming and Jasper's second daughter, who will be married within eight days. The exchange passes at twenty-two shillings and threepence.—Antwerp, 21 July 1561. Signed.
Orig. Hol. Add. Endd. Pp. 4.
July 22.327. Intelligences from various Places.
1. Milan, 16 July 1561. The Castellan was going into Spain to answer certain informations concerning a new fortification about the castle, of great expense, and to small purpose. The corsairs have done much harm, especially in Puglia [Apulia]; where, landing three or four hundred at a time, they took a great number of persons. Visconte Cicala, lately taken by Dragut Rays, is well entertained by him, and is put in hope to be shortly dismissed. It is said King Philip has made the Duke of Alva his lieutenantgeneral, by sea and land. The Bishop of Terracina arrived in Spain, and presented the Pope's licence for levying 300,000 crowns yearly of the clergy, until the number of galleys which the King had determined to make, should be furnished; at which the King seemed displeased, having required licence to alienate so much land of the Church as would amount to 25,000 crowns a year, which licence he expected would be sent by the said Bishop.
2. Don Luigi Valeja was sent by King Philip to Portugal for three causes: one to request that the Government might be jointly used by the Queen Mother and the Cardinal, it being supposed the Cardinal took the matter upon him alone; the second, to borrow the galleys of Portugal to resist the Turk's army; and the third, requesting the King to marry a daughter of the King of Bohemia.
3. Answer was made to the first, that there was no other meaning but the Government to be jointly. To the second, the King intended to send his galleys to Gibraltar, and being there, they should be at King Philip's command for the aid of that coast. To the third, it was honourable, but the King was too young to treat of such a matter yet.
4. The corsairs had taken two rich ships coming from the Canary Islands laden with sugar and other merchandise. Others have taken three foists and a galley belonging to the Religion of Malta.
5. King Philip's affairs grow worse because of the discord of his Councillors. The debate between the Brescians and the Cremoneses is not yet quieted. It is thought the end will be good by the means of the Marquis of Pescara.
6. Fifteen Turkish vessels attempted to land in Malorque and other places. Entering as friends into Antibes, they were made much of; from thence they departed to Marseilles, where they were furnished with masts and oars and such things as they lacked. The Duke of Savoy and his subjects of the Valle D'Angrona have agreed, and they are permitted to enjoy their religion till the end of the General Council. A Turkish foist passing Corsica landed forty persons to seek some "butyn." The Comite, who was a Christian renegade, seeing his time, released all the Christian men that rowed in chains in the foist, and put all the Turks in their places, that remained in the vessel. He then went his way, and sending the Turks to be sold at Genoa, he liberated all the Christian men. The said forty Turks remained in the isle, where order was given to take them, and good sums of money offered for their apprehension.
7. Rome, 22 July 1561. Fifty sail of the Turks were seen about Terracina, whereof there were twelve of Dragut Rays' galleys, whereby the Pope was obliged to send a number of men for defence of Ostia and other places. It was expected they would do all the harm they could on the river of Genoa. The Cardinal of Marsilia is dead. The Pope has published a Bull, whereby all prelates dying in Rome are inhibited to make any testament.
8. Certain Turkish vessels had laid siege to a place of Puglia, called Goso [Gioja]. The Conte of Tendila was banished from Spain, and had retired to Portugal. The Cardinal of Ferrara was on his way to France, with a great train, making small journeys, not exceeding fifteen miles a day. He expects to be at the Court of France about the middle of September. He has received letters from the King of Navarre signifying he will be welcome to the Court. He is charged, first, to settle the displeasure between Vendôme and Guise; if any remain, then to hasten the French prelates to the General Council for fear of a National Council, and to do his best to support the old religion there. Cardinal Morone has cleared himself concerning the election of another Pope when this one dies. The Bishop of Terracina has informed the Pope that King Philip would send his prelates to the Council immediately, and would cause his Ambassador in France to travail that those prelates may do the same. It is confirmed by letters from Naples of the executions for religious matters. Two hundred have been put to death, five hundred condemned to the galleys, and a great number banished.
Endd. Pp. 6.
July 22.328. The Marquis of Winchester and Sir R. Sackville to Cecil.
They forward Challoner's request to have certain lands belonging to the Queen, of the yearly value of 21l. 11s. 2d., lying at East Haddon and Cold Ashby, in Northamptonshire, in exchange for certain others, parcels of the manor of St. Bees, in Cumberland, of the yearly value of 21l. 15l. 8d. He also desires to be restored to his annuity of 50l. Encloses a bill of another suit, touching the same annuity.—22 July 1561. Signed.
Orig., with seal. Add. Endd. by Cecil. Pp. 4.
July 23.329. Measurement between the Tweed and the Sea.
"A note of remembrance of the quantity of the measure of the ground betwixt the river of Tweed and the sea side above the castle and town of Berwick, taken 21 July by Sir Thomas Dacre, Richard Goodall, and John Rophe, carpenter."
Length from low-water mark of the Tweed to low-water mark of the sea, 4,000 feet. From Tweed side to the sea side, taking one place with another, the ground is eighty feet deep, that the sea may easily fall into the Tweed. For the safeguard of the town, there may be water fifty feet deep always standing, if need require. There are 300 feet between the walls and where the ditch shall be, for casting of the earth towards the walls. They think the same may be done with charges by the Queen; and if it were once finished, there was never such a strength made for the safeguard of the town.— Berwick, 23 July 1561. Signed: Thomas Dacre, John Roffe.
Orig. Endd. by Cecil's secretary. Pp. 2.
July 24.330. Fortescue's Debt to Farre.
Acknowledgment of a debt of fifty-five rials of plate, current money of Spain, owing by Thomas Fortescue to William Farre.—24 July 1561. Signed.
Orig., with seal. Endd. Pp. 2.
July 25.331. Thomas Cecil to his Father.
1. Wrote on 10th July, and on the 19th received his letters. Thanks him for his affectionate care, and for the advice which he had given him in writing before his departure. Of study there is little or nothing; they spend their whole time in seeing what is to be seen. Not being yet settled, they cannot apportion any fixed time to study. There is a dispute about the rent of their house, which he hopes will be settled, as he likes his quarters, and the landlord is a wise, honest, and religious man. But Windebanke will write more fully about these matters. Will himself write at greater length about his studies in his next letter, and will take care to obey his father's injunctions.
2. On the day that he received his father's letters, Throckmorton took him to the Court. In consequence of the news which they brought, their presence was not so acceptable as formerly. He there witnessed a terrible battle between a lion and three dogs, in which the latter were victorious.— Paris, 25 July 1561. Signed.
Orig. Hol. Add. Endd. Lat. Pp. 2.
July 25.332. Windebank to Cecil.
1. Cannot as yet send an estimate of their monthly charges. (fn. 2) With Throckmorton's help found a gentleman, who, for 300 crowns a year, will lodge, board, and find them fire and candle, with other necessaries, and give them stable room for their horses, and allow them a fourth man as lackey. The monthly rate is twenty-five crowns, that is eight for Mr. Thomas, eight for Windebank, seven for Thomas Kendall, and the rest for the fourth man, which he will not abate. The gentleman is a courtier, and is learned and has had charge in the wars, and is of "indifferent good religion;" yet, all that notwithstanding, his demand is very great.
2. The fashion of gentlemen and of meaner men is to ride with foot-cloth, and therefore Mr. Thomas must have his horse and foot-cloth. The keeping of two horses will come to 4s. the week, or at least two and a half French crowns a month. His furniture of apparel for the winter will stand almost 20l. Mr. Thomas has spent his time as a courtier, and Windebank trusts that when he is settled he will frame himself more to his studies.
3. In his letter of the 10th, he desired to know Cecil's pleasure touching the forty crowns which Mr. Thomas has received for his hobby. Desires that he will remember him to avoid English company, saving so far as their duty to Throckmorton and the Earl of Hertford requires, and that he do not neglect the Latin tongue.—Paris, 25 July 1561. Signed.
4. P. S.—Their engagement with the aforesaid gentleman will only be from month to month.
Orig. Hol., with seal. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
July 25.333. Draft of the above.
In Windebank's hol., and endd. by him. Pp. 4.

Footnotes

1 His name was Robert Rouvet, see No. 304.
2 Are as yet hanging upon the Ambassador, and many times resorting to Lord Hertford.—Cancelled passage in the draft, see next number.