Elizabeth
April 1580, 21-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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Arthur John Butler (editor)

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1904

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246-255

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'Elizabeth: April 1580, 21-30', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Elizabeth, Volume 14: 1579-1580 (1904), pp. 246-255. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73448 Date accessed: 28 August 2014.


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April 1580, 21-30

April 21. 272. COBHAM to the QUEEN.
The king coming yesterday to Paris sent Secretary Brulart to me to inform me that the Prince of Condé had suddenly left la Fère, accompanied by sundry troops of horsemen and other forces, of which he wished me to advertise your Majesty, hoping that you will assist him with your counsel and all other good means. Thus much by the king's command I have thought it my duty to certify. It seemed from Brulast that the king neither could nor would seem to know which way the Prince has gone. But I am informed he went by Sedan, a town of the Duchess of Bouillon, and thence into Germany.—Paris, 21 April 1580. ½ p. [France IV. 57.]
April 21. 273. COBHAM to BURGHLEY.
Since my letter sent by Mr Floude, the Prince of Condé has started suddenly from la Fère. The king is much troubled and sent Secretary Brulart to me so to signify to the Queen. It seems they are very 'doubtful to have' much trouble this year, since they have taken arms in Dauphiné, Languedoc, and Provence ; while in some places those of the league have joined them of the Religion. There is therefore small hope of the king making any enterprise elsewhere. I enclose notes of certain edicts which the king intends to have confirmed by the Court of Parliament, that he may levy great sums of money. Likewise I send the proffers which the Catholic king has sent to them of Portugal, and the names of all the principal persons at present managing that realm.—Paris, 21 April 1580. Add. Endd. On the back is pasted a fragment of a paper addressed to Dr Wilson, referring to 'Edmund Roberts.' ½ p. [Ibid.IV. 58.]
April 21. 274. COBHAM to [WALSINGHAM].
I have sought to get the names of the Englishmen. After I have obtained them I will send them 'by the next.' I suppose you know one John Frost who has lately gone into Scotland, and will be with Sir Lewis Balandine, the Justice-Clerk, ready to give intelligence to any that serves her Majesty. I perceive that Mr David Chambers purposes to repair into England, to require that he may have access to the Scottish Queen. As yet I have not visited the Bishop of Glasgow, for I know not her Majesty's pleasure. It is thought that these troubles in France have proceeded, not for any cause of religion, whereby the edict of pacification shall be broken by them, but for the discontent and ill-government of the State. I am waiting to hear from you of the matters which I certified by Mr Phillips and Mr Floude.—Paris 21 April 1580. P.S.—I am informed that the Scots have this day had advertisement from a Scottish merchant dwelling at Newhaven, that d'Aubigny has got the keeping of Stirling Castle, and the body of the king. 1 p. [Ibid. IV. 59.]
April 21. 275. The ESTATES of HOLLAND to the QUEEN.
Whereas the manifold and urgent burdens of the war have been the reason that we have been unable to pay the second instalment due to the merchants of Ipswich, and we understand that application has been made to your Majesty for letters of arrest, tending to the great hurt of persons dwelling in these lands, and of the common cause ; we have thought good hereby to beseech you graciously to regard the great burden of these lands, and charge the merchants your subjects to suspend the proceedings in execution, and postpone the stay till next October, by which time we hope to make such provision for payment that no further complaints will reach you.— The Hague, 21 April 1580. (Signed) de Rechtere, and another. Add. (Seal.) Endd. in later hand. Dutch. 1 p. [Holl. and Fl. XIII. 22.]
April 22. 276. AUGUSTINO SUTARINI to COBHAM.
Owing to important business, I have been compelled to start for Milan without saying a word to anyone ; wherefore you will excuse me. And whereas I am of the same mind as before, namely to serve your Queen, I write to say that if she accepts my offer as it is made, and it seems good to you that I execute it, you should advise me in Milan by a letter in duplicate, addressed thus : 'To the very reverend Gio. Battista Buttinone, Canon of St. Stephen's in Milan.' I shall stay in his house. Send the other copy as a mercantile letter, whereby it will have a safe delivery, and time will not be lost. When you get this I think you will have heard from your Queen, yes or no. If you wish me to come you will find the money for my expenses, since I do not want to spend my own. Answer me as soon as possible, and I remind you that the more secretly this business is handled, the better ; since you have now made an anatomy of my affairs, in a manner of speaking. And I will not fail in my promise to you for your own private affairs.— Lyons, 22 April 1580. Add. Endd. : Augustino Sutarini to Sir H. Cobham. His going out of France and abode at Milan. Ital. 1 p. [France.]
April 26. 277. COBHAM to BURGHLEY.
M. de Vray is come hither and has informed the king that Monsieur had dispatched him to England to the Queen, 'pretending' to bring those affairs effectually to some conclusion. On the 23rd I was visited by him, when he told me that Monsieur wished him to let me know of his going. It seems he hopes to 'procure' her Majesty to send for the Commissioners, as also that she will be pleased to advise Monsieur how he shall deal in the matter of the Low Countries, for he is staying his enterprise only until he may be resolved of the Queen's liking therein. I think he meant to have gone to-day but he 'feeled' a 'grudging' of an ague, whereon he was let blood this morning ; otherwise he would have dined with me. M. de 'Marchamont' is come hither this afternoon, sent 'on message in post' from Monsieur. He had had public conference with the king, in which he has assured his Majesty that his brother is ready to do him service in appeasing these troubles, beseeching him that the devisors of evil treacherous acts may be punished. Thus there is again conceived a little hope of repose, but surely the foundation is but slippery. As to what the king wished me to write as to the Prince of Condé's departure from la Fère, it is now certainly known that he is still there.—Paris, 26 April 1580. P.S.—Please let the Queen know that the Prince of Condé did not leave la Fère, and that the king was wrongly informed. Add. Endd. 1 p. [France IV. 61.]
April 26. 278. COBHAM to WALSINGHAM.
Whereas it was certified to the king, and I also was informed by some of the Religion of credit, that the Prince of Condé had left la Fère, as I wrote by Bluemantle, it is now held for truth that he is still there, of which please advertise the Queen. It seems there were suspicions of some secret designs on both sides, and upon the sight of a few troops who passed to and from la Fère, there arose an opinion of his departing, which was advertised by M. Crèvecœur, who has a jealous eye on him. The King of Navarre went from Nérac on the 15th inst. to Montauban on the Tarn, and has since taken four or five places thereabouts. The gentlemen of the Religion have taken arms in sundry parts by the Loire, and seized a few towns and castles in Poitou. M. de Liancourt was sent on Saturday the 23rd to la Fère, to speak with the prince ; and Beauvois la Nocle was sent by the king on the 22nd to Sedan in the belief that the prince was there. Monsieur seems to take upon him the appeasing of these beginnings and has dispatched de Vray to the Queen : who is come here, and purposes to start for England in two days, if his health serve him. I have moved the Ambassador of Portugal for the money he owes you. He promises payment on receipt of money which he expects daily. The Queen Mother is not expected till the end of this month.—Paris, 26 April 1580. P.S.—Lord Sandes came to Paris to-day, minding to stay here some time. Add. Endd. 1 p. [France IV. 62.]
April 27. 279. '27 April 1580. The names of sundry Englishmen, Papists, presently abiding in Paris.'
GENTLEMEN OF YORKSHIRE AND THE NORTH.
Three of the Fairfaxes
3 Manneryes
3 Wentworths
2 Stapletons
2 Danbys
2 Blunckstons
2 Musgraves
2 Swynbornes
Tankard
Goodriche
Caverley
Kendall
Pilkington
Rockworth
Vavasor
Womwell
Norton
Worthington
Meeres
Burghe
Blackston
Notton
Middleton
Wharton
Woodrooffe
Hungat
Bradford
Fitzwilliams
Rossington
Osborne
2 Gascoynes.

LANCASHIRE.

Orrell
Hawghton
Trafford
Ashton
[symbol] Thorneborowe

STAFFORDSHIRE.

Cuney
Aston
2 Warners
2 Basfords
Fitzherbert
Greysley
Swynerton
Erswicke

WARWICKSHIRE.

Meredey
Payne
2 Conways
Gryffin
Yoily

WORCESTERSHIRE.

Folliatt
Sheldon
Russell
2 of the Liggins
Hynckes
DERBYSHIRE.
Darcy
Babington
Foulgham
Frechwell
Fartlett
Deacon

NORTHAMPTON.

Farley
Cresswell
Vawse
Varneham
Saunders

CHESHIRE.

Hollmbery
Savadge
Turbridge
Hurlston
Chambley
Dutton
Brewerton
Mannering
Roche

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.

Barckley
2 Whittingtons
Tracy
Bray
Hanckesman
Aylworth

WILTSHIRE, DEVON.

2 Davers
2 Hungerfords
Copston
Carewe (Devon)

HAMPSHIRE.

Lawrence
3 Shelleys
2 Writhesleyes

NORFOLK.

Windam
Hudleston
Kittson
Catlin
Benington

OXFORDSHIRE.

Barker
Harte

WELSH COUNTIES.

Parry
2 Owens
2 Scudamores
2 Vaughans (Heref.)
2 Hanmers
Salisbury
OF SUNDRY COUNTIES.

2 Doyleys
Allen
Lodge
2 Redmans
Gobbins
[symbol] Kniveton
Eannes
Fortescue
Budley
Baker
Buckle
Elthrop
Biscott
Kempton
Baston
Buckett
Farrington
Branington
Jenings (Leicester)
Shroughborowe (Leicester)
Wroughton
Hassock
Walner
Banes
2 Bassedges (Nottingh.)
Omer
Travers
Royston
3 Wards
Pudds
Baymont
Holland (Lincoln)
Hardwigge
Colombye
Restall (Buckingh.)
Brighton
Gossadge
Cosley
Cowlson
Redborne (Heref.)
Kempson
2 Brownes
Wolstrop
Sheffield
Lutcott
Turvyle
Banister (Salop)
Cooper
Brackett
Mountjoy, kinsman to Lord Mountjoy, sometime appertaining to the Duke of Norfolk and now steward to M. Pibrac
These for the most part are gentlemen of good account here, and no students. Such gentlemen and others as are accounted for students and placed in Colleges or appertaining thereto :—
3 Smythes, one a kinsman of the late Earl of Arundel
2 Bridemans, gent.
Ere way
Ployden, the lawyer's son
Dawbson
Flood, brother-in-law to Lord Lumley
Bayly, Dr. B's. son
Banckley
3 Nevells, gent.
Knight, gent.
Cornwallis, gent.
Powell, gent.
Mundey
Biggs
Offley, gent.
Richardson
Front
Allyott
2 Wilbromes, gent
Lovell, g.
Daniell, g.
3 Skeynes, sons to Sir Tho.
Brompton
Speaks, g.
Jackson
Bearnmore
Brackley
3 Barkers
Robinson
3 Clarks
Goodgin
Goodwin
Burnell
Bostock
Hartley
Bushell
Brinckott
Beckett
Wood
Thorley
Ludwell
Broughton
Herson
Hockett
Harrison
Hamlett
Usher
Smitheson
Tilsley
Warner
Hudson
Bosley
Snowe
Snagge
Luddington
Playne
Letherborowe
Marshall
Skevington
Whetston
Stillington (York)
Gates
Warden
Phillipps

There are besides them many gentlemen and others at REIMS, ORLEANS, and other places in France, who are not particularly known. Lady Morley has these in her house :
Mr. Parker, her son

Merideth
Mr. Hall
Peyton
Hanmer
Vaghan
Lancaster
2 Webbs
Pilsbury
2 Sharlocks, g.
Boyer
Lovett
Planckuey
Poydell
2 Bracyes, g.
Ollyett, g.
Barnes
Chudley
Barnett
Nightingall
Ethrop
Ruckby
Manley
Godfrey
Atkinson
Christman
Brasbridge, g.
Throgmorton, g.
Sutherton, g.
Edleston
Rogers, g.
Turton
Greenfield, g.
Litchfield, g.
Hethicke
Otwell
2 Johnsons
Allen
Watson
2 Gyffords, g. of Staffordshire, gone to Reims
Woosley, g. of Staffordshire, gone to Reims
2 Crosses (? erased) greatly suspected to be Papists

ENGLISH DOCTORS.

Dr. Allen
Dr. Darbishyre
Dr. Peashey
Dr. Robinson
Dr. Bayly
Dr. Richard
Dr. Tomkinson, a Jesuit
Dr. Farnham
Dr. Nicholson
Dr. Smithe
Dr. Robards
Dr. Smithike
Dr. Wilkinson
Dr. Barnet
Dr. Bristowe
Dr. Knott, lately gone to the Prince of Parma

Lady Copley has only one, Mr. Brooke. The whole number of Papists are 307. It is thought there are about 100 Papists or rather more in this town, English and Irish, besides the forenamed ; who, living secretly and disguised as they do, cannot so readily be known.

THE ENGLISH PROTESTANTS IN PARIS.

Mr. Bacon
2 Hoptons
Mansfield
Varneham
Gawdy
Doyell
LICENCIATES IN CIVIL LAW.

Edwards, a Londoner
Percy of Yorkshire
Davison, Northampt.
Harding
Covert
Crompton
Weston
Appelton
Tempest
Francke

GREAT PRACTISERS.

Tho. Morgan
Warbutton
Clitherowe
King
Hiliard
Watson, son to the Attorney in London
Brackford, a pensioner of the Scots Queen
Thomas Evans, a companion of David Chambers, a Scot
Orton
Sudgrave, an Irishman

IRISHMEN.

Lawrence Priest
Edmunds Priest
Whyte Priest

GENTLEMEN.

Fitzpatrick
Dowby
Tirloughe
Cooly
Mr. Hughes
2 Sudgraves

ENGLISH FRIARS.

Fitzherbert
Boulser
Chambers
Fertley
Medcalfe
Branch
Cocks
Purston
Beckworth.

GENTLEMEN REMAINING AT ROUEN.

Sir John Barckley
Mr. John Wootton
Anderton (Lancaster)
Sheldon, a practiser
Smythe
Willoughby
Corbett
Buggins
Porter
Hidgcock
Windebancke
Champernowne
Cary, gone to Germany
Nichols
Barrington suspected
Machett suspected

besides those which appertain to my Lord the ambassador.
Protestants, 20
Sir Jerome Bowes has three more.
Lord Sandes remains here with 10 servants
Mr. Crofts, Mr. Comptroller's son.
Endd. : Mary I., the names of Englishmen residing in France, being Papists. 3 pp. [France IV. 63.]
April 30. 280. The FRENCH KING to HENRY HOWARD.
I have heard from my ambassador, M. de Mauvissière, how on every opportunity that can serve to confirm the friendship between the Queen of England and myself, and especially in regard to her marriage according to my desire with my brother the Duke of Anjou, you employ your good offices, and forget nothing which your good natural disposition, desiring of seeing our amity established, can effect. From which I wish to assure you I have received great pleasure and satisfaction, and am most grateful to you, as you deserve, and as I shall always on occasion be glad to show.—Paris, the last of April 1580. (Signed) Henry. (Countersigned) Brulart. Add. : Monsieur Henry de Hauuard mon cousin. Endd. : French king, and in Latin. Fr. ½ p. [France IV. 64.]
April 30. 281. A. GOSSON to DAVISON.
I received yours of the 23rd before that which you had previously sent by the Flemish post. I have seen no sign of its reaching me. Since your departure I have written to you twice, on 13 June and 22 August, 1579. I handed both to your secretary, who told me he had forwarded them to you. I cannot fitly thank you for your kind remembrance and for the honour you do me in your last. I have been all along at Antwerp without budging since the day when I returned ; though I mean to budge as soon as I have effected what my mother and other relations are urging me to do without further excuses, wherein I am sufficiently disposed to obey them. The fact is that for the re-establishment of our house they want me to marry, and several very honourable matches have been proposed to me here. But when I come to the point of concluding, the matter is always difficult, especially as many good matches offer, each having different qualities to recommend it ; and I fear that if I take one and leave the other it will be worse for me rather than better. I regret very much that you are not present, that I might have the advantage of your aid and counsel. But as this cannot be I will dare to be so enterprising as to ask you privately your advice by letter on all the persons (ceux et celles) upon whom I have cast my thoughts. I shall keep this to myself, as I am sure you will do. In this way you will increase my obligation to you. As for the news, I am glad that your country remains in sure peace and quietness, that it may serve as a port and a retreat as heretofore for so many poor people afflicted by the storm which agitates all the rest of Christendom. Touching the reception here of M. d'Anjou, it is true that every province has separately voted for it, under such conditions as shall be approved for the security of the country. But so far there has been no general resolution, because the deputies for the provinces have been returning since the arrival of his Excellency. I hear that they will be able to begin next week, and that they will proceed to the election of a State Council and Chamber of Finances, according to the representation and instruction laid before them by his Excellency shortly before his journey into Holland. From this it is hoped that matters will be better ordered and regulated in future. As for the report that is current here, and is not easily believed with you, you may adhere to your judgement as correct ; nevertheless it is useful to both you and us that the contrary opinion should be in vogue. M. de la Noue is using all his acts and endeavours as a soldier. He has lately shown himself in the neighbourhood of Haulterive, and has enabled those of Tournay to pass their goods and stock themselves with what they needed. This done he has returned to Ninove, where Colonel Norris and his troops, who have been employing every device suitable to the conquest of Mechlin, are to go and join him. We are also led to hope for the reduction of Groningen, in token of which they write from Holland that they are holding parley with those of the Union of Utrecht as to the conditions. Elsewhere, the Prince of Parma is at Mons in Hainault, and does not sleep. God order all for the best.—Antwerp, 30 April 1580. Add. Fr. 2½ pp. [Holl. and Fl. XIII. 23.]
April 30. 282. VILLIERS to DAVISON.
There is no need to excuse yourself for not writing to me, for I know you have no great matter just now. I thank you for your good will. If I could see you once a month I should have part of my wish ; for there are many things which the pen cannot and must not convey, and I much prefer that men should sometimes err in judgement than that they should make a mistake by writing too much. M. de la Noue has made as though he would (a fait contenance de) besiege Haulterive ; meanwhile he has re-victualled Tournai, which was his object. The enemy has re-crossed the river with all his forces. He (la Noue) having only 400 horse and 2,000 foot, has gone to a place of security awaiting reinforcements, and trying to carry out what you wot of, if it comes to pass. He is at present between Ghent and Oudenarde on the river, the enemy towards Ath. Meanwhile the people of Cambray and Bouchain have every chance of taking the forts which harassed them ; which they are doing, and have burnt three. The French regiment which was at Ninove is coming to-day to the camp. The English ensigns which are at Mechlin will leave it on Monday, and I think others will follow. Twelve ensigns of Scots are still at Menin, and will not be taken away unless it is very much to the purpose. The enemy want to assemble forces again towards Carpen for the succour of Groningen ; meanwhile Count 'Hoenlo' has recovered all the fortresses of the country, till only Groningen remains. Still they do not speak of surrender, and the town cannot be taken by force. These losses of towns make the enemy so furious that M. de Capres killed a poor man who brought him a letter about the capture either of his brother-in-law or of Mechlin. I write nothing about the war in France, for I think you are sufficiently informed about it ; nor of the report current of Monsieur's illness. You will soon know it as certainly as we, if it is true.—Antwerp, the last of April 1580. P.S.—Kindly give Mr and Mrs Killigrew my humble respects, with those of their poor gossip, who is still lying in. Add. Fr. 1 p. [Ibid. XIII. 24.]
April [?] 283. 'Report which came from Crate to the most reverend Archbishop of Santo [py. Santiago] of the preparations for war made in the ports of Spain.'
In the port of Cadiz are the Marquis of Santa Cruz, general of the galleys of Spain, with 36 galleys and 20 ships ; general of them Don Alonso de Bazan, his brother, with two tercios of 6,000 Spaniards ; maestre de campo, Don Luis Enriquez. Antonio Moreno brings four companies of Don Pedro de Sotomayor's tercio, maestre de campo of Lombardy. At Gibraltar is Marcello Doria with 20 galleys of Prince Andrea Doria and private persons, with one tercio of 3,000 Spaniards ; maestre de campo, Don Antonio Zapata. In the same port has arrived Fabrizio Colonna, son of Marcantonio, with 10 galleys from Sicily and some people ; and four companies of Don Diego Enriquez, maestre de campo. The Prior of Hungary and Carlos Pinelo with 13 ships, and two coroneles of 6,000 Italians from the kingdom of Naples. Prospero Colonna with 7 ships and one coronelia of 3,000 Tuscans and Florentines. From the district of Genoa and Lombards one coronelia of 4,000 gastadores (pioneers). Don Pedro de Medicis, brother of the Duke of Florence, is general of all the Italian infantry. In this port are expected 11 other ships with 6,000 Germans under the Count of Lodron, who started from the port of La Espeque [Speke in the translation, qy. Spezzia] on Jan. 23 last. In the Alfagayas of Tortosa are 20 galleys from Naples which came at the first, brought by Don Juan de Cardosa, with a tercio from that kingdom of 3,000 Spanish infantry. As maestre del campo comes Don Pedro Gonzalez de Mendoza, son of the Marquis of Mondejar. The total is 86 galleys and 49 ships ; 13,000 Spaniards, 9,000 Italians, 6,000 Germans, 4,000 gastadores ; besides the sloops and pinnaces (zambras) from the west coast, with the people, lances, and mariners whom Don Juan Denys, Real of Biscay, brings, who are many. Also many ships have come from Italy and Naples, with cargoes of all sorts of supplies, arms, munitions and appurtenances of war, with many people, the number of whom is not known. There embark also Sancho de Avila, captain-general of the coast of Granada with 300 horse. Besides there are being raised by the Estates of Old Castile 6,000 infantry, besides the maestros de campo Don Gabriel Nyno, — de Aya. In Estremadura much supplies are being got together, and about Badajos they are fortifying some places on the frontier of Portugal, in addition to the preparations which the Alcalde Tejada is making in Tierra de Campos. The officers of the army in addition to the captains-general, are Luis de Barrientos, Castellan of Gayenta, quartermaster, Andres de Avila, caterer that used to be to the galleys of Spain ; accountant, Alonso de Alameda, who used to be so to the army of Flanders ; paymaster, Juan de Portilla. Sp. 1½ pp [Spain I. 45.]