America and West Indies
May 1704, 1-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1916

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111-123

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'America and West Indies: May 1704, 1-10', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 22: 1704-1705 (1916), pp. 111-123. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73656 Date accessed: 28 November 2014.


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Contents

May 1704, 1-10

May 1.283. Affidavit of Capt. Moodie. Directed to prove the charges against Col. Nicholson of using violent "billingsgate language" to Ministers etc., and of autocratic behaviour towards himself, etc. If he was not removed, the best sort of the people would leave the country etc. His few supporters are such as he put in place, particularly Col. Will. Wilson, a Naval Officer, who is one of the greatest traders in Virginia, etc. Signed, J. Moodie. Endorsed, Recd. April 26 and May 1st, Read April 28, 1704. 3 large closely written pp. [C.O. 5, 1314. No. 9.]
May 1.284. Deposition of Mr. Commissary Blair concerning Governor Nicholson's mal-administration with relation to the Clergy, the College, and himself. [Cf. Memorial of Council of Virginia, April 10.]
He abuses that part of the Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction committed to himself and invades that left to the Bishop of London. He gave a licence to — Snead, a man of no estate, to marry an heiress of York County contrary to the consent of her Guardian. He refuses to sign probates for nine or ten months: has not inducted one Minister during his Government; they are thereby kept in precarious circumstances, ready to be turned off at pleasure, which makes the better sort leave the country and the rest obsequious. He convocates the Clergy without taking notice of the Bishop's Commissary, appointing preachers at those convocations, proposes the subject matters thereat and holds separate meetings of the Clergy himself, and gets them to sign papers in the name of the Clergy, requiring of some canonical obedience to himself, and turning out Ministers without process or trial. I have heard him say the clergy were all a pack of scandalous fellows etc., and several of the most noted good characters he abused with the most opprobrious names. Some he has made ride bare-headed by him in the bitter cold and scorching heat, some he has laid violent hands on whilst they were on horseback and pulled off their hat himself, or threatened publicly to tear their gowns over their ears, swearing the most dreadfull oaths in their presence, often at the Church door, and and if any preached of any duty he was known to neglect etc., he seldom escaped without threats. The Addresses he obtained by treats and threats etc. As to the College. He has not endeavoured to get the Assembly to assist the College in their necessity. He railed against the building, though extraordinary good for that country, and entered a publick protest against it in the College Records. He reflected on the College Accounts, threatened the Governors with a writ of enquiry, declaring solemnly that if they could give no better accounts, he must be of the people's opinion that the College was only a trick to serve some men's particular designs. He put such an affront upon them as to order their accounts to be laid before the Grand Jury, but no fault could be discovered. I have heard him swear that he would seize the College for the King's use, and he crowded into it the Secretary's Office etc., to the great disturbance of the College business. As to ye finishing part of it, he did so excessively hurry it on for those several uses, that partly by the timber being unseasoned, and partly by employing unskilful workmen, it was shamefully spoilt. By giving excessive wages, and by several unnecessary additions of his own invention, without the direction of the Governors of the College, they were brought 500l. in debt, besides 200l. which at first he advanced towards the founding of a scholarship, but spent in finishing the building, yet afterwards made the College repay it every farthing, when he had had the applause of it both in England and Virginia. In order to the ruining of the College Revenue, for about two years they had none of the 1d. per pound from Maryland, by his contrivance, etc., so that there was not enough to pay the Masters' salarys. He tried to hound me out of the Country. The occasion he took to fly out into open enmity with me was a pretended jealousy of my brother, as if he had been privately a-courting his Mistress, and swore to be revenged on me. Since then he has frequently threatened and abused me in public, and maliciously calumniated me, accusing me to my Diocesan of whoredom, adultery and incest, whereas I am clear from the least imputation of that nature. Now he denies that he writ any such thing. I have had no salary from the College for two years. He wrought upon a great part of the Clergy to join in a complaint of me to my Lord Bishop of London, for having suspended a Minister for notorious drunkenness and other proved crimes. He tampered with my servants, once tried to break into my room; and once, a fortnight before Christmas, 1702, while I lodged in the College, I heard the Schoolboys about 12 p.m. a driving of great nails to barricade the doors of the Grammar School. I was mightily surprized, for we had banished this custom, and it was quite left off, for some years. I made haste to gett up, and, with the assistance of two servant men, had almost forced open one of the doors, before they sufficiently secured it. But they fired off 3 or 4 pistols, and hurt one of my servants in the eye with the wadds. While I prest forward, some of the boys having a great kindness for me, call'd out "For God's sake, Sr., don't offer to come in, for we have shott; and shall certainly fire at any one that first enters." I began to think there was something more than ordinary in the matter, and desired a Parly with them, thinking to find out upon what account it was that they had provided fire arms, powder and shott, which they had never used to do; but that night they would not discover it: though I confess I had some suspicion of the designs of my malicious neighbour. In the morning, getting all the other Masters together, and calling for workmen to break open the doors, before wee began, wee offer'd them a pardon if they would open of their own accord and tell us the truth, who it was that sett them on, tho' by that time I had seen one of H.E. servants that morning a handing of them in some more powder. Upon this the boys sent out at a window by a ladder, one of the cheif Confederates, that knew the whole plott. The short of his story was, that while they had no thoughts of any such thing, the Govr. sent for him and put him upon it, gave them money to buy victuals and drink and candles, and powder and shott, and lent them six of his own pistols. Upon hearing that the Govr. was the author and contriver of this business, we sent the boys to him, leaving to H.E. to determine the time when he would have them dismis'd, for it was then about a week before the usual time. H.E. being out of humour, to the great disappointment of the boys, order'd that they should continue at their books till the usual time, and then be dismis'd. This decision made them very angry, and they said they wondered what he had made all that to do for, when they were not to be dismis'd one day sooner than ordinary for their pains. When we enter'd the School, wee found the Gover.'s three pair of pistols, with some swords and other weapons they had provided. It was God's great mercy to me that the boys gave me warning of the shott, and so sav'd me from the danger which I have too much reason to suspect was contriv'd on purpose upon my account, H.E. being then in too bad an humour to do such a thing out of a frolick; besides that the fire-armes, powder and shott, my lying in the Colledge, and the differences between him and me, wch. at that time were come to some heighth, made ye badness of ye design too, too probable. About 6 weeks later, someone, whom I believe to have been the Governor himself, came to my chamber door and endeavoured to break in, etc. Signed, James Blair. Endorsed, Recd. April 26 and May 1st. Read April 28 [sic], 1704. 5 large pp. [C.O. 5, 1314. No. 8.]
May 2.285. Council of Trade and Plantations to Sir Charles Hedges. Enclose Printed Instructions to privateers and an Additional Instruction to be given to privateers in America by the respective Governours there, upon their receiving H.M. orders from you, it seeming to us necessary that both the said Instructions, as also an authentick copy of Lord Nottingham's letter relating to a Trade with the Spaniards be sent to the Governments undermentioned. The orders to be given to men of war, privateers or letter of marque ships going from England being to be given by H.R.H. the Lord High Admiral, which is all that occurs to us at present for the West India Mail, for which our particular letters will be ready to be sent on Thursday next. Annexed,
285. i. List of Governors to whom above Instructions etc. should be sent. Same as Feb. 18, with addition of Sir William Mathew and Mr. Penn.
285. ii. Printed Copy of Instructions to Privateers. St. James's. June 1, 1702. Countersigned, C. Hedges. 7 pp.
285. iii. Additional Instructions to Privateers. St. James's, May 4, 1704. Whereas we in conjunction with our allies the States General are willing to encourage our and their intercourse with such of the Spanish Nation in the West Indies as shall be inclined to acknowledge the title and sovereignty of Charles III, King of Spain, with whom we are in friendship and allyance. We therefore direct that from and after June 1, 1704, no injury, violence, spoile or molestation whatsoever shall be done by any of our ships of war, privateers, letters of marque or by any of our Governours, or under their permission or authority, or any other officers of, in or belonging to any of our Isles, Colonies or Plantations in America, upon or within the main land of the Continent, or of the Isles or Plantations belonging to the Spaniards in America, or against any of our subjects or the subjects of the States General, or any of them, their ships, vessels or goods, that shall be found coming to or going from any Port or Place in the Spanish West Indies, etc., anything contained in our Declaration of War or Commissions to the contrary notwithstanding, provided that no goods belonging to the inhabitants of France or its vassals or any others inhabiting within the Dominions and Territories of that Crown, nor any contraband goods or provisions of war be permitted to be carried to any Spanish Plantations in any ship whatsoever etc.; provided also that this Instruction be so understood as that it may still be lawful for any of our men of war etc. to attack and seize any Spanish ship, according to the intent of our former Instructions. Countersigned, Ch. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 8. pp. 434–439.]
May 2.286. J. Bridger and others to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Proposes to supply H.M. with 15,000 barrels of pitch and tar in five years from Dec. 1705, tar at 36s. per barrel, and pitch at 23s. per cwt. The tar barrels to guage 30 gallons and to be delivered at Deptford etc. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 2, 1704. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 863. No. 92; and 5, 911. p. 240.]
May 2.287. J. Bridger and others to the Council of Trade and Plantations. On condition H.M. grant them (who have been the first producers of pottash in America) a patent giving them the sole right and advantage arising thereby for 7 years, then they will furnish England with the tar and pitch referred to above. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 4, 1704. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 863. No. 93; and 5, 911. pp. 273, 274.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
288. Council of Trade and Plantations to Sir Charles Hedges, H.M. Principal Secretary of State. We desire you to lay before H.M. the additional Instruction for New Jersey, as likewise that for settling Ports in Maryland, and the warrants for using new Seals in the Plantations; that if possible, they may be sent to Col. Nott, who only waits now for a fair wind, after which there will be no other opportunity of conveyance for many months. And that we may be enabled to answer your letter of April 21, we desire you will send us all the papers which you received from us, relating to Mr. Raworth, and the Canary merchants.[C.O. 5, 994.A. p. 202.]
May 3.
Admiralty Office.
289. J. Burchett to Mr. Popple. H.M.S. Coventry at Portsmouth, Capt. Lawrence, wch. is bound to Newfoundland, and is the last ship that goes thither this summer, being now ready to proceed, I am commanded by the Prince to acquaint you therewith, that so if the Council of Trade and Plantations have any heads of enquirys to send by her, you will please to hasten them hither. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 5, 1704. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 195, 3. No. 17; and 195, 3. p. 324.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
290. W. Popple, jr., to Lt. Gov. Bennett. The Council of Trade and Plantations observing that the Commissions you have granted to privateers being [sic] of too large an extent and otherwise irregular, enclose copy of the Commissions granted here in England, which is to serve as a form for those you shall grant hereafter; the form of the Instructions will be sent you by Mr. Secretary Hedges. Encloses letters from Lord Nottingham relating to Prizes and the Spaniards. [C.O. 38, 5. p. 470.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
291. Circular letter from Sir Charles Hedges to the several Governors of the Plantations. Encloses copies of Lord Nottingham's letter relating to trade with the Spaniards, and an Additional Instruction for Privateers. [See No. 285.] "The Earl of Nottingham having resigned the Seals of Secretary of State to H.M., and H.M. having been pleased to appoint me to take care of the Plantation affairs, it is requisite that I should give you notice of it, by this conveyance, that you may for the future direct to me such letters as relate to H.M. service, and I desire you will acquaint me, by all opportunities, of such things as occur in your parts." Signed, C. Hedges. Annexed,
291. i. ii. Instructions referred to in preceding. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 1–5.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
292. W. Popple, jr., to Josiah Burchet. Enclosing following to be submitted to the Lord High Admiral to be given in charge to the Commodore of the Newfoundland Squadron for answers, etc. Annexed,
292. i. Heads of Enquiry relating to the Trade and Fishery of Newfoundland. [See Cal. A. and W.I., 1700. No. 198.i.] Additional Instructions:—Whereas it appears [from former answers to the above Enquiries] that the Inhabitants in general have not a due regard to the several regulations for the more advantagious mannagement of the Fishery, it being found that northwards of St. John's as far as Carboniere, and to the Southward as far as Ferryland, the trees are rinded and the woods destroyed as much as before the late Act; that the Admirals of Harbours and Masters of ships do not exactly observe the rules prescribed by Act of Parliament; that the vessells from New England supply the people of Newfoundland with provisions; that the New England Traders seldome depart the country till the men of war are first sailed, and then they carry with them numbers of handicraftsmen, seamen and fishermen whom they entice thither in expectation of great wages; that the Masters of ships are very negligent in bringing their men home, whereby they save the charge of their passage, and those men so left are enticed and carryed to New England; that European commodities have been carryed directly from France, Spain and Portugal to Newfoundland in English ships contrary to law, and sold or truckt with the Traders from New England for tobacco', sugar and other of the enumerated commodities, and carryed to foreign parts, so that at the latter end of the years the Masters have been wholly taken up in the management of that illegal trade, which might in some measure be prevented, had the officers commanding H.M. ships power like that of a Custome House Officer to seize such goods; you are therefore upon your arrival in those parts to take care as far as in you lyes, that the best remedies be applyed for the prevention of those mischeifs and to report your opinion thereupon, in order to further consideration and to the preparing of such clauses to be proposed at the next Sessions of Parliament as may be requisite for the more effectual regulating that trade. And whereas in order to the better security of St. John's Harbour, H.M. has given directions to John Roop for the preparing and fixing a boom, which is to be done with all publick diligence, you are to inspect the carrying on of that work, if not already finished, and to assist therein, as far as the other service committed to your care will permit. It having been represented to H.M. by severall Merchants, that Trinity Bay being but three miles overland from Placentia, the cheif Fort of the French, from whence they have been frequently insulted, and it being desired by them that, for the prevention of the like mischeif for the future and the better security of the fishing of that Bay, a fort be built there in some proper place furnished with 20 or 30 guns, and that 40 or 50 soldiers be also sent thither with Officers, armes, ammunition, etc.; and they add, that Carboniere, a considerable fishing place in Conception Bay, being also in danger of insults from the French, it may be necessary that it be in like manner fortifyed, alledging that the same may be done at a small charge; but it not sufficiently appearing by their Memorials, in what places the said forts may be erected, so as to be a security to the said Harbours from attacks by sea, and to the Settlements from attacks by land, you are to view those places and to report to one of H.M. Principal Secretarys of State, and to the Council of Trade and Plantations, how the same are fitted for such fortifications, and what may be the charge of erecting them. [C.O. 195, 3. pp. 303–323.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
293. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Handasyd. Since our letter of March 17 we have received yours of Feb. 6 and March 5. We are glad to perceive you have been so successfull against the enemy by taking so many privateers. We have laid what you write concerning the ships of warr before H.R.H. the Lord High Admiral, but must advise you that in all matters relating to the Admiralty you make your application for the future immediately and fully to H.R.H., sending us copies thereof, for our information. We have sent your proposal for settling a Governor in the Bay of Campeachy to a Secretary of State, but we cannot foresee that it will be approved of in the present conjuncture, as you will judge by the Earl of Nottingham's letter sent you in ours of March 17. As to your desire of directions about dissolving the Assembly, we writ you, Feb. 16, that we could not give any at this distance, but must leave it to you, who being upon the place can best judge what will be most for H.M. service on this and all other the like occasions. We observe by the accounts of the Revenue formerly sent us and those now received with your last letter that there are yet wanting the accounts for a year and a half, viz. from March 25, 1700, to Sept. 29, 1701, which we therefore desire you to send us by the first opportunity, and to be very constant for the future in sending us all the necessary information and papers for H.M. service. We cannot conclude without observing to you that we find your letter to the Spanish Governor printed in the publick newspapers, as also several other things which are word for word the same as what you have writ to us; and upon enquiry it appears you have writ the same to private persons here in town and sent them copies of the same papers as to us, which you ought not to do, and therefore we desire you to be more reserved in matters of that nature for the future. P.S.—The account of Prizes you sent us, we have laid before the Lord High Treasurer. [C.O. 138, 11. pp. 265–267.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
294. W. Popple, jr., to Mr. Attorney General. The Council of Trade and Plantations being prest for their dispatch upon severall Virginia Laws, in order to the making a compleat collection to be laid before H.M. before the return of the Secretary of Virginia, who is come over for that purpose, desire your speedy report upon those sent you May 28. [C.O. 5, 1360. p. 470.]
May 4.
Jamaica.
295. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Finding that the packet boat does not arrive so soon as I expected, I take this opportunity by the Jamaica gally to give your Lordships an account of what hes offered here since my last. Having ane account of some design the enemy had in draweing some of there forces together and fearing it might be upon us, I ordered H.M.S. Seahorse, Capt. Johns, who then was ready to saile, to goe to the Spanish Coast and there to endevour to take off a prisoner or turtler, if they could meet any at sea, to see what we could learn of the enemies motion. He sailed March 14, but discovering a sail nine leagues off our Island, he gave her chace and found her to be a French privatier with 70 odd men. He came up with her and gave her some gunns, but She finding he was to hard for her made towards the land, and it proveing calm, rowed away from him and gott into Manchioneel Harbour, where he pershewed (pursued), and accordingly resolved to board her. But the other having landed some of their men in each side of the Harbour ga(l)led his men that they were not able to handle their sailes, and killed and wounded several of them. H.M.S. Seahorse struck upon a rock and so was lost, altho' the privatier was taken, and the men being 77 with their armes being landed endeavouring to fight their way through the country to gett to some Harbour to gett off, but I having timely notice of it ordered two Companies of H.M. forces with all the Militia I could gett, and having given them orders that if they did offer to strike one stroke to take nor give noe quarters, and there advance partys meeting one another in a strait passage they being demanded to surrender and delyver up their arms otherwise that was to be there fait, but they, after some French Gascoin language, laid down their arms without firing a shott, and is now here in prison, they are a party of the briskest men that I have seen among them since I came to this country, they being all French but two, the one a Spaniard and the other a Englishman. I am disposing them two or three in the Merchant ships as they have occasion with orders to delyver them unto H.M. jales when they arrive, which I hope your Lordships will approve of. All the Sea Horse's men were saved and gunns and most part of her rigging, provisions and stores and ammunition, and truly the loss was not great, for she would not have been able to have made another cruize, she was so destroyed by the worms and her timber so rotten and decayed that she could hardly fflot upon the water. As to our enemys making of a general attack on us, I am of opinion as formerly that they are not able in these parts. But if they should, your Lordships shall hear that we shall showe ourselves to be faithfull subjects to our gracious Queen and country, and like true English men not to be dantned with their numbers. The Assembly is now sitting, and I hope they will prove better then the last, they seeming to be sensible of the failings the last committed. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. June 13, Read July 18, 1704. Addressed. Holograph. 1½ pp. [C.O. 137, 6. No. 45; and 138, 11. pp. 295–298.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
296. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Codrington. Since ours of Feb. 16 last, we have received yours of Feb. 6 and 14, and one without date. As to the affair of Guadaloupe, Capt. Walker having been ordered to answer your questions before the Lords of the Privy Councill, we did send to their Lordships all the letters and other papers we received from you, relating to that expedition, in order to the making good your allegations. As to what you write about Col. Thomas's giving us information of the state of the Islands, when he was before us, we asked him severall questions which he did not own himself instructed to answer. We have read the Act you have sent us for the settling of Courts at Antegoa, which seems to us to have been well considered, and the obtaining thereof a good service in you. We have sent the same to Mr. Attor. and Mr. Sollr. Genll. If they have no objection thereunto, which we do not foresee, we shall lay it before H.M. for her royal confirmation. We hope you will have been able to get the like Acts past in the other Islands. We are glad the Assembly go on with the fortification of Monks Hill, and hope they will perfect it; but they are mistaken in beleiving that Barbadoes is trusted with the application of the 4½ per cent. otherwise than they are, that Revenue being now wholly applyed to the use of those Islands in due proportion. The account of prizes taken and condemned at Antegoa, we sent to my Lord High Treasurer, and the account of H.R.H. tenths of prizes condemned at Nevis to the Admiralty, to which Offices those matters appertain. We have not failed upon all occasions to recommend you to H.M., and as to your arrears of salary, we have acquainted Mr. Cary with what you write, and shall be assistant to him or any other of your friends in procuring the same. [C.O. 153, 8. pp. 284–286.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
297. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Sir B. Granville. Since ours of March 17, we have received two letters from you of Jan. 12 and Feb. 6. We sent to the Board of Ordnance what you writ us relating to Mr. Hayes, but we are informed they have appointed one of the Engineers now at Jamaica for the service of Barbados. You will do well to give H.R.H. Councill from time to time an account of his dues in your hands. As to the payment of the Gunners, orders have some time since been given, which we doubt not have before this been received. We have sent to Mr. Attorney Generall your query about the Commission for the tryal of pirates, and as soon as we shall receive his answer thereunto, we shall send you the same, or represent to H.M. that a new Commission be issued, if it be necessary. We send you here inclosed the copy of Mr. Attorney General's opinion upon the case of Manasses Gilligan for your information. But you will have seen by Lord Nottingham's letter (inclosed March 17) how you are to govern yourself in this conjuncture with relation to the Spaniards. The Agents of Barbados having presented to us the inclosed list of stores wanting for the Island of Barbados, we reported the same to H.M., whereupon H.M. has been pleased to refer the same to the Lord High Treasurer, who is to consider how far the said list may be complyed with in relation to the present state of the Revenue of the 4¼ per cent., which is intirely appropriated to the use for which it was raised. And whereas you represent to us the difficulties you lie under by reason of the late regulation against presents, and being very sensible of your diligence and application to H.M. service, we shall lay hold of all occasions of testifying how truely we are your very loving Friends. P.S.—Inclosed is a letter H.M. has ordered us to write to the late President and Council of Barbados, which you will read for your information and deliver unto them. [C.O. 29, 8. pp. 431–433.]
May 4.298. Mr. Thrale's Answer to the Complaints exhibited against Governor Nicholson by Dr. Blair and others. The charges are mostly too general to be answered, or malicious insinuations without proof etc. It is humbly submitted to the Council of Trade and Plantations whether they will proceed immediately upon a hearing with an expectation only of such proofs as the Respondent may be judged capable of producing from the nature of the defence, or will order copies of everything to be first transmitted to Virginia that the Governor may thereupon by affidavits or otherways make his just defence etc. Signed, John Thrale. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 4, 1704. 11 pp. [C.O. 5, 1314. No. 16.]
May 4.
St. James's.
299. Order of Queen in Council. It being this day represented to H.M. at the Board from a Committee of Councill upon hearing the complaints of Col. Codrington relating to the expedition to the West Indies the last year with the squadron of H.M. ships commanded by Capt. Walker, that the Lords of the Committee had taken notice that notwithstanding the said squadron had been sent to Barbados with order upon advising with the Governor to use his best endeavour to defend Barbados and the Leeward Islands against the attempts of the enemy, and that upon his arriving with the squadron at Barbados, he had applyed himselfe to the President and Councill in whom the cheif command was then vested, that notice of the said squadron being there might be sent to Col. Codrington, Governor of the Leeward Islands, to the end that if he had wanted the assistance of the said squadron for H.M. service he might have acquainted the said Capt. Walker therewith, Notice thereof was not sent to Col. Codrington; H.M. in Councill is thereupon pleased to order that the Governor or Commander in Cheif of Barbados examine into the proceedings of the said President and Councill of Barbados in this matter, and why with so little regard to H.M. service in the safety of those Islands, notice was not forthwith sent to the Governour of the Leeward Islands of the arrivall of the said squadron at Barbados, and what he finds to be the reason of so great neglect of H.M. service and the publick safety of those Islands, and that he returne an account thereof to the Council of Trade and Plantations, who are to signifie H.M. pleasure herein to the Governor or Commander in Cheif of Barbados for the time being, and upon receiving his answer to report the same together with their opinion upon the whole matter to H.M. at this Board. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 4, 1704. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 31; and 29, 8. pp. 434–436.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
300. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Sir B. Granville. The Lords of the Privy Councill having examined the proceedings of the late Commodore Walker, and the Commanders of the ships under his command, and of the land forces imployed upon Guadaloupe, and taking particular notice that the said squadron and land forces sent to the West Indies, as well for the security of Barbados as of the neighbouring Islands, and others belonging to H.M., did remain for the space of two months at Barbados, during which time no notice was given of their being in those parts to Governor Codrington, which was altogether necessary in regard that the said squadron and forces might have been sooner wanted at the Leeward Islands, in case the French had made any attack or had any number of ships there, against whom an advantage might have been taken. And the said Commodore Walker having informed the Lords of the Councill that no such notice had been given by him, by reason that he had no vessell under his command other than 70 gunn ships, but that he had acquainted the then President and Councill of Barbados how fit and proper it was that an early information should be given to the Leeward Islands of the arrivall of the said squadron and land forces, but that they had refused to hire a vessell on purpose or to employ the sloop belonging to the Island on this occasion; and a report having been made hereof to the Queen in Councill, H.M. taking the same into consideration has thought fit to signify her pleasure unto us that you be directed to make a full and strict enquiry into this miscarriage and neglect; and after due examination had to inform us of the true state thereof that we may thereupon lay the same before H.M. We do therefore hereby desire you to proceed herein with all convenient speed, and to take the best care you can that no such default or neglect do happen for the future under your government. [C.O. 29, 8. pp. 437–439.]
May 4.301. Mr. Thurston to Mr. Popple. The departure of the convoy is just at hand: I desire you will therefore move the Council of Trade and Plantations to signify to Mr. Lowndes the necessity of giving some speedy orders for the issue of the money for the soldiers at Newfoundland, this being the last conveyance for the present year. Signed, J. Thurston. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 5, 1704. 1½ pp. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 19.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
302. Wm. Popple, jr., to Mr. Lownds. I am to desire you to lay [the preceding] before my Lord High Treasurer. [C.O. 195, 3. p. 327.]
May 5.303. Mr. Thurston to Mr. Popple. Prays that the Lord High Admiral may be moved to direct the Commander of the Newfoundland Convoy to receive on board the stores for the soldiers there. Signed, J. Thurston. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 5, 1704. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 18.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
304. W. Popple, jr., to Josiah Burchett. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire you would move H.R.H. Council for their directions to the Commander of the Newfoundland Convoy to receive on board the stores for the soldiers there, and to the Victuallers of the Navy to ship off the provisions designed for them, as also either to pay Mr. Thurston, the Agent, or send themselves the money that is to serve instead of malt and hops. [C.O. 195, 3. pp. 325, 326.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
305. W. Popple, jr., to Mr. Attorney General. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire your opinion whether H.M. may grant such a patent as desired by Mr. Bridger, May 2. [C.O. 5, 911. p. 274.]
[May 6.]306. Planters and Merchants trading to Barbados to the Queen. There is about 60 ships gone to load there, which will be coming thence the latter end of June. Without convoy they will be in great danger to be taken by the French privateers at Martinico and St. Christophers, as well as upon the coast when they come home. Without some ships of war to cruize to win [d]ward of Barbados during the warr, the merchants ships, which carry provision and necessaries thither both from England, Ireland and the Northern Colonies, will be in danger to be taken by the said privateers, and if it should fall out to be soe, the inhabitants would be unable to subsist. Pray for convoy and ships to cruize off Barbadoes. 24 signatures. Endorsed, R. May 6. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 22.]
May 7.
Plymouth.
307. Governor Sir W. Mathew to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The fleet bound for the West Indies is put back to this place. The master of a Swedish vessel gives an account that Count de Thoulouze is come out of Brest with two and twenty sail, and that hee met with 8 French men of war of 60 guns as he passed by Belle Isle steering to the Eastward. Recommends the speedy filling up of Col. Whetham's regiment. Signed, Will. Mathew. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 10, 1704. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 5. No. 68.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
308. Sir Charles Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The Lords of the Committee of Council desire to speak with you on Thursday, and to have an account of what progress you have made towards the procuring of Navall Stores etc. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 8. 1 p. [C.O. 5 863. No. 94; and 5, 911. p. 275.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
309. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Offer two Acts of Nevis [see April 5] to be confirmed. [C.O. 153, 8. p. 288.]
May 10.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
310. Lord High Treasurer to the Queen. Referring (upon the Order of Council, Nov. 25) to following report. Signed, Godolphin. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 19, 1704. ¾ p. Enclosed,
310. i. Principal Officers of the Mint to the Lord High Treasurer. We concur with the Representation of the Council of Trade and Plantations and enclose table of the value of coins in the Plantations according to their weight and the assays lately made of them in the Mint. Signed, J. Stanley, Is. Newton, Jno. Ellis. Mint Office, Dec. 9, 1703. Subscribed, Table of coins, embodied in Proclamation of June 15. 2 pp. [C.O. 323, 5. Nos. 47, 48; and 324, 8. pp. 440–444.]