America and West Indies
January 1705

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1916

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352-367

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'America and West Indies: January 1705', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 22: 1704-1705 (1916), pp. 352-367. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73675 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Contents

January 1705

1705.
Jan 2.
Treasury Chambers.
784. W. Lowndes to Mr. Popple. Mr Lord Treasurer desires you to lay before the Council of Trade and Plantations for their opinion the petition of John Taylor, relating to a particular duty demanded by the Government of New England upon his shipps, though built in that country for transporting masts hither, because himself is not an inhabitant there. Signed, Wm. Lowndes. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 4, 1704/5. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 863. No. 126; and 5, 911. pp. 404, 405.]
Jan. 2.
St. James's.
785. Order of Queen in Council. Referring to the Council of Trade and Plantations the enclosed petition for their Report. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read March 12, 1704/5. ¾p. Enclosed,
785. i. Sir T. Lawrence to the Queen. Prays that directions be sent to the Governor of Maryland for settling H.M. office of Secretary there in the quiet enjoyment of its rights. Copy. 4pp. Set out, Acts of Privy Council, II. No. 1042. [C.O. 5, 715. Nos. 82, 82.i.; and 5, 726. pp. 301–305.]
Jan. 2.
2 m/11 (Jan.), 1704.
786. Mr. Penn to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since my last proposall seemed to you to clogg the practicableness of the thing desired by you, to witt, the Resignation of my Govermt. to the Queen, because of the reservations made by me upon it, I write this to let you know, that since it is made so difficult to me [to ?] hold, I shall wave those conditions yt. were in my own favour, and shall be satisfyed with my seigniory and Proprietary priviledges, with this only saveing to me and my successors, that we shall be exempted from troublesom offices and ye Publick Taxes, and that the inhabitants may have their entire Liberty of Conscience, and be continued as capable and eligible to any civil employments as hetherto they have been, the People called Quakers especially, because of their number and wealth, and that they chiefly made it a country; which I desire you to report to the Queen, with a just regard to my vast expence and ffateigue these 30 yeares, employed to get and make it and maintain it to the present unpresidented progress the place is arrived at, and you will much oblige Your respectfull Friend, Signed, Wm. Penn. I propose another Lt. Governour to be approved, to succeed the present Gentleman in case of death, that there may be no disorder or failure in Govermt. on such an accident. Holograph. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1263. No. 3.]
[Jan. 3.]787. Mr. Robt. Livingston to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays that they recommend to H.M. that he be restored to his Office of Secretary for the Indian Affairs at New York and that his salary be paid out of the 30 p.c. and, for the future, out of H.M. Quit-rents. Signed, Robt. Livingston. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 3, 1704/5. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
787. i.–vii. Copies of Documents relating to his Appointment and Suspension. Cf. Dec. 14, 1704. The whole 11 pp. [C.O. 5, 1048. Nos. 100, 100.i.–vii.]
Jan. 3.
3 m/11
788. Mr. Penn to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Honble. Friends. To explaine my selfe upon ye termes, offices and taxes, in my letter of yesterday. I mean by offices any one under ye Governr., wch. is not of our own seeking, Civil or Military, and by taxes, not to pay pole mony, or any land or mony tax, I mean not customs, or tradeing imposts. I begg your dispatch in this affaire, being as I conceive come to ye point you exprest to satisfy you when my first and large memoriall was presented to you; takeing this with you; yt. ye Bill in Parl. gave me no time to settle a Revenue to my own great expence for these 3 years in defraying ye charges there, and so long expensive attendance here to issue my languishing affaires: as also that ye first year after my arrivall there, ye Queen's Revenue augmented from 2 or 300l. per ann. to 2,000l. per ann., and ye year 1700 8,000l. and odd monys paid, as I have certificats to show out of ye Custom-house books here, wch. I think is a present advantage to ye Queen, and she will have it more in her own power to augment ym. by ye care of her own officers and Gover. I am with a just esteem, Your respectf. Friend, Wm. Penn. Holograph. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1263. No. 2.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
789. W. Popple, jr., to W. Lowndes. In reply to yours of Jan. 2, the Council of Trade and Plantations have not as yet received any such Law from New Hampshire, and it not being specified in Mr. Tayler's petition what those duties are, they will write to Col. Dudley that he do forthwith transmit the said Law, in order to their laying the same before H.M. for her disallowance, if there shal be cause. The mast ships already there will be come away before any orders can be received there. [C.O. 5, 911. pp. 405, 406.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
790. Mr. Secretary Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. H.M. refers the enclosed papers back to you for your consideration, and if you have anything to propose for H.M. service relating to that place, or that you are of opinion it may be reduced, you will please to report by what means you think it may be done, and what strength may be sufficient. I send you also [for your report thereon] severall papers relating to some disorders at Newfoundland, and the mutiny of that garrison, which may be of ill consequence if some immediate care be not taken to prevent the same, etc. Signed, Ch. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read Jan. 9th, 1704/5. 1 p. Enclosed,
790. i. Lt. Moody to [? the Council of Trade and Plantations]. Duplicate of No. 598. 1 p.
790. ii. Petition of Inhabitants of Newfoundland to Commodore Bridge. Duplicate of Dec. 23, 1704. 1 p.
790. iii. Petition of Soldiers at Newfoundland to Commodore Bridge. Duplicate of Dec. 23, 1704. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. Nos. 41, 41.i.–iii; and (without enclosures) 195, 3. p. 367.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
791. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Enclose draught Bill for encouraging the importation of Naval Stores from the Plantations (annexed). (See Dec. 18, 1704.) [C.O. 324. 9. pp. 47–55.]
Jan. 5.792. Sir Wm. Mathew's Commission to be Governor of the Leeward Islands. Same as that of Governor Codrington. [See Cal. 1699. No. 382.] With addition: In case of the death or absence of the Governor, the Lt. Governor of Nevis is to execute this Commission, or in case of his death or absence, the Council of Nevis, the first Councillor nominated to preside. "We have revoked and determined by these presents our Commission to Christopher Codrington." [C.O. 153, 8. pp. 333–363.]
Jan. 9.793. J. Clifford to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The Earl of Pembroke, Lord President of H.M. Privy Council, directs me to acquaint you that report of my business be made without any further delays, etc. Signed, Jer. Clifford. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 10, 1704/3. Addressed. Sealed. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 75. No. 107; and 389, 36. pp. 230, 231.]
[Jan. 9.]794. List of ships arrived in England out of the Fleet which sailed from Barbados and the Leeward Islands Oct., 1704, 108 strong. Arrived from Barbados 26, Montserat 4, Antigua 17, Nevis 12. Arrived at Lisbon 2, and 4 men of war=65. Carried to St. Malo 23, to Brest 7. missing 13=43. Endorsed, Communicated to the Board by Mr. Berwick [=Barwick]. Recd. Read Jan. 9, 1704/5. 1p. [C.O. 152, 6. No. 2.]
Jan. 9.
Crutchett
Fryers.
795. Mr. Merrett to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. Signed, Solomon Merrett. Endorsed, Recd. 9th, Read Jan. 23, 1704/5, Addressed. Sealed. 1 p. Enclosed,
795. i. Letter from John Roope. St. John, Oct. 12, 1704. Repeats No. 626. Endorsed as preceding. 1p.
795. ii. Petition of Traders in Newfoundland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. St. Johns, Oct. 10, 1704. See No. 818.i. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. Nos. 43, 43.i., ii.; and 195, 3. pp. 384–391.]
[Jan. 10.]
Fleet Prison.
796. Mr. Clifford to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Not having heard from your Lordships since mine of Oct. 31, I again petitioned H.M. for relief, which was debated in Council Dec. 14. Prays to know whether any report has been made or orders received, etc. Signed, Jer. Clifford. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 10, 1704/5. 1½ pp. [C.O. 388, 75. No. 108; and 389, 36. pp. 232, 233.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
797. W. Popple to Mr. Clifford. Enclosing following.
797. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to Saml. Shepherd, John Gardner, and Jacob Oosterland. Repeat request of Sept. 13, to look over and transmit Mr. Clifford's accounts. [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 234, 235.]
[Jan. 10.]798. William Cary on the Trade and Fishery in Newfoundland. We the Merchants, Ship Masters and others inhabiting in the town of Bideford, trading to the New-land, humbly shew the great advantages and proffit the French nation have acquired by their Fishery in that country and consequently the vast loss and detriment which has accrued to the English nation. (1) The French by a modest computation, have not less than 500 or 600 sayle of ships employed in that trade, which hath created them such a great number of saylers, as that their ships of war are thereby mann'd and they made formidable to their enemies. (2) Their own country is thereby supplyed with fish which consumes great quantities, which otherwise must be furnished by the English as formerly, and likewise carry great quantities to Spain and Portugal and Italy, where they always have the first and best markets, to the great damage of the English, which, as the case now stands, cannot be prevented because they have possessed themselves of the greatest and best part of that land for their fishery, having the best fishing ground, the greatest plenty of fish, and the largest and most convenient places for making and drying the same, and less annoyed by the ice, whereby their fishing voyages are sooner made, and their ships [come] much earlier to their above-mentioned marketts, which they furnish before our ships can arrive there, to the utter ruin and destruction of the English Newfoundland Fishery. Whereas our English nation might have the following advantages and proffits by that honest and beneficial trade, if our enemys the French were wholy extirpated thence; and we humbly conceive now having a war declared with them may be the most proper time for doing the same. (1) We might then employ so many ships on that Trade, which usually carry one-third landmen out with them, that thereby there would be such a vast encrease every year of seamen, that the Government could never want saylers to man the fleet on any occasion whatever, the Newfoundland Trade having been by experience found the best nursery for seamen, and the French, for want thereof, would be so weak'ned in their seamen, that their Navy would not be so mann'd as now they are. (2) We should not only have the Spanish, Portugal and Italian marketts to ourselvs, but also furnish France, whereby great advantage and proffit might be gained, and by the produce of our honest labour, drawn out of the sea, we should bring their silver and other commoditys into this nation, the customs of which would be a great revenue to our [ ] and advantage to the subject. (3) The Newfoundland Trade requires nothing but the growth and manufacture of our own Nation (salt excepted), as netts, lines, fishing hooks, beef, bier, pork, pease, bisquetts etc., great quantities of which would yearly be exported thither, whereby lands would lett at higher rates, and the farmers be the better enabled to pay their rents; besides the encouragement and great benefit the handicraftsmen and artificers would find thereby. Wherefore this every way beneficial Trade would be of much more advantage than both the Indies, and we should thereby annoy our enemys the French in their most tender part. And when it shall please God a peace is hereafter concluded, we presume this advantageous Trade might be wholy and firmly established to the English, by an article that should for ever exclude the French from the same. Endorsed, Communicated by Mr. Prior. Recd. Read Jan. 10, 1704/5. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 42; and 195, 3. pp. 368–371.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
799. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. In reply to Order of Council, Dec. 14, 1704, recommend that Mr. Livingston be restored and his salary of 100l. be paid. [C.O. 5, 1120. pp. 240, 241.]
Jan. 11.
St. James's.
800. Order of Queen in Council. Ordered as above, and see Acts of Privy Council, II, No. 954. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 31, 1704/5. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1048. No. 101; and 5, 1120. pp. 242, 243.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
801. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Recommend that the supply of ordnance and gunners requested by Gov. Sir W. Mathew (Sept. 28, Dec. 12) be sent, " or such part as the 4½ p.c. now in hand will extend to." [C.O. 153, 9. pp. 75, 76.]
Jan. 11.
St. James's.
802. Order of Queen in Council. Referring above Representation to the Lord High Treasurer to report upon. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 31, 1704/5. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 152, 6. No. 4; and 153, 9. pp. 77, 78.]
Jan. 11.
St. James's.
803. Order of Queen in Council. Refer enclosed to Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 23, 1704/5. 1p. Enclosed,
803. i. Agents of Barbados to the Queen. Pray that the case of Francis Lee, carried aboard H.M.S. Dolphin and kept there by Lt. Nicholas Wanley and Capt. St. Loe, be examined. [See No. 591, and Acts of Privy Council, II. No. 957.] Copy. 1½ pp. [C.O. 28, 7. Nos. 73, 73.i.; and 29, 9. pp. 124–128.]
Jan. 11.
St. James's.
804. Order of Queen in Council. Refer following petition to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 7, 1704/5. 1 p. Enclosed,
804. i. John Lesley, Phillip Kirton, Christopher Estwick, Enoch Gretton and Thomas Maxwell, Members of the late Assembly of Barbadoes. Charges and grievances against Governor Sir B. Granville. Pray that a day be appointed for hearing the same before H.M. in Council. Signed, Jno. Kirton. 10¾ pp. Set out, House of Lords MSS. vi. pp. 367–371. [C.O. 28, 7. Nos. 74, 74.i.; and 29, 9. pp. 152–171.]
[Jan. 11.]805. Robert Baron to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays them to direct Lt. Governor Bennet to pay him 71l. 1s. 8d. due to him for the care of St. George's Church for 1 year and 9 months at the bidding of the Governor etc. [Cf. Dec. 12, 1704.] Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 11, 1704/5. 1 p. [C.O. 37, 7. No. 1.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
806. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Enclose following. Annexed.
806. i. Draught of a letter from the Queen to Governor Dudley. We have given directions that 20 cannon with their appurtenances be sent to you for the fort on Castle Island. Quote part of Representation Nov. 7, 1704, relating to Governors' Salaries and the forts at Pemaquid and Piscataqua. You are to represent to our Council and Assembly our sense of their great neglect as well of their duty to us as of their own security in this occasion, and again to move them in the most pressing manner to apply themselves immediately to the building the Fort at Pemaquid and to contribute towards the charge of the Fort at Piscataqua, as also to settle a salary upon our Governor and Lieut.-Governor; and you are further to signifye unto them, that if they do not forthwith comply with our just expectation herein, they will appear to us undeserving of our Royal favour and bounty towards them on the like occasion. [C.O. 5, 911. pp. 408–411.]
Jan. 11.
St. James.
807. Order of Queen in Council. Approving preceding, and ordering Instructions to Governor Dudley to be prepared for H.M. signature accordingly. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 31, 1704/5. 1 p. Enclosed,
807. i. The Queen to Governor Dudley, as in preceding. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 863. No. 128; and 5, 751. Nos. 60, 60.i.; and(without enclosure) 5, 911. pp. 414, 415.]
Jan. 11.
St. James's.
808. Order of Queen in Council. The Council of Trade and Plantations are to prepare an Instruction to Governors of Plantations to return an account of their stores of Ordnance etc. Set out, Acts of Privy Council, II. No. 956. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 18, 1704/5. 1 p. [C.O. 324, 9. p. 56.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
809. W. Popple, jr., to Wm. Penn. The Council of Trade and Plantations having had under consideration your proposall for surrendering your right of government of Pennsylvania to H.M., send you the enclosed queries, unto which they desire your particular and distinct answer in writing to-morrow morning. (1) What is meant by Seigniory and Proprietary Priviledges? A full and distinct account is desired what those priviledges are, and how far they are understood to extend. (2) Who is to be understood by the word Successors that are to be exempted from publick offices and taxes? Q. Whether by intire liberty of conscience anything else is meant, than such a toleration as is allowed by the Act of Parliament past here. (3) What is meant by the people called Quakers being continued as capable and elegible to any civill imployments ? What are those imployments ? Is it intended such people shall be admitted to imployments without taking the oath directed by the Law of England or the Affirmation allowed to Quakers; and will such people allow such persons as in England would be obliged and are willing to take an oath in any publick Proceedings to do the same ? [C.O. 5, 1291. pp. 87–89.]
Jan. 12.
(12, 11m. 1704.)
810. Wm. Penn to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to preceding. To the ffirst, I mean all the Royaltys that can belong to Paramount Courts, as fines, forfeitures, deodands etc., with jurisdiction of Courts Leet and Barron, and erecting of mannors etc. as exprest in my Graunt, Mines, IMinerals, Royall mines and fishes. To the second Querie, I mean by successors, my Blood, discending from me, my children and posterity. To ye third Querie about liberty of conscience, I mean not only yt. relating to worship, but to education, or schools, a coercive Ministeriall maintainance, the Militia. To the fourth Querie, I say, I meane that they may be capable of any civill employmt., but Govers., takeing the legal Affirmation of the Country according to custom, from Counsellor to Constable, as they have been from the beginning; which is but just and reasonable in my opinion and every body's else I have talked with on yt. subject, being a country and govermt. made by them, for their own ease, in points where they found themselvs pinch't here, and will very uneasily be made Dissenters in their own country, where also they never excluded or abridg'd any, but only claime equall priviledges and preferments with others, even when twenty to one, and that they may continue so is wt. I desire, as a most reasonable saveing, and which I hope will seem so in yr. opinion. Signed, Wm. Penn. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 12, 1704/5. Holograph. 2¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 1263. No. I; and 5, 1291. pp. 89–91.]
[Jan. 12.] 811. Extract of Letter from Mr. Roope relating to Placentia, Oct. 27, 1704. q.v. Endorsed, Communicated by Mr. Blathwayt. Recd. Read Jan. 12, 1704/5. 1½ pp. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 45; and 195, 3. pp. 380, 381.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
812. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. In obedience to H.M. commands [Jan. 5], we desire you to represent to H.M. that we have examined severall persons and papers and find that the mutiny of the garrison at St. John's has proceeded from the soldiers not having been relieved according to H.M. Declaration of Nov. 19, 1702, signifying that such soldiers as desire to be relieved after three years' service in the West Indies shall be relieved accordingly. Whereupon we are humbly of opinion that it is absolutely necessary for H.M. service to relieve that Company by a like number of soldiers and officers, who may have directions to live peaceably and friendly with the inhabitants. And as to Placentia we transmit to you the several accounts we have lately received concerning the state of that place, and we are humbly of opinion that it would be of the greatest importance to H.M. service and the good of the English Fishery that the said place be reduced. Besides that that place, lying as it were in the centre of the Northern and Southern Dominions of the French in America, does give a retreat and refreshment to their fleets and ships returning to Europe, to the great advantage of their navigation and the annoyance of H.M. subjects. Autographs. 2 pp. [C.O. 194, 22. No. 11; and 195, 3. pp. 382, 383.]
Jan. 16.813. Agents of Barbados to Mr. Secretary Hedges. We lately attended the Committee of H.M. Privy Councill about a petition of Barbados praying that H.M. would send 500 soldiers thither. Their Lordships acquainted us that there had been a complaint made by some officers who had been at the West Indies, that the inhabitants of those Collonys had not contributed to the quartering their men, which was a great discouragement to others to goe thither; and desired to know what we would propose for encouragement to the forces wee prayed for. We answered that noe soldiers had been sent to Barbados this warr, and therefore the officers' complaint could not mean the people of that Island; that towards the quartering the 500 sent the last warr, the Island did contribute what was sufficient as long as they continued there; and that we were confident the Assembly would not have given us orders to apply soe earnestly for men, of which they stand soe much in need, unless they would contribute soe much as was necessary, with what H.M. allows, for their comfortable subsistence; that we would consult the Gentlemen in England, who have estates in that Island. These did unanimously agree that if H.M. would send 500 men, the Proprietors of the Island would and ought to contribute soe much to the pay allowed by H.M. as would be necessary to quarter them, and that they would signify their opinions to their friends at Barbados. Which we desire you to lay before their Lordships, and also that, since wee attended their Lordships, wee have had an account that the Assembly has voted, that in case H.M. will grant their desire, they will raise a fund to the purpose mentioned, which great charge they would never bring upon themselves, especially at this time, if they did not finde it of absolute necessity. Signed, J. Stanley, Wm. Bridges, Mel. Holder, and 21 signatures of those consulted by them as above. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 35.]
Jan. 17,
London.
814. Mr. Merret and others to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The time of the year being come for making preparations for the security of Newfoundland, we humbly offer that one or more men of warr may be ready to sayle from Spithead the middle of March next with the fishing ships, to call at Dartmouth, Topsham and Plimouth for fishing ships of those parts, and proceed directly to Newfoundland with them, which early proceedings may be a means to preserve the country from the designes of the enemy; also that one or more men of warr may saile at the same time for Lisbon with the ships that goe thither to load salt etc. and convoy them from thence to Newfoundland. That two or more other men of warr may be ordered to saile by May 20 from Spithead with the sack ships that goe to take of the fish. That by Sept. 10 next, one of said men of warr may be ordered for England with the ships bound home with trayne oyle etc. and one man of warr may proceed and see the ships to Viana, Oporto, and Aveiro, and the other two men of warr may proceed with the ships bound to Lisbon; humbly offering to your Lordships' consideration, that the carrying the ships all to Lisbon and afterwards to see them into the Northerly Ports of Portugall hath been and is a great prejudice to H.M. service, and also a great loss and dammage to the Merchants, for by the long expence of time and so many ships coming to Lisbon they sell their fish to loss, and have not their ships home till June or July, when by this method they may be at home in Jan. or Feb. Whereby H.M. will have the men for her service, and the customes of the wines and other goods three months sooner, and the Merchants will have their wines sound and in order and save three or four months charges, which will be a great encouragement to Navigation, which is now at so low an ebb. Towards effecting this it will be necessary that ye Captains of the men of war be ordered to lye not above 30 or 40 working days in Portugall, and that during most of that time they may be ordered to cruise between the Burlings and North Cape, and often to look into Vigo, which will in all probability prevent the taking severall ships by the privateers out of those places, about 60 to 80 sayle of ships having for these three years last past been taken, the dammage to H.M. Customes sustained thereby may be computed at least 96,000l. to 100,000l., beside the Merchants' loss twice as much. And also wee humbly offer that the two first men of warr for the security of the Fishery, and for annoying the enemy, may be ordered within 8 or 10 days after their arrival in Newfoundland and after they have seen the severall ships into their Ports they are bound to, to cruize about Cape de Raze, where they may meet with the ships bound to Quebecke which are generally very rich, and also will prevent the enemy from insulting the Southern parts as they frequently do in the spring. And that both these men of warr with the latter may be all ordered to cruize in the month of July, to Aug. 24, from Cape Raze to St. Peter's, which they being ordered, may not only destroy said Harbours, but might intercept ye Placentia ships which are coming for Europe about said time. And further, that whatever ships shall be bound from Lisbon to Newfoundland or from England to Newfoundland, and shall give in bond to proceed on said voyage, may be exempted from any embargo that H.M. shall think fitt to lay on shipping, for as this Fishery is at so low an ebb, it cannot bear the consequent charges of an embargo. Signed, Solomon Merrett, Simon Cole, Charles Houblon, Hen. Neale. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 23, 1704/5 2 pp. [C.O. 194. 3. No. 44; and 195, 3. pp. 393–397.]
Jan. 17.815. J. Clifford to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following copy of his letter to Messrs. Shepherd etc. [Jan. 10], since which I have neither seen nor heard from any of them. Signed, Jer. Clifford. Endorsed, Recd. 17 Jan., Read Feb. 1, 1704/5. Enclosed,
815. i. J. Clifford to S. Shepherd, John Gardner, and Jacob Oosterland. Jan. 11, 1704/5. Fleet. Copy. The wholepp. [C.O. 388, 75. Nos. 109, 109.i.; and (without enclosure) 389, 36. p. 236.]
Jan. 20.
London.
816. Copy of Memorial presented to the Queen by the Sieur de Vrybergen, Envoy of the States General, for the release of several ships taken trading to France. [C.O. 389, 18. pp. 345–347.]
[Jan. 23.]817. Agents of Barbados to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Having instructions from the present General Assembly to justify the proceedings of the Governor, pray that they may peruse the Minutes of Council and Assembly, and be heard by Counsel. Signed, J. Stanley, Wm. Cleland, Mel. Holder. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 23, 1704/5. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 78.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
818. W. Popple, jr., to Mr. Lowndes. Encloses following to be laid before the Lord High Treasurer. Prefixed,
818. i. Traders in Newfoundland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Complain of Collin Campbell, SubCommissioner of Prizes at St. Johns, who sold 3 prizes brought in there clandestinely, instead of by inch of candle after due notice as the Law directs. St. John's, Oct. 10, 1704. Signed, Danll. Courtin, Alex. Smith, Peter Crapp, senr., John Tayler, John Bickford, Henry Hayman, jr., Roger Carter, David Roberts, Joshua Thomas, Henry Hayman, snr., Abra. Passmore, Wm. Lane, Phill. Mannowey. [C.O. 195, 3. pp. 389–392.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
819. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. We thought enclosed of such consequence as to be fit to be transmitted to you, in order to H.M. pleasure thereupon, since that if the merchants on the Northern Continent do forbear trading and carrying provisions to the Southern Plantations, it would tend to the ruine of those Islands and be of the greatest prejudice to H.M. Customs in England. Autographs. 1 p. Enclosed,
819. i. Petition of Merchants to Governor Dudley and Minute of Council of the Massachusetts Bay thereon. See No. 609.i. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 751. Nos. 61, 61.i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 911. p. 411.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
820. W. Popple, jr., to Mr. Lowndes. Enclosing extract of letter from Col. Quary relating to a prize carried into Maryland, to be laid before the Lord High Treasurer for his directions therein. [C.O. 5, 726. p. 300.]
[Jan. 23.]821. Capt. Lloyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays the Board to report upon his case and to represent that his disbursements be paid and that he return to his command at Newfoundland with credit. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 23, 1704/5. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 46.]
[Jan. 23.]822. Col. Cleland to [the Council of Trade and Plantations]. Criticises the charges against Governor Sir B. Granville [Jan. 11], with the aid of the Minutes of Council of Barbados etc. Signed, Wm. Cleland. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 23, 1704/5. 16½ pp. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 75.]
Jan. 23.
Office of
Ordnance.
823. Board of Ordnance to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Desire to know whether they have any objection to the withdrawal from Jamaica of 7 artificers, "wee having received information that they are not imployed there." Signed, Ja. Lowther, C. Musgrave, Ja. Craggs. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 24, 1704/5. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 7. No. 1; and 138, 11. p. 357.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
824. W. Popple to Mr. Burchett. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire Capt. Bridge's reply to their queries Dec. 19 etc. [C.O. 195, 3. p. 398.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
825. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Enclosing following report to be laid before H.M. Autographs. 1 p. Enclosed,
825. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Report on convoy for Newfoundland. Recommend as desired by the Merchants of London, No. 814. Autographs. 2 pp.
825. ii. Copy of Memorial of London Merchants, No. 814. 4 pp. [C.O. 194, 22. Nos. 12, 12.i.; and (enclosure i. only) 195, 3. pp. 399–402.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
826. Mr. Secretary Hedges to Governor Sir B. Granville. Repeats instructions about prisoners, Sept. 28, 1704, and refers him to the Commissioners for the Exchange of Prisoners. Similar letters to Governor Sir W. Mathew, Governor Handasyde and Lt. Governor Bennet. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 17, 18.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
827. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Board of Ordnance. In reply to your letter of Jan. 23, relating to the sending for over of some artificers now at Jamaica, and we not having had any notice of their going thither, nor any knowledge to what service they were designed, nor having had any account from the Governor concerning them, we have no objection why they may not be recalled, unless the Governor of that Island shall judge them necessary for H.M. service there. [C.O. 138, 11. p. 358.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
828. Mr. Secretary Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Having received from Gov. Dudley an Address to H.M. of the Council and Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, and a Memorial accompanying it relating to arms and ammunition for that Province, I am directed to transmit them for your consideration and opinion, what number of cannon and stores of war may be necessary to be sent thither, to lay before H.M. to-morrow night. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 26, 1704/5. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 863. No. 127; and 5, 911. pp. 413, 414.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
829. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. In reply to preceding, refer to Representation of Nov. 7 and Order of Council thereon, referring the same to the Treasury, where we understand that matter is in a way of despatch. The present Address etc. are only duplicates of what was sent by Capt. Cary. Autographs. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 751. No. 62; and 5, 911. pp. 412, 413.]
Jan. 26.830. Affidavit of F. Lee as to his being carried from Barbados by Lt. Wanley and detained by Capt. St. Loe, etc. [See Jan. 11.] Signed, Fran. Lee. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 26,. 1704/5. 3 pp. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 76.]
[Jan. 26.]831. Abstract of several letters received from Virginia. Governor Nicholson has vowed vengeance on the Petitioners against him. To terrify people from talking freely concerning him, he sets up Inquisition Courts, giving Commissions to his creatures to examine all persons upon oath, if ever they heard such a man reflect upon the Governor; and obliges them to answer to interrogatories upon oath what they have heard such a one say in private conversation of the Governor; and himself terrifies backward witnesses. He packs juries, striking out and putting in whom he thinks fit; hectors the judges, so that they dare not enter up their order, if he dissents; browbeats the Council; intercepts letters and commands Gentlemen in H.M. name to deliver up their letters to him. He makes H.M. Attorney General prosecute, upon a law made against the authors of rebellion, such as in private conversation complain of his abuses, and so threatens the few lawyers that they dare not defend them. He has published letters from his Agents declaring that all will be decided in his favour. Having lately caused an indictment to be brought against a Minister [Jno. Monroe] upon the above Act, after he had in the grossest language abused him and threatened him with his bended fist at his nose, he told him he might date all his misery from the day he married that woman, meaning the sister of one of the Complainants. He gives all the places of profit among those who sign Addresses in his favour, and when by law they are incapable of holding the office, he gives them a blank Commission to fill up with a friend or sell for their own profit, as one of them [Col. Jno. West] lately sold a Sherrif's place for 8,000lb. of tobacco. His usage of the Council is so insulting and abusive, that four of them have now desired their friends here, if there be no redress, to petition H.M. to discharge them, etc. Signed, Phill. Ludwell, Steph. Fouace, James Blair. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 26, 1704/5. 3¼ pp. Enclosed,
831. i. Copy of Information of the Attorney General of Virginia against Jno. Monroe as in preceding. Signed, S. Thomson, A.G. Oct. 1704. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1314. Nos. 36, 36.i.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
832. W. Popple to Mr. Burchet. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire you to move H.R.H. the Lord High Admiral's Council that Capt. St. Loe and Lt. Wanley may attend them as soon as maybe [see Jan. 11]. [C.O. 29, 9. pp. 130, 131.]
Jan. 26.
Fleet Prison.
833. J. Clifford to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have neither seen nor heard from Mr. Shepherd etc. since Sept. Prays the Board to use such further measures as they shall think proper. Signed, Jer. Clifford. Subscribed,
833. i. Account of money due to him from the Dutch Company at Surinam. Annexed,
833. ii. J. Clifford to Mr. Shippard. Jan. 24. Fleet Prison. Proposes to accept 30,000l. sterl. Signed, Jer. Clifford. The whole endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 1, 1704/5. Addressed. Sealed. Postmark. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 388, 75. Nos. 110, 110.i.; and 389, 36. pp. 237, 238.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
834. W. Popple to Mr. Attorney and Solicitor General. Enclosing extract from Gov. Dudley's letter, July 13, relating to Connecticut and Rhode Island to be made use of at the hearing before H.M. in Council on Thursday. [C.O. 5, 1291. p. 124.]
Jan. 28.
Councill Office.
835. Mr Povey to Mr. Popple. The meeting of the Council is put off to Feb. 8, at which time the business of Rhode Island and Connecticutt is to be heard etc. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 31, 1704/5. 1 p. [C.O. 5. 1263. No. 8; and 5, 1291. p. 125.]
[Jan. 29.]836. Capt. Bridge to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Answer to queries of Dec. 19, 1704. At St. John's and Ferryland, 23 fishing ships, 42 sack-ships, 68,000 quintals of fish taken, 18,207 hhds. oil. At Fort William most of the carriages out of repair. 83 effectual soldiers. The reason of their petition against Capt. Lloyd is their large stay in that Country, and H.M.S. Coventry being taken by the enemy, which they were in hopes would bring relief. Capt. Lloyd was never confined by me, but ordered by me with the advice of the rest of the Captains that it would be of great service that he did go home to represent the same. Signed, J. Bridge. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 29. 1704/5. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 47; and 195, 3. pp. 402, 403.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
837. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. In obedience to Order in Council, Jan. 11, enclose following to be presented to H.M. before the next Council, which is put off till Feb. 8. Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
837. i. Circular Letter to the Governors of Plantations. Wherea by our Instructions you were required upon your arriva to demand an account of the stores of war sent from the Office of Ordnance here, and likewise what other arms etc. had been bought with the publick money for the service of our said Province, and how the same have been employed etc., and to transmit such an account and inventory of stores remaining yearly, and whereas such accounts have not been duly transmitted by you, We do hereby repeat unto you our Royal pleasure, and do strictly charge and command you to observe our said Instruction in transmitting the said accounts, as also that you send a duplicate thereof to our Master General or Principal Officers of our Ordnance, which accounts are to express the particulars of Ordnance, carriages, ball, powder and all other sorts of arms and ammunitions in our publick stores at your said arrival, and what has been since sent to you, and to specify the time of the disposal and the occasion thereof, it being our pleasure that the said accounts be transmitted every six months or oft'ner as opportunity shall offer for our better information, and duplicates thereof by the next conveyance. [C.O. 5, 3. Nos. 21, 22; and 324, 9. pp. 57–59.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
838. W. Popple, jr., to the Lord Bishop of London. Encloses extract of Governor Dudley's letter, July 13, 1704, relating to sending Ministers among the Five Nations of Indians. [C.O. 5, 911. p. 447.]
Jan. 31.
Barbados.
839. Governor Sir B. Granville to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letter of Nov. 30. I am very much troubled that any of your Lordships' time should be taken up in hearing complaints against me. I have no other concern, being very confident that whenever you shall be pleased to let me know what they are, I shall clear myself etc. I have indeed seen some papers spread about here stiled copies of Petitions to the Queen, one of them signed by seven persons as far as it charges me is in the publick acts of Government, and every part of it will appear groundlesse out of the Minutes of Council and Assembly. The other, from four suspended Councellours, gives a reason for my suspending of them which I never gave nor had occasion to give—nothing can be more untrue then that I procured that bill to be brought into the Assembly, then that I intended any advantage to me by it, then that I would have accepted of it, if it had been offered me, or that I knew their opinion of it. That Bill was began in the Assembly and laid asleep there without ever being sent up to the Council and that, too, long before their suspension, which likewise appears in the Minutes of Council and Assembly. The nature of my accusation admits of no other proof then what appears in the Council books, nor needs any then what they own generally in their answers. We differ only in the conclusion. Your Lordships have condemned the behaviour of the absenting Assembly-men. I lookt upon the behaviour of the four Councellours the support and encouragement given to it, and for that I condemned them. Their opinions are before your Lordships entred in the Minutes of the Council. I very much wish their arguments and discourse upon this occasion at the Council table were so too. However, I rely upon what is there, and submit myself to your Lordships' judgment. If the event may be allowed to justify the means, I have no reason to repent what I have done; instead of all publick matters being at a stand (as it was before) the Assembly meets, the publick debts paid, some provision made for the fortifications, a brigantine and sloop set out to protect the trade, a prison provided for debtors and malefactors, the Courts of Justice give dispatch to businesse, and more particularly the Chancery, where the Lists, from 30 sheets it has often swelled to, is now reduced to one; all factions and animosities almost extinguished, there being no other remains of it then what is kept up by the 11 Petitioners, who give out they are countenanced at home, my proceedings condemned and they all to be restored. If anything should stick with your Lordships that is not cleared by what is entred in the Council books or ready to be soe by the Agents, whenever you are pleased to let me know it, I doe undertake to doe it, having in all things acted with the greatest integrity for H.M. service, even to the impoverishing myself in a Government where soe many others have raised their fortunes etc. As to Down's, his charge is entred in the Council books, to which he never gave any answer, some parts of the proofs are there also, but many of them being matters of account whilst he was in the Treasury, could not be ready to be so particularly entred there, but are now all sent over to ye Agents etc. My not swearing of him into the Council was upon the unanimous request, advice and concurrence of the Members of Council, he being known by everybody to be a wicked liver, the cheif mover of all seditions and faction, most corrupt whilst in his office of Treasurer, and to have dissipated the publick money. Refers to enclosed accounts, Acts and Minutes, etc. Signed, Bevill Granville. Endorsed, Recd. 18, Read 26 April, 1705. Holograph. 3¾ pp. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 77; and 29, 9. pp. 284–291.]