America and West Indies
February 1705, 16-28

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1916

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376-395

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'America and West Indies: February 1705, 16-28', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 22: 1704-1705 (1916), pp. 376-395. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73677 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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February 1705, 16-28

Feb. 16.
Whitehall.
869. Mr. Secretary Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following extract, which you will please to consider and think of proper means to prevent the like ill practices for the future. You will please to lay before H.M. the complaint of Col. Handasyde about the Councill etc. of Jamaica. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 22, 1704/5. 1 p. Enclosed,
869. i. Extract of letter from Governor Handasyd to Sir C. Hedges relating to English ships trading to Curacoa etc. [See C.S.P., Dec. 17, 1704.] ¾ p. [C.O. 137, 7. Nos. 3, 3.i.; and 138, 11. pp. 376, 377.]
Feb. 16.
Whitehall.
870. W. Popple to Wm. Lowndes. Encloses extract of letter from Governor Handasyd [C.S.P., Dec. 17, 1704], relating to the Mermaid's prize. He will lay my Lord Treasurer's observations upon the Act for setling the publick Revenue before the first Assembly in order to amending it. [C.O. 138, 11. p. 372.]
Feb. 16.
Whitehall.
871. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Enclose extracts of Governor Handasyd's letter (Dec. 17, 1704). Propose that H.M. write circular letters to Governors inforcing her good inclinations in reference to Trade with the Spaniards in those parts, and directing them to take good security from the persons to whom they have granted or shall grant Commissions that they shall not break faith with such of the Spaniards as they shall trade with, nor entice them from the land or out of their harbours on pretence of trade in order to make a prey of them, as is complained of, and that copies of such letters be communicated by the Governor of Jamaica to the Spaniards, as they may have the greater confidence in the assurance given them by a mutual trade. [C.O. 138, 11. pp. 373, 374.]
Feb. 16.
Whitehall.
872. W. Popple, jr., to the Agents of Jamaica. Summons them to attend the Board, concerning the Assembly's neglect of H.M. letter relating to the case of the soldiers at Jamaica. [C.O. 138, 11. pp. 374, 375.]
Feb. 16.
Whitehall.
873. W. Popple, jr., to the Commissioners for sick and wounded seamen and exchange of prisoners. The Council of Trade and Plantations pray for a copy of your letter to Governor Handasyd in order to their considering his difficulties relating to the exchange of French prisoners. [C.O. 138, 11. pp. 375, 376.]
Feb. 17.874. H.M. Instructions to Governor Sir Wm. Mathew. Same as those of Governor Codrington [Cal., 1699, No. 766], with following variations:—
Councillors of Nevis, Wm. Burt, John Smergin, Azariah Pinney, James Bevon, William Butler, William Ling, James Thynn, Daniell Smith, Richard Abbott, Phineas Andrews, Phillip Broome and Thomas Butler; of Antego, John Yeomans, Lt. Gov., Rowland Williams, John Fry, senr., John Hamilton, Edward Byam, James Thynn, Henry Pearn, Wm. Coddrington, Charles Mathew, Henry Lyons, Barry Tankard, and Thomas Morris; for Mountserrat, Anthony Hodges, jr., Lt. Governor, William Fox, Thomas Lee, William Fry, John Scot, James Thynn, John Dawly, Joseph Little, Wm. Beddingfield, George Milward, George Lydell, and Charles Mathew; for St. Kitts, Walter Hamilton, Lt. Governor, John Mac-Arthur, Michl. Lambert, Henry Burrell, Samuel Crook, John Garnet, Stephen Pain, John Davis, Charles Mathew, James Thynn, Joseph Crisp, and John Pogson.
The stile of enacting Laws is to be by Governor, Council and Assembly.—Different matters are to be provided for as much as possible by different Acts, and no clauses to be inserted or annexed to any Act foreign to what the title of it imports.—He is to make a complete collection of the Laws in force.—Neither the Governor nor any Lieut.-Governor is to receive any present from the Assemblies [see Cal., 1703], except a house or rent, provided the assignment thereof be made at the first session of Assembly after the Governor's arrival. 1,200l. out of the 4½ p.c. is assigned for the Governor's salary, and 200l. each for the Lieut.-Governors. He is to endeavour to induce the Assemblies, thus exempted from this customary burden, to contribute in more ample and effectual manner to their own safety and preservation. This to be entered in the Registers of the Councils and Assemblies.—No clause to be inserted in any Law for levying money whereby the same shall not be made liable to be accounted for unto us here in England.—Goods of pirates are to be seized, and, if perishable, publicly sold, and pirates tried according to the Commission granted for that purpose: accessories to be sent to England.—He has power to suspend Captains of men of war for neglect of duty and to commit them to custody, the next superior officer to succeed in command. Privateers are to wear a Jack with a white scutcheon in the middle. The Governor is to grant commissions to privateers according to the Commissions and Instructions given in England. A survey is to be made of the fortifications, and an account thereof sent home yearly; a survey of harbours and landing places to be made and such fortifications as necessary erected at the public charge. The duty of 4½ p.c. to be applied to repairing and maintaining the fortifications, and the Assembly to be moved to contribute towards their defence. Prizes are to be taken care of and accounted for and arrears recovered. Appeals to H.M. in Council to be allowed in cases of fines imposed for misdemeanors, if the value be 200l., the Appellant first giving good security that he will effectually prosecute the same, and answer the condemnation if the sentence be confirmed. The Governor is to get a law passed to make bankrupts' estates liable to answer debts contracted in England. All writs are to be issued in the Queen's name. The Governor is empowered to do anything for the immediate advantage and security of the Islands, with the consent of the Council, giving speedy notice thereof for H.M. approval. He is not to grant Commissions of mark or reprizals against any Prince or State in amity with H.M. without H.M. especial command. [C.O. 153, 8. pp. 364–437.]
Feb. 19.
New York.
875. Governor Lord Cornbury to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have pursued the directions given me in your letter of June 29 relating to correspondence etc. Signed, Cornbury. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read 28th June, 1705. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1048. No. 104; and 5, 1120. pp. 313, 314.]
Feb. 19.
New York.
876. Governor Lord Cornbury to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Your Lordshipps' letter of June 29 is come to my hands, etc. I have caused H.M. Proclamation [relating to foreign currency] to be published in this Province, and have sent orders to Col. Ingoldsby (who is now at Burlington) to take care to have it published throughout that Province, etc. It was on Munday, Feb. 5, that it was published in this city, which is the day the Boston post sets out from hence, as soon as the Proclamation was published, severall persons here (pursuant to the directions sent to them from Boston) sent away as much money by the post as he could carry, and for 4 or 5 days all manner of trade was stopped, there was noe market nor one could buy nothing with ready money, 2 or 3 days after this a petition was presented to me, signed by most of the considerable merchants in this place, setting forth the many inconveniencys that would attend the putting that Proclamation strictly in practice, even to the infallible ruin of this Province, occasioned chiefly by the neighbouring Collonys' disobedience to H.M. commands. I send you a copy of the Petition, by which you will see how the Spanish coin has gone, not only in this Province, but in the neighbouring Collonys, particularly that of Pensilvania, which by raising the vallue of pieces of eight of 17dwt. to 7s. 6d., and the lighter money in proportion, have considerably drained this Province of it's money, as New England has done on the other side by clipping, which they don't scruple doing openly, as appear'd very lately by the Purser of H.M.S. Jersey, one Franklyn, who was going to pay a summ of money for severall things he had had for the use of the ship, during the time she was there careening, and an acquaintance of his of that place seing him tell out a parcell of broad heavy peices of eight, asked him what he was to doe with that money; the Purser told him he was going to pay it away, upon which his friend told him if he would let him have it for a few hours, he would bring it to him with advantage, the Purser let him have it, and he did bring him back his number of peices of eight, and to the value of 53oz. of silver more, and this out of 60l. currant money of New York. There is another instance of one Mr. Scott, a merchant of this City, being last summer at Rhode Island, out of 1,000 peices of eight of 17dwt. got 73oz. of silver and the peices of eight were paid by him at the rate of 17dwt. still, and he says that if he would have suffered them to be clipp'd to 15dwt. he might have got above 250oz. of silver, these practices of our neighbours have done a great deal of harm to this Province, both in respect to their trade to the West Indies, and with the other part of the Continent, but now they think they have it in their power to destroy this Province effectually, because they are resolved not to obey the Queen's commands contained in her Proclamation; this I was lately informed of by some persons come from Boston, and perticularly by Mr. Adolph Philips, who was present at the publication of H.M. Proclamation at Boston, who asking some of the merchants there what effect that would have upon their trade, was answered that they had published the Queen's Proclamation in obedience to H.M. commands, but that the money would goe as it did before, this we find to be true by every day's experience; the allegations in the Petition and severall things of this nature having been related to me and proved beyond contradiction, prevailed with me to communicate the aforementioned Petition to H.M. Councill for this Province, and to desire them to consider the contents of it very seriously, and to let me know their thoughts of it, which they did, and made a report (enclosed), by which you will find that some of our neighbours instead of obeying H.M. Proclamation, have advanced the value of their coin, by taking peices of eight of 13dwt. for 6s., which never went here for more than 5s. 3d. New York money, this is now daily practised in New England, in order to get all our money from us, and they conclude their report by saying that if the Proclamation be put in execution according to the letter thereof, it will be the utter ruin of this Province, as likewise to inform myself of the truth of severall things, which had been told me by severall persons, touching the practices of the New England people upon the matter of money, and I find by undeniable proof that since H.M. Proclamation has been published here, severall merchants at Boston have wrote to their Correspondents here to send all the money they can, whether it be heavy or not, and they will not only take it at the same rates it went at before the Proclamation, but will likewise allow 10 per cent. for as much as they can send, this is so true that very lately a young man of this town being at Boston to buy some goods to the vallue of 500l., paid that summ in single ryals, at 8 ryals for 6s., which is the rate they used to pass at here, and had allowance of 9 per cent. besides, and he says that if he could have stayed two or three days longer, he might have had 10 per cent.; this can be intended for nothing but to ruin this place, for before this Proclamation the money at Boston was 12½ better than the money at New York, soe that if we bought 100l. worth of goods at Boston, we must have paid 112l. 10s. New York money. Whereas now by their taking peices of eight of 13dwt. for 6s., they have raised the coin higher than ever it was before, the consequence whereof will be that our merchants here will send their money to Boston for European goods, which will in a short time destroy the trade of this Province to England, and make us depend intirely upon Boston for all such commoditys as we now fetch in our own ships from England, to the manifest ruin of our Navigation, this the people of this Collony think very hard, especially since the people of New England are like to reap this advantage by their disobedience to the Queen's commands. Having seriously considered these things and H.M. Proclamation [quoted] and it being very evident that H.M. good intentions to all her subjects in America will be frustrated by the disobedience of her subjects of New England and Rhode Island, and it being very plain that this Province will be ruined beyond recovery if H.M. Proclamation is put in execution, according to the letter of it, I have consented to the request of H.M. Councill, which is, to direct the Collector to receive money upon all the branches of the Revenue at the rates it formerly went, till this matter might be lay'd before the Queen, and her farther pleasure be known thereon. It is not through any manner of disobedience to H.M. commands (which we shall upon all occasions be ready to obey) that we have not immediately complyd with her Proclamation, but only to save this Province from utter ruin, which would most certainly have hapned, before I could have received her commands upon this representation; and I do further intreat your Lordshipps to assure H.M. that if notwithstanding what I have now offered to you, it is her royal pleasure that the directions in the Proclamation should be complyed with, her commands shall be punctually obeyed; I hope your Lordshipps will not look upon my behaviour in this matter as proceeding from any design of disobeying the Queen, I can boldly say I never had nor shall have any such design, but I considered that delaying the putting that Proclamation in execution, till H.M. might be informed of the consequences that would have attended it, could be noe prejudice to H.M. service, nor injury to any of her subjects, whereas on the other hand the ruin of this Province was unavoidable. Signed, Cornbury. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read June 27th, 1705. Holograph. 5 pp. Enclosed,
876. i. Merchants of New York to Governor Lord Cornbury. Described in preceding letter. 67 signatures. Set out, New York Documents, Vol. IV., pp. 1133–1135. Endorsed as preceding. 3 pp.
876. ii. Copy of Report of the Council of New York to Governor Lord Cornbury. New York, Feb. 8, 1704. Described in preceding letter. Endorsed as preceding. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1048. Nos. 105, 105. i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 1120. pp. 298–309.]
Feb. 19.
Admiralty Office.
877. J. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Capt. St. Loe and Lt. Wanley are ordered to attend the Council of Trade and Plantations. If any part of the complaint may be fit to enquire into at a Court Martial, I desire you to transmit the same to me. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 20, 1704/5. ¾ p. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 83; and 29, 9. p. 186.]
Feb. 19.878. Governor Lord Cornbury to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Your Lordshipps' letter of May 23, 1704, came to my hands on Dec. 15 at Amboy, in which you are pleased to say, you daily expect the particular account of the affairs of New Jersey, which I promised to your Lordships by my letter of Dec. 18, 1703, by which I perceive my letter of Jan. 14, 170¾ is not come to your hands; I returned from New Jersey to this city on Dec. 14, 1703, and hearing the Centurion was not sailed from Boston, and the post being just ready to go away, I stopt him long enough to write to your Lordshipps that letter of Dec. 18, 1703; about a fortnight after that, hearing that the Centurion had had a mischance, going out from Boston, and was forc'd to return into Port again, I wrote the letter of Jan. 14, 170¾, and sent it to Boston, in hopes it would come time enough to reach the Centurion, and after that I sent a duplicate of it to Rhode Island, which was put on board a vessel going for England, by a Minister who had promised me to take care to send it by the first vessel that should sail from Rhode Island, or Boston, and which he wrote me word he had done; however those ways being very uncertain, I did send another duplicate of that letter to your Lordships by H.M.S. Jersey, which I hope, is come to your hands before this time, by which you will see what was done at Amboy in the first session of the Assembly of that Province; and in another letter, by the Jersey, Nov. 4, I did acquaint you with what had passed at the next meeting of the Assembly of New Jersey at Burlington, which was in Sep., and on the 28th of that month, I did dissolve that Assembly to sit on Nov. 9, at which time they met, and passed the several Acts following, viz.: (1) An Act for raising a Revenue for the support of H.M. Government within this Province of New Jersey for two years; (2) An Act for uniting and quieting the minds of all H.M. subjects within this Province; (3) An Act for altering the present Constitution, and regulating the election of Representatives to serve in the General Assembly; (4) An Act for settling the Militia of this Province; (5) An Act for laying out, regulating, clearing and preserving publick common highways; (6) An Act for the suppressing of immorality; (7) An Act for reviving and continuing the Courts of Quarter-Sessions and Common Pleas in the Counties of Bergen, Middlesex and Monmouth; (8) An Act for regulating Negro, Indian and Molatto slaves. The first is what the last Assembly would never have pass'd, unlesse I would have pass'd their Proprietor Bill. When I first saw this last Bill, I sent for one of the Assembly, whom I thought I could more freely talk with than the rest, and asked him what was the reason they had given the Revenue for soe short a time, he answered me very readily, that it was for noe other reason, but because they had never had a general tax throughout the whole Province, and that they could make no manner of computation what the country was able to bear; that this would be a tryal of that, and that if I would be satisfied with this Bill for the present, when they saw what the country would be able to bear, they would be ready to settle such a Revenue as would effectually answer the occasions of the Government; this being soe frankly told me, and considering how stubborn the last Assembly had been upon this point, and being everyday informed that the Quakers bragged, that there should be noe Revenue settled, that the Queen had sent them a Governor, but they would keep him poor enough; these and such like reports were spread about, not by the meanest men among them, but by the topping leading Quakers; therefore I thought it proper to let that Bill passe, and intreat your Lordships to recommend it to H.M. for her royal approbation. The second Act I thought a very reasonable Bill, because it will put an effectual end to many prosecutions which were intended to have been carry'd on in New Jersey, against some persons who opposed Col. Hamilton's Government; and H.M. having commanded me not to suffer any proceedings to be carry'd on against any persons upon account of former animosities, I thought this would be the most effectual way to answer H.M. commands, espetially since Mr. Morris, to whom the Queen had done the honour to make him one of her Councill, was very warm for those prosecutions, as appear'd the last year, that he prevail'd with Mr. Griffith, the Attorney-General of New Jersey, to preferr a Bill of Indictment against some of the people of Elizabeth Town, for a riot said to have been committed during the time of the Government of Col. Hamilton; this the Attorney-General was prevailed with to doe without my knowledge, but a complaint being brought to me of that matter, I directed the AttorneyGeneral to enter a Noli prosequi, which he did accordingly; it is an Act which will make the people easy, therefore I hope the Queen will confirm it. (3) is an Act to alter the manner of electing members of Assembly; in the 15th clause of my Instructions, H.M. makes use of these words [and that this number of Representatives shall not be enlarged or diminished, or the manner of electing them altered, otherwise than by an Act or Acts of the General Assembly there, and confirmed by the approbation of us, our heirs and successors] by which I suppose, the Queen was graciously pleas'd to leave it to the consideration of those, whom she has appointed to serve H.M. in that Province, to propose a method of election, which may be more advantageous to the Queen's service, and the good of the Country than the regulation contain'd in H.M. Instructions to me; and indeed I am of opinion that this Act will answer that end, for the number is not altered, which was appointed by the Queen, but only the quallification and the method of electing, by which means we shall be able to have the men of the best substance chosen; for as I have informed your Lordshipps by a former letter, the landed men are not the men of the greatest substance in these parts of the world; I intreat you will intercede with the Queen that this Act may be confirmed. (4) is so necessary an Act, that I hope it carries reason enough in itself to obtain H.M. confirmation. (5) is an Act of absolute necessity; and indeed, without an Act of this kind, the roads in New Jersey would in a short time be unpassable, so I hope that Act will be confirmed. (6) I wish it may answer the intent, if it does, it will be the best Act that ever was passed; I hope it needs no farther recommendation to get it confirm'd, than the good which is intended by it, and certainly there is great need of it. The reason for passing (7) was that those Courts hapned to fall out at the time that the Assembly was sitting at Burlington, and the Judges of those Courts are Members of H.M. Council, and could not attend the Courts at that time; soe that all Causes depending would have abated to the prejudice of the partys concerned, had not such an Act been passed, therefore I hope H.M. will be pleased to confirm it. (8) Considering the situation of the Province of New Jersey, that Act is absolutely necessary; and indeed without it, it will be impossible to keep slaves in any order, for if a slave is punished for any fault, he will run away, and there are people enough who will hide them, to have the benefit of their labours in the mean time, to the great loss of the owners, and I hope this will be a means to prevent both that, and their thieving, to which they are all very much addicted; and it will be a great help to the owners of those slaves, who now very often loose the labours of their slaves for a month together, and sometimes longer; therefore I intreat your Lordships to intercede with H.M., that this Act may be confirmed. Thus I have given your Lordships an account of all the Acts of Assembly passed in the General Assembly of New Jersey in the first Session of the new Assembly; they were of course to have held their next Sessions at Amboy, but we find by experience that holding the winter-sessions at Burlington, and the Springsessions at Amboy, is very inconvenient; so at the request of several persons, both of the Council and Assembly, I have adjourn'd the Assembly to meet the next time at Burlington, which may be April 27 next; then the next time they will meet at Amboy, and so alternately; unless you are pleased to direct otherwise. Mr. Lewis Morris has behaved himself very ill, as I think; for ever since he came hither from England, he has endeavour'd to persuade the Proprietors in Jersey, and those people who are in their interests, that the Government was surrendered to the Queen upon certain terms and conditions agreed upon, before the Proprietors would surrender; being informed of this, I sent for Mr. Morris, and ask'd him how he came to raise that report, which he must know not to be true, for that if any such thing had been done, I should certainly have been informed by your Lordshipps, and by the Earl of Nottingham, what those terms and conditions were, that I might conform myself to them, and that since I had noe such directions, there could be noe such thing; to which he replyed, that it was true, that the Government was surrendred upon terms; and that if they could not have obtain'd those terms, they would not have surrendred at all; I desired him to shew me those terms, he told me, they were contain'd in my Instructions, and instanced particularly the 15th clause, in which the qualifications of persons to elect, and be elected, are contain'd, and said, that was one of the terms; and said that the 53d clause where I am directed to admit Quakers into offices or employments, signing the Declaration of their Allegiance etc. was another of the termes, to which I answer'd that he might as well say that the 37th clause, where I am commanded not to suffer any persons besides the General Proprietors or their Agents, to purchase any land from the Indians, was one of those Terms too; upon which he said that they had noe need of such a clause, and that the Queen was mistaken in that clause, for that the Proprietors had no need of any licence from the Queen to purchase from the Indians, for the land was their own already, by virtue of the grant from H.R.H. the Duke of York, to my Lord Berkley and Sir George Carteret, whose right they have purchased; I told him the Queen was best judge of what clauses were proper to be inserted in the Instructions she was pleased to honour me with, and that as I found them, I would obey them, and I told him, it did not become him to speak at that rate of the Queen; and indeed that gentleman does give his tongue too great a liberty; however for that time we parted, and I did not see him in some months, for going to Amboy in my way to Burlington, to meet the Assembly there, I appointed Mr. Morris and Captn. Bowne to meet me at Amboy on Aug. 30, upon the account of some disturbance that was like to be occasioned, by a rape committed by an Indian upon a white woman, and some of the Justices had imprisoned the Indian. Captn. Bowne met me according to appointment, but Mr. Morris chose that very day to goe from his house in New Jersey to New York, without soe much as writing one line of excuse, or taking any manner of notice; I pursued my journey to Burlington, but Mr. Morris neither came nor wrote, soe on the last day that the Councill sat, I did suspend Mr. Morris from his place in Councill, and ordered the Clerk to enter a minute in his book, of his suspension, and the reason of it, which was, for neglecting H.M. service, without having obtained leave to be absent; when I was at New York, one Dr. Ennis, a minister of the Church of England, who is setled in Mr. Morris's neighbourhood in New Jersey, came to me and told me that Mr. Morris was very sorry that he had commited soe great a fault, and desired that he might have leave to come to me, and acknowledge it, I told him, he might come when he pleased, and the next day Mr. Morris and he came to me and owned his fault, and said that if I would restore him to his place, he would by his constant application to the Queen's service, convince me that it was not out of any disrespect, that he had neglected his duty before; I told him, I did not desire to be severe, or uneasy to any Gentleman, but that it was my duty to take care the persons who had the honour to serve the Queen in that Province, should doe their duty; espetially at a time when severall things were to be done, necessary for the setling the Country, soe we parted, and I did not hear from him any more till a few days before I went to New Jersey to meet the new Assembly, when I received a letter from him, from a farme he has in West-Chester County, in this Province of New York, by which he acquainted me, that having lately taken that farme into his hands, he was very busy putting his affairs in order there, and that it would be a great prejudice to him, if he should be forced to attend his duty at Burlington, and therefore desired I would dispence with his attendance for ten days, to which I answered, that ten days could break noe squares, because it would be near ten days before we should enter upon businesse, therefore I would not differ with him for that, and I went to Burlington at the time appointed, but Mr. Morris did not come, till after three weeks, before which the House of Representatives had passed the Bill for the Revenue, and it had had one reading in the Councill, however I would not differ with him for a few days, in hopes he would be as good as his word; but instead of that, after the Bill had been read twice, and was committed to a Committee of the Councill, Mr. Morris did what he could to make that Act miscarry, by offering such amendments to it, as he knew the House of Representatives would never agree to, notwithstanding I had desired him perticularly, to give what dispatch he could to that Act, because of the season of the year, which was soe farr advanced, that we were in great danger of being frozen up; Capt. Bowne and some others of H.M. Council having told me of Mr. Morris's obstinacy, and he coming immediately into my lodgings, I asked why he would give any interruption to that Act, which he knew to be soe necessary and which he had soe faithfully promised me to forward, to the utmost of his power; he told me, he had very good reasons for what he did, that he had calculated what the occasions of the Government would require, and that 2,000l. would not suffice, I told him, that I looked upon that to be only a pretence to lose the Bill, and desired him not to insist upon anything of that nature, but that he would meet at the Committee the next morning, pursuant to their adjournment, and dispatch the Bill, but instead of that, the next day he went to Philadelphia without taking any notice of me, or asking leave, though he was going out of the Province, however I was not willing to take advantage of that, hoping he might come to his sences again, and therefore I did stay to the last day that the Councill sate, but he never thought fit to attend his duty in Councill, though he was returned from Philadelphia four or five days before I left Burlington, but when he was asked how he came not to come to me, he answered he vallued not the Governor of a farthing, soe when I was going to dismisse the Councill, I did again suspend Mr. Morris from his place in the Councill, till H.M. pleasure might be known, and I hope the Queen will be pleased to confirm that suspension, and that he may be dismissed from being a Member of that Board, and a better man put in his stead, for I am well satisfied, he will always obstruct the Queen's service, and indeed he has soe entirely given himself up to the interest of the Proprietors, that he can see with noe other eyes but theirs, and I cannot say that they have always pursued the interest of the Crowne; Mr. Morris is one of those who have endeavoured to possesse the people here, that they have a right to have Generall Assemblys, and that the Assemblys in these Colonys have the same priviledges, powers and authoritys as the House of Commons in England, he must not deny this, for he said it to me severall times, and said that the people here were Englishmen, and were entituled to all the priviledges of Englishmen, and that if the Queen would not allow them to send Members to represent these Collonys in the House of Commons in England, it was highly reasonable they should have Assemblys of their own, and that they were to be governed by laws of their making; indeed I have as often answered him, that he was mistaken, that the Assemblys which have been held here are purely by the favour of the Crowne, that I look upon their power of making Laws, as intended to be noe more than what every Corporation in England has, that is, to make by-laws for the well-governing of that Corporation; this offended Mr. Morris very much, and indeed if it were his opinion alone, I should not regard it, but it is the opinion of many people in the Provinces of New-York and New-Jersey, espetially to the East-end of Long Island, where they are generally Commonwealths men, this opinion can tend to nothing, but the diminishing the authority of the Queen in these parts, which I hope will not be suffered; this Gentleman has not been contented with spreading this doctrine as much as he can in New-Jersey, but endeavours to incourage it in this Province, where it has already taken root, he is now soliciting to get himself chosen for the County of West-Chester for an Assembly, which I intend to call in a few days, I hope he will not succeed, because I am well satisfied his intention is not good. I did formerly recommend to your Lordships Col. Townley and Mr. Daniell Cox, to be of H.M. Councill of New-Jersey, in the room of Edwd. Hunlock, and Samuel Leonard, who were dead before I received the honour of H.M. Commission for that Government; since that time, one Mr. Samuel Walker, who was also one of the Councill, is dead, soe that now there are three vacancys, which I humbly intreat your Lordshipps may be filled by Col. Richard Townley, Mr. Daniell Coxe, and Mr. Roger Mompesson, whom I have appointed to be Chief-Justice of NewJersey, till the Queen's pleasure may be known; and I desire you will recommend him to the Queen to be confirmed in that place, he is very proper for it, and has brought the Supreame Court in New York into very good order, and I don't question but he will doe the same in New-Jersey. I farther intreat your Lordshipps that I may have a Statute-book sent me for this Province of New-York, and another for New-Jersey, to remain with the Clerk of the Councill of each Province; there is indeed a great necessity of this, because there are often Pleadings before the Councill, where the lawyers take the liberty of quoting Acts of Parliament of England falsely, which they think they may the more freely doe, because they know, there is noe Statute book belonging to the Government. I desire, you will intercede with H.M., that I may have a Great-Seale for the Province of NewJersey, I am at a mighty losse for want of one, there have been two barbarous murders committed lately, one by a woman who joined with a man to murder her husband; the other of another woman, who murdred her own child; the Country was very desirous to have these two people tryed as soon as possible, because there are noe goals sufficient to keep criminalls in, and indeed, I would have issued a special Commission for the tryall of them, but for want of a Seale I could not; I must likewise beg your Lordshipps' directions in some matters relating to the Government, and particularly with respect to fines, forfeitures and escheats, which some of the Proprietors on the place pretend to say the Queen has nothing to doe withall, but that they belong to the Proprietors; however, till I receive your commands in that matter, I have taken care where anything of that nature has hapned, to have them secured for the Queen; there is likewise a thing called horse-hunting, the woods are full of wild horses; in the Province of New-York, the Governor of New-York appoints a Ranger General, who deputes persons under him for every County, to take care of all such horses as are taken up wild in the woods; and I have appointed one in New-Jersey; but the Proprietors here, say it is their right; soe I would not let the person I had named proceed, till I had received your Lordshipps' directions, which I intreat, I may have. In September last I went downe the river Delaware as low as Salem, which is the lowest County but one, on the Jersey side, towards the Capes of Delaware River, and is 73 miles below Burlington, there is a pretty little towne built there called Salem, which is capable of being made a good place for trade, there being a creek there, in which there is noe lesse than 15ft. water at low water, soe capable of receiving good ships; I did intend to have gone downe as far as the Capes, but the North-West winds began to set in, and I being but in a small boat, thought it not proper to venture for fear of being blown out to sea, which often happens at that time of the year, but I intend (God willing) to goe downe this spring, because I am willing to give the Queen the best account I can, of all the parts of those Governments she has been pleased to honour me with the Government of. Signed, Cornbury. P.S. I had almost forgot to observe to your Lordshipps some of the inconveniencys that may attend the 37th clause of my Instructions, in which I am directed not to suffer any persons besides the Generall Proprietors or their Agents to purchase land from the Indians; now I conceive that this will be a means to hinder the country from being cleared and peopled soe soon as it would otherwise be, for the Proprietors will not sell any land but at certain rates, which they who live in the Province have agreed among themselves shall be the price, and under such quit-rents as they think fit, soe that several people who would settle in New Jersey goe over into Pensilvania and settle there; I am of opinion that if a certain quit-rent were fixed, to be paid to the Proprietors for every 100 acres, and soe for a greater or lesser quantity, and that the Governor for the time being may be at liberty to grant licences to any person who has a mind to purchase from the Indians, it can be noe prejudice to the Proprietors but will be a means to people the country much sooner. Endorsed, Recd. 25th June, Read July 5, 1705. Holograph. 10½ pp. [C.O. 5, 970. No. 24; and 5, 994.A. pp. 204–226.]
Feb. 20.
Whitehall.
879. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. We humbly lay before your Majesty a report from Mr. Attorney and Sollicitor General relating to the absenting Members of the Assembly of Barbados. [C.O. 29. 9. p. 185.]
[Feb. 20.]880. Mr. Congreve to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Gives lists of presents sent to the Indians 1700, of stores of war sent to New York last summer and captured by the French, and of same now required. Signed, C. Congreve. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 20, 1704/5. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1048. No. 106.]
Feb. 21.
Cockpitt.
881. Mr. Secretary Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their opinion, "except what relates to the impressing of men, for which there is a standing rule." Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd, Read Feb. 23rd. 1704/5. 1 p. Enclosed,
881. i. Sir Richard Levett and Wm. Lone, owners of the Dolphin and Mermaid, to the Queen. These ships, letters of marque and carrying slaves for the Plantations, were detained in Virginia. [See March 2.] Pray that they may not be detained in any port, or their crews impressed. Endorsed, Read Feb. 18, 1704-(5). 1 p. [C.O. 5. 1314. Nos. 39. 39.i.: and 5, 1361. pp. 50–53.]
Feb. 21.882. Jer. Clifford to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have made my applications to Messrs. Shepheard etc. without effect. Prays for the despatch of his business. Signed, Jer. Clifford. Endorsed, Recd. Read. Feb. 22, 1704/5. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 75. No. 113; and 389, 36. pp. 244, 245.]
Feb. 22.883. W. Popple to Mr. Clifford. In reply to preceding. Desiring him to procure from Messrs. Shepherd etc. his account current sent them May 23, 1704. [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 245, 246.]
Feb. 22.
Boston.
884. Mr. Byfield to [? Mr. Secretary Hedges]. Last year I was appointed by H.R.H. Judge of the Court of Admiralty. A small prize brought in by H.M.S. Advice was condemned by my Deputy, Mr. Newton, and for the whole fees of all the officers of the Court I demanded 5 p.c. which is much less than is taken at other places. My Commission warrants me to take such fees as are accustomed, but have never taken more than as above. Yet John Colman, Agent for H.R.H. and one of the Commissioners for Prizes, will not pay ye same, but threatens to complain of me to your Honour. He bought the captor's share of the prize before any condemnation, which I think is very improper etc., and for that he is to pay one half of my demands out of his own pocket, he will not pay the same. We have but little business in the Court of Admiralty etc. Signed, Natha. Byfield. Endorsed, Dec. [?] 3. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 751. No. 63.]
Feb. 22.885. Capt. St. Loe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. On Sept. 16 I ordered Lt. Wanley to apply to Alexander Skeene, Secretary of Barbados, for a man he desired me to press, he being an idle, disorderly person and one of no settled habitation, but with good management would make a Captain's clerk or ship's steward. Lee being at supper, Skeene came without any application, and offered to shew him where Lee was, he being then in a riot. Skeene said he had nothing to say for him. As for any combination between Mr. Arthur Slingsby, myself and Lieut., it's altogether false and scandalous, but tis certain Mr. Slingsby was at Mr. Skeene's when 'twas moved to me, and gave Lee much the same character as the other had done. Signed, E. St. Loe. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 23, 1705. 1½ pp. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 84; and 29, 9. pp. 187, 188.]
Feb. 22.
Whitehall.
886. Mr. Secretary Hedges to Governor Sir Bevill Granville. A contract being made by H.M. Postmaster-General here for the carrying on a constant and monthly correspondence, by pacquetboats, between England and H.M. Plantation Islands in America, and Deputys being appointed by the Postmaster Generall for the more carefully distributing the letters which go from hence to the said Islands and for the more regular collecting the letters for England, it is H.M. pleasure that you give the person deputed for your Island all the encouragement and protection that may be necessary etc. A similar Letter was written to Governor Sir Wm. Mathew, Governor Handasyde, and Capt. Bennet. [C.O. 324, 30. p. 24.]
Feb. 22.
Whitehall.
887. Mr. Secretary Hedges to Governor Sir W. Mathew. Acknowledges letter of Nov. 25. H.M. approves of the method that is used here in the exchange of prisoners, which you are to proceed in, and to send a list of all of them to the Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners here etc. Directions are given to the Commander of the Pacquet Boat as you desire to remain 48 hours at the Island where you shall happen to be at the time of its arrivall, or longer if need be. I have received two Acts of St. Christophers and two of Antegoa, which shall be laid before H.M. for her royal assent. I shall endeavour to gett you directions concerning the shares of prizes etc. as desired. I thank you for your concern for Mr. Larton's widdow, and shall send you a copy of his patent by the next conveyance. You may be sure I shall make the best use that I can of the state of what is necessary for a supply of men and artillery for the defence of the Islands, when it comes to my hands. The Lieut. Governor of Antegoa being a person unfitt for that employment, I desire you will lett us know who in your opinion is a man capable of doing H.M. good service there. I think the Collection of the Laws you say is preparing to be transmitted hither, when it is considered here, will put an end to the doubts you are under at present, what Laws are in force and what not. The inconvenience you find from the Act of the Militia in relation to the parade and rendezvous seems not otherwise to be remyded than by another Act. That part of your letter which relates to fines etc. I intend to lay before my Lord Treasurer, and hope by the next pacquet you may receive directions in that matter. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 22–24.]
Feb. 22.
Whitehall.
888. Mr. Secretary Hedges to Governor Sir B. Granville. H.M. approves of your proposall for a General Exchange [of prisoners] for Barbadoes, and recommends it to your care to manage it for the best advantage to her service, which she concludes may be done without any charge of subsisting the prisoners or transports, since you say it has hitherto been paid out of the publick levies, and H.M. is also satisfied that the unlawfull commerce, which you say you have reason to fear will be carryed on, may be better prevented by yourself than any other. If you have not already received any orders about the prisoners condemned at the Court Martiall, you are to exchange them with others. If the French will not agree upon this Generall Exchange, you may make the exchanges of man for man, and quality for quality, giving an account to the Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners of all you do in that matter from time to time, and in case you shall have any supernumeraries, they are to be sent home, giving an account to the said Commissioners, or if you judge it better you may make your agreement to have as many delivered to Col. Mathews, if upon advising with him you shall find that he wants prisoners to redeem any of H.M. subjects belonging to the Leeward Islands, and this you may do. H.M. is pleased to consent that the Sieurs Torailles [Sept. 29, 1704] be exchanged for Col. Michaell Lambert, Capt. Andrew Chouvet and Mr. James Raleigh, inhabitants of St. Christophers, who were taken going from that Island to Antegoa, on board a Danish ship and are detained at Martinique, by way of reprizal. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 21, 22.]
Feb. 22.
Whitehall.
889. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Quote Lord Cornbury's statement of the want of arms, powder and bedding for New York; his request for a man of war to protect the trade with the Southern Plantations, and a present for the Five Nations of Indians. Stores, provided out of the Company's pay, sent out last summer were taken by the French. Propose that they be made good, and 50 barrels of powder sent, to be paid for by the Assembly. And that a present of 300l. value be sent for the Indians. Set out, Acts of Privy Council, II. Nos. 960, 961. [C.O. 5, 1120. pp. 271–273.]
Feb. 22.890. List of the small arms etc., for New York, sent last summer and taken by the French. (See preceding.) [C.O. 5, 1120. p. 274.]
Feb. 22.
St. James.
891. Order of Queen in Council. Refers the question of a present for the Indians [in preceding] to the Lord High Treasurer. Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Memorandum in margin: A warrant was signed by the Queen, July 1705, directing Col. Byerley, Receiver General of New York, to pay 300l. for this use, as appears by entries in the Treasury. This was upon Mr. Champante's solicitation. Endorsed, Recd. Read Sept. 25, 1705. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1048. No. 107; and 5, 1120. pp. 340, 341.]
Feb. 22.
St. James.
892. Order of Queen in Council. Refers extract of No. 889, relating to stores for New York to the Duke of Marlborough, Master General of the Ordnance, for an estimate. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 1048. No. 108; and 5, 1120. p. 339.]
Feb. 22.
St. James.
893. Order of Queen in Council. Refers petition of owners of the Richard and James and Rumbo galley to H.R.H., to consider of what force and burthen ships, which have letters of marque and trade to H.M. Plantations in America, ought to consist of, to exempt them from being detained by an embargo, as they desire etc. Signed, C. Musgrave. [C.O. 324, 9. pp. 60, 61.]
Feb. 22.
Whitehall.
894. Mr. Secretary Hedges to Governor Handasyde. H.M. is pleased to approve of what you propose [Dec. 17, 1704], in relation to the not exchanging of prisoners, and what you propose concerning the Commission[er]s of Privateers being restrained to the French only, except such of the Spaniards as correspond with France or have French goods on board, seems very reasonable, that they may not intercept our trade with the Spaniards: in the meantime such as disturbe it, and come within your power may, We think, be punished by you according to the rigour of Law. That part of your letter which relates to prizes and ships going to St. Thomas and Curacoa is laid before my Lord Treasurer, and I hope by the next pacquet boat some directions will be sent in those matters. What you propose concerning the adding two companies to your regiment, will I suppose be complyed with, and that you will hear what is done therein by the next pacquet. The depositions against Mr. Totterdale are come to hand, but it is supposed that he being so great a disturber of all Governors as you represent him, it is in your power to punish him there according to his deserts. Encloses H.M. Letter for transmitting half yearly accounts of Stores of War. Quoted. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 18–20.]
Feb. 23.
Fleet Prison.
895. Mr. Clifford to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The merchants have drawn up their report, but will not take the least notice of me etc. Signed, Jer. Clifford. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 75. No. 115; and 389, 36. pp. 248, 249.]
Feb. 25.896. Agents of Barbados to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to Capt. St. Loe [Feb. 22]. He admits that, contrary to his Instructions, he pressed Lee without an order from the Governor. The depositions he produces from Slingsby, Skene, etc., that Lee is a scandalous fellow, ought not to be regarded, not being under the seal of the Island; but they rather prove the combination, etc. Signed, Mel. Holder, Wm. Cleland, J. Stanley, Wm. Bridges. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 28, 1704/5. 1 closely written p. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 85; and 29, 9. pp. 189–191.]
Feb. 25.
New York.
897. Governor Lord Cornbury to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letters of August 24 and 25, with H.M. letter relating to shares of prizes, which I shall take care punctually to observe, as likewise H.M. Instructions relating to the Acts of Trade and Navigation. I have obeyed your Lordshipps' directions in appointing a day of thanksgiving for the Glorious Victory etc. which has been observed. As for the account of the stores which your Lordshipps require of me, I will endeavour to comply with it, even by this ship if possible, but if not, by the next you shall most certainly have it. Since Dr. Bridge's death, there are dead of H.M. Councill Mr. Ling, Mr. Attorney Generall Broughton, and Coll. Smith, and Col. Romer has not been near me upwards of two years, and I hear is now going for England, soe that there are but seaven Councellors in the Province, Col. Schuyler and Mr. Renslaer live at Albany, Mr. Lawrence and Mr. Beekman live upon Long Island, and Coll. Heathcot in West Chester County, soe that there were but two in towne, Mr. Van Dam and Mr. Wenham, and indeed all the winter I can have the assistance of none but those who live in towne, therefore I have lately admitted into the Councill Mr. Mompesson, Mr. John Barbaric and Mr. Adolph Phillips, whom I intreat your Lordshipps may be confirmed, I think them all three very good men, and I am satisfyed they will serve the Queen as they ought to doe. As for the Acts of Assembly sent in June, I cannot imagine how that mistake came, but for the future I shall observe your Lordshipps' directions and certifie all the Acts. Signed, Cornbury. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read June 28th, 1705. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1048. No. 109; and 5, 1120. pp. 315–317.]
Feb. 26.
New York.
898. Governor Lord Cornbury to Sir Ch. Hedges. Acknowledges letter of May 25 etc. I shall take care to prepare against the next conveyance as good an account as I can of the two Provinces under my care etc. I had soe short notice of this ship's sailing that I could not doe it now etc. Signed, Cornbury. Endorsed, R. June 26. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1084. Nos. 24, and (duplicate) 24.i.]
[Feb. 27.]899. The Case of Thomas Byfield and Co. Upon the assurance of the Council of Trade and Plantations, that if they would undertake the importing pitch and tair from Carolina, they might depend upon all fitting encouragement from the Government, they fitted out the Dove to Carolina in May last. They expect her arrival in two months time. Pray for the addition of a clause allowing the same encouragement for what pitch and tarr she shall import, as is contained in the Bill for importing Naval Stores from the Plantations, although she arrives before the said Act commences. Endorsed, Recd. Feb. 27, 1704/5. Printed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1263. No. 13.]
[Feb. 27.]900. Mr. Congreve to the Council of Trade and Plantations. There will want at least 100 men to recruit the 4 Companies at New York. Signed, C. Congreve. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 27, 1704/5. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1048. No. 110; and 5, 1120. pp. 274, 275.]
[Feb. 27.]901. Account of the Respitts on the Four Companies at New York, Jan. 1, 1702—Oct. 1704. Total 2,000l. 0s. 8d. Signed, John Mercer. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 27, 1704/5. 2 large pp. [C.O. 5, 1048. No. 111.]
Feb. 27.
Jamaica.
902. Governor Handasyd to Sir Charles Hedges. Acknowledges letter of Dec. 7 with the King of Spain's Proclamations, which I shall endeavour to get dispersed etc. As to the two Regiments here, I have nothing more to propose except that the inhabitants be obliged to quarter both officers and soldiers, or to procure them quarters, by which means they will not loose their lives for want of lodgeing. The Gentlemen that belong to the Island, who are in England, may pretend what they will, but there are of my own Regiment out of quarters, at Port Royall and Spanish Town, above 150. Those at Port Royall have no other lodgeing but under the platforms and the Heavens for their Canopee, and have no other beds but an iron or brass gun, and bricks to lie upon; and in Spanish Town 40 or 50 have no other lodgeing but under a shade or an old house, when they can find one empty. My other proposal is that we may have four months pay advanced, by which means we may have our mony paid here always as it is due; and the liberty to pitch upon those Gentlemen who are fitt to answer our Bills. The Gentleman who I request may serve my Regiment is Mr. Knights. I enclose a copy of the Protection I am sending to a party of French, who have revolted from the French and Spanish Governments in the West Indies and request H.M. gracious protection, they takeing the oaths and behaveing themselves as they ought to do. They are about 70 or 80 in number. Mr. Totterdale has again been disturbing the people and opposing authority. His affronting and bringing actions against the Councellors (before which it has always been usual to ask leave, and when done in a decent manner has never been refused) is the occasion of his being taken in custody, and unless he is prevented pleading in the Queen's Courts, I see no end of his villainy, his party is so great, that he never wants some, who dare not openly appear in it, to assist him, so that he can't want juries conformable to his inclination. [Refers to Minutes of Council.] Here are 4 merchant ships that will sail in 3 or 4 days, by which I send several French prisoners, according to the request of the Captains to help to sail them, which they oblige themselves to deliver to the first of H.M. goals. I shall take care the men of war shall see them past the Capes, and then I hope they will be clear of all danger in these parts. Our Privateers have since my last brought in 3 prizes, two French, the other a Spaniard. As to the value of them, I am wholly a stranger. The Insurrection of the negroes is quite quelled, some of the Ring Leaders were taken and executed, the rest were sent off the Island. I return you hearty thanks for your news, if our success in Portugall had been answerable to the Duke of Marlborough's glorious success in Germany, we had before this broke the heart of that Tyrant. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Rd. Aug. 6. 2½ pp. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 6.]
Feb. 27.
Jamaica.
903. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letter of Nov. 30. Mr. Chaplin has sent by this packett copies of his accounts, sworn to by him before me. Encloses duplicates, with the Minutes of Councill since my last, by which your Lordships will see how I am constantly plagued by Mr. Totterdale, etc. Repeats part of preceding. The Spanish trade goes but very slowly on at present, as I do apprehend, they having been supply'd by the French and Dutch. Some alterations in our Privateers' Instructions are absolutely wanting, to prevent their taking the Spaniards, except such as have French goods or naval stores on board. As for my own part, I dare not hazzard making any alterations without orders from H.M. or H.R.H. I have writ to the Admiralty Board to that purpose to lay it before H.R.H., and likewise to the Secretary of State. The two Regiments here are indifferent healthy, except such as have no quarters, etc. as in preceding. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 18, Read 24 April, 1705. 3 pp. Enclosed,
903. i. Copy of Protection sent by Governor Handasyd to some French deserters lying concealed at Boca Toxo on the Spanish coast. Feb. 22, 1704/5. Signed, Tho. Handasyd, Endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 7. Nos. 6, 6.i.; and (without enclosure) 138, 11. pp. 389–392.]
Feb. 28.
Whitehall.
904. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Sir W. Mathew. Since our letter of Nov. 30, we have received yours of Oct. 2 and Nov. 25. We laid before H.M. two Acts past at St. Christophers in Sept., which H.M. was graciously pleased to confirm. Enclose Order in Councill. What you writ about the Barbados fleet's not touching at Antego and Mountserrat has been laid before the Lord High Admiral. We also represented to H.M. what you write about the want of cannon and Master-gunners for the Leeward Islands, which representation H.M. has been pleased to refer to the Lord High Treasurer, and we shall not faile to give you timely notice of what shall be done therein. In relation to the collection of the Laws, we must again desire that you would hasten the dispatch thereof. And tho' you may not particularly know what Laws have been confirmed and what repealed, yet when you shall have sent us a compleat collection of the whole, with the years in which each Act was passed, we shall be able to set that matter right. [C.O. 153, 9. pp. 84, 85.]
Feb. 28.
Whitehall.
905. W. Popple, jr., to Josiah Burchet. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire to know what Instructions Capt. St. Loe had relating to pressing at Barbadoes etc. [C.O. 29, 9. p. 192.]