America and West Indies
January 1706, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1916

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1-13

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'America and West Indies: January 1706, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 23: 1706-1708 (1916), pp. 1-13. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73712 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


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COLONIAL PAPERS.

January 1706, 1-15

[? 1706.]1. Gentlemen residing in England, who have estates in Barbadoes, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Pray that Kirton's petition may not have any influence with them to the prejudice of the Governor, representing as it does "a very few unquiet spirits that have but small estates, that will be content with no Governor, unless they can prevail upon him to pursue their measures, however injurious," etc. Signed, Paul Carrington, Wm. Andrews, Charles Cox, John Walter, Rich. Bate, Saml. Child, Phill. Scott, John Rollstone, Mel. Holder, John Hill, Wm. Trent, J. Colleton, Robt. Davers, Jno. Bromley, Pat. Mein, Richd. Scott, Wm. Estland, H. Bendyshe, Tho. Foulerton, Robt. Chester, Timothy Salter, Hen. Evans. 3 pp. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 42.]
Jan. 2.
Admiralty Office.
2. J. Burchett to W. Popple, jr. H.M.S. Nonsuch is under orders to come to the Downes. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 3, 1705/6. Addressed. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 2; and 5, 1120. p. 384.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
3. W. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Desires Capt. Bridge's reply to enquiries concerning Newfoundland. [C.O. 195, 4. p. 63.]
Jan. 2.
Star Inne, Near ye Monument.
4. Mr. Jackson, late Minister at Newfoundland, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays to be heard on all matters concerning Newfoundland, to clear my reputation, etc. Prays to be excused waiting on their Lordships in person, we being all cast away in H.M.S. Faulkland's prize, and loosing almost all we had and myself labouring under a great indisposition of body then and ever since, etc. Signed, John Jackson. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 3, 1706. Addressed. Holograph. 1½ pp. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 91; and 195, 4. pp. 65, 66.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
5. W. Popple, jr., to Mr. Jackson. The Council of Trade and Plantations are sorry for your ill state of health. Till you are able to come abroad, they desire you would send in writing an account of the trade and fishery of Newfoundland, etc. [C.O. 195, 4. p. 67.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
6. W. Popple, jr., to Sir Wm. Phiphard. The Council of Trade and Plantations, being informed by Mr. Blathwayt that you have received some accounts of this year's trade and fishery at Newfoundland, desire you would communicate them to them. [C.O. 195, 4. p. 64.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
7. W. Popple, jr., to Mr. Lowndes. Encloses bill, transmitted by Governor Nicholson, July 25, for 50l. usually paid out of the Public Revenue to the Agent of the Virginia affairs for the Lord High Treasurer's direction, Governor Nicholson not having appointed any Agent since Mr. Thrale's death. [C.O. 5, 1361. pp. 423, 424.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
8. W. Popple, jr., to Capt. Boys. You are to send the box by post from the Downs (see Dec. 27, 1705). [C.O. 5, 1120. p. 383.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
9. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Recommend that the Act of Maryland suspending the Act to prevent the growth of Popery [see Dec. 5 and 21, 1705] be continued without limitation of time, etc. Set out, Acts of Privy Council, II. pp. 497–499.] [C.O. 5, 726. pp. 354–357.]
Jan. 3.
St. James's.
10. Order of Queen in Council. Governor Seymour is to represent to the Assembly of Maryland as preceding. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 9, 1705/6. 4¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 716. No. 3; and 5, 726. pp. 360–362.]
Jan. 3.
St. James's.
11. Order of Queen in Council. Refer following to the Council of Trade and Plantations to examine and report upon. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Lowther), Read Nov. 11, 1706. 1¼ pp. Enclosed,
11. i. Col. Tobias Frere to the Queen. Councillor of Barbados 1687–1704, he withdrew from the sitting of Council constituting a Court of Chancery when a cause between himself and Wm. Springham came on to be heard. The Governor construed this withdrawal as voluntary and malicious, and dismissed him, without alledging any manner of misbehaviour on his part. Prays to be reinstated. Copy. 2 pp.
11. ii. Certificates, signed by R. Grey and J. Kendall as to Col. Frere's loyal service under their governments.
11. iii—iv. Similar certificates. 26 signatures. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 9. Nos. 71, 71. i.–iv.; and 29, 10. pp. 188–195.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
12. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Recommend that Mr. Peregrine Browne have permission as desired (see Dec. 19, 1705); provided he do not sail with the Nicholson, from Maryland, before the convoy come thence, lest he fall into the hands of the enemy and give notice of the Fleet, and for that such anticipation is a discouragement to trade by forestalling the market. [C.O. 5, 726. pp. 358, 359.]
Jan. 7.
Cockpitt.
13. Mr. Secretary Hedges to Governor Seymour. You are to permit the Nicholson to sail without convoy any time after the convoy now bound for Maryland has sailed thence. Signed, C. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 30. p. 52.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
14. W. Popple, jr., to Mr. Burchett. The Council of Trade and Plantations being prest for their report to the House of Commons relating to Newfoundland desire you would move H.R.H. Council that Commodore Bridge come to this Board as soon as possible, with such papers as he may have in answer to enquiries relating thereto. [C.O. 195, 4. p. 68.]
Jan. 8.
Admiralty Office.
15. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Reply to preceding. Capt. Bridge is ordered to send his answer and to repair to town as soon as the Court Marshall is over, which is to enquire into the losse of the ship he commanded, etc. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 9, 1705/6. Holograph. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 92; and 195, 4. pp. 69, 70.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
16. W. Popple, jr., to Mr. Attorney General. The Council of Trade and Plantations return you the enclosed papers relating to Mr. Allen, with a copy of his declaration in ejectment, and desire your opinion whether it be fit for H.M. to grant his petition, and whether H.M. by Order in Council may not prohibit the tenants in possession from committing wast, pending the suit, and untill the same shall be determined by H.M. in Council upon his Appeal. [C.O. 5, 912. p. 70.]
[Jan.] 10.
London.
17. Mr. Dummer to Mr. Popple. Gives sailings of the Jamaica packet arrived Falmouth Jan. 6, 103 days out and home. The Islands are indifferently healthfull. Nov. 29, met with the Experiment and Terrible fireships, 7 leagues to windward of Port Royall from Old England. One Coleby, a commander of a tradeing sloop to the coast of Cartagena, mett with a French privateer of 10 guns and 95 men, who [had] very much annoyed our tradeing sloopes, and taken many of them on that coast. Coleby had 8 guns and 40 men, being a bold man, resolved to give the privateer occasion of fighting and lay by for him, the privateer boarded him three times, and he as often cleared himself of his enemy, when Coleby perceived his advantage, boarded the privateer and take him, in this rancounter hee killed the French 11 men and wounded 30 more, with loss only of 2 of his own men. They have advice att Jamaica of the takeing of Barcellona, and great life is conceived thereupon for trade with New Spaine. Signed, E. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 11, 1705/6. Addressed. Sealed. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 323, 6. No. 1.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
18. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. In reply to Order of Council Dec. 20, 1705, we humbly represent that the Proprietary and Charter Colonies in generall have no ways answered the chief design for which such large tracts of land and such privileges and immunities were granted by the Crown. They have not conformed themselves to the severall Acts of Parliament for regulating Trade and Navigation, to which they ought to pay the same obedience and submit to the same restrictions as the other Plantations subject to your Majesty's immediate Government, on the contrary, in Connecticut and Rhode Island the Governours have not applyed for your Royall approbation, nor have taken the oaths required by the Acts of Trade, as required by the Act for preventing frauds, etc. They have assumed to themselves a power of making laws contrary and repugnant to the Laws of England and directly prejudicial to Legal Trade. Diverse of them have denyed Appeals to your Majesty in Councill, by which not only the inhabitants, but others your Majesty's subjects are deprived of that benefit enjoyed in the Plantations under your Majesty's immediate Government, and the parties agrieved are left without remedy against the arbitrary and illegal proceedings of their Courts. These Colonies are the refuge and retreat of Pyrates and illegal traders, and the receptacle of goods imported thither from foreign parts contrary to Law, in return of which commodities, those of the growth of these Colonies are, likewise contrary to Law, exported to foreign parts; all which is much encouraged by their not admitting Appeals. They give protection to deserters and malefactors, etc. Repeat C.S.P., 1705, No. 975.i., Article (3). These Independent Colonies do turn the course of trade to the promoting and incouraging woollen and other manufactures proper to England, instead of applying their thoughts and endeavours to the production of such commodities as are fit to be encouraged in those parts, according to the true design and intention of such settlements. They do not in general take due care for their own defence and security against an enemy either in building forts or in providing their inhabitants with sufficient arms and ammunition against an attack, which is every day more and more to be apprehended, considering how the French power increases in those parts; nor have some of them any regular Militia established amongst them. These mischiefs chiefly arise from the ill use they make of the powers intrusted to them by their Charters, and the independency which they pretend to, presuming that each Government is obliged only to defend itself, without any consideration had of their neighbours, or of the general preservation of the whole. Upon this presumption they do refuse to furnish their quota of assistance (during the war) to the other Plantations under your Majesties immediate Government, notwithstanding your Majesties repeated commands by your Royall letters in this behalf. Under colour and pretence of their Charters, several of them try robberies, murders and other crimes, make Laws in capital matters, and punish with death, without any legall authority for ye same. They have refused to submit to your Majesty's and H.R.H. Commissions of Vice-Admiralty, and for commanding their Militia, and have defeated the power given to ye Governors of your Majesties neighbouring Colonies therein. Many of the Proprietary and Charter Governments have not complied with your Majesty's Proclamation for settling the current rates of foreign coins [June 15, 1704], but the people have proceeded to reduce the coin by clipping to a lower value than before, which is allowed to pass at any rate, in order to drain your Majesties other Plantations of their current money. So that these your Majesties commands will by such means remain ineffectual untill the severall Colonies in America be so regulated as to be brought under the same direction and Government. We lay before your Majesty some particular misfeazances. (1) The Massachusetts Bay. Quote from Gov. Dudley's letter July 25, '05, as to the Assembly's attitude towards clipped coin. They have absolutely refused to comply with your Majesty's directions to rebuild the fort at Pemaquid, contribute towards that at Piscataqua, or to settle any fixed salary upon your Majesty's Governour or Lt. Governour, but at the year's end give them, as also to the Judges and other civil officers such allowance as they pretend to judge they may have deserved, which renders their support precarious and dependant on the People. (2) Rhode Island. Quote from Gov. Dudley Nov. 3, '05. If any of H.M. subjects, not being inhabitants of that Colony, sue for a debt in their Courts, they can have no right done, if the defendant be one of that Colony. Quote Gov. Dudley July 25, '05, as to the refusal of the Government to recognise his Commissions to command the Militia, etc. Quote Gov. Dudley, March 10, '05, as to their granting a commission to John Halsey, a privateer, etc., contrary to their Charter and H.M. Order in Council Jan. 28, '04. The Quakers will not admit of any persons of estates or abilities into any places of publick trust. [Sept. 17, '02.] (3) Connecticutt. They try robberies etc. and refuse to submit to H.M. and H.R.H. Commissions of ViceAdmiralty and for commanding their Militia as preceding. Refuse to allow appeals and give great discouragements and vexation to those that demand the same. Quote their conduct to H.M. Commissioners concerning the Mohegan Indians [Nov. 1, '05].
From the aforesaid irregular and illegal proceedings it will be easily judged of what great benefit the re-uniting to the Crown the Government of all these Colonies will necessarily be to your Majesties other Dominions, by the removall of these inconveniences, and by the uniformity and more due regulation of Trade, by the good correspondency that may be established thereby between your Majesty's severall Plantations, and by the common and mutual defence of all, as well as by preventing the great and frequent oppositions yt. are made to your Majesty's Laws and Government, by which means your Majesties Empire in America, which is of so great an extent, will be better secured from the attempts of any enemy, and become in all respects of greater advantage to this Kingdome, and to your Majesties Revenue arising from those parts. P.S.—As to the Bahama Islands, which by their scituation are of very great consequence to the trade of this Kingdom and safety of the navigation from the West Indies, we have made no mention of them, for that the Proprietors not having been able to defend those Islands, the Spaniards about three years ago with a very small force [having] destroyed and ravaged the said Islands and killed or carry'd off all your Majesties subjects there, nor have the Proprietors done anything for resettling the same. [C.O. 5, 1291. pp. 238–253.]
[Jan. 11.]19. Mr. Roope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Recounts history of Newfoundland settlement and fishery. When the French came to Plasentia, 1662, several English inhabitants were there and were by ye French suffered to live and injoy their religion until ye beginning of ye late warr, when ye Governour ordered all that would not conform to ye Romish way to leave, wch. some did, others did nott, there being ye offspring of severall now there, and two of ye old men yett alive; they in few yeares increased theire fishery so as yt. they have in a manner destroyed ours, for there being nott att present vent enough for more Newfoundland fish yn. wt. about 35,000 men cann be imployed in, they, by haveing greate large tracts of fishing ground and many harbours, fish butt few shipps in a place, for they have about 90 leagues on ye east side to ye N. of us, in wch. they have many good fishing harbours, butt no inhabitants nor fortress; on ye W. they have about 150 leagues on ye Island side, and a farr larger quantity on ye maine, whereas wee now have nott passing 70 leagues in all, and ye fish cometh wth. ym. in ye beginning of Aprill, and wth. us nott before about ye middle of May, and they haveing for ye most part beach on ye W. side to dry and cure theire fish on, are ready to go to sea to fish in 4 or 5 dayes after their arrivall, whereas wee must be att least 3 or 4 weekes ere cann be ready to fish, and on ye East side nor on ye N. part of ye west side, they haveing no inhabitants nor by boats, so yt. wt. stages, flakes, etc. that they leave, they are sure to find wn. arrive ye next season, neither is any liquors etc. brought to debauch ye fishermen, whereas wee have to our greate loss and detriment, their fish being better cured, and commonly they take more for a boate, they have allso very wholesome lawes, wch. make all things goe easy. Soe that whereas formerly wee had about 600 sayle that did fish on ye banks and ashoare, and might have about 30,000 men imployed, now that they have such quantity and wee reduced to, in 1704, about 50 Europeans and 16 Americans, and, in 1705, about 40 Europeans and 20 Americans, most of the Europeans that fished came from Portugall, for itt it is so late every yeare ere ye convoy is appointed yt. ye best fishing season is over before they cann arrive. Proposes yt. itt may be represented to H.M. in Councell ye necessity of ye convoy departing before March 10. On Jan. 21, 1704/5, M. Subercasse surprised ye harbour of St. John's, etc. For some little time gave no quarter, butt soone contradicted yt. order; all ye men, wch. were about 220, were putt in ye church for a prison, wch. is an open place, and itt being a bitter sharp frost and much snow often falling, severall died of ye cold and severall had theire feet frozen. Some few days after he sent some Indians to Torbay, who killed 2 men several hours after they had given ym. quarter, etc. etc. [see C.S.P., 1705]. M. Subercasse sent about 230 prisoners to Placentia, whom he forced to work in their fishery, and at the end of the fishing season sent severall of ye youth to Canada, some for France, and other some are still at Plasentia, who are said to have entred in ye French service, all ye Irish are certainely entred.
As to theire settlements, Plasentia is ye onely place yt. is fortifyed, and nott so strong as reported, haveing in ye fortress butt 120 soldiers, guns and 2 mortars, besides 300 Indians and 500 inhabitants of St. Peters (St. Pierre), Plasentia and Point Verd. The constant inhabitants of Plasentia in summer are about 200 men. Last summer there were 26 French ships, and one Spanier, 210 boats kept there, 12 great ships of St Malo fished att Pettit North, 10 ships att St. Peters, how many at Cape Britton and Nova Scotia knowe nott, one att Petitt Martire, and one att Petit Paradis; for these 3 last yeares they have had a small ship of 18 guns to attend ye garrison, butt was never man'd in winter. Proposes that 4 light frigatts, 40 to 50 guns, depart from England about Feb. 20 or sooner, and be ordered to cruise, two on Bank Verd and two about Cape St. Mary's and ye mouth of ye Bay of Argenton, until ye midle of June, to take wt. ships they cann, and the latter from time to time to goe up ye Bay of Argenton as high as Plasentia, goeing up on ye N.W. side and in ye night strech over to Plasentia side and runn downe in ye morning all along ye shoare, and take and destroy wt. boats they cann, and all ye stages on ye Cape, etc., keeping ye men prisoners, and after ye cruice endeavour to destroy St. Peters, etc., and then take a cruice on ye bankes, and yt. ye convoys endeavour to take those att Petitt North.
Ye last season 24 of theire ships bound to Plasentia were taken, 21 by ye Dutch and 3 by ye English and one banker. Signed, John Roope, John Mouldin, a soldier carried from St. Johns to Placentia and now sent to France, and Wm. Riots, a smith, the same. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 11, 1705/6. Holograph. 6 pp. Enclosed,
19. i. Account of the Newfoundland Fishery in 1705. 12 fishing ships from Portugall, 8 from England, burden about 2,400 tunn; 20 sack ships; 20 from America. Ship's boats, 60; by-boats, 40; Buena Vista boats, 24; Trinity Bay, 16; Conception Bay, 40; St. Johns and ye Southward, 80; Total, 260. Stages, 80. Had 78,000 quintals of fish and 455 tun of traine oyle. Inhabitants, 800 men, 130 women, 200 children. A great deal of fish was spoyled by bad weather. In the Bays of Consumption and Trinity and att Buena Vista, they were so annoyed by ye Indians in ye fishing season yt. they are allmost utterly ruined. At the latter end of ye yeare they surprised and destroyed severall of ye vessels that came to carry the fish to St. John's. 1 p.
19. ii. English settlements N. of Bonavista, are Keeles, Little Barrow Harbour, Salvage, Green's Pond, Salmon Cove, where is a noble salmon fishery. The people of Buena Vista doe allso in winter goe to ye North some 100 leagues to hunt and take good furr. ½ p. [C.O. 194, 3. Nos. 93, 93.i.ii.; and 195, 4. pp. 73–85.]
[Jan. 11.]20. T. Corbin to the Council of Trade and Plantations. From the first settlement of H.M. Colony of Virginia, the Secretary for the time being have always had the nomination, confirmation, commissionating, removing and displacing the Clarks of the several County Courts, with all fees and perquisites etc. H.M. hath granted a Commission to Edmund Jennings for that office in full and ample manner as any former Secretary ever had and enjoyed. John Taylor, gentleman, was commissionated and placed Clark of Charles Citty County, who in 1702 had leave from the Governor and Council to go for England for the recovery of his health, and admitted to recommend a fitt person to execute the place during his absence, and to be restored at his return. In 1703 the County of Charles Citty was by a law divided into two Counties, one of which retains the name, the other is called Prince George County; on the division Col. Nicholson, their Governor, claimed and insisted on, as a right, the nomination of the Clark of the new County (called Prince George) and accordingly nominated Richard Bland, gentleman. The late and present Secretarys seldom disposing of any such place without the Governor's knowledge or good liking, and being unwilling to contest in whom the right of nomination in this particular case lay, did commissionate Bland, being a person qualified for the execution of that office, and the trustee of Taylor had liberty to continue in the Clark's place of Charles City County some time. John Taylor was afterwards putt out of that office, hath now petitioned the present Governor to be restored, and to have the choice of the Clark's place of the Counties so divided, which H.E. hath thought fitt to lay before the Council. Who are of opinion that the petitioner's case deserves a favourable regard and ought in justice to have his choice of the Clarks' places. Whereas Mr. Secretary Jennings dos not seem in the least to desire to intrench or claim anything that may not of right belong to his Offices, or is not intended to be granted by the Letters Pattent to him, and that he may do right in this particular and other like cases, he humbly prays your Lordships' instruction whether, considering that the said office is granted by Letters Patents, under the Great Seal of England, to be executed by him or his deputy or deputies for whom he is and will be answerable, that he may have all the rights, immunities, profit, fees and nomination of Clarks be continued and asserted to him without the Council intermedling with the appointments of said Clarks, who are the Secretary's Deputies in the several Counties commissionated by him. If any otherwise then what the said Secretary, or his predecessour hath practised, would be the taking away the greatest part of the proffits of his office. A determination having already been made in favour of the Secretary of Maryland in the like case between Col. Copley and Sir T. Lawrence. Signed, Thomas Corbin. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 11, 1705/6., 1 large p. [C.O. 5, 1315. No. 3; and 5, 1361. pp. 426–429.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
21. W. Popple, jr., to Lt. Moody. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire you would let them have to-morrow morning an account of the trade and fishery of Newfoundland. [C.O. 195, 4. p. 86.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
22. Same to Mr. Burchett. The Council of Trade being pressed to lay their report in a day or two at furthest before the House of Commons, desire you to let me know whether you have had any answer from Commodore Bridge, etc. [C.O. 195, 4. p. 87.]
Jan. 14.
Admiralty Office.
23. Mr. Fawler to W. Popple, jr. Reply to preceding. A messenger is sent this night to Deptford to order Capt. Bridges to attend the Council of Trade and Plantations to-morrow. J. Fawler. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 15, 1705/6. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 94; and 195, 4. p. 100.]
Jan. 14.
Jamaica.
24. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letters of Oct. 29, Nov. 1 and Aug. 30. I have likewise received the enclosed scheam relating to the packett boats, which I shall cause to be set up publickly at Kingston and Spanish Town; I presume to give your Lorpps. my opinion therein, that the pacquet boats will certainly answer the designe, in case there is not too great a quantity of merchants' goods transported from England hence [? hither], and from hence to England, which, as I am informed, is already practised. If so they will be liable to be taken as well as any other vessell, and by which means a great deal of plate and boullion, as well as rich merchantable goods will fall into the enemies hands; I was informed the last packett boat took with her 30,000l. in money and plate. I gave you an account in my last of the Act [being] past for quartering the souldiers, and likewise of 5 other Acts, which I s[ent] some time agoe; but such tacking I never have heard of in any Ass[embly], and to speak plain there is no state to be made of their actions; the [Quartering] Act is but for 12 months, and that relating to Forreignors is for e[ver for] which reason and many others I hope H.M. will not give it He[r Royal] assent, but that it remain for 12 months till another Act is mad[e for] the quartering my Regiment, which I am in hopes I shall be able [to persuade] the Assembly to. Here are lately brought in by H.M.S. Reserve and Bristoll 5 sail of French merchant ships, taken off Cape Francoise laden with sugar. The Deputy Secretary, Mr. Nicholls, died here some few days agoe, and the Councill and I have appointed Mr. Alan Brodrick to succeed him, who was formerly in that post, and is a very ingenious man and ffit for it; any agreement the pattentee may make with him, I leave wholly to themselves. I have received here by this packett boat 52 recruits with my Major, a Lieut., Ensigne and Serjeant, and part of my Regiment's cloathing. I have an account from Coll. Johnson of Antegua, of advice Dec. 23, that the French at Martinico expect 30 sail of French men of war there, and that two of them were already arrived: I am of opinion it is only a French Gasconnade: but if otherwise, I doubt not but care will be taken to send an English fleet soon after them; and your Lorpps. may be assured, if their designe is against this Island, that I will to the last drop of my blood faithfully endeavour to defend the honour of H.M. Crown and dignity, and the interest of old England. Admiral Whetstone has been sickly for some time, and I am apprehensive will hardly recover his health in these parts: he writt me a letter three days agoe of his designing to bring Capt. Bennett Allen to a trial for his mismanagement with the two French ships, which I gave you an account of in my last. The Island of late has been attended with more than usuall [morta]lity, but now grows healthier. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read April 15th, 1706. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 7. No. 20; and 138, 11. pp. 444–447; and (extract) 137, 45. No. 73.]
Jan. 14.
Cockpitt.
25. Sir C. Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following, for your observations thereupon, and what you can propose to be done for the benefitt of that place. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 15, 1705/6. 1 p. Enclosed,
25. i. A relation of the most material occurrences at St. Johns and parts adjacent during the administration of Lt. John Moody, from Sept. 12, 1704—Oct., 1705. London, Jan 8, 1705–6. Complains of the disaffection of Lt. Latham and Mr. Roop. Mr. Latham was given instructions for guarding the South Castle (quoted). The inhabitants refused to keep watch in the harbour as urged by Mr. Moody. Recounts in further detail the French attempt on the Fort etc. Jan. 21, 1704/5. Blames Lt. Latham for not having removed the barrels of powder to the South Castle. Praises behaviour of the soldiers. Estimate of damage done to St. John, and the other harbours by the French—188,000l. sterl. Accounts of ravages in other harbours. Lt. Latham's insubordination continued (June). The enemy's raids continued till Aug. (details). "The season being far spent, the garrison weake, and little or no hopes of any succors from England this year, Moody thought himself bound to take some further measures for the better security of the inhabitants, their effects and provisions, and to preserve a communication between the Fort and them. In order to which, he consulted with Captains of the men of war, who readily sent him 300 seamen, who helped his soldiers to build a new fortification and palisadoed it all round. Several masters of ships and some inhabitants lent their helping hands, so that the work was finished before the arrival of Major Lloyd. Relator also represented to Commodore Bridge the bad condition of the garrison and that Relator's commands were not obeyed; he proposed repairs for the fort etc., which were also finished. Oct., 1705 Capt. Chamberlaine in the Litchfield prize and Capt. Partington, in the Anglesea arrived with Major Lloyd and a new company of foot to releive the garrison, who with the Relator sailed on Nov. 21, 1705 with the Commodore, on board H.M.S. Loo, which on Dec. 12 was cast away by the Needles and several seamen and soldiers drowned. Relator got ashore with the loss of all his effects and many of his papers, climbing up the cliffs with ropes" etc. Signed, J. Moody. 27 large closely written pp. [C.O. 194, 3. Nos. 95, 95.i.; and (without enclosure) 195, 4. p. 101.]
[Jan. 15.]26. Mr. Roope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. M. Subercasse's seizure of the harbour of St. John's, Jan. 21, 1704(5) was knowen by ye meanes of Archebald Taylour, a soldier of ye garrison yt. about sunnryseing lowered ye litle drawbridge and went out with a botle of rumm to drink with some of his consorts, but wn. he came on ye uttmost pt. of ye glacis, he saw ye enemy, who fyered on him. He allarmed the garrison. About 5 or 6 of the enemy crep up to ye top of ye gassis, and fired and killed one of our people, one of them was killed, the rest retired. Our people cleared away the snow from the guns, and yt. was all ye times yt. ye enimy was neare ye Fort. About 14 dayes after M. Subercass sent enclosed letter. The parlee proposed was held for 4 dayes and then broak off. On ye 2nd day M. Subercass forced me to write to Mr. Latham the enclosed letter, which your Lordships were informed was treasonable.
M. Subercasse nott gaineing his point, haveing found 2 barrils of powder, gott 2 sacre gunns on an hill about 300 yards from ye South side Castle, begann to cannonade ye woodwoerk thereof, and fiered on the first day about 50 shott, butt finding that he did little or no dammage, after yt. they fired butt now and then, and seeing ye sloop yt. he had ordered to come with 200 shells and an 11 inch mortar did nott appeare, nor theire fire-arrowes yt. they threw into ye South side Castle did not take (for they were nott well made) he prepared to goe offe, after haveing destroyed about 40 tunn of ye timber of ye boome etc. One Gouling, a missionary Jesuit, allways kept close to ye Indians untill they came to Ferriland etc. 'Tis said that there was an Order from the Court of France for ye expedition, for as soon as ye Charente, a King's ship, arrived att Placentia, La Vespe was with all possible speed fitted out for Quebeque and brought back about 100 Indians and Canadiens etc. and plundered Conception Bay etc. About ye beginning of July, there came to Plasentia Bay about 150 Indians of another Nation, and went immediately to disturb our fishery, and ye Governour did declare yt. our fishery should allways be disturbed, and yt. he expected a greater force, and yn. would again attempt St. Johns. Signed, John Roope. 3¼ pp. Enclosed,
26. i. Mr. Roope to Robert Latham. St. John's, Feb. 4, 1704/5. Misfortune hath made me a prisoner of war. The Governor of Plasentia was much enraged against you because there were 3 musketts fired on his fflagg of truce, butt I told him yt. itt must be donne without your knoweledge. He declareth yt. he knew nothing of ye burning of your house, butt to ye contrary, he is for makeing good anything to an officer. There is a treaty on foote between Mr. Moody and him, I think itt is about a surrender; he would nott att first heare yt. you should be conserned in ye treaty, butt now is satisfyed yt. you be. So desire you to take ye best measures yt. you cann think of etc. Signed, John Roope. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 15, 1705/6. Addressed "au Commandant du Chateau" etc. Sealed. 1 p.
26. ii. M. Subercasse to the Commanding Officer in Fort William, St. John's, Feb. 13, 1704/5. My intentions were to possess myself of ye harbour of St. Johns and of all ye other ports belonging to England, wch. by God's assistance I have donne. etc. Am willing to grant a reasonable capitulation etc. If you think of entring into a treaty, I will send you any one of the prisoners yt. you shall think fit to have with you, on your parole to return him if we cannot agree, etc. Copy. 1 p.
26. iii. Same to same. Feb. 14. "According to your desire I send Messrs Campbell and Pemberton, with whom you may consult." Desires him not to insist to have the Officer commanding the Castle on the South side amongst those that are to treat with him, he having fired on a flag of truce etc. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. Nos. 96, 96.i.–iii.; and 195, 4. pp. 88–99.]
Jan. 15.
Cockpit.
27. Mr. Secretary Hedges to Governor Sir B. Granville. In answer to yours of Oct. 22, H.M. gives you a latitude to act for ye best of her service and ye advantage of her subjects, ye poor prisoners at Martinique, in all you do for exchanging ye French men who were condemned at Barbados some years since, and for ye exchange of whom orders have been sent you, but since ye Governor at Martinique trifles with you in pretending to have ye French prisoners set at liberty, and seems to have a reserve not only to capitulate for ye exchange of H.M. subjects, but for damages to ye Fr. men so long detain'd, you are to use great caution yt. you are not tricked in that matter, in case you should set ye Fr. men at liberty as is demanded. It is not to be disputed now whether the French were justly condemned or not, the Court Martiall, who were competent judges, determined that point, and tho H.M. thought fit to remit ye punishment, that ought to be looked as an act of H.M. great goodness and clemency, for there is no question but by ye laws of war they ought to have dyed, and yt. penalty may still be executed in justice, tho' H.M. will not have it done so long after ye fact committed. Signed, C. Hedges. Holograph. 1½ pp. [C. O. 137, 51. No. 10; and 324, 30. pp. 57, 58.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
28. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. We have received inclosed Memorial. We have only to add that the Leeward Islands are very much exposed to the insults of the French, not only from their Islands intermixed with those of H.M., but in the passage of their fleets from Europe, and that in the beginning of the last warr, the regiment commanded by the Duke of Bolton did consist as sent from hence of 900 men, officers and servants included, which were afterwards reduced to the number of 500 effective private soldiers, but in what manner it shall please H.M. with regard to the other affairs now to regulate the defence of these Islands is humbly submitted, etc. Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
28. i. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Repeats Memorial of May 31, 1704, and requests the Board to lay the matter before the Queen in Council, that something may be done before the convoy sails on Feb. 10. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 15, 1705/6. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 39. Nos. 107, 107.i.; and 152, 6. No. 32; and 153, 9. pp. 288–291.]