America and West Indies
January 1706, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1916

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13-29

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'America and West Indies: January 1706, 16-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 23: 1706-1708 (1916), pp. 13-29. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73713 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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January 1706, 16-31

Jan 16.
London.
29. Mr. Jackson to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Lt. Lloyd (1704) used for trade H.M. money, put into his hands to pay the soldiers at Newfoundland, by falling the price of fish with his ready money, and buying liquors at low rates, he forced soldiers and inhabitants to buy of his sutlers at unreasonable prices, so that they became debters and slaves the next fishery season to him, for by his arbitrary power he would be paid first, and sweep their rocks of fish, not allowing an equal dividend to be made amongst the creditors. Quotes his barbarous treatment of Adams. James Benger he imprisoned because he would not pay a debt, etc. This was his frequent practice amongst his debtors, that they would run from their flakes and business as from an Indian, when they saw him coming, wch. he often did with his sword and cane in hand, threatening, if not beating, those he lighted on. When ships arrived first into the harbour he would forestall the inhabitants, and set his own rates upon goods. When Masters of ships came to demand payment therefor, he hath cavil'd with some, beat others, as Capt. Hatch, Capt. Davy, Capt. Pickering, etc., for demanding the reasonable rates they sold to others. He compelled the inhabitants to testify to his good behaviour. His return to the country this year was so amazing to most, that notwithstanding all the asseverations he made, many of the old sufficient traders and planters have left the country and business for fear he should treat 'um as formerly. He has declared that as it cost him dear to re-assume the Government, so he is resolved to repay himself etc., and now doth actually keep there Mr. Tarrant as his factor, etc. He allowed the garrison to go to ruin, the soldiers undisciplined and their sufferings intolerable. He took one Short's lawful wife into his own bed and gave her absolute power. He forced the soldiers to hire and was a mere debauched libertine, not only damn'd and cursed me, but prevented people from attending service by his immodest revellings etc. The harbour was surprised through the people following Roope's advice and not guarding it as Lt. Moody urged them to do etc. Prays to know his accusers, etc. Signed, John Jackson. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 17, 1705/6. Addressed. 8 pp. [C. O. 194, 3. No. 98; and 195, 4. pp. 130–143.]
Jan. 16.
Cockpitt.
30. Mr. Secretary Hedges to Governor Sir B. Granville. Francesco Pavia, with his wife and family, who [were] very serviceable to the English in the expedition to Cadiz, where they left all their effects, and came into England with the fleet, intending to settle in Barbadoes, H.M. has not only bestowed her royal bounty upon them to transport them thither, but also recommended them to you, that you will give them all fitting countenance and assistance, etc. Signed, C. Hedges. [C. O. 324, 30. p. 53.]
[Jan. 16.]31. Mr. Roope's account of stores necessary for completing the boom of St. Johns. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 16, 1705/6. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 97; and 195, 4. p. 103.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
32. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Sec. Hedges. Enclose following, that you may receive H.M. leave for our presenting the same to the House of Commons. Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
32. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the House of Commons. [See Dec. 21, 1705.] Quote Representation of Feb. 170½, and reports subsequently received and calendared supra concerning Newfoundland trade and fishery, and the French there. "The English that continue there yearly are dispers'd into about 30 greater harbours besides coves and other fishing places above 80 leagues distant from North to South. The English live there the whole year without any civill or military Government in all the [enumerated] harbours and coves, except St. Johns, where a Captain only his one [? own] officers and soldiers; and by reason of the distances of the habitations from each other, and the inhabitants being under no discipline, they will constantly be exposed to the incursions of the enemy, who are under strict discipline and rules of Government. … Our fishery has not of late years been so considerable as formerly, which may be imputed chiefly to the interruptions and difficulties occasioned by the War, etc. The inhabitants have not a due regard to the Act of Parliament, 1699, to encourage the trade to Newfoundland. Quote instances from Commodore's Reports given supra. For the preventing of which irregularities, we humbly offer, that a power be given, by a clause in an Act that shall be passed, to the Commanders of H.M. ships of warr, and to the Admirals of each harbour in Newfoundland, to lay fines and penalities upon offenders, not exceeding 5l. sterl., and a power of confining such offenders in case of non-payment, not exceeding 10 days; that the Commanders of H.M. ships of war may have the power of a Custome-House Officer to search the New England ships upon their coming, and to take an account of the number of their seamen and passengers and to take bond from each of the Masters, that they shall not carry away a greater number of men than they brought, which we hope would in a great measure prevent the irregularities committed by the New England traders. Repeat accounts of decrease of the fishery since the coming of the French, 1657. We cannot but conclude that whilst Placentia does remain in the hands of the French, our fishery will be under continual discouragements. This Report was delayed in hopes of the attendance of Commodore Bridge, whose ship was cast away, etc. [C.O. 195, 4. pp. 104–129; and (without enclosure) 194, 22. No. 57.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
33. Mr. Secretary Hedges to Governor Handasyde. Acknowledges letter of Nov. 20. I have laid before H.M. yr. proposall for exchanging yr. men at ye expiration of 6 years, which is approved, and if anything els could be proposed as an encouragement for those men, it would have a gracious reception. I am sorry ye Assembly has not answer'd yr. expectation in what you have pressed so much for H.M. service; their proceedings are under consideration, and by my next you may hear of ye result; at present I can only assure you H.M. is well satisfyed in yr. zeal for her service, and as a mark how much she depends on yr. care and prudent conduct, I herewith send you H.M. Instructions relating to an affair of ye greatest importance, for H.M. doubts not but yr. prudence and experience will enable you to put her commands in execution in ye best manner for carrying on ye proposed service, and therefore has not only given you a latitude as to ye time and manner of dispersing ye papers, but relies very much on your advices and conduct in the further carrying on of this design. You may observe ye promises of assistance are upon notice given how far ye Spaniards approve and are ready to co-operate with such forces as H.M. shall send, and therefore I am to desire you will be as particular and as timely in ye advices concerning all yt. is expected from hence as is possible. The printed papers contain a full account of our successes in old Spain, etc. I believe I need not trouble you with any observations on the methods taken by ye French for working themselves into ye Span. W. India trade, since they can't escape yr. observation, but since it is of consequence to have that design thoroughly insinuated to ye Spaniards, and to make them sensible of ye practices and designs of ye French for monopolising their trade, it cannot be amisse to repeat to you, by the enclosed paper, what occurs to me, tho' it may be no news to you. The Queen having been informed that Lt. Arbuthnett of Col. Livesay's Regiment in Jamaica has been condemned to dye for mutiny, and that he is since distracted, is pleased to pardon him, etc. Signed, C. Hedges. 2¾ pp. Enclosed,
33. i. H.M. Instructions for General Handasyde. St. James's, Jan. 14, 1705/6. The Kingdom of Catalonia having submitted to Charles III, and it appearing to us that there is a very good disposition in Arragon and Valentia to enter into the same measures, wee cannot but think this juncture so very proper and favourable for inviting and encouraging the Spaniards in the West Indies to shake off the French servitude, and follow the example of their friends in Old Spain, that it ought not to be neglected, as being a matter of the greatest importance to us and our allyes. In case therefore you shall find any disposition in the Spaniards in America to declare for King Charles III, you are, by all proper means, to encourage them therein, giving them assurance of assistance and protection upon the first notice that can be sent of it to Europe, and for that purpose you are to disperse the advertisement and declaration, herewith sent you, upon the coast of Hispaniola, Cuba and of the other Dominions of Spain in the Terra Firma, or elsewhere, as you shall judge best for the publication thereof, together with the letters of the King of Spain and other papers that accompany it, which you are to do at such time as you think most proper etc. And you are particularly to assure them, that in case they desire it, we shall be very ready, upon the first notice, to send them assistance both by ships and land forces, with armes and ammunition, and other necessaries to be landed at such places, and employed in such manner as may be of the greatest use for rescuing them from the yoake of France, and restoring their trade to the ancient Channel between Old and New Spain. You are also to let such as are well disposed know that King Charles III, their natural Sovereign, is taking measures for sending with all expedition to the principall parts of the West Indies succours of naturall Spaniards with Military and Civil Officers for their assistance and the good government of those parts in his own Royal name, and is likewise providing for the Ecclesiastical Government in the manner accustomed. You are, from time to time, to give a particular account to one of our Principal Secretaries of all you shall do in this matter, and what progress you make, and how you find the Spaniards disposed, and also whether they are willing to receive any of our forces and joyn with them, and what assistance they want, and what time and place they expect them. Signed, A. R.
33. ii. An account of the French monopolizing the Spanish West India Trade. It having been the chief aim of the French in possessing themselves of Spain, to make themselves masters of the West India trade, M. du Casse, who has lived about 30 years upon Hispaniola, near the Spaniards, and had used the profession of buchaneering, became well acquainted with the interests and practices of the Spaniards in the West Indies, and made himself first well known to the Court of France upon the occasion of Pointy's expedition to Carthagena, wherein they had great disputes about the plunder. Soon after, the late King of Spaine dying, Du Casse persuaded the King of France to take to himself the direction of the Assiento, or farme of the negroes, that is so absolutely necessary for the trade and subsistence of the Spanish West Indies, which was thereupon divided into 3 shares, one to the King of France, one to King Philip, and the other third to Du Casse and his associates, French and Spaniards. By this contract the French have liberty to carry negroes to the Spanish West Indies in their own ships, and with all sorts of provisions and other necessaries for their trade, and also to bring back in the same ships directly to France, all sorts of Spanish effects, gold and silver, cochenil etc., as the price of their negroes, and under that pretence everything they can purchase or gett credit for, which never having been before allowed of to any forreign Nation, nor to the Spaniards themselves otherwise than in the Flota and Galeons with some inconsiderable exception, the Galeons and Flota are become almost useless, or are at least made so by the French, who choose rather to bring home the Treasure of the Indies in their own men of war and merchant ships, than to entrust it to the Spanish fleets, which are not only apt by the formality and stated times of their sailing to fall into our hands, but being obliged to come to Cales, or at least to be subject to the orders of the Contratation house, or Councill of Merchants at Seville, for a proper distribution of the effects to all the parts of Spain, the French cannot divert them so conveniently to their own profitt and purposes, nor furnish the Indies so well with their own native commodities as directly from France, which is the occasion, that all possible means are used by the French, and M. du Casse in particular, to hinder the going out of the Galeons and Flotta, as it is now said the Spanish Court has been perswaded at present to putt a stop to them for this year, which being on the one hand very injurious to the Spaniards, as well in Spain as in their American Dominions, and very advantageous to the French, there is no doubt but this prohibition will cause very great discontents (more than any other thing can do) in Spain, as also in the Spanish West Indies, so on the other hand it will be very proper to make this design and contrivance of the French well known and understood in the Indies, to provoke them to a revolt, to which they are otherwise sufficiently inclined, since by such embargo the inhabitants of those parts must be reduced to the greatest necessities by the want of means of subsistence, as well as of a vent of the produce of their labours and estates, unless they will submitt to be further imposed upon in the prizes of all sorts of goods and effects by this Monopoly of the French, instead of their former correspondencies and dealings with their own factors and countrymen of Old Spain. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 54–60; and (without enclosure ii.) 137, 51. Nos. 9, 9. i.ii.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
34. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. We have considered a collection of the Laws of Pennsylvania passed by Mr. Penn there in 1700 and 1701. We concur with the objections of the Attorney General to several [quoted. See C.S.P., 1704, No. 604]. We have likewise examined all the other Laws aforementioned with relation to the good Government of that Province and the due regulation of trade, and do find divers reasons for your Majesties disallowing and repealing several (annexed. See C.S.P., 1705, No. 1278.i.). As to the others, we have no objections, so that in case your Majesty do not see cause within 6 months from their being now delivered to your Majesties Privy Councill to repeal any of them, they will remain in full force pursuant to the Charter of Propriety. Annexed,
34. i. List of the Laws of Pennsylvania, 1700 and 1701. See C.S.P., 1704, No. 604, and Acts. [C.O. 5, 1291. pp. 254–295.]
Jan. 18.35. Sir T. Laurence to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The Law lately passed in Maryland for taking away the benefit of the ordinary licences from the Secretary is in a particular manner intituled a petitionary Law humbly offered to H.M. for her assent. The Secretary prays that directions may go to the Governor that the profits arising may be kept in bank till H.M. pleasure be known. Mr. Wm. Bladen is Clark of the Council and Clerk of the Council in Assembly, for which he is allowed 12,000lb. tobacco for each etc. He keeps those offices distinct from the Secretary's Office, but hath formerly and now lately charged ye Secretary for copies of Journals of Councils in Assembly sent to this Board, under pretence that one Journal of Council in each Assembly is delivered into the Secretary's Office to be kept among the Records of that office. The Secretary prays that Mr. Bladen, who hath the sole advantage, may be obliged to deliver to him or his Deputy the copies and duplicates of such Journals of Council in Assembly as are to be examin'd by him and to be sent by him to this Board, and that it may be declared to be his duty so to do. Signed, Tho. Laurence. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 18, 1705/6. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 716. No. 5; and 5, 726. pp. 363–365.]
Jan. 18.
St. James's.
36. Order of Queen in Council. The Appeal of George Lillington (Dec. 13, 1705) is admitted etc. See Acts of Privy Council, II. p. 493. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 12, 1705/6. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 9. No. 33; and 29, 10. pp. 32, 33.]
Jan. 18.
St. James's.
37. Order of Queen in Council. The fine of 2,000l. is to be repaid to Mr. Lillington, until his appeal be determined. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 28, 9. No. 34; and 29, 10. pp. 34, 35.]
Jan. 18.38. Mr. Jackson to Sir C. Hedges. Duplicate of No. 29. [C.O. 194, 22. No. 58.]
Jan. 19.39. Lt. Moody to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Answer to Major Lloyd, Nov. 21, 1705. He alleges there were 29 men wanting in the Company. There were but 23 as appears by the muster-roll. The provisions belonging to them will not near make up those supplied to the inhabitants and deserters during the siege, for which I demanded payment, but received none. I hope the sufferings of the soldiers will indeed be inquired into. Neither I nor they have received either cloaths or one farthing subsistance since Mr. Lloyd's suspension. Mr. Huxford, the storekeeper, is accountable for the stores. Signed, J. Moody. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 21, 1705/6. 1 large p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 99; and 195, 4. pp. 152–155.]
Jan. 19.
Philadia. in the Prov. of Pensylvania.
40. Lt. Governor Evans to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to letter of Nov. 9, 1705. The annual Assembly of this Province has a few days agoe ended their first sessions, having first agreed to a considerable number of Acts, partly such as were excepted against by the Attor. Genll., and the rest such new ones as the country seem'd to stand in need of. Copies shall be sent as soon as transcribed. Of these, two have given me the greatest concern. (1) An Act directing the qualifications of officers etc. Att my arrival in this Province I found H.M. Order of Council as to officers taking oaths or the affirmation [quoted. See C. S. P. 1703. No. 219]. To this a due obedience was generally paid thro' out the Govermt., and has been so ever since. But there arose upon it one difficulty which made many of the people very uneasy, wch. was that tho' the Quakers were by the sd. Order allowed to be in office, yett seeing they cannot administer an oath with any more ffreedom than they can take one, so in such cases where a Magistrate is not present that can administer one, (as in cases cognizable before one Justice only etc.), it must often happen that it would inevitably occasion a failure of Justice if nothing but a direct oath should be allow'd to passe. Refers to Minutes of Council and Address of Assembly enclosed. As her sacred Majesties Orders shall alwayes with me have the uttmost force and efficacy of a Law, so I proceeded with the greatest tendernesse and caution upon it, But finding the Country would by no means be satisfied or the Assembly depart, or at least agree to anything of what importance soever unlesse they could have that piece of regard shewn to the exigencies of their circumstances, which they said so loudly call'd for it, and which could scarce by any be interpreted to interfere or clash with H.M. Order when reasonably expounded. I prevail'd with them, however, to allow a sufficient time in the Act before it should be in force to know H.M. pleasure therein that notwithstanding the Bill had the sanction off an Act here, yett nothing should be done by it till such time as H.M., if found repugnan [t] to Her Royal pleasure, might lay her commands upon me etc., for the Act takes not place till Sept. 20, 1706, which I told them was the uttmost and last point I could possibly strain to. What in no small measure prevail'd on me to agree to this Bill so far as I have done was, that it does really very much exceed what could be expected from an Assembly of this Province at this time on this Head, for oaths according to ye Queen's Order are therein allow'd (as far as these people can expresse themselves upon that point) to all such as are willing to take them, if there be any magistrate present that can administer them, as in ye Courts of Justice there will or may be always such, but in case of private Magistrates it may sometimes be otherwise, and where an oath cannot be taken, (that is where a propper officer is not present to administer one), there the affirmation according to the Law of England must, which by all mankind that consider it, is judged to be very obligatory and binding and very sollemn. The only difference, then, between H.M. Order and this Act consists in that difficulty wch. I have mentioned before. Notwithstanding it's very probable that some here may raise objections, wch. if they do will be no more than is too common in these parts, from some or other upon everything that passes. I have used ye most tender regard possible to H.M. Order, and because this seem'd not fully in all points to come up to the sd. Order, therefore I endeavour'd intirely to divert it etc. Prays for directions. (2) For the second [Act] about the money, it is with no small regrett I have observ'd H.M. Proclamation so little complied with, but it was impossible for me to force it while the Govmts. arround us take no notice of it, N. York being of so much more note and more immediately having the happiness of being under H.M. Directions than the adjacent Colonies will always serve for a precedent in such cases, and their example very much lead their neighbours. All I can say to this Act is, that the People very much press'd for a better Regulation, and yett till N. York and others began, could not be induc'd to fall in with ye Proclamation. Observing this, I was of opinion that such an Act as this, reducing all weights to one certain common value, would the most of anything facilitate ye practise of H.M. Proclamation, whenever orders should come (upon ye present generall neglect) more effectually to putt it in force thro'out ye Continent. And therefore I agreed that such a Bill should be drawn up and pass'd, which because it is of such general use I caus'd to be printed etc. In accordance with H.M. Proclamation, signified in a letter sign'd William Popple, jr., I have caused a Thanksgiving to be duely solemnised; tho' I was att a losse to know by whose Order it was sent, that being not mentioned in the least, and the Gentleman a stranger intirely. In cases of this nature, a Govmt. would act upon sure grounds, etc. etc. Signed, John Evans. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read June 17th, 1706. 8 pp. Enclosed,
40. i. Representatives of the Province of Pennsylvania to Lt. Governor Evans, in favour of the Bill relating to oaths, referred to in preceding. 11th 11 mo. 1705/6. Signed, Jos. Growdon, Speaker. Endorsed as preceding. 1¾ pp.
40. ii. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Pennsylvania upon a Conference concerning the Bill relating to oaths. Signed, James Logan, Sec. Same endorsement. 6 pp.
40. iii. Printed copy of Act of Pennsylvania proportioning the rates of money. 1 p.
40. iv. Copy of an Act of Pennsylvania, directing the qualifications of all Magistrates and Officers and the manner of giving evidence. Endorsed as above. 3¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1263. Nos. 114, 114.i.–iv.; and (without enclosures) 5, 1291. pp. 399–407.]
[Jan. 21.]41. Merchants of Bideford trading to Newfoundland, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. For many years past petitioners have sent 40 to 50 ships a fishing voyage to Feryland. The French and Indians have no less than three times the last year destroyed all they could not carry away from thence. Pray that a fort may be erected there and a man of war be sent to Milford by Feb. 20 to convoy their fleet and protect them till the fort be finished. 13 signatures. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 21, 1705/6. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 100; and 195, 4. pp. 156–159.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
42. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. We have received a Memorial from Lt. Moody (Jan. 14), wherein he sets forth the faithfull services of the soldiers lately returned from Newfoundland, and their sufferings. And they being at present at Portsmouth, wee do propose that Sir John Gibson, Lt. Governour of that Garrison, may have directions to examine them touching proceedings there; and also to give his opinion on preceding memorial, he having formerly commanded in Newfoundland. [C.O. 195, 4. pp. 159, 160.]
Jan. 21.
Cockpitt.
43. Mr. Secretary Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers back the Address of the Assembly of Virginia, complaining against Col Quary. You are to report how you find the fact, and what may be fit for H.M. to do in it. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 22, 1705/6. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1315. No. 4; and 5, 1361. p. 430.]
Jan. 22.
Barbados.
44. Governor Sir B. Granville to the Council of Trade and Plantations. This pacquet boat brings me no commands etc. Encloses Minutes of Council, Acts and Naval Officers' Accounts. We have here a very strong report of a considerable French squadron expected dayly at Martinique, it is to consist, they say, of upwards of 30 men of war, some fireships and bomb vessels. Signed, Bevill Granville. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read April 15th, 1706. Holograph. 1 p. Enclosed,
44. i. List of ships entered and cleared at Barbados, June 25—Sept. 24, 1705. For England 28; for the Plantations, 38. Sept. 25–Dec. 24. For England 1, for the Plantations 56. Cargoes of sugar, rum, mellossoes, cotton, limejuice, ginger, alloes. Same endorsement. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 9. Nos. 37, 37.i.,ii.; and 29, 10. pp. 42–45; and (extract from letter) 28, 38. No. 43.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
45. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Enclose following to be laid before H.M. Annexed,
45. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Upon examination of the Address of the Assembly of Virginia [No. 43] we find the same is chiefly intended to lay before your Majesty a complaint against Col. Quary, as if he had insinuated to us that nothing less than your Majesty's displeasure backed with an armed force would be sufficient to restrain your subjects in that Province in their duty to your Majesty. The said Address was occasioned by a letter writ by Mr. Robert Beverly, an inhabitant of Virginia then in England to the Assembly of that Colony, in which he incloses copies of letters pretending that they were writ by Quary to us, upon which the Assembly proceeded to make the said Address without hearing Col. Quary, he being then imployed in your Majesty's service at New York, and having no opportunity of justifying himself at the drawing up the said Address. We never did receive any letter from Col. Quary, containing such words or expressions as are recited in the Address, and upon perusal of the Address we do not find that the words or expressions alledged against Quary, if they had been used by him, can by any fair construction bear such a meaning or interpretation as the Assembly of Virginia put upon them. We further humbly represent, that what hath been done herein by Beverly tends to the fomenting of divisions and jealousies amongst your Majesties subjects in Virginia and may be prejudicial to your Majesties service by the malicious aspersions cast on the chief officer of your Majesty's Customs and a member of your Council there, and we are humbly of opinion that letters be writ to your Majesty's Governor of Virginia, directing him to lay this matter before the Assembly, that it may appear to them that the said Address was made upon a misrepresentation by Beverly, and that the reputation of Col. Quary may be vindicated. Autograph signatures. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1341. No. 1; and 5, 1361. pp. 430–433.]
Jan. 23.46. Mr. Thurston to W. Popple. Encloses following to be laid before the Board. Signed, J. Thurston. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 25, 1705/6. 1 p. Enclosed,
46. i. List of necessaries, pay and clothing for the soldiers at Newfoundland, 1706. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. Nos. 101, 101.i.; and 195, 4. pp. 161, 162.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
47. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Summarize report of Commissioners on the complaint of the Mohegans. Col. Dudley declaring his doubts whether the Government [of Connecticut] will comply with their sentence, we humbly offer that your Majesty by your Order in Council signify your approbation of the same, that all persons whom it may concern may render all due obedience thereunto. [C.O. 5, 912. pp. 111–113.]
Jan. 24.
Cockpitt.
48. Mr. Sec. Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to No. 42. I desire you will lett me know the particular heads you would have the soldiers examined upon, that I may send directions accordingly. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 25, 1705/6. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 103; and 195, 4. p. 169.]
Jan. 24.49. Lt. Moody to Wm. Popple. Encloses following to to be laid before the Board. Signed, J. Moody. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 25, 1705/6. ½ p. Enclosed,
49. i. Certificate by officers and soldiers of Lt. Moody's Company, testifying to his bravery and good discipline, etc. Mr. Latham was disobedient and did not set a good example to the garrison of St. John's. Portsmouth, Jan. 3. 3¼ pp. [C.O. 194, 3. Nos. 102, 102.i.; and 195, 4. pp. 163–168.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
50. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Sec. Hedges. Reply to No. 48. We desire that the soldiers be examined upon the following queries:—(1) How many were in garrison when Capt. Lloyd came from Newfoundland. (2) How many immediately before his return. (3) How many arrived with him. (4) How many of those men now at Portsmouth were officers during the seige, and returned by Capt. Lloyd as private soldiers. (5) Whether any of them, during his command, and how many, were forced out of the fishery. (6) What advantage accrued to him by it, and how much to them. Sir John Gibson may ask them such other questions as he may judge proper. [C.O. 195, 4. pp. 170, 171.]
Jan. 25.51. Order of the House of Lords, that the Council of Trade and Plantations produce documents, concerning following petition, enumerated, House of Lords MSS. VI. pp. 371–373. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 28, 1705/6. 3½ pp. Enclosed,
51. i. John Lesley, Thomas Maxwell and John Kirton to the House of Lords. Their grievances against Governor Sir B. Granville are increased. Pray to be heard before their Lordships. Copy. 2½ pp. Set out, House of Lords MSS. VI. pp. 363, 364.
51. ii. Particulars of the grievances mentioned in preceding. Signed, Jno. Kirton. 11¼ pp. Set out, House of Lords MSS. VI. pp. 367–371. [C.O. 28, 9. Nos. 29, 29.i., ii.; and (without enclosure i) 29, 10. pp. 1–6.]
Jan. 26.52. Mr. Thurston to Mr. Popple. Major Lloyd demands about 70l. out of the growing off-reckonings of the Company at Newfoundland, to re-imburse him what he alledges to have layd out upon the men he took over with him from the Lord Paston's Regiment, when, for the cloaths and accoutrements he had along with 'em thence, the officers of that Regiment are found to ask no less than 274l. 10s. from the same fund. As the case thus stands, it is impossible to find out any man that will undertake the cloathing that is proposed to be now sent, for that by so great an anticipation, such new cloathing cannot begin to be payd for almost 2 years. Signed, J. Thurston. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 28, 1705/6. Holograph. 2 pp. Enclosed,
52. i. Account of the cloathing of the Company at St. Johns. A full cloathing one year, and small necessaries the next has been the method observed all along until the last year, when, instead of a full cloathing, they had only I surtout, I pair of shoes, I pair of stockings, I shirt and I neckcloth, occasioned cheifly by the Comptrollers of the Army allowing 92l. out of that year's off-reckonings for satisfying part of the demand of Capt. Lloyd, etc. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. Nos. 107, 107.i.; and 195, 4. pp. 180–183.]
Jan. 27.
Caroliner.
53. R. Oglethorp to Mr. Secretary Hedges. An account of persons trading with pirates. Peeter Smith in St. Thomas', ye greatest mearchant there, and being a Deane [=Dane] sworne did trade with Capt. Kidd. Smith supplies the French at Martinicoe all this warr; they likewise doe at St. Thomas harbour all piratts, and some that are noated, Dudley Rayner, one of Kidd's men, Jeffrey Edwards, Edward Woodman, etc. Itt is not a plaice to be suffered, for any piratt for a smale matter of money may bee naterlised Deane, then they may trade amongst ye French and Spanyard all this warr, which they dayly carry news and stores. In these parts this is a pretection, being sworn Deanes. Capt. Tempest Rogers, yt. maid yt. grate voyage with Capt. Kidd a trayding yt. kept him in St. Thomas, and he was a sworne Deane, and since dyed amongst ye French a trayding with them and ye said Smith, as all that he left in his hands, which is considerable. There is one Jno. King att St. Christopher yt. as gott a grate estate by trayding with piratts, and stands indebted to Rogers on his books. Capt. Rogers his Doctor lives att St. Christophers, which can give a true account of ye hole viage. Capt. George Leonard, Governour of Anguila, trayded with Rogers and lay att anchor aboute 20 dayes, and he knowing ye goods he bought to be some of Capt. Kidd's. Capt. Kidd's boate was ashore att Anguila and Kidd lay att anchor thaire aboute fower houers. Leonard stands indebted to Rogers 300 ps. of eiaght. Capt. Charles Collihorne, that lives att Antigua, went to Crab Island and traded with Rogers for a considerable bales of Kidd's goods, which he has made a plentifull estate in Antigua, and owes Capt. Rogers, by his books, 2586 ps. of eiaght. Jno. Lucas, that lives in Antigua, went to St. Thomas, and did macke up account wth. Capt. Rogers, he being Attorney for ye owners in London, and was paid to a penny and did give a discharge in full in behalfe of ye owners, which is contrary to law, when he knew what he was, etc. Lucas being a Justice at that time, Capt. Rogers drew a bill on Capt. Collihorne, which was excepted of Mr. Lucas, etc. Here is severall more yt. I can give your Honour an account of, if you please to send for mee home, etc. Thaire is one Capt. Emanul. Mannassus Gillingam and one Capt. Derrydoe and others yt. have a St. Thomas his pass, and thay goe from thence to Curacao and tacke in negroes and dry goods and trayde to ye French Islands and Spanyards, etc. Signed, Rich. Oglethorp. Addressed. Postmark (v/7). 2¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 382. No. 9.]
[Jan. 27.]54. Lt. Moody to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In answer to your letter of Jan. 25, I was in hopes that Mr. Lloyd and Mr. Latham had given you particulars, but give you my opinion. The Fort at St. Johns hath little of regularity, being built foursquare without any bastion, soe that the whole curtine is exposed, and wee cant see any part of the ditch from corner to corner, and alsoe the parapet is too low, soe yt. the men upon the ramparts are not covered. I was forced to fix planks and throw up earth to cover them, and also to make long wooden troughs for carrying bombshells and granadoes to secure the ditch during the attack. The platformes are all out of order and deficient, carriages of the guns were mostly rotten; the place for the magazine is too slight; the walls of the fort are only of loose earth palisadoed, and apt to fall doune into the ditch, which is neither broad nor deep enough, and dry. There are two riseings grounds within half a pistol shot where the enemy did come undiscovered, and place themselves without the reach of our guns and lie firing. They ought to be levelled, as also some rising grounds in the place we ordered to build the New Towne in to make the ground sloping, so as to be under the guns of the Fort. The scituation of the Fort is bad, there being hills on the W. and E., but there is not a spot in the Harbour but what are lyable to the same inconveniences, if not more. The Castle is small, but stronger than the Fort, and very useful against ships coming in, and is most exposed by a foolish platform a little above it, where the enemy may come without the reach of any gun, and they very much annoy the Castle. The North Battery is of noe use, the men being soe exposed to the enemy's fire, that they cannot stand by a gun. The Houses, barracks and arms are very much out of repair, the two first by the Gentleman's refusing to do it under whose care it was, and the last for want of armourers and materials. And alsoe there is a very great want of fire; ships going there should be oblidged to carry coals for ballast. I cannot tell what necessaries are wanting, etc. Signed, J. Moody. Endorsed, Recd. 27th, Read Jan. 28th, 1705/6. 2 pp. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 104; and 195, 4. pp. 172–175.]
[Jan. 28.]55. Mr. Roope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Describes his difficulties in fixing the boom at St. John's, and his hardships and losses when carried away prisoner to Placentia. Prays for consideration of his case. Signed, John Roope. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 28, 1705/6. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 106; and 195, 4. pp. 176–180.]
Jan. 28.56. Mr. Roope's Memorial to Committee of the House of Commons. Complains of the encroachments of the French on the Newfoundland Fishery and the debauching of the fishermen and inhabitants with rum brought in by the Amerricans. Copy. 3 pp. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 105.]
Jan. 28.
Speaker's Chambers.
57. Order of the Committee of the House of Commons appointed to consider of the trade to Newfoundland. The Council of Trade and Plantations to produce Capt. Moody's Journal, complaints against Major Lloyd and Capt. Moody, papers delivered by Mr. Campbell and Merchants of London, etc. etc. supra. Signed, Wm. Clayton. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 31, 1705/6. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 108; and 195, 4. pp. 183, 184.]
[Jan. 28.]58. Sir H. Ashhurst to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays for copies of complaints against Connecticott by Governor Lord Cornbury and Gov. Dudley, and of the Report on the Mohegans. Signed, Hen. Ashhurst. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 28, 1705/6. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1263. No. 58.]
Jan. 28.
St. James's.
59. The Queen to Governor Lord Cornbury. Whereas we are given to understand that great abuses have been committed in our Plantations in matters relating to prizes, to the end therefore that all such abuses in the management of the said prizes may be discovered, and the like for the future better prevented etc., we do hereby strictly charge you to interpose with your authority and advice in all differences arising between the Agents appointed for the management of prizes and the Captains of our ships of war, and others concerned, who shall make application to you in our Province of New Yorke, as likewise in an especiall manner to be aiding and assisting unto James and Hercules Coutter, who are appointed Agents there, etc. As also to transmit unto our High Treasurer exact accounts concerning prizes from time to time, etc. Countersigned, C. Hedges.
A like letter to Governor Nott, mutatis mutandis, in favour of James Walker, Agent for Prizes in Virginia. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 66, 67.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
60. W. Popple, jr., to the Clerk of the Council. Desires an account of the Council Days, March 2, 1704/5—July 20. [C.O. 29, 10. p. 7.]
Jan. 29.61. An account of the Council Days as above. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 29, 1705/6. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 9. No. 30; and 29, 10. p. 8.]
Jan. 29.
Antigua.
62. Lt. Governor Johnson to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Itt has beene a custome in these Islands ever since a Pattent was granted for the office of a Provost Marshall for the Pattentee by himself or Deputy to find a man alwayes to attend the commandes of the Governours of the respective Islands, and the Commander in Cheife in whichsoever of the Islands he happens to be, and to carry packetts and letters to him whenever they arive, but such an height of insolence are some men arived to, depending I presume on the originall Patentee's favor, who generally is some great man at home, that the Deputy Provost Marshall of this Island the other day, when was in the country, absolutely refus'd to bring to me two packetts which came in two express boates from Leeward, giving account of some designes the enemy had of attacking these Islands, and of their expecting 30 sayle of men of war to that end, arrogantly declaring that whatever former customes and usages had been he minded not, nor would he be at the trouble of carrying or sending letters or packetts to any Governor whatever; for which unbecoming behaviour and failures of his duty, I thought fitt to suspend him from his office, till H.M. pleasure be knowne. This I thought myself obliged (my Lords) to acquaint you, not doubting your approbation thereof, as also that the authority of such an officer is variously disputed and exercised in these parts, in many things pretending to the power of Shrieves in England, which I pray your Lordshipps will take into consideration, so as that by a declaration of their authority a period may be putt to the many disputes which daily arrise concerning the same, to the ease, safety and satisfaction of the inhabitants. Signed, Jon. Johnson. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read April 15th, 1706. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 6. No. 40; and 153, 9. pp. 328, 329; and (extract) 152, 39. No. 108.]
Jan. 29.
Cockpitt.
63. Mr. Secretary Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Enquires whether there is any objection to orders being given to the Governors of Virginia and Maryland in accordance with following petition. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 1, 1705/6. 1 p. Enclosed,
63. i. Merchants trading to Virginia and Maryland to the Queen. Pray that no embargo may be put upon such merchant ships as may be left behind the convoy due to sail from Virginia, June 15, many of that fleet being but lately gone, and some still to go etc. 31 signatures. [C.O. 5, 1315. Nos. 5, 7; and 5, 1361. pp. 433–435.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
64. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Committee of the House of Lords. Enclose papers ordered Jan. 25, and explain why they delayed presenting their report on Barbados till July 20, 1705, and recapitulate procedure of last year in that matter, and Minutes of Council of Trade. [C.O. 29, 10. pp. 9–23.]
Jan. 31.65. List of papers relating to Newfoundland presented by the Council of Trade and Plantations to the House of Commons. [See Jan. 28.] 6 pp. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 109.]
Jan. 31.
St. James's.
66. The Queen to Governor Nott. In behalf of Col. Quary, Quotes Representation on Address from the Assembly of Virginia. of which, "We are graciously pleased to approve. And it is our will and pleasure that you lay this whole matter before our Assembly there, that it may appear to them that ye said Address was made upon a misrepresentation by Robert Beverly, whereby the reputation of Col. Quary, our officer, may be vindicated. Wee cannot but on this occasion lett you know that as wee shall be always ready to receive ye just complaints of our subjects there, and give them redress therein, so on the contrary wee do expect that you do discourage as much as may be all such as shall be groundless, and tend only to ye fomenting divisions amongst our subjects, and such as shall be employed in our service there, etc. Countersigned, C. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 68–70.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
67. Mr. Sec. Hedges to Governor Nott. Acknowledges letter of Sept. 22, with journals of transactions at Virginia. They are under the consideration of the Committee of Trade. You will have severall of H.M. letters for Members to be of the Councill, as recommended by the Committee of Trade; when you are setled, you will best judge of the persons who are fitt for that honor, and I should be glad to have your thoughts of them from time to time, not doubting but your chief regard will be for H.M. interest. I thank you for remembering the particular persons I mentioned to you, etc. Signed, C. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 60, 61.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
68. Same to Sir Wm. Whetstone. Your letter of July 18 did not come to hand before 25th inst. I immediately laid it before the Queen, who was extreamly well satisfied with the account you give of the good inclinations of the Spaniards in America, and approves of the good treatment you have shewed them, and the encouragement you have given them, and the endeavours you use for improving their trade and correspondence with Jamaica. You are desired to continue those good offices, and if you find them inclined to shake off the French yoke, and declare for King Charles, it is a matter of that consequence that I believe they will not want for any assistance and support from hence, whenever it shall be known that they will receive it, and co-operate with such forces as H.M. shall send. I hope therefore you will from time to time lett me know how they are disposed to embrace the interest of K. Charles III, with your opinion what may be necessary to be done from hence to encourage and support them in such an attempt, and what may be the most proper season for it. Signed, C. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 61, 62.]