America and West Indies
February 1706, 16-28

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1916

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52-62

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'America and West Indies: February 1706, 16-28', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 23: 1706-1708 (1916), pp. 52-62. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73715 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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February 1706, 16-28

Feb. 16.114. Affidavit of soldiers in Town lately arrived from Newfoundland, as to Capt. Lloyd's mulcting them of their pay, trading in H.M. stores, violent behaviour, Sabbath-breaking etc. See March 29. 5 signatures. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 26, 1705/6. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 125.]
Feb. 16.115. House of Commons to the Queen. Pray that orders may be given for timely convoys to Newfoundland in detail. See Commons' Journal, Feb. 16, 1705/6. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 21, 1705/6. Copy. 1½ pp. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 119.]
Feb. 16.
Jamaica.
116. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letter of Oct. 29. I shall serve Mr. Dummer to the uttermost of my power, but as to his packettboats, I am apprehensive there is a great mismanagement in loading them too deep, through which means I am of opinion the Barbadoes miscarried: she ran ashoar on the Island of Heniagoe, Dec. 28, on her voyage to England, as I have an account by the Capt., who arrived here two days since with all his men except his Lieut. and Chief Mate, in a small barke they made of the rack of the packett-boat, after she was cast ashore, and coming back to Jamaica with the mail and what mony was shipt on board the packett-boat, which I am informed was a very considerable summ, were taken by a French privateer, who plundered them of their money (the mail being thrown overboard) took the Lieut. and Chief Mate, and lett the Captain and the rest of his men go. The goods they saved on the Island they were cast away, and Mr. Dummer's Agent, Mr. Wood, and other persons concerned, are fitting out a sloop from hence to fetch them, the goods being of very great value. We have an account from the Windward Islands, of great preparations the French are making at Martineco, as it is supposed either to attack this Island or some other of H.M. Colonies in these parts, they having called in their privateers, some ships are arrived from France, and more are daily expected, the number of them I cannot yet learn, or what forces they may have on board, but by a letter from Curasao to a merchant here, I have advice that 4 French men of war are arrived at Tobago, with 300 souldiers on board each etc. If their designe is on this Island, I shall take all possible care to put every thing in as good a posture of defence as we are capable of, etc., as Jan. 16. I shall be obliged to lay an imbargo on all vessells after the packett boat is sailed, till we have a further account of what the enemies' designe is. Our men of war here are almost ready to go to sea, but are in great want of men, and I am affraid if shipping does not come in, I shall be obliged to press men on the Island to supply them. The two additional Companys for my Regiment are not yet arrived; and we still want 150 men to compleat our Companys, 70 men each according to the establishment, which I hope your Lops., since we are so threatened, will take care we are supply'd with. Encloses deposition of Dr. Ogle, physician to the fleet, by which your Lops. will be informed of such hardships, as I never have met withall, and likewise my proceedings therein. Prays for the Board's favour and protection on behalf of myself and Regiment, that neither I as a Collonel may loose my post in the army, nor my Regiment its cors. My Commission as Brevett Coll. bears date June 28, 1701, and that for the Regiment June 20, 1702, by which I believe I am now an old Collonell. One of our privateers having taken a Spanish advice boat two days since, I send the most material letter that was found on board translated into English. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read 15th April, 1706. 2 pp. Enclosed,
116. i. Letter from a merchant at Cadiz, Dec. 20, to a correspondent at La Vera Cruz referred to in preceding. Our King hath not wherewith to pay one soldier etc. Complains of taxation etc. Same endorsement. 1 p.
116. ii. Letter from a correspondent at Curacoa to Mr. Gautier in Jamaica. Feb. 17, 1706. There is an imbargoe laid here because there is daily expected at Martinique 16 men of war and 4 briganteens laden with provisions and ammunition, wch. are fitting out at Rochefort. This news came by 4 ships of war arrived at Tobago, each with 300 soldiers. The expedition is said to be against this Island and Jamaica etc. Same endorsement. 1 p.
116. iii. (a) Copy of Deposition of Dr. Ogle. Jamaica, Jan. 30, 1705/6. Capt. Jemisson, in company with Sir W. Whetstone, Capt. Allen and deponent, said that the Governor told him there was an affidavit sent home agt. him. Capt. Allen replied there would a great many affidavits go home agt. the Governor of his arbitrary and unjust proceedings, and that he was a rascall and a villain, had neither honour nor honesty, and that he would prove when he gott home etc., etc. Signed, Nicholas Ogle. Subscribed,
(b) I must confess I was dissatisfied at Capt. Allen's misbehaviour in running away from the two French merchant ships, of 46 guns worth 100,000,000 of livres, the other of 26 men with 100 barrills of indigo and a great deal of money, and wrote my opinion to Admiral Whetstone, etc., which I suppose was the occasion of his speaking such scandalous words behind my back. But I thank God nobody ever dared to say so to my face, or justify it. The Magistrate by whom the deposition was taken immediately issued out a warrant for the apprehending of Capt. Allen, he being then ashore. But as soon as I had notice of his barbarous usage of me, I went on board the Montague to decide the matter as a man of honour ought to do, where I found Capt. Allen in such a submissive posture, that if he had killed my father, I could not have drawn my sword agt. him. He made reparation as follows. Signed, Tho. Handasyd.
(c) I heartily beg pardon for any words or actions by me said or done against H.E. etc. Signed, B. Allen. Jan. 31, 1705/6. Copies. Same endorsement. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 7. Nos. 21, 21, i.–iii; and (without enclosures) 138, 11. pp. 448–453; and (extract of covering letter and duplicate of No. iii.) 137, 45. Nos. 74, 74.i.]
Feb. 16.
Jamaica.
117. Governor Handasyd to Mr. Secretary Hedges. I am honoured with yours of Nov. 29, etc. I shall take particular care that the Spaniards have as much notice of [our glorious success in Catalonia] as possible, who I find generally very well inclined to King Charles' interest, except such as are in great imployments with French officers, who are as spys over them in all their actions. Repeats parts of preceding letter. The Island is at present healthy again, but has been attended with great mortality. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, R. May 21. 1½ large pp. [C.O. 137, 45. No. 75.]
Feb. 18.118. Mr. Bridger to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Mr. Heathcote (Feb. 4) barely asserts every particular without any proof or explanation. I do, with the result of my own experience, say it is impossible, and he cannot performe any one thing he aims at, etc. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 18, 1705/6. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 7; and 5, 1120. p. 412.]
Feb. 18.
Cockpitt.
119. Mr. Sec. Hedges to Governor Nott. You are to permit merchants' ships to sail from Virginia after the departure of the convoy, without being embargoed there, in case a second convoy be not sent to bring them away in Sept. Signed, C. Hedges. Similar letter, mutatis mutandis, to the Governor of Maryland. [C.O. 324, 30. p. 71.]
Feb. 18.
Cock Pitt.
120. Sir C. Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The House of Commons having given leave for a Bill to be brought in relating to the Proprietary and Charter Governments in America, I send you a draught of what has been prepared for that purpose for your observations thereon. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 19, 1705/6. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1263. No. 62; and 5, 1291. p. 323.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
121. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Return preceding Act with some alterations. We do not determine whither the last clause may not too much restrain H.M. Prerogative. Annexed,
121. i. Amended Draught of Bill for the better regulation of Charter and Proprietary Governments in America and for the encouragement of the trade of this Kingdom and of H.M. Plantations. 5 pp. [C.O. 5, 3. No. 27; and 5, 1291. pp. 324–332.]
Feb. 19.122. Heads of Complaints against Mr. Jones, Sec. of Bermuda, delivered to Mr. Bradshaw for his answer, by the Council of Trade and Plantations. Same as C.S.P. 1701, No. 797.ii., with additions; (20) He hath falsely represented the tempers and dispositions of the inhabitants. (21) Hath rendered himself so very obnoxious, that the Council, to whom he is by his Patent Clerk, refuse the doing business if he attends them, being, as they say, the professed enemy to the the people of that Island. (22) He occasions the stagnation of all publick business, for the Courts will not proceed, if he be their clerk (see Oct. 9, 1705). (23) He has commenced his action against one of the tenants as also against the Marshall, who officiated during his suspension for the profits of his office (June 29, 1705). 7¼ pp. [C.O. 37, 7. No. 13; and 38, 6. pp. 148–151.]
Feb. 20.
Whitehall.
123. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. Enclose accounts of the Board [see Dec. 25, 1705]. [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 310, 311.]
Feb. 20.
Whitehall.
124. W. Popple, jr., to Mr. Lowndes. Reply to Feb. 8. Mr. Byerly informs the Council of Trade and Plantations that the charge of prosecutions of seizures in New York for irregular trade was formerly defrayed out of the gross value before any dividend made, but that he understands that an Order of Council has been lately issued at New York, as Feb. 8, whereof their Lordships have no information; but if true, they are of opinion that the charge should not be taken from the Queen's part only, but from the whole produce, according to the former usage. [C.O. 5, 1120. pp. 413, 414.]
Feb. 20.
Council Chamber, Whitehall.
125. Order of Committee of Appeals. The Agent of the Mohegan Indians to have copies of Sir H. Ashhurst's Appeal and Council of Trade's representation, and the parties to be heard at the first meeting after Easter. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 2, 1706. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 1263. No. 68; and 5, 1291. pp. 348, 349.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
126. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Propose, as ordered Feb. 21, that the fishing admirals at Newfoundland be reminded to keep a journal of ships etc. and send a copy to the Privy Council. See Acts of Privy Council, II. p. 504. [C.O. 195, 4. pp. 208, 209.]
Feb. 22.
Whitehall.
127. W. Popple, jr., to Mr. Lowndes. Reply to Feb. 4. The Council of Trade and Plantations find that Mr. Heathcote's proposals, for providing certain quantities of Naval Stores at New York, will engage the Crown in great uncertainties; that the transmitting to him of English goods to the value of 450l. sterl. for the building of each ship according to his proposal will necessarily engage H.M. in the expence of maintaining an officer here to purchase such goods and hold constant correspondence with him there, and as to the iron-work necessary for the said ships, he is not particular enough, either in the charge thereof, or in the manner of sending it thither. They conceive his proposals of making sail-cloth at New York not proper to be encouraged, for that it will be more advantagious to England that all hemp and flax of the growth of the Plantations should be imported hither, in order to the manufacturing of it here. They cannot think his proposall of having 6 soldiers out of each Company advisable, especially during this time of war, for that the safety of the Province will not admit of their being taken from their posts, and the paying to his order here in England and subsistence and pay of 24 men, proposed to be enlisted by him, will cause great confusion in the accounts of the soldiers there. The late Act for encouraging the importation of Naval Stores was designed as a general invitation to all persons whatsoever to promote that undertaking; and a compliance with this or any particular proposal (in which the Crown is to be concerned), will tend to the obstructing the publick benefit designed by the Act. [C.O. 5, 1120. pp. 414–416.]
Feb. 22.
Knights-Bridge, 22nd. 12/mo (Feb.) 1705/6.
128. William Penn to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses letter from Lt. Gov. Evans and Address [see Nov. 9, 1705]. I also inclose the heads of a letter, instead of the former to the Lieut. Governor, if you please to write one, which I think would be an encouragement to the Governor, Assembly, and better part of the Province and Territories, and a stroke on them that have been both troublesome and culpable, especially those you complained of in the late Reigne so justly. I could be glad of your advises and Letter to my Lt. Govr. to inclose them in my Pacquet, to be sent by this oppertunity. Signed, Wm. Penn. Endorsed, Recd. Feb. 22, Read March 1, 1705/6. 1 p. Enclosed.
128. i. Some Minutes for a Letter to the Lt. Governor of Pennsylvania from ye Lords Comrs. of Trade. (1) That instead of expressing their dissatisfaction that no care has been as yet (?) taken for the support of the Governmt. they are very glad to hear by ye Chief Governr. that this Assembly has done themselves and the Country the justice to grant some supplies for the support of the Governmt. (2) That those persons should be encouraged that have always, and now especially shewn themselves ready to support the Governmt. and that are not of violent and obstinate Tempers. (3) To express their minds that the Duty on Tobacco be paid in Tobacco, for want of money, as the Statute indulges. For the Lords Comrs. may assure themselves that an overofficiousness of the Officers to recommend themselves must needs be the ruine of the Plantation Trade, which merchants too sensibly feel. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1263. Nos. 65, 65.i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1291. p. 336.]
Feb. 22.129. Sir H. Ashhurst to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays for copies and dates of Col. Dudley's letters complaining of Connecticott's refusal of the quota and treatment of H.M. Commission. Signed, Hen. Ashhurst. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 22, 1705/6. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1263. No. 63.]
Feb. 22.
Whitehall.
130. Mr. Secretary Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for consideration. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 22, 1705/6. ¾ p. Enclosed,
130. i. Col. Quary, S.G. of H.M. Customs in America to the Lord High Treasurer, Feb. 2, 1705(6). No trade belonging to England is under worse management than that of tobacco. Proposes such a regulation as may be "for the interest of H.M., the planters and merchants, now injurious to all." These Provinces producing but one crop of tobacco yearly, one fleet under a good convoy may bring the same home, which would fix the price of tobacco in England and abroad and people would buy briskly, being well assured no other supply could come till next year. The late distractive and irregular way of severall fleets discourages the buyer and lowers the price, to the ruin of all concern'd, for they depend on an after fleet's bringing greater quantities then really there is, and so defer buying. If the outward bound fleet could arrive about the beginning of Decr., the greatest part of the crop would be stript and packt and be ready to sail in April or May, by which damage to their ships by the wormes and sickness and the enemy will be prevented. No single ships ought to be suffered to run, which, if taken, encourages the privateers, lessens H.M. Revenue and spoils our Foreign Marketts. Perhaps there never was such an instance of 3 several Fleets in 14 months' time, which has given such a fatal blow to this trade as will hardly be retrieved, for several thousand hhds. of Oronoko tobacco being worth nothing to the owners, many of the Planters' Bills of Exchange were returned protested, not above half the quantity of our manufacture sent, to the great disappointment and utter ruin of many in the course of trade, the present war having deprived us of the trade with Spain, France, Flanders and part of the Baltick. Those markets are now largely supplied from Holland. Refers to manufacture in Russia, confirming following. Signed, Rob. Quary. 5 pp. [C.O. 5, 1315. Nos. 9, 9.i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1361. p. 443; and (enclosure only) 5, 3. No. 26.]
Feb. 22.131. Planters and Manufacturers of Tobacco to the Queen. Your Majesty's Order put a stop to the manufacture of tobacco at Moscow. Petitioners believe several persons are endeavouring to set up the manufacture of tobacco there again, and to gain the monopoly of importing it. Pray that directions be given to H.M. Envoy at Moscow that he use his utmost endeavours to obtain liberty to all your Majesty's subjects to import tobacco in leaf, and manufactured here, into his Czarish Majesty's Dominions, upon an equal and as reasonable a duty as possible; and that such measures may be taken for the prevention of any manufacturers or utensils for manufacturing tobacco going into those dominions or elsewhere beyond the seas, as your Majesty shall think fitt. 65 signatures. Annexed,
131. i. Reasons against permitting manufacturers of tobacco and utensils to be sent to Moscow. (1) The Czar's subjects will become masters of the art, make their own tobacco serve instead of our Plantation tobacco, and engross the trade of the East. (2) Virginia and Maryland imploy annually 300 sail of ships, which is a good nursery for sailors, produces a considerable Revenue to H.M. and advantage to the manufacturers of this Kingdom, those Plantations taking off not less then 300,000l. per annum of our course manufactures, and imploy 200,000 poor of this Kingdom, besides what are employed in the Plantations. (3) If the Czar's subjects learn that art, it will necessitate the Planters to find out other manufactures and cloath themselves, whereby the poor of this Kingdom will be deprived of their subsistance. (4) The Tobacco trade is under such discouragement by these practices that for 5 years last past there hath not been exported so much manufactured tobacco as was in one year before, etc. (4) The exportation of tobacco into the Czar's dominions by any persons exclusive of others of your Majesty's subjects qualified by law is in effect a monopoly, and contrary to the course and nature of trade, and to the prejudice of all other your Majesty's subjects, and will tend to the great damage of Virginia and Maryland. Subscribed,
131. ii. H.M. refers preceding petition to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their opinion. Signed, Rob. Harley, Kensington. The whole endorsed, Recd. from Clayton, Read Feb. 25, 1705/6. 1½ large pp. [C.O. 5, 1315. Nos. 10, 10.i., ii.; and 5, 1361. pp. 445–449.]
Feb. 22.
Admiralty Office.
132. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. In answer to yours of 21st. The ships which go to New England this year to fetch masts for the Navy are first to proceed to Lisbone with Navall Stores. The convoy appointed is the Dover, which is to proceed to Lisbone with the next squadron of H.M. ships bound thither, in all probability about 3 weekes or a month hence. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 26, 1705/6. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 864. No. 52; and 5, 912. p. 126.]
Feb. 23.
Admiralty Office.
133. Council of the Admiralty to the Queen. Report on petition of Newfoundland Merchants for convoy. The usuall convoy has been 4 ships, two sailing in March, and two in May. All possible endeavour should be used to support this important trade; but as there is and will be a very pressing occasion for ships for other services, which 'tis to be feared cannot be all provided for, soe is there likewise a great scarcity of men to putt them into a condition for the sea. And there being at present a general embargoe, it is humbly submitted to H.M. whether the same shall be taken off from the Newfoundland ships, and protections granted for their men as desired, and whether Petitioners shall be gratified, according to their petition, with six ships of warr for the security of their fleet. Signed, D. Mitchell, Geo. Churchill, Clow. Shovell. Countersigned, J. Burchett. 2 pp. [S.P. Naval, 7. Under date.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
134. W. Popple to Mr. Bradshaw. The Council of Trade and Plantations being pressed for their report on Mr. Jones, desire you to despatch your answer before Monday [see Feb. 19]. [C.O. 38, 6. p. 151.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
135. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Refer to letter of May 16, 1705. The season now approaching for the Commodore's going to Newfoundland, we doe submit it to H.M. pleasure whether the Commission to command in chief there should issue, as formerly, to him, or whether he should be restrained as the last year. In case there were not a competent number of fire-arms sent last year, according to our letter of July 13, we humbly offer that they should be sent by the first convoy. Autograph signatures. Endorsed, R. March 1. 2 pp. [C.O. 194, 22. No. 62; and 195, 4. pp. 210–212.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
136. W. Popple, jr., to Wm. Clayton and Tho. Johnson. Encloses extract of Memorial from Col. Quary [No. 130.i.] relating to convoys for Virginia and Maryland, and desires the opinion of the merchants of Leverpool.
The like Letter to Major Yates at Bristol and Isac Milner at Whitehaven. [C.O. 5, 1361. pp. 443, 444.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
137. W. Popple, jr., to Col. Blakiston. The Council of Trade and Plantations having this day been attended by the Virginia and Maryland merchants relating to convoys, and the merchants not agreeing amongst themselves, desire you to communicate inclosed extract of a Memorial [No. 130.i.] for their opinion. [C.O. 5, 1361. p. 444.]
Feb. 25.138. John Anderson and other soldiers, lately returned from Newfoundland, to the House of Commons. Give details as to Lt. Lloyd's forcing the soldiers to trade with him at exorbitant prices and to hire themselves out to the fishing. We have not received any pay since Sept. 22, 1704, etc. 6 signatures. Endorsed, Recd. from the House of Commons Feb. 25, 1705/6. 2 pp. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 121.]
Feb. 25.139. Mr. Commins' Representation to the House of Commons upon corruptions in the Trade to Newfoundland. Contrary to the Act ships come from Portugal, unduly navigated, and fish, bringing goods from Portugal. Ships that come early in the spring take up more fishing room than they have occasion, to serve their friends that come later. They do not come qualified in their complement of men according to the injunction of the Act to have at least one man in five never at sea before. No ship should carry off any inhabitants or servants without publick notice. Ships trading there, fearing the inhabitants are insolvent, pillage their Rock for the saving of themselves. Describes abuses as to shipping room, heaving ballast into the harbour, Admirals not keeping Journals to send to the Privy Council, and the observation of the Sabbath. The decision of civil matters ought not to be in the hands of the Admirals. The inhabitants ought to be under the Commanding Officer, whom the inhabitants of St. Johns refused to obey for their own safety, having those notions infused into them by the West Country Masters, that he has no power over them. An established Government is very necessary there. Proposals for the regulation of the price and sale of fish and train oil. Men of war ought not to press men from the boats of other harbours that are withdrawing their effects for safety. Men of war should cruise from harbour to harbour, etc. Care should be taken of the Irish there, for they by our daily experience have proved very detrimental, taking up arms for the enemy and giving information. If Placentia were reduced, France and Spain would starve, etc. Endorsed as preceding. 2 pp. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 122.]
Feb. 25.
Swallow Street, Westminster.
140. Mr. Jackson to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. Signed, John Jackson. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 26, 1705/6. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
140. i. Mr. Jackson to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays to be heard face to face with his accusers. Signed, John Jackson. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. Nos. 123, 123.i.]
Feb. 26.
London.
141. Mr. Campbell to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Offers reasons why the Agent for Prizes at Newfoundland should not be debarred from trading. Signed, Ja. Campbell. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 26, 1705/6. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 124.]
Feb. 26.
Barbados.
142. Governor Sir B. Granville to [? Lt. Governor Johnson]. I have the favour of your letter of the 18th inst. by Mr. Nivine, who communicated to me allso what you writt to Capt. Stucley. I did, as you desired me, give my opinion to him, but he insists upon haveing a positive order from me, which I am no waies impowered to give him. I am very impatient to hear of your good success, etc. Signed, Bevill Granville. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 44.]
Feb. 26.
Deptford in Carlisle Bay, Barbados.
143. Capt. Stuckley to Lt. Governor Johnson. I have received yours of the 18th, and should be as glad as any man alive to be assisting to the relief of the Leeward Islands. My orders from H.R.H. are to send [? attend] on ye Collony of New England, and absolutely to follow Col. Dudley's orders, whose were to me to convoy the Fleet bound thence to this place and Salt Tertudoes, and back again. Should I neglect doing it, I am liable to his just complaints of my breach of orders, and the prejudice that will ensue to a fleet of 40 sail. My goeing to Antegoa, etc. will of necessity disapoint theire proceeding to Salt-Tertudoes, and New England want as necessary an assistance by that means as any it has, etc. as preceding. Signed, H. Stuckley. Addressed. Sealed. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 45.]
Feb. 28.
Cockpitt.
144. Mr. Secretary Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their opinion before laying it before H.M. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read March 4, 1705/6. 1 p. Enclosed,
144. i. G. Ritter to the Queen. Francois Louys Michel, citizen of Berne, having settled in Pennsylvania, has through petitioner, citizen of the same town, persuaded a colony of 4 to 500 Swiss Protestants to go and settle on some uninhabited lands in Pennsylvania or on the frontier of Virginia. Prays H.M. consent and protection and that (1) they should be regarded as H.M. subjects; (2) that they should be settled on some navigable river; (3) that each Colonist have about 100 acres, and the settlement be called Berne; (4) that Orders be given to H.M. Governor to advance them seed-corn for the first year, to be repaid in 4 years; (5) that they have freedom to trade like H.M. other subjects; (6) and exemption from taxes for 10 years; (7) freedom to choose Ministers of the Gospel, and officers of justice and police, under the direction of the Governor; (8) that, after public prayers for H.M., they should be allowed to pray for the Republic of Berne, which is allied to H.M.; (9) that similar privileges be granted to all who hereafter come from Switzerland to increase that Colony; (10) that they be transported with their effects from Rotterdam at H.M. expense. Signed, George Ritter. French. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 1315. Nos. 14, 14.i.; and 5, 1362. pp. 9–12.]
Feb. 28.
Whitehall.
145. W. Popple to Mr. Jackson. The Council of Trade and Plantations send you Mr. Clark's affidavit and Mr. Span's letter for your answer. [C.O. 195, 4. p. 232.]