America and West Indies
April 1706, 16-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1916

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108-125

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'America and West Indies: April 1706, 16-30', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 23: 1706-1708 (1916), pp. 108-125. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73720 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


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April 1706, 16-30

April 16.
Nevis, Mrs. Stanley's.
270. [?] — to John Tonstall. Dear Friend, Since mine per last pacquet, with the relation of the misfortunes of St. Xtophers, I have a more dismall and dreadfull story of my own to relate, which requires that thou summonest and musterest together thy best and strongest Reason to bear up and support thee under, for it is the grieviousest shock of mischief Fortune had in her power to smite both thee and me withall etc., etc. Describes the French invasion [see June 3]. They deceived us and stole their landing at Green Bay and thereabouts. The major part of our forces were quite the other side of our Island, beyond Cades Bay.... Upon the hill above the Bath plain our handful of men ingaged them very smartly for some time, doeing them considerable mischief; in which ingagement Col. Daniel Smith (would to God we had had a number of such men) was shot in the right shoulder, etc. At Mr. Bevon's morning star in an open ffield, under noe cover, we ingaged the main of the enemy, 3,500 men (a peice of the greatest ffool hardyness that ever people were guilty of) here was a very warm dispute, and we knock'd downe three pair of their collours out of twelve that marched against us. They shott dead upon the place Major Wm. Child, and Mr. Lawrence Broadbelt had his leg broke with a musquet ball close by me. When our people had got enough of it here, they retired to the Deodand [see C.S.P., 1699. p. 463] and Col. Wm. Butler in the way sett fire to his owne house, where was a great quantity of goods belonging to the adjacent inhabitants burnt. In the Deodand we mett some of our Grandy men, and the main of our own forces, which ought to have joined us and fought but thought better to secure themselves, wives and children in this safe retreat, where we was to fight it to the very stumps; but as the Devill and some of our Grandy men would have it, on Sunday morning, when the enemy march'd boldly up to us, and by the strength of the place we had ten to one against them, we surrendered the place and Island in great hurry without fireing a gun etc. I would not have you be too forward in defending the behaviour of some of our Grandees, for they do not deserve it, and time will tell you who they are, though now you would little suspect them. The brave behaviour and defence [of the negroes in the mountains] shames what some of their masters did, and they do not stick to tell us so. The French since they have us under those rediculous conditions make a jest of them etc. [as June 3]. Having got the four hostages, Thomas Abbot, Joseph Stanley, Phillip De Witt and Charles Earle, they thought fitt to take their leave the 10th inst. at night somewhat in a hurry, haveing news by one of their spy-boats of a squadron of 14 tall ships off of Berbados, since proved to be a squadron of their owne… Had we made any resistance at the Deodand, the French own that they would have given us very honourable conditions. M. Chavanac, who commanded at St. Kitts, is a much more civilized man than M. D'Iberville. Mr. Charles Bridgwater was marryed not an hour before the alarm guns were fired, to the best fortune here, Mrs. Bartlet, but had the displeasure to see it all destroy'd before he injoy'd his bride, so precarious is the riches of this world. It is impossible H.M. Dominions in this part of the world should be preserved and kept unless. H.M. will guard us with a sufficient strength by sea and a necessary supply of forces by land, which God put in her heart to doe, else most of her Islands will be abandoned by the inhabitants. It is to be hoped notice will be taken of our people's being imprisoned, almost starved and barbarously used, contrary to the Articles and the usage we alwayes give to their prisoners of war. 4 pp. [C.O. 184, 1. No. 17.]
April 16.
Plymouth.
271. Col. Quary to W. Popple. I hope to dispatch my reply (to April 11) by the next post etc. Signed, Robt. Quary. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 24, 1706. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1315. No. 28; and 5, 1362. p. 36.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
272. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. Enclose accounts of the Board (see March 25). [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 313–315.]
April 16.
Cockpitt.
273. Mr. Secretary Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Col. Quary having given a further memorial to my Lord High Treasurer concerning the Tobacco Trade, I desire your further thoughts upon that matter. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 18, 1706. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1315. No. 27; and 5, 1362. p. 35.]
April 17.
Antigua.
274. Lt. Gov. Johnson to [? Mr. Secretary Hedges]. I was sealing up a long letter to your Honour, intending to dispatch away the packquett immediately to Col. Handesyde, that he might be early upon his guard. But I am now forc't to alter my stile and measures, one of our spy boats just now return'd and brings us assurance that the French have quitted Nevis, and withall not only a very melancholy account, but a very different one from what exspected. Not knowing yet what is become of the enemy, I doe not think it proper to goe from this Island. I could wish the enemy had mett a warmer reception, the Commander there is known to be as good and gallant a man as any in H.M. Colonys, where the failure has been I shan't yet pretend to determine. M. D'Iberville stood up to windward, when he left Nevis, and wee are well assur'd M. D'Casse is arrived with 14 sail att Martinique. I am endeavouring here to be as well prepar'd as 'tis possible with a handfull of men, for if the enemy be still to Windward, 'tis very probable they will make us a short vissitt, tho such a force be by much to considerable to be cheifly design'd against these weak Colonys, etc. Signed, Jon. Johnson. Endorsed, R. June 23. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 7, 1. No. 11.]
April 18.
Nevis.
275. Capt. Dunbar to Col. Thomas Whetham. This is to give you a melancholly account of the destruction of the poor little rock of Nevis [see June 3]. The Dodang [see No. 270] is surrounded by a deep gully on one side and a steep woody mountain on the other, but neither provision of any kind, water or ammunition, their coming was so sudden etc. Describes his protests against M. D'Iberville's hard usage of the prisoners of war. Nobody has saved anything. Repeats June 3 and April 16 etc. Signed, David Dunbarr. Addressed. 3 pp. [C.O. 184, 1. No. 18.]
April 19.
Lyme-Street.
276. Agents of Mr. Skene to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Enclose following. By reason of the miscarriage of the two packett boates which left Barbadoes in Nov. and Dec., we believe some of his answers have been lost. Signed, Tho. Foulerton, Row. Tryon. Endorsed, Recd. April 20, Read May 1, 1706. Addressed. ¾ p. Enclosed,
276. i. Answer of A. Skene to so much of the information against Governor Sir B. Granville as relates to himself. Neither informants nor any other persons preferred any complaint against him; he has, on the contrary, been commended for the execution of his office. (1) As to his taking an annual fee of 17s. 6d. for the Governor's license for a ship to sail, he took only the usual 5s., but sometimes when employed to draw a petition for a master of a ship, as he was for Bayley and Keyes, then he charged the usual fee of 12s. 6d. for that office. He never exacted either for himself or for the Governor any unlawful or unusual fees, see following. (2) He was in no way an accessory in the carrying off of Mr. Lee. He was only called from his house to suppress a riot. (3) The deposition of Guy Ball (1705. No. 657) is untrue. The Governor gave no order for stopping the ships, only did not oblige those to sail which were not ready. Signed as preceding. 2 pp.
276. ii. Certificate by Governor Sir B. Granville that the following is sworn a true copy. Signed, Bevill Granville. ½ p.
276. iii. Copy of proceedings at a Court of Oyer and Terminer of Barbados, Dec. 11, 1705. Court House, Egginton's Green, St. Michael's Town, Wm. Holder, Edward Burke, Christopher Warren, Richd. Brewster, Thomas Alleyne, Charles Buckworth, John Holder, Robert Hackett, Simon Lambert, John Merring, Thomas Prideaux, Thomas Afflick, Dudley Woodbridge, Wm. Allamby, Robert Stillingfleet, Giles Theyer, Peter Mascoll, Zachary Shute, Hugh Hall, John Rushworth, Alexander Cuningham, William Shuller, of the Quorum. Jury empanelled Dec. 12, vizt.—Wm. Phillips, James Browne, Wm. Harmer, Thomas Barry, George Lindsay, Robert Allanson, John Howell, Robert Nurse, John Calvin, Joseph Thorne, Henry Williams, Bennett Reese. Information of Wm. Rawlin against Alexander Skene for procuring the carrying off of Francis Lee, and for taking illegal fees from Keys, Baylie and Ball, etc. Their depositions quoted and that of Alexander Arnott, and Minute of Council Nov. 21, 1704. Skene was acquitted. Endorsed as letter. 16 large pp.
276. iv. Certificate of the Council and Assembly of Barbados in favour of Mr. Skene. He has always regulated himself by the knowne rules of his office etc. 23 signatures. Same endorsement. 1 p.
276. v. Certificate by Governor Sir B. Granville that the following were sworn to as genuine. Signed, Bevill Granville. 1 p.
276. vi. Deposition of Mr. Arnot, that Skene assisted to suppress a riot. An attack was made at night upon the house of John Morris. Lt. Wanley arrested Francis Lee. Signed, Alexr. Skene. June 23, 1705. 1½ pp.
276. vii. Copy of Warrant for apprehending above mentioned rioters. Nov. 25, 1704. Signed, Alexander Skene. Endorsed as letter. 2½ pp. [C.O. 28, 9. Nos. 39, 39.i., 40–43, 40.i., 42.i.; and (letter and enclosure i. only) 29, 10. pp. 50–57.]
April 19.277. John Graves to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I sailed from Portsmouth on the feast of St. Michael, 1703, in the Providence, Jos. Blagdon, master, for New Providence, having on board Edwd. Birch, the Governor of the Bahama Islands. We got into Providence Harbour Jan. 1st. Four brigantines driven off their course put in there. There is a Fort about the bigness of the Royal Exchange, having about 40 great guns, and 150 men fit to bear arms, besides about 250 other souls. When the enemy came they brought with them 4 or 500 men in severall vessels, and having taken some prisoners, forced them to pilot their ships into the Harbour, where landing they found no resistance, nor was any of the inhabitants destroyed at that time, except only one man, who was killed, and another had his hand cut off. However, before they attempted the Fort, they made a halt and by threatening their prisoners, found there would be no resistance, so proceeded and carryed all before them. The French Capt. and the Spaniards declared if anybody had appeared in the Fort, and fired but one gun, they would never have attempted it. Before they went off, they burn't the town and Church to ashes, except 2 or 3 sorry houses where the French and Spaniards kept their prisoners; they broke the carriages of the great guns and spiked up most of them, some they tossed over the walls and some they threw down into ye Fort, 2 or 3 were burst to peices. They plundered in gold, silver, slaves etc. to the value of 30,000l.; and in Sept. following they came and carryed off more plunder and 40 slaves. Besides said damages, I have had no particulars, only that the gates of the fort were broke down, and made a small breach in the walls of the eastermost part of the Fort, which by very great rains that fell some time before I came off were for about 40 ft. much damnifyed. And here desire to take notice of an accident, which contributed greatly to the enemy's success. Mr. Ellis Lightwood, a Gentleman of a considerable estate in that Island, having made great rejoycings and kept open house for the birth of a son, so that allmost all the defensible men being at his house on that occasion, were got drunk, and hardly in their beds when the enemy landed; this made their enterprise very easy, none being in a condition to oppose ym.… In June, 1704, I went in a small sloop a cruizing, being informed that 2 or 3 vessells from Curaçao was amongst the Islands trading with their dry goods for our commodities. I found at Exuma Islands about 90 souls, I crossed the Channel to Columbus alias Cat Island, found there at several places about 120 souls, upon Elutheria at least 160, upon Harbour Island 60, and return'd in July. On Aug. 3 the Spaniards came in a gally with 65 men, they lay to the eastward and took one of our small sloopes that was coming to Providence from Carolina, and made the prisoners pilot them in before day and took us in our beds; at which time there was not above 20 men on the Island, and some of those at 20 miles distance: their usage to me was very cruell, not leaving me a shoe to my foot or more cloathing than would cover my nakedness, and the next day most barbarously used me. Dec. 18 I went to Carolina, where I found our Governor, who had been there 2 months before I arrived. I left upon the Island 27 families, and amongst all the Islands at least 4 or 500 people that are scattered some 200 miles distance, so yt. in a little time they will be worse than the Wild Indians, and at the best they are very ready to succour and trade with Pirates; they have 12 or 14 small sloopes amongst them, that escaped the enemy, so that unless H.M. give immediate protection, it will become a second Madagascar. For my Lord Granville has declared that they cannot send strength sufficient to protect the people, or to support the Governor's power in putting the Laws in execution against offenders. What will be requisite to revive the Colony and make it a flourishing place of trade is as follows:—100 soldiers to be kept in garrison. One small man of war and a yatcht or sloop to cruise amongst the Islands in search of pirates and to prevent unlawfull trade. 200 spare arms, 2 mortars for 6 inch shell, 4 hand-mortars for hand granados, carriages and stores for 40 great gunns, which are already there unmounted. All manner of tools for procuring stone and timber for building fortifications and barracks, and some long oars for sloops. Provisions for a year. Please to note that only Providence was destroyed and plundered; that provisions have been for 20 years past at very high rates, vizt. mutton, veal, pork and goat at 9d. per pound, beef, fresh and salt, at 6d., eggs 1½d. each, butter 18d. per lb. milk 6d. per quart, and other things proportionable, excepting fish and turtle. But, in few years, with good management, and the use of means that are to be found out, provisions may be had cheap and in plenty, and H.M. eased of most if not all the charge wch. this place at present requires to resettle it, and will prove as good a place of trade as most in the Indies. Signed, Jno. Graves. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 19, 1706. 7½ pp. Enclosed,
277. i. Copy of Petition of the Inhabitants of Providence to John Graves, H.M. Chief Officer of Customs there. Nov. 30, 1704. Whereas we are informed by Thomas Simpson that Edward Byrche, our Governor, is departed for South Carolina, declaring before he went that he found the people would not doe anything towards settling the Government, and that he would leave them as he found them, we, finding ourselves in a deplorable condition, not having any head during his absence, and severall Spanish prizes being now in this Harbour brought in by Capt. Thomas Williams, by a lawful commission from Governor Sir N. Johnson, which can no ways be lawfully condemned, nor we receive our just debts from Capt. Williams' company, who are most inhabitants of this Island, and that our wives and children are in a manner starved for want of cloathing and provisions, being very lately barbarously plundered by the Spaniards of all they had, not leaving to some a shift to cover their nakedness, and we having no prospect of relief without the condemnation of these prizes, wee therefore request you to take the administration of this Government upon you with the advice of a Council conven'd as nigh as possible to the Lords' concessions, till the return of our Governour etc. Signed, Richd. King, Timothy Marsh, Peter Courent, James Simes, John Nuball, John Caverly [sic] jr., Edward White, Benjamin Watkins, Jonathan Thomas, Thomas Frith, Nathl. Simons, Mackell Tenes, Thomas Neiller, John Simes, John Staritan, senr. and jr., Nathl. Staritan, John Pinder, John Coverle [sic], John Somersell [sic], John Backer, Ed. Bllay [sic], Jonathan Frist, John Bullock, John Burton, Thomas Williams, Malachy Salmon, Griffith Lewis, David Foise, Pieter (?), John Williams, John Jones, John Bunch, Samll. Johnson, James Maverick, Edward Minard, Jacob Fill, Razamnas Floyd, Luke Horton, Thomas A—, Nathaniel Garrell, Abraham Carlee, Sam. Kellnge, Samuel Townsend, Joseph Bullock, Joseph Minett, John Avery, William Gignos, James Glover, Jonathan Potter, John Loe, John Redwood. Endorsed, Recd. from Mr. Graves, Read April 19, 1706. 2½ pp.
277. ii. A Memorial: or, a Short Account of the Bahama Islands etc. Delivered to the Lords Proprietors of the said Islands and H.M. Commissioners of Customs by John Graves, Collector etc. and now humbly presented to both Houses of Parliament. Shows the value of the Islands and of the harbour of New Providence, which may prove another Tangere or Dunkirk, etc. I have solicited some merchants and find some willing to adventure to settle a factory to carry on the Spanish Trade, which is the most profitablest trade in the known world; but they query how their effects shall be secured. A man of war, a garrison and stores are wanted. A Governor cannot subsist on the 1/7th part of your Lordships' Tenth, which sometimes does not come to 30l. per annum. War is no sooner ended, but the West Indies always swarms with Pyrats, and one large ship shall plunder the inhabitants when they please; one small pyrat with 50 men that are acquainted with the inhabitants (which too many of them are) will ruin that place, and be assisted by the loose inhabitants, who have hitherto never been prosecuted to effect for aiding them, nor is it in any man's power to do it without strength sufficient to put the laws in execution. Your Governors hitherto have wink'd much at such ill practices for filthy lucre. I hold myself oblig'd, as many years a tenant to your Lordships and 20 years a dweller in Providence, to inform your Lordships, that granting such Islands and other privileges from the Tenants in general to particular persons will be to the utter destroying the Colony. Anne Island, call'd Hog Island, to Nicholas Trott [see C.S.P. 1699, No. 810 and 1700. No. 250]. Now lately an Island call'd Exuma, which has the great salt-pond on it, to Henry Palmer, who was set at work by Trott to purchase it for their joint interest. Your Brazaletwood and all timber to Palmer. Your whale-fishing to another [see C.S.P. 1700. No. 250]. Fishing on racks to another. All which is contrary to your first condescensions to the first settlers, and your Instructions to Governors, so that it is not in your power to grant those privileges to any stranger or particular tenant. We have now been 20 years in war, and your Lordships, tho' often solicited, never did send us the least assistance in any warlike stores. Your poor Tenants having been so disheartened, and then harass'd, by ill Governors, may be imputed the main reason that place has so often suffer'd by the common Enemy; and now lately three times Plunder'd and lay'd in Ashes. Printed. 8 pp.
277. iii. Petition of John Graves to the House of Lords. The inhabitants of the Bahamas pray to be taken under H.M. protection. Set out, H. of L. MSS. New Series, VI. p. 412. Signed, Jno. Graves, Collr. ¾ p.
277. iv. A brief Memorial (on the importance of the Bahamas) presented to the House of Lords by, Signed, Jo. Graves. Set out, H. of L. MSS. VI. pp. 412, 413. 1 p. Nos. ii.-iv. endorsed, Recd. Read April 19, 1706. [C.O. 5, 1263. Nos. 102, 102.i.-iv.; and (without enclosures ii.–iv.) 5, 1291. pp. 361–370.]
April 20.
Whitehall (sent by ye fleet commanded by Capt. Kerr).
278. Mr. Sec. Hedges to Governor Handasyd. Acknowledges letters of Jan. 14 and Feb. 16 with rumours of French fleet. It can't be imagined that France can spare many ships, having the utmost occasion for them nearer home, but you do well to be on your guard, and it is not to be doubted but you will do your duty, you may be assured that all possible care will be taken for your assistance from hence. Capt. Kerr is directed to saile to Jamaica with the Breda, Windsor, Sunderland, Assistance, Dunkirk prize and Hawke fireship; and when he arrives there, to put himself under the command of Sir W. Whetstone, but in case he is dead, he, Capt. Kerr, is then to take upon him the command of the ships now at Jamaica, as also the Crown and Sheerness, which he is to carry from Barbadoes and the Leeward Islands, and then consider at a Councill of Warr, how the squadron may be best employed, but more especially in the attempting the Spanish Galleons, which is particularly recommended to his care, but before he proceeds, he is to advise with you and the Councill of Jamaica, what ships, if any, may be proper to leave there for the defence of that Island in his absence, and to desire of you and the Councill what assistance you can give him, either as to men or shipping, for the better enabling him to perform such service as shall be agreed on. When the said service shall be over, he is to return the Crowne to Barbadoes, and the Sheerness to the Leeward Islands; and he is particularly directed to send the Trade from Jamaica to England under such convoy and at such time as shall be judged most proper at a Council of Warr. All which I acquaint you with, it being H.M. pleasure that you should afford him what assistance you can in putting his Instructions in execution, and particularly in intercepting the Galleons, wch. have lately so narrowly escaped Sir John Leake. H.M. has ordered the Secretary of Warr to lay before Her what post in the Army is your due etc. I think there can be no danger of your Regiment looseing its Corps. Signed, C. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 79, 80.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
279. Mr. Sec. Hedges to the Governor of the Leeward Islands. By letters from Sir B. Granville I find that H.M. subjects in the West Indies have been alarmed by reports of [p]reparations making by the French for some expedition in those parts, which we have reason to look upon as groundless, since it cannot be imagined that they can spare so many ships for such an enterprise, having so much occasion for their navall strength nearer home. However you will do well to be upon your guard, and you may be assured all possible care will be taken for your assistance from hence. H.M. is now sending a squadron of ships under Capt. Kerr, who is directed to proceed to the Leeward Islands with his own proper squadron, as above, as also the Jersey and Crown (if she timely joins him at Spithead) and the Sheerness and Swan. When he comes to the Leeward Islands, he is to inform himself of you and the Councill what number of ships (if any) the enemy have in your parts, of what strength they are, and how they design to employ them. And if he is informed that they intend to insult any H.M. Plantations, or to make any new Settlement either at Tabago, or among any of the Leward Islands, he is to consider at a Councill of war, what may be fitt to be done, and to desire of you and the Councill of the Leeward Islands what land-forces you can be able to supply him withall. If the Councill of War thinks it necessary that he should carry with him all or part of the ships that shall be at Barbadoes and the Leeward Islands (i.e. the Kinsale, Maidstone, Experiment, Dolphin, Jerzey, Crown at Barbadoes, and the Greyhound, Medway Prize, Sheerness and Swan at the Leeward Islands), he is to do it, but to return them to those Islands again, so soon as the service shall be over, and from the Leeward Islands he is to write to Barbadoes for the ships there, and for such land forces as can be spared from thence, he is also to go to Barbadoes, and to govern himself there in the same manner, and if he proceeds on service against the enemy directly from Barbadoes, to send to the Leeward Islands for the ships there and for such land forces as you can supply him with. You are to give him all the assistance you can etc. Signed, C. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 81, 82.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
280. Same to Governor Sir B. Granville. Repeats preceding, mutatis mutandis. Signed, C. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 82–84.]
April 20.
St. Christophers, Charles Fort.
281. Lt. Governor Hamilton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Repeats letter of March 15. Since which the enemy have wholly subdued Nevis in two dayes, the perticulars I suppose your Lordships have from Col. Abbott, etc. Refers to enclosures and begs the Board to represent the state of [St. Kitts] to H.M. that care may be taken to supply me, that so good a Colony and two of H.M. best forts in the West Indies, may not be lost for want of soldiers and ammunition to defend the same, for the Assembly have been put in mind of what was needfull for several years before I came to the Government, and very often since, they have often made fair promises, but could never see any performance: when the enemy were actually before Nevis for the first time, then I was forced to use all manner of means to get some provisions into the forts, and had barraks built with thatch in the forts after the enemy were actually landed, though the Assembly have been often put in mind of the ill consequence that attends thatched houses. As for the soldiers of the Regiment, I nor no other Lieut. Governor can have any dependance upon them, for sometimes detachments are ordered aboard H.M. ships of war, at other times drawn off to other Islands, as the Commander in Chief thinks convenient. I had now out of the three smal Companies that are posted in this Island 37 of the best men pick't out, and carried to Antigua, where they now are, and your Lordships are sensible what it is to defend a garrison with Militia that have constantly their wives and children bawling about them; I therefore hope that your Lordships will take it into your consideration, and represent to H.M. the necessity of having a constant good garrison and provisions to preserve two Forts, which if well provided, will be almost impregnable, and forever maintain H.M. Soveraignety in this so fertile and good an Island. I most humbly offer, that if two good independent Companies of 100, or itself of 80 men each, were here constantly in garrison it would put a mighty dread in the enemy, and hinder them not only from attempting the forts, but hinder the privateers from coming to almost any part of the Island, as they now sometimes do in some by-places to get off negroes, which can hardly be prevented, wee having very good bayes along shoar to land in for 24 miles together and impossible to guard every bay with so few men, and if anything of that kind should happen, those soldiers would at all times be ready at a minute's warning; whereas the Militia are a long time before they can be got together, too late for such a service. If a mortar or two for bombs were ordered in the Fort, in case any of the enemies shipping should come to batter, might prove of vast service, and an ingenier for some time to make some necessary works upon Brimston Hill etc. I am afraid I have trespassed in being so tedious, but beg your Lordships to believe it is out of a true zeal for H.M. service, and the preservation of the Colony I am intrusted with, however rudely I have been treated by some self-will'd, malicious person. Signed, W. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. June 24, Read July 1, 1706. 2 pp. Enclosed,
281. i. Account of Stores and Troops in St. Kitts, April 20, 1706. Total, 431 men, including 45 H.M. soldiers, etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 6. Nos. 57, 57.i.; and 239, 1. Nos. 9, 9.i.; and (without enclosure) 153, 9. pp. 381–384.]
April 22.
Nevis.
282. Col. Abbott to [? Sir C. Hedges]. Describes French invasion. See June 3, April 16 and 18. The enemy stole a landing at Green Bay, where was posted Col. Burt and 30 men at Long Point, and Lt. Col. Butler and 40 men at Gualding's Point: the former leaving his post, and the latter not taking that due care as became him, was the occasion of our being surprised. Complains of the want of a Regulation of officers, not having Commissions, myself none, since the going out of Col. Codrington. Col. Johnson has not dun this Island the justice he ought, it being only one thretned. Platforms will not fight themselves, have occasion'd great expence to little purpose. I could never get 200 men at no time to face the enemie, and the chief officers constantly discouraging the men, 'twas impossible to doe anything, I meane the 2 gentlemen before-mentioned, never such pultrongs living. Could not pretend to fight their whole army myself, there was never such an immorigrous people ever hatch't etc. Signed, Rich. Abbott. P.S.—The principall inhabittants having made choyce of an Agent here, could not prevaile with the Commander of the Antigua packett, nor with Col. Burt, Deputy-Postmaster here, for an accommodation on board her, but was preferable to a common strumpit. The number of negroes the French have plunder'd is about half, and the greatest part of the menkind being now in our mountaines refusing to surrender their arms, wee being disarm'd by the enemy, are forced to let them take their own measures, which proves very pernicious to uss, by killing all our stock, soe that we shall be forced to dissert for want of sufficiencie. Endorsed, R. June 26. 3 pp. [C.O. 184, 1. No. 19.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
283. Sir C. Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Desires warrants for Col. Ingoldesby as April 11. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 24, 1706. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 14; and 5, 1120. p. 455.]
April 22.
Bermuda.
284. Lt. Governor Bennett to Mr. Popple. A vessel this day arriving here from Antigua (the onely one permitted to come away) brought me a letter from an inhabitant there, dated March 30 last. I had not time to transmit it att large, but my brother has a copy thereof. The contents are, that "on Feb. 4 last appeared a French fleet consisting of 7 large ships, 3 briganteens and 20 sloops, who we believed intended to land on our Island, but the wind blowing very hard att East, they were forced to bare away for Nevis etc. Describes attack on Nevis and St. Kitts. On March 21 they appeared again to us with 52 sail of vessels, but they went to Nevis again, and has burnt and destroy'd that, and we daily expect them up here att Antigua." By the vessel that carries this to Virginia I have sent letters to the Governors throughout the Continent, that they may know the danger of letting vessels go to the Southward. I expect a visit from the enemy upon their return homeward from the Havanah in Aug. or Sept., for they must cross this latitude, but I shall be prepared for them, and will doe what I can to defend this place. Signed, B. Bennett. Endorsed, Recd. Oct. 15, 1706, Read March 14, 1706/7. Holograph. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 37, 7. No. 38; and 38, 6. pp. 224, 225.]
[April 22.]285. Estimate of cost of a garrison of 100 centries etc. for the Bahamas. Total, 2,114l. 18s. 4d. per annum. Endorsed, Recd. from Mr. Killigrew. April 22, 1706. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1263. No. 103.]
[April 22.]286. Similar estimate for a garrison in Port Royal, Carolina. The Proprietors' charge of the Civil List is: Governor 200l., Secretary 70l., Judge of Common Pleas 60l., Naval Officer 40l., Surveyor General 100l., Receiver General 80l. Total, 610l. Endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1263. No. 104; and 5, 1291. p. 371.]
[April 22.]287. An account of the commodities which Carolina and the Bahama Islands do or may produce. Should I write the description of Carolina with all its Beauty, health, fullness and product it is capable of, it would not onely swell to a vollume, but would look like a romance etc. Carolina produce:—Pott ashes, rice, the best yett known, hemp and flax twice a year, cole seed, rape seed, and lindseed oyles, pitch, tarr, rosin, turpentine, safflower for dyes, tobacco as good as Spanish, silke twice a year, tallow hides, deer and other skinns, almonds, raisins, dryed grapes, figgs twice a year, tea better than Bohee tea, prunelles and other plumbs yt. now come from France; olives thrive to a miracle; mulberry wine, whale fishing; delicious peaches of 24 ounces from which are made rare wines and excellent brandyes, and when dryed are an exceeding good sweetmeet, tho' at present many are given to ye hoggs by reason of ye plenty; green wax in great quantityes, being ye product of ye mirtle berry, cochoneal lately found and may be propogated; druggs for dyers and apothecaries too numerous to name. All sorts of timber. The Carolina trade with ye Leeward Islands is at present: Corne, twice a year, Beef, Porke, Potted venison and fowle, Beefe, Soap, Candles, Butter, Chease, Pipe staves, Boards, Planks, Timber for houses and mills and sugar works, Spiritts of severall kinds from fruits. The Bahamas product and trade is, or may be: sugar, indico, ginger, cotton, kidd-skins, cocoa, oranges, lemmons, pomgranates, brazilletto wood, spermacæta whale, amber-grease, tortoise-shell. Dates will thrive to a miracle. The thick-wrind gitterne tree, from whose fruit and flower is made so delicious a drink yt. it is (tho made at Barbados) sold there for 8s. a quart. Salt in vast quantities, etc., etc. Endorsed as preceding. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1263. No. 105.]
April 23.
Boston.
288. Governor Dudley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Ten days since I received your Lordshipps' letters, and the duplicate of Oct. 29 last, with the inclosed accounts of Mr. Dummer's packet boats, and the Assembly of the Province being sitting, I communicated the same with all advantage, and at their next meeting I suppose they will offer something thereupon. Refers to previous letters. I have nothing to add by this uncertain conveyance, but that every thing is well here. I have had no trouble from my French and Indian neighbours this winter, they have no habitation nor planting within the lines of these Provinces, which I have destroyed in the two years past, and their marches are now so long, about 300 miles, and they have been so often disappointed, that I believe I may be at ease from them, but dare not abate of my forces, which burthen the Province with a very great charge, but they have not yet accounted it heavy, being perfectly satisfied with the just and thrifty expence thereof, which makes me easy with them. I humbly pray your Lordships will represent my service herein to H.M., and if I can approve myself herein, I am well rewarded for all the fatigues I have taken etc. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read July 15th, 1706. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 864. No. 68; and 5, 912. pp. 178–180.]
April 23.
Plymouth.
289. Col. Quary to Mr. Popple. Encloses reply to the Merchants of Liverpool. I will finish my reply to the Whitehaven merchants by the next opportunity. I beleive wee shall sail in the morning. Signed, Robt. Quary. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 29, 1706. Holograph. 1 p. Enclosed,
289. i. Col. Quary to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Confirms his remarks upon the Continental Trade in Tobacco. (Feb. 22.) Plymouth, April 21. Signed, Robt. Quary. 2 pp.
289. ii. Reply to the Merchants of Liverpool, April 6. (1) Maryland is certainly later than Virginia, but there is no tobacco out after Oct., which gives the planters at least 7 months to strip and pack their tobacco before May. But this being a matter of fact, I appeal to the Assemblies. (2) The merchants will have at least 7 months to sell their goods and purchase their loading. There would be no glut, the ships not being confined to any one place. Anyhow the Planters have only one crop a year. (3) This tender concern for the poor planters happens very unseasonable, for the very last year the persons imploy'd by these very Gentlemen took the advantage of the poor planters' necessity and forced them to part with their tobacco for ¼d. per lb. (4) It was not the quantity that came in the first fleet, but the expectation of others to follow that lowered the price of tobacco here. (5) The ships are generally made up at Kiquitan or Lynhaven Bay and a N. wind will bring all the ships from every river etc. Plymouth, April 23, 1706. Signed, Robt. Quary. 4 closely written pp. [C.O. 5, 1315. Nos. 30, 30.i., ii.; and 5, 1362. pp. 53–63.]
April 24.
Whitehall.
290. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Enclose following. Autograph signatures. 1 p. Annexed,
290. i. Draft of warrant for Col. Ingoldesby's Commission etc. (see April 11 and 22 and N.J. Archives 1st ser. iii. 146). [C.O. 5, 980. Nos. 37, 37.i.; and 5, 1120. pp. 456–458.]
April 24.
Whitehall.
291. W. Popple to Mr. Attorney and Solicitor General. Presses for reply to letters of April 12. [C.O. 5, 1291. p. 374.]
[April 24.]292. Mr. Graves to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Suggestions as to what is needed to put New Providence into a state of defence. Signed, Jno. Graves. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 24, 1706. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1263. No. 106; and 5, 1291. pp. 372–374.]
April 26.293. Virginia Merchants to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In reply to queries. (1) It would be of the greatest advantage to our Plantations and encourage the merchants importers to bring home more tobacco etc. if H.M. subjects may have the same liberty to send our tobacco to France directly as the Dutch have etc. (2) As to some encouragement to be given for the manufacturing of tobacco in England. Propose that all tobacco used in the Navy or by our armies abroad be manufactured in England etc. (3) As to making the export of tobacco as easy to our merchants as possible, so as to be able to undersell the Dutch, an Act of Parliament will be required. (4) Liberty obtained from the King of Spain freely to import tobacco of the growth of our Plantations into his dominions to be freely sold there, which hath been of late years made difficult, notwithstanding a former Treaty, and from the King of Portugal at least the liberty to furnish our forces in his service, will be of great help to our Plantations by making the consumption far greater. (5) A speedy Treaty with the Czar for a free importation by all English subjects would give life to trade and support thousands etc. Signed, John Hyde, Tho. Wharton, John Linton, Izaac Millner, Tho. Coutts. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 26, 1706. 2½ large pp. [C.O. 5, 1315. No. 29; and 5, 1362. pp. 37–43.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
294. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Sir B. Granville. Acknowledge letters of Oct. 22 and Jan. 22. We are glad that you found a better temper in the last Assembly than was in the former ones, and we hope that by your prudent management and equal administration of Justice, you will have composed the differences that have lately been in that Island. Enclose Order of Council, April 4, repealing Act confirming titles, to be entered in the Council Books. And for your better guidance in the passing of another Act of the like nature, we send you here inclosed a copy of Mr. Attorney General's report thereupon. We send you also an extract of our Minutes, March 18, 1705/6, upon an Act to keep inviolate the freedome of elections (a copy whereof was delivered to Col. Clealand), by which you will know our opinion upon the said Act. Not having yet received from you such an account of stores of war as you were directed to transmit, Feb. 22, 1704/5, we send you a copy of ye said letter, that you may take care that ye same be duly complyed with. [C.O. 29, 10. pp. 46, 47.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
295. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Enclose following, to be laid before H.M. Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
295. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Report upon convoys and tobacco trade of Virginia and Maryland. Quote Col. Quary, April 2 etc. The merchants of London differ very much amongst themselves and from those of the Western Ports, for that some of them being only Factors and Agents for the Planters, and others being merchants, or purchasing tobacco in the country on their own behalf in exchange for goods by them imported thither, each gives his opinion according to the particular view and interest which he hath in the disposal of his tobacco. The merchants of London who trade for themselves wou'd alwaies have the market open and therefore desire 2 convoys yearly, those who trade as Factors are satisfied with one. We are humbly of opinion that, with regard to the general security and advantage of the trade, and to the present occasions which your Majesty may otherwise have for your shipping, one convoy may suffice, which, as is generally agreed, may sail not later than Sept. Reasons given. This routine to commence Sept., 1707, and meanwhile one to sail in Jan. next. Ships from the Western Ports not ready to sail from England with the outward-bound convoy may go as best they can. After the arrival of the convoy in Virginia and Maryland, no ships to sail thence before its departure, without particular leave from your Majesty. Ships not able to come away thence with the convoy, by reason of their late arrival from England or other accidents, may be permitted to return without convoy. After the arrival of the convoy, one of the ships of war to remain during the winter season in the Rivers of Virginia, another in Maryland, and the rest, in case they arrive soon enough, before the setting in of the Frosts, to wood and water etc., and to cruize off of Barbados and the Leeward Islands, or elsewhere within the Tropics, as H.R.H. shal direct, for the better security of the trade of those parts which hath lately very much suffered by the enemy: Quote Sir J. Cooke [April 9] upon Col. Quary's proposal that H.M. subjects have liberty to send their tobacco directly to France. We humbly represent that, whereas at present there is no commerce by English ships with France, your Majesty may permit newtral ships to load tobacco in England and carry the same directly to France etc. We have had proposals that all tobacco used on board your Majesty's Navy may be allowed the same drawback as for foreign exportation; but whereas the same may considerably diminish your Majesty's Revenue, we cannot advise the same, or that the tobacco for the Navy and Armies abroad be manufactured here in bright rolls, there being no law to inforce the same, besides the putting such of your Majesty's subjects as are in your immediate service under particular restraints. Propose that H.M. ministers at the Courts of Spain and Portugal press, as suggested by Col. Quary, for free importation of tobacco etc., and as to Russia, that H.M. Orders to her Envoy be respited for a short time to enable the Contractors with the Czar to sell their stock. As to Sweden repeat Representation of April 11th. Autograph signatures. 13 pp. Set out in part, Acts of Privy Council, II. No. 1016, q.v. [C.O. 5, 3. Nos. 31, 31.i.; and 5, 1362. pp. 43–53.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
296. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lt. Governor Johnson. Acknowledge letters of Sept. 15 and 17, Nov. 3 and Jan. 29. We observe what you write in the first in relation to the fortifications etc. We approve of your care and diligence in putting the Islands in the best posture of defence you can, and we desire you from time to time to give us the most particular account you are able not only of their state of defence, but of all other matters relating to your Government. We have examined the accounts of stores of warr in Nevis and Antegua, but not finding the said accounts so particular as was expected, so that we suppose you had not H.M. Instructions in that behalf, which has been given to Col. Park, a copy whereof is here inclosed. We writ to you fully, Nov. 1 last, in relation to the sending us a collection of all the laws, and that being a matter wherein H.M. service is so much concerned, we must again repeat it as necessary to be done, as Col. Park is likewise directed. You say, Nov. 3, that "we never proceed by any laws that are not confirmed except such as lye before H.M. for the royal assent." We do not well understand what you mean by that exception. Repeat Instruction given to Col. Park April 12 fin. [C.O. 153, 9. pp. 330–332.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
297. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Handasyd. Acknowledge letters of Nov. 20, Jan. 14, and Feb. 7 and 16. We have consider'd the Act for quartering of souldiers, and agree with you that it is not fit for H.M. royal approbation; however, we have sent it to Mr. Attorny General for his opinion in point of law, and do intend as soon as we shall have recieved it, to lay the said Act before H.M. for her disallowance thereof, in the meanwhile you will do well to endeavour to persuade the next Assembly to pass a new Act for the quartering of souldiers, but without that clause which excludes all who are not naturall born subjects of England or the Islands in America from any civil or military imployments. We can no way approve of the allowing the souldiers 5s. a week in lieu of quarters, as we have formerly writ you, and therefore we desire you to move the Assembly again, upon that head, and to endeavour to make them sensible how much it is their interest to contribute towards the building of barracks for the lodging souldiers H.M. is pleased to send for their defence, which will in a great measure free them from the annual charge they are at in quartering them. We have communicated what you write in relation to the hardship your regiment suffers to Capt. Gardner your Agent, and enclose his answer [April 10]. We have laid what you write in relation to Capt. Allen; to the preparation of the French at Martinico; to your want of the two additional Companys; and to the rank of your Corps, and your own advancement before H.M., and are assured that you will be satisfied in those particulars. Not having yet received from you such an account of stores of war as you were directed to transmit by H.M. letter of Feb. 22, 1704/5, we send you a copy of the said letter, that you may take care that the same be duly comply'd with, and that you give the necessary directions therein. [C.O. 138, 11. pp. 460–463.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
298. Certificate by the Council of Trade and Plantations. Mrs. Elizabeth Furnesse is entitled to be paid for the engraving of the Seals for the Plantations etc., the executors of her father Henry Harris waiving any claim, as per annexed certificate. [C.O. 324, 9. pp. 120, 121.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
299. W. Popple to Mr. Linton. Encloses extract from Col. Quary's letter, Apr. 23, for explanation. [C.O. 5, 1362. p. 64.]
[April 30.]300. John Perrie, Provost Marshall of the Leeward Islands, to the Council of Trade and Plantations (see Jan. 29). Prays that the suspension of his Deputy, John Barnes, by Lt. Gov. Johnson without the advice of the Council, be taken off, and his fees returned and that the Provost Marshall be not required to do other duties than by the Law directed. An Act of Antigua specially provides that the duties of the Provost Marshall are only to summon the Council and Assembly and attend the Governor or Lieut. Governor on all publick occasions or when in Council. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 30, 1706. 1½ pp. [C.O. 152, 6. No. 41.]
[April 30.]301. Mr. Roope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays for consideration of his great losses, and of his services in helping to build the new fortifications at St. Johns etc. Signed, John Roope. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 30, 1706. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 160.]