America and West Indies
August 1706, 1-15

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Cecil Headlam (editor)

Year published

1916

Pages

184-194

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: August 1706, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 23: 1706-1708 (1916), pp. 184-194. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73724 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

August 1706, 1-15

Aug. 1.
London.
451. Mr. Dummer to Mr. Popple. Gives sailings of the Jamaica packet boat. Out and home, 107 days. The Islands are all quiett, ye French being supposed to be sailed to Leeward to attend ye galleons now at Cartagena and Flota at La Vera Cruce. Signed, E. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. 1st, Read 8th Aug., 1706. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 6. No. 14.]
Aug. 1.
London.
452. Same to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Quotes from a letter from Col. Burt, Nevis, June 1st:—The whole French force, of 5,000 odd men, was extreamely well armed, every man a choice firelock and bayonett fixt upon ye muzle, every man a cutting sword and many a pole-axe, which force we had about 400 men to resist. At this time there were 25 vessels in port and 300 odd men belonging to them, not 20 of them gave any assistance, but as soon as ye enemy landed, went into ye country, and with ye revolting negroes robbed ye planters as ye women and ye familyes left their houses, and plundered more than 3 parts of ye houses in ye Island. The negroes betooke themselves to ye mountaines with their plunder and there defend themselves, some that were nearest ye enemy went to them and were strip't of what they carryed off, as they deserved. Soe soon as ye enemy retired, abundance of sloopes and other vessells flocked here and took off goods, negroes, horses, etc. by stealth, which we could not prevent for want of a guard shipp. Col. Johnson has not given us any succour whatever, nor has been here himselfe to consider what to doe against all these misfortunes. The enemy had not above one halfe ye negroes, not a quarter of ye stock, or were halfe ye settlements distroyed, but now ye Island is a third worse than when they left. Many of ye ffamilyes by this meanes are disheartned and have left ye place. The enemy used us barbarously, kept noe word with us in any point, and ye remaines we have, in case we are not protected from ye obligations we were forced to comply with, will be carryed away, etc. Signed, E. Dummer. Endorsed, R. 1 Aug. Addressed. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 45. No. 82.]
Aug. 1.
Crutchett Fryers.
453. Mr. Merrett to Mr. Popple. I have received news from Newfoundland that in Dec. last a party of French came to Ferryland to load salt. Capt. Lloyd imediately sent a party from St. Johns, who routed them and took several Canadians prisoners. In March last an Officer from Placentia came with a strong party of French and Indians to Port Grave in Conception Bay. Mr. Lloyd with 32 souldiers went in persuit; on his approach they fled, but he following them, took severall of the Indians prisoners. There wintered in Newfoundland last winter 1,200 English. The prisoners gave an account that the French from Placentia intended to make another attempt on St. Johns last winter, but gave it over as they were on their guard there, which I presume if Mr. Moody had done, the French had not done that damage. All are well satisfied with Mr. Lloyd's government and conduct. Signed, Solomon Merrett. Endorsed, Recd. 2nd, Read 6th Aug., 1706. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 165.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
454. Mr. Secretary Hedges to Governor Sir B. Granville. Yesterday arrived a West India packet bringing me letters from Antego and Nevis, but none from you. These letters give an account that ye unfortunate Island of Nevis has suffered a 3d. part more since ye ennemy left it, by reason of disorders and want of due care taken for settling ye people there. H.M. has given orders for applying a proper remedy and for putting those Islands into as good a condition of Defence as is possible with all expedition. In the mean time, it is to be wisht that the neighbouring Governments and such men of war as are in those parts would use thier endeavours to releive and support the Island of Nevis and give countenance and spirit to ye Inhabitants, that they do not desert ye Island. I hope ye Governor will be arrived there long before this time, who by his presence and authority may be able to restrain the disorders that have been committed since the French were there and still are continued in a very scandalous manner. I am very glad to hear by other hands that you had made very good preparations for giving the French a warm reception if they had made any attempt upon your Island. It is concluded now that danger is over, and that it will be no more in ye power of ye ennemy to give any disturbances in those parts. I have sent you heretofore ye continuation of our good successes, and you will receive by the news sent you this night from the office an account of King Charles III being proclaimed at Madrid, who we have little reason to doubt is by this time possest of ye whole Kingdom of Spain, you will take all opportunities that offer of letting ye Spaniards in America have ye good news of ye happy progresses of ye Allys, particularly of their Lawfull Soveraign, that it may encourage them to shake off the yoke of a fforeign Government, and to declare for his Catholick Majesty. I hope it will not be long before I shall be able to send you an account of further successes, the ffleet being ready to sail with Land Forces on board upon some expedition which in all probability will be of very great advantage to the common cause. Signed, C. Hedges. The two concluding sentences were sent as a Circular signed by Mr. Secretary to Governor Lord Cornbury, Governor Nott, and Governor Seymour. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 99, 100, 104.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
455. Same to Governor Parke. I hope this will find you in your Government, where you have been very much wanted, the inhabitants of Nevis having according to the accounts I have received suffered very much since the French went off by their own disorders and for want of the presence and authority of a Governor, and I don't find that ye persons upon whom the administration devolved upon the death of Sir Wm. Matthews have taken any care of it, either before or after ye French being there. You are to enquire into all those mismanagements both before they were attackt, at ye time of ye ennemy's being in ye Island and since they left it, and to send over the originall Depositions, with your opinion upon the whole. You are to see the Blacks encouraged, who behaved themselves with so much resolution upon this occasion, and to use them well, and as to the grant made by Ibberville to certain Inhabitants of Nevis, it is by all means to be discountenanced, and if any of them should insist upon it, you are to send an account thereof and who they are. I send you an extract of what I writ concerning what H.M. has done, and measures are taken for sending you every thing else that is necessary for your Defence and Relief. She thinks it for ye service that you should make either Nevis or St. Christophers ye place of yr. residence at this juncture, and ye rather at Nevis, since by your authority and presence you will bee better able to put an end to ye scandalous disorders that have been committed and are still, according to the accounts I receive, continued in that Island. You are to use your utmost endeavours to encourage and give spirit to ye inhabitants to resettle, giving them assurances that H.M. is very sensible of their condition and will send them forthwith all Ordnance Stores that are necessary, more men, and will omitt nothing for putting them again into a flourishing condition, if they will do their parts for making H.M. gracious Intentions effectuall. But above all she has it in her thoughts to secure them from ye demand of 1,400 Negroes the French pretend to make upon them, and which the Inhabitants are apprehensive the French may exact upon them after Oct. 6, before wch. time I hope you will have ye satisfaction of seing a good squadron of H.M. ships at those Islands. In the mean time H.M. does not doubt but you will exert yourself in ye best manner you can for her service, ye security of ye Islands, and ye quieting ye minds of ye inhabitants. And it is to be hoped that hereafter ye French will not be in a condition to give them any disturbance. Concludes as preceding. Signed, C. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 100–102.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
456. Mr. Secretary Hedges to Governor Dudley. I received ye 6th past yr. favour of April 23. I have sent you heretofore ye continuation of our good successes, etc. as in preceding. H.M. is well satisfyed to find you are in so good a posture with your French and Indian neighbours, and is pleased to approve of your service in relation to them. The copys of ye Articles offered to Monsr. Vaudreville and ye Treaty proposed by him to you concerning ye exchange of prisoners having been laid before H.M., she is pleased to order that you do not proceed any farther in that matter. Signed, C. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 30. p. 103.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
457. Same to Wm. Burt. Yesterday I received a letter subscribed by yourself and 4 other Gentlemen, but without a date, which I have laid before the Queen, as I had before done Mr. Richard Abbot's letter of April 22, together with other letters relating to Nevis and St. Christophers, ye humble representation of divers merchants trading with St. Christophers, and a petition of the inhabitants of Nevis, whereupon H.M. has been graciously pleased immediatly to take such measures for your relief and support as are suitable to your unfortunate condition, of which I hope you will soon find the good effect. I have by H.M. command written at large to ye Governor to take all possible care for encouraging and giving spirit to ye inhabitants, in which I hope you will afford him all possible assistance in all that is necessary to be done, till such time as H.M. supplys can be sent from hence. Signed, C. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 30. p. 104.]
Aug. 2.
Jamaica.
458. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letter and enclosures of April 26, and a duplicate of H.M. order relating to the stores of war in this Island, which I complyed with on receipt of the originall by the Barbadoes packett-boat that sailed Dec. last, and miscarried in her passage, and with it sent a copy of a bond of one Robert Daniell of Carolina for the return of some stores of war, sent for the service of that place, upon the request of the chief inhabitants there, and upon notice of the miscarriage of that packettboat, I likewise sent duplicates of both those papers to your Lorpps. by the Queen Anne pacquet boat that sailed from hence Aprill 1st. I now send the same account, with an addition to it of what arms have been since delivered out to the inhabitants upon apprehensions of the Enemy. As to affairs in these parts, there are 14 gallions at Carthagene, 4 of which are men-of-war, two of 50 guns, each one of 54, and the other of 60 guns, and 10 merchant ships, but by an account we have from the Spanish merchants there, they are the poorest that ever came to the West Indies. Our woolen manufactory sells well among the Spaniards, but at present we have none here. Here is a new Vice-Roy come to Carthagene under convoy of 3 French menof-war as they call them, but they are only privateers, he has above 70 Gentlemen of his attendants that are all French, he himself is very much in the French interest, which is a great dissatisfaction to all the Spaniards, he was just come to Carthagene when the fflag of truce sent from hence came there, he told the Governor that he ought not to receive the packett with the King of Spain's Declarations, letters, etc., they being from an enemy, but the Governor called a Councill, wherein it was resolved on, that the packett should be opened, and copys of the letters taken and sent to Old Spain, and also of the Declarations etc., and the other packetts to Havanna, Porto Bell etc., as directed, which was a great mortification to the Vice-Roy. The Governor told him he himselfe was welcome there, but as for his attendants, none should be admitted there that were French. He had the like message sent from Porto Bell, when notice was given there of his coming, which shews the Spaniards' inclination for King Charles' interest, and I am of opinion whenever the fleet arrives, there will be great alterations. Admirall Whetstone, having been out with his Squadron, mett with a violent storm, in which he lost his main-mast and disabled his mizon mast, but he is making all the dispatch he can to refitt his ship. Two of H.M. ships of war, the Montague and Foulston [? Folkestone], sailed from hence about three weeks ago, but were drove into the leeward part of this Island, they are now sailed again, and as I'm informed, bound for Newfoundland. This Island is very healthy, and I am of opinion if Monsieur had come, he would not have taken Jamaica in 6 months' time, tho he had brought 10,000 men with him, and I do assure your Lordships that the honour of our great and gracious Queen, and the welfare of Old England shall never be lost, where I have the honour to command. I am still in want of recruits and men to compleat the two additional Companys, here being no more sent over of those two Companys than 35 men, so that I shall want to recruit the regiment and fill up those companys, at least 150 men. The Quartering Act being near expired, I have been obliged to call an Assembly, which is to meet Sept. 3. I hope they will be better humour'd than usuall, and not endeavour to entrench on H.M. Royall prerogative, which if they do, I shall be obliged to dissolve them. Our ffleet of men-of-war and merchant ships under the command of Capt. Kerr, arrived here July 25. The men-of-war design to sail within 3 or 4 days to the Spanish coast. Another packett boat came in here July 27, so that we have now 2 packett-boats in harbour, and if anything happens during its stay worth giving your Lops. the trouble of, I shall not omitt letting you know; and since I understand by that packett-boat that your Lops. have received the account of the stores and bond of Robert Daniell, in which account is mentioned the particulars he had, I shall not trouble your Lorps. with them again, and as for the putting the bond in execution, it cannot be done here, because here are no effects of his, but must be done in England, where he has an estate. I send your Lorps. here enclosed an Address from the Councill of this Island and myselfe to congratulate H.M. happy success, which we humbly desire your Lordships will present to H.M. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 17th, Sept., 1706. 3¾ pp. Enclosed,
458. i. Governor and Council of Jamaica to the Queen. Congratulatory Address upon the successes of H.M. arms in Flanders and Spain. Thanks for reinforcing Admiral Whetstone with the squadron of men of war lately arrived etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 7. Nos. 30, 30.i.; and 137, 51. No. 17; and (without enclosure) 138, 12. pp. 17–24; and (extract of letter) 137, 51. No. 12.]
Aug. 2.
Jamaica.
459. Governor Handasyd to Mr. Sec. Hedges. Acknowledges letters of April 20, May 9 and 16. As soon as Capt. Carr [Kerr] arrives, all the assistance that lies in my power shall be given in his expedition. Returns thanks for his Regiment etc. and repeats parts of preceding. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, R. Sept. 14. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 51. Nos. 15, and (duplicate) 16.]
Aug. 2.
Whitehall.
460. W. Popple, jr., to J. Burchett. Encloses extract of letter from Gov. Handasyd [above], to be laid before the Lord High Admiral's Council. [C.O. 138, 12. pp. 16, 17.]
Aug. 6.
Jamaica.
461. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letters of May 30 and 31. I have caused all the news of H.M. glorious success in Flanders, Spain etc. to be put into the best Spanish I can, and sent to the Admirall of the Gallions, and to the Vice-roy, who is lately arrived in these parts, and likewise to the Spanish Governors. Capt. Kerr has joyned Admirall Whetstone, who is gone with a noble squadron to the Spanish Coast, and I doubt not but their appearance there will have a very good effect. As to what your Lops. are pleased to say in relation to me and my Regiment, ffor my own part I am allways ready to serve our gracious Queen in any place she is pleased to command me to, and I dare say the Regiment is the same, since it is for the good of H.M. service, so that we do assure ourselves, on your Lorps.' promise to patronize us, that if a sudden peace should be made, we shall meet with no hardships, since we are of 18 or 20 years' standing, there not being many elder regiments in the service. I enclose to your Lorps. the copy of a letter sent to Mr. Arnold Brown, late Agent for prizes in Jamaica, who was superceeded by a Commission in the last packett, and has now in his hands between 7,000l. and 8,000l. of H.M. mony, and I do assure myselfe he will remitt it in heavy mony by this ffleet; by which letter your Lordps. will be informed of a very ill design of one Mr. Glover, the person who writt it, wherein he mentions the Duke of Marlborough's interest as an encouragement to Mr. Brown to follow his barbarous proposall: Mr. Glover's presumption herein I am very much surprized at, and cannot omitt giving your Lorps. notice of it, desireing his Grace may be informed thereof, that such methods may be taken with Mr. Glover, as may be a terror to all those who dare make use of a Nobleman's name of his worth to carry on their ill designs. Your Lorps'. Instructions of May 31 for a Thanksgiving shall be punctually observed. I shall be very glad to serve Sir Salathial Lovell, in what your Lops. have recommended to me relating to his son, who is supposed to be cast away in his voyage to England, but he left a power in a Gentleman's hands here to receive what effects of his were left behind, whom I shall take care to speak to of it, the first opportunity I have: a younger son of Sir Salathiel's died here since, and as I'm informed has left his affairs in great confusion. A Gentleman to whom he was considerably indebted has administered, and I believe everybody he has been concerned with will be loosers. By the last packett boat arrived a Serjeant and 24 men for the 2 additionall companys, 4 men deserted at the Windward Islands, and one man died in the passage, so that I shall want about 120 men to compleat the Regiment. I hope it will not be long before I shall send your Lorps. the welcome news that matters are as favourable in these parts for the interest of King Charles, as in Old Spain, and I do assure your Lorps. no endeavours of mine shall be wanting towards the perfecting of it. Our homeward bound ffleet under convoy of Admiral Whetstone will not sail from hence in less than 2 months' time, and I am certain there will be at least 200,000l. in boullion on board them, so that I hope your Lorps. will take care that a squadron be ordered to meet them in the chops of the Channell. Our Spanish trade goes on very well, we are much in want of woolens for that trade, of which there is but little come in this ffleet. The Island is very healthy. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 17th Sept., 1706. 2½ pp. Enclosed,
461. i. Mr. Glover to Arnold Browne. London, April 25, 1706. I have yett with difficulty prevented the Commissions being sent to ye abovesaid genll. per last pacquet, but fear it will come per this, tho' if I can, will stop it longer, however as it is you'll have time to gett a good sum of money into your hands, for I hear that there are severall prizes lately brought into your Port of considerable vallue, and if they should pretend to prosecute you for the money there, it is but comeing home for England imediately and bring a summe of money wth. you and all your effects, and I doe not fear but to get you in againe in the same post, if you have a mind to goe back againe, but I hope you'l have secured soe much money, that you'l have noe occasion to goe back againe, and I doe not doubt but by the interest of the Duke of Marlborough, I may procure you some good employment here, if you be but just to me, and take care to pay me my money, which I doubt not but you'l doe, considering how ffavourable and kind I have been to you. Signed, John Glover. Vera copia, Arnold Browne. Endorsed, Recd. Sept. 14, 1706. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 7. Nos. 31, 31.i.; and (without enclosure) 138, 12. pp. 24–29; and (extract of covering letter) 137, 51. No. 18.]
Aug. 6.
Jamaica.
462. Governor Handasyd to Mr. Sec. Hedges. Acknowledges letters of April 20 and May 30. The ffleet is arrived here consisting of 11 sail of men of war and a fireship, etc. Repeats parts of preceding letter. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, R. Oct. 30. 1¾ pp. Enclosed,
462. i. Duplicate of preceding enclosure. [C.O. 137, 51. Nos. 19, 19.i.; and (without enclosure) 137, 45. No. 83.]
Aug. 10.
New York.
463. Governor Lord Cornbury to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letter of July 18. By the first clause I perceive that you expect to hear from me what has been the effect of the suspension of execution of H.M. Proclamation relating to the coin etc. The only effect I can acquaint you with, is, that this Collony has by that means had money enough circulating in it to carry on the Trade of the Province, which otherwise would not have been. I must confesse that the money we have is very bad, and that is cheifly the fault of the Assembly, and that thus, the people of Boston have a much greater Trade to Old England then the people of New York, by reason whereof they have much greater quantitys of European goods then our people have, and much more then they can consume, they send great quantitys of European goods in their sloops to this place, here they sell their goods for ready money, and good money, this money they clip at Boston to a third part lesse in vallue then it was when they received it, and send it back hither to buy our corn in grain (for they seldom take flower); by this means they are able to sell flower made of our own corn in the Islands cheaper then we can, this I have endeavoured to prevail with the Assembly to prevent by laying an additional duty on all European commoditys imported into this place, from any place but from England, but they have not been willing to doe it yet. As for the account of stores of warr, I sent accounts of all the stores expended here since I came to this Province by the way of Jamaica, and now I send an account of what stores are remaining here, by which you will see that wee want almost everything. Your Lordshipps are pleased to observe that I could not legally and properly by my Instructions admit Mr. Mompesson, Mr. Barbarie and Mr. Phillips into the Councill, without H.M. previous appointment, which I acknowledge, and ask H.M. pardon for it; but at the same time intreat you to believe that I should not have done it, had not the Queen's service in a great measure required it, for by my Instructions I am directed not to act any thing in Councill without five of the Councill, unlesse it be in cases of emergency. Now, when I added those three Gentlemen to the Councill, there was then Members of the Councill living, Col. Schuyler, Mr. Van. Dam, Mr. Beekman, Mr. Lawrence, Col. Heathcott, Col. Romer, Col. Wenham and Mr. Renslaer, of those there are only Mr. Van Dam and Col. Wenham livers in town, Col. Schuyler and Mr. Renslaer live at Albany, Mr. Beekman and Mr. Lawrence live in Long Island, Col. Heathcott lives in West Chester County, and Col. Romer has been at Boston almost 4 years, soe that I could be sure but of two Councellors in winter time, let the exigency be what it would, for those at Albany can not come in the winter, those on Long Island are under as great difficultys, for sometimes for a month or six weeks together it is impossible to crosse from this City to Long Island; Col. Heathcott is under the same difficulty sometimes, and this I doe assure your Lordshipps is the only reason that moved me to admit those three Gentlemen into the Councill; I return my most humble thanks to your Lordshipps for your kindness to me, in representing that matter favourably to the Queen; I will take care not to committ the like error again; I herewith send a list of 12 persons, whom I look upon to be the fittest persons to serve H.M. in her Councill. I have been forced to dismisse Mr. Wm. Lawrence from the Councill, after having born with him upwards of three years, in many irregularitys, and perticularly one time having had a complaint against him for assaulting a man upon the highway. I sent for him, and told him if he would not cease committing these irregular proceedings (of which I reckon'd up severall that he had been guilty of), I should be forced to remove him, he promised he would amend his ways, but instead of that, in a few weeks, I had a complaint by some of the Justices of Queen's County where he lives, that he and some other persons moved by him had committed a Riot and desired leave to proceed against him at Law, I acquainted the Councill, who were all of opinion that he ought to be dismissed from the Councill, and indeed I was of the same opinion, being well satisfied that he is in noe wise fit to serve H.M. in that place, nor indeed in noe other; therefore I did dismisse him, and ordered the Secretary Mr. Clark to make an entry in the Councill Books accordingly, which he has done. I intreat your Lordshipps that Col. Peartree may be admitted in the room of Mr. Lawrence, whose suspension I hope the Queen will be gratiously pleased to approve of; I likewise intreat your Lordshipps that Col. Quary may either come into the Councill in the room of Col. Romer, who has quite left this Province, or be added to the number of twelve, as he is in New Jersey. All the Journalls of the Assembly, and the Minutes of Councill since my coming into this Province are transcribing in order to send to your Lordshipps, they would have been ready by this time, but Mr. Cosens, who was formerly Clerk of the Councill, has been a great while at Rhode Island upon his own affairs, is but few days agoe return'd to this place, and is hard at work upon them; soe I hope in a short time they will be finished, and shall be sent by the first conveyance that offers. Signed, Cornbury. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 28, Read Dec. 5, 1706. Holograph. 3 pp. Enclosed,
463. i. List of persons supposed fit for vacancies in the Council of New York. Col. Wm. Peartree, Col. R. Quary, Col. Rd. Willet, Capt. John Chollwell, May Bickley, James Emott, Capt. Ebenezer Wilson, Major Thomas Jones, Major Augustin Graham, Stephen De Lancey, Col. Wm. Merrit, Barent Rynders. Endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1049. Nos. 18, 18.i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1120. pp. 483–489.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
464. Sir C. Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I desire you will prepare a warrant for H.M. signature for a Commission of Review in pursuance of Order in Council, June 26. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read Aug. 15, 1706. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 17; and 5, 1120. p. 476.]
Aug. 13.
Whitehall.
465. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Board of Ordnance. Enclose Lt. Governor Bennett's list of stores of war which he found at Bermuda. (See No. 424.i.) [C.O. 38, 6. p. 220.]
Aug. 13.
Admiralty Office.
466. H.R.H. the Lord High Admiral to the Queen. I have no objection to the Martha (Sir W. Phippard) being permitted to return from Virginia without being embargo'd. Signed, George. [S.P. Naval, 7. under date.]
Aug. 15.
Barbados.
467. Governor Sir B. Granville to Mr. Sec. Hedges. I have the honour of your several letters of the 28 and 30 June and the 4 of July etc. We have had no certain news of the French since they left Nevis so long agoe, they did not make any attempt on this place, notwithstanding what they gave out: by reports which come about to us from Martinique by the way of Antegoa we are told that Monsr. d'Ibberville was near 4 months agoe at St. Domingo ready to sail from thence for to attack Jamaica, having added five ships of warr to his squadron and taken 1,000 Land men more on board, etc. Signed, Bevill Granville. Endorsed, R. Oct. 30. Holograph. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 43. No. 9.]
Aug. 15.
Whitehall.
468. W. Popple to Mr. Attorney General. The Council of Trade and Plantations send you a copy of the first Commission and proceedings on the complaints of the Mohegan Indians, and desire you to send them a draught of a Commission of Review. [C.O. 5, 1120. p. 477.]
Aug. 15.
Maryland.
469. Governor Seymour to Mr. Popple. In obedience to their Lordships' commands signifyed by your letter July 28, 1705, which I recd. not till Feb. 10, 1705/6, I have sent the Old Seale of the Province by the Rev. Mr. Evans, Minister of Philadelphia etc. Sooner I could not send it with any likelihood of safety. Signed, Jo. Seymour. Endorsed, Recd. 20th, Read 25th Nov., 1706. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 716. No. 17; and 5, 726. p. 395.]