America and West Indies
December 1706

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1916

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323-341

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'America and West Indies: December 1706', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 23: 1706-1708 (1916), pp. 323-341. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73733 Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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Contents

December 1706

Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
636. Mr. Sec. Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses letters from Col. Seymour, Col. Dudley, Mr. Heathcote, Capt. Lloyd and Mr. Byfield. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Dec. 3, 1706, Read Feb. 21, 1706/7. ½ p. [C.O. 323, 6. No. 27; and 324, 9. p. 135.]
[Dec. 2.]637. Caleb Heathcote to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Relating to his proposal concerning Naval Stores. New Yorke, April 16, 1706. Referred to in preceding, Signed. Caleb Heathcote. Endorsed, R. Nov. 25, 1706. Recd. (by the Board of Trade) Dec. 3, 1706, Read. Feb. 21, 1706/7. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 24.]
[Dec. 2.]638. Inhabitants and Traders in and to Nevis to the Queen. The devastation lately made by the French caused severall of the inhabitants to withdraw their persons and the small remainder of their estates from thence, and others daily follow, insomuch that the said Island may become uninhabited. For remedy propose the appointment as Lt. Governor of a man of loyalty to your Majestie and interest with the inhabitants. Col. Daniel Smith is such a person. His courage and conduct was particularly signalized in the defence of that Island, in which he received a wound. Signed, Jos. Jory, Miles Stapleton, Rich. Meriwether, Ja. Walker, George Turney, Dav. Foulis, John. Vaughan, Joseph Martyn, John Tonstall, Aza. Pinney, Samll. Ball, Jon. Meriwether, Wm. Coleman, Nath. Carpenter. Subscribed,
638. i. H.M. having been moved upon this petition, refers the same to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Signed, C. Hedges. The whole endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 9, 1706. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 6. Nos. 67, 67.i.; and 153, 9. pp. 419, 420.]
Dec. 2.639. Deposition of B. Vanderwerff. Enclosed is a true copy of a law passed in Pensilvania, etc. Signed, Benja. Vanderwerff. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 10, 1706. ¾ p. Enclosed,
639. i. Copy of Act directing the qualifications of officers, etc. [C.O. 5, 1263. Nos. 129, 129.i.]
[Dec. 3.]640. Richard Butler and others to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Further proposals etc. in pursuance of Memorial, June 10. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 3, 1706. 3 pp. [C.O. 323, 6. Nos. 21, 21.i.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
641. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Report upon the petition of Richard Butler and others (June 10). The proposal of the Petitioners for clothing 200,000 servants and slaves etc. cannot be effected as they desire unless the Assemblies in the several Plantations shou'd agree to pass Acts to compell the inhabitants to cloath their servants and slaves with such linsey woolsey, or that an Act of Parliament as they desire be past here for that purpose. We are further humbly of opinion that the wares and merchandises of any sort to be sent from England for the supply of your Majesty's Plantations, ought rather to be recommended to your subjects there by their proper goodness, usefulness and cheapness than be imposed upon them by a rated price, by the power and compulsion of Laws which wou'd be the greatest discouragement to trade. That the obtaining of such Laws in the Plantations we humbly conceive will meet with a general opposition from the merchants and planters, for that the petitioners expect that in order to their design, great taxes be laid upon most branches of trade in those parts, which in a great measure are already tax'd, and all of them appropriated to the public service, so that the sending of the queries annex'd to the said Petition to the several Governors, as desired by the petitioners, may raise jealousies and occasion disturbances amongst your Majesty's subjects in those parts, which may be attended with very ill consequences, so that instead of what is proposed by the petitioners, we have advised them to apply themselves to the promoting of the manufacture by sending over in the ord'nary course of trade, some specimens or patterns of linsey woolsey shapes or cloaths, that so upon tryal of them first had, it may be made appear that what is proposed by the petitioners was designed more for a public benefit than for a particular profit or interest. We have also acquainted them that the woolen goods of all sorts from England will be at present in great demand in several parts of the continent, in as much as those people have been induced by proper encouragements to desist from carrying on and working that manufacture in America, and in lieu thereof have applied themselves to the produce of pitch, tar and other naval stores, of which considerable quantities are now arrived, in barter whereof the woolen manufacture of England will be readily accepted of. [C.O. 324, 9. pp. 131–133.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
642. W. Popple, jr., to Wm. Lowndes. Encloses Act of Virginia for the settling of ports, etc., for the opinion of the Commissioners of H.M. Customs. [C.O. 5, 1362. pp. 86, 87.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
643. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Signify that, as Principal Secretary of State, he is one of the Commissioners of Trade etc. [C.O. 389, 36. p. 319.]
Dec. 5.
Barbadoes.
644. Col. Sharpe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to letter of Nov. 28. Since which we have received great life from H.M. happy repeated assurancys of her Royall care and protection given us by Sir John Jennings, who with the squadron of H.M. ships under his command arrived here Nov. 29, and after haveing communicated such H.M. royall flavour and his great zeal and readyness to enterprize anything for our advantage, sayled this day for the Leeward Islands with an humble Address to H.M. and the thanks of this Government. I have ever since Sir B. Granville left this Government, endeavour'd to compose the Heats and animosities which have so long distracted this unhappy Place, and did once flatter myself I should have succeeded in so just a design, and in order to it at my first meeting the Council and Assembly, I did freely communicate my thoughts upon the present posture of our affaires to them; (copy enclosed). But to my great disapointment I have found the apprehensions some persons have entertain'd, that our Paper Act would be amended, I humbly mean, brought from their own advantage to the publick good, have prevented all healing methods of reconciling our unhappy differencys, and instead thereof have infused groundless feares into the people, of many alterations design'd in the Military and Civil Offices, altho it is notorious no one officer, Civil or Military, has been displaced since Sir B. Granville left us; nor has anything been transacted but according to the settlement of the Government unanimously agreed upon by Sir Bevill and them all. Nor have they stopt here, but have proceeded to discourse publickly of their intentions (tho but three of the Members of H.M. Councill here), to endeavour by all the meanes imaginable to dissolve the settlement of the Government dureing a Presidency, which according to H.M. Patent and directions to Sir B. Granville was so solemnly settled by Him and the whole Council upon his designing to leave us, and since twice, as solemnly and unanimously, affirm'd by the whole Council again. These unwarrantable proceedings still keep alive our divisions, and universally convince the People that they are intended only to prevent any alterations of the Paper Act, which now plainly appeares to be the greatest misfortune imaginable to us, and that at the passing the Assembly was carried but by one voice. But this matter we heare now lyes under H.M. consideration, which is a great satisfaction to us. Signed, Wm. Sharpe. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 17th March, 1706/7. Holograph. 3 pp. Enclosed,
644. i. Copy of Col. Sharpe's Speech to the Council and Assembly of Barbados on their first meeting him in Council. There is no way to prevent our impending ruine but to lay aside those animosities and prejudices which threaten it. I have the honour of giving the example, which I am proud to find had had that universall influence as to bring the whole people unanimously in to me etc. Recommends fortifying the country. And here I can't but commiserate the unhappy circumstances of the inferiour sort of our inhabitants, who are so disheartened by the fatigue, labour and insupportable expence of military duty, that most of them are forced to seek for support in other parts, and those who remain are but so many miserable objects of charity. Your Militia is hereby reduced lower than I can give myselfe leave to mention, and yett daily decreasing, so that we have not even the consolation of knowing where the mischief will end. To supply this difficiency I am of opinion that we address her sacred Majesty for such fforces as may perform the severer dutyes, and that such provision be made for their subsistance, as will be least grievious to the Country. To do all this, you must be at great expence; nothing but a firm perswasion of the necessity of these measures could prevail upon me to recommend them; my own possessions will subject me to as large a share of the burthen as any. Trade is essential, even to the being of a Colony; this tender Plant all wise Governments have nurs'd and cherisht with the fondest care, as the Darling of their hopes. Now when H.M. victorious armes, under the great Captain of the Age, the Prince and Duke of Marlbrough, have restored the Ballance of Europe, the great and only aim of all her glorious actions, it is highly probable Trade will be settled on a firmer foundation, and you'l then have an oppertunity of fixing her for ever yours. It is then incumbent upon you Gentlemen to give such encouragement as may secure our portion of her smiles, which can only be compast by establishing your creditt. Continues as No. 632.ii., and concludes by recommending the support of true religion and virtue and the sacrifice of all private considerations to the publick good. Endorsed, Recd. March 14, 1706/7. 2½ pp.
644. ii. Minutes of Council of Barbados, under Sir B. Granville, Sept. 4, 1706, settling the powers of the President of the Council in his absence, unanimously approved of then and by the Council at two subsequent meetings, after his departure, Sept. 14 and Oct. 1. Endorsed as preceding. 3 pp. [C.O. 28, 9. Nos. 93, 93.i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 29, 10. pp. 402–405.]
Dec. 5.
Barbadoes.
645. Col. Sharpe to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Duplicate of preceding letter. Endorsed, Recd. March 14, 1706/7. Holograph. 3 pp. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 57.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
646. Wm. Popple to Mr. Attorney General. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire your opinion upon Lord Cornbury's letter [Oct. 3] relating to the granting of letters of administration, and particularly what may be fit for H.M. to do in all the Plantations upon the like occasions. [C.O. 5, 1120. p. 510.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
647. Same to Mr. Burchet. Encloses extract of Lord Cornbury's letter (Oct. 3), relating to Capt. Miles, to be laid before the Lord High Admiral's Council. [C.O. 5, 1120. p. 511.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
648. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Navy Board. Propose a conference as directed Nov. 30. [C.O. 5, 912. pp. 208, 209.]
Dec. 6.649. Mr. Duport to the Queen. Prays that Col. Michaell Lambert may be confirmed in his appointment as Lt. Gov. of St. Kitts. Signed, F. Duport. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 9, 1706. ½ p. [C.O. 152, 6. No. 68; and 153, 9. p. 421.]
Dec. 7/18.650. Col. Romer to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prisoner at St. Malo, he describes his capture in a mast-ship by two French frigates. He threw his drawings and papers overboard, etc. Signed, Wolfgang Wilhelm Römer. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 1, Read Feb. 28, 1706/7. Addressed. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 864. No. 162.]
Dec. 7.
Bristol.
651. J. Templeman to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following, having been Admiral at St. Johns last year. Praises Major Lloyd, his discipline of his soldiers and protection of the inhabitants, etc. Signed, Jno. Templeman. Endorsed, Recd. Dec. 11, 1706/7. Read Jan. 20, 1706/7. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
651. i. Lists of the Planters' stages, boats, men, train-fats, blubber-casks and fishing ships at St. Johns and QuidiVidi, 1706. 3 pp. [C.O. 194, 4. Nos. 10, 10.i.; and 195, 4. pp. 331–335.]
Dec. 8.
Kensington.
652. The Queen to Governor Seymour. Permit for the Coleman and the Benjamin not to be stopt in the West Indies for convoy. Countersigned, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 3.]
Dec. 9.
St. Christophers.
653. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letter of Sep. 26. You tell me you expect that I follow all my Instructions, which is impossible, but as near as I can, I will. One is, that I shall not swear any of ye Councill when there are seaven on the place; there are nine at Nevis, and yett for want of a Councill there can be nothing done, for five of them have been sick for this month, and one is gone for England. Then I am to send home a list of six of the ablest of the inhabitants, for you to choose out of them Councellors, I must own I am att a loss how to find out which are the ablest of the inhabitants for you to choose out of them Councillors. If you had ordered me to send you ye names of all the inhabitants, I cou'd easily have done that, when I can doe the other I will. I found abundance of strange people crowded into the Commissions of the Peace. I have turn'd none out, I huddled them all together again as I found them. Capt. Poggson that kill'd Col. Johnson, he is one of the Councill, and every one of his Jury are Justices of the Peace, the Foreman was Lieut. Governour of this Island, had not my Instructions tyed me up to ye contrary, I would have turn'd out all the twelve Justices, and Mr. Poggson too. Had Poggson been brought in guilty of the murder, as he ought to have been, I should have certainly suspended him; but as it is I shall follow your orders; I think Col. Codrington deserves to be suspended, but I shall not suspend him neither, except a Jury brings him in guilty of treason or murder. There was one Capt. Kitt and Capt. Stodder, when the enemy were on shore on this Island, march'd off from the rest, and whilest ye French plunder'd on one side the Island, they plunder'd on the other; they were tryed by a Court Marshall and brought off; I have turn'd them out from being Captains. I think my Instructions leave me at liberty to turn out a Militia Captain without sending my reasons home; these are the onely two I have turn'd out, and I send the reason. Before I came from Antigua, a gentleman on a very slight occasion drew his pistoll, and shot a poor man dead; I was affraid I must have been obliged to suspend him, but upon tryall, tho' there wanted noe proof, yet a consciencious Jury brought him in not guilty. A Hangman, I find, is like to have but little buisness in these Islands. Your Lordships expects I send you home the particulars how Nevis came to be so cowardly lost, truly I went about enquireing but at last I found the depositions would have made a vollume, soe I gave it over, for every one accused the other, in short every one run away, all the mischief that was done, was one Major Child kill'd and Col. Smith wounded, and as I am informed it was by randome shott, for nobody expected musketts wou'd have carryed soe farr. A parcell of drunken saylors gott to a fort and fired some gunns at the towne, when the French were in it; which a Major had the reputation of tho' the sailors said there was never a gunn fired till above an hour after the Major left them; whilst he stay'd they did nothing but drink, and when the drink was all out, they began to fire, this is all the fireing, I heard, there was on our side, etc. Repeats parts of following letter. After they were landed 'twas to no purpose to oppose them, for they were above ten to one, God help them, I pitty them, I have been five times with them, and got the pestilential feavour there and had a narrow escape the last time I went in an open boat, for I have never a man of war. The Swan I sent 9 week since to see the fleet off at sea, and she is not yet returned; the Greyhound and Sherness came disabled from Jamaica and are not yet fitted. The pestilence is so great at Nevis, that half of the people are dead or dying. I carryed 100 soldiers from the other Island, besides those that were there; the officers are all dead, and the soldiers that are not dead are sick, not able to doe duty. I ordered an officer to goe from hence to command there, he told me he would quitt his Commission rather than goe. I sent for Capt. Moore from Montserrat, and before he had been there three days he fell sick of the feaver, and is like to dye. The French sent to demand the 1,400 negroes, Nov. 23. One Monsr. Laland brought me a letter from Monsr. Machault, the French Generall at Martinico. I sent back an answer; I gave him the best reason I cou'd for it's not being due, but at last lett him know the capitulation was sent home to England, and that I should be govern'd by the orders I received from thence. Monsr. Laland was desireous to speak with me, which I refused because the French Generall had refused to see the gent. I sent in the last Flagg of Truce. In returning to Martinique a Dutch Caper took them, 'tis well for us they have at present noe man of war to protect their sloopes, otherwise we might expect them and we are not in a condition to receive them. We have not above three great gunns which I have gott without putting the Queen to any charge; there was hardly any powder till I brought 15 barrells from Antigua. There are not 100 good small arms in these two Islands, not one in tenn that the soldiers have that are fitt for service; and near one third of the soldiers without any, and for swords the Planters never have any, and except the officers, there is not tenn in the whole ten Companies. I desired the people of Nevis to throw up a line about the town, that they might have some place to retreat too, that they might be defended, I promised to lay it out and see it don, but they refused, tho' it would have cost them nothing but the labour of their negroes, and they have still above 2,000 left. Col. Johnson, who understood nothing of the matter; poor man, he cou'd neither write nor read, therefore, 'twas not likely he could understand fortification, he put them to soe much charge in building of a little fort and platformes that were of noe use to him, that I cant gett them now to do anything; there is here a trench, as they called it, that is, a straight ditch, and the ditch on the wrong side; one wou'd think soe many officers that was here should know better. The People of St. Kitts doe everything I desire for their defence; I have made them a regular line from the sea to Brimstone Hill, there is a narrow Pass between that hill and the mountain, where this week I designe to begin a little Fort, there are three Passes more, by nature soe strong as a little labour will make them too strong for any American force to hurt; the People are soe pleased that they begin to think themselves out of danger allready. I am from Monday morning to Satterday night at the trenches, I have my dinner brought me in the feild, I have and doe take more paines for them than ever I took for myself, when I have finished, if I can gett gunns and stores, I shall think this Island very secure. The privateers used to plague us by takeing off our negroes in the night, I have settled little guards all round the Island, and have ordered rounds to goe as regular as in a frontier town, and to encourage it I goe sometimes all night myself, and make the Lieut. Governor doe the same, since this has been done, we have not lost one negroe, they are soe pleased with it now, that there is an emulation amongst themselves, who shall doe their duty best. P.S.—I am rebuilding the fort on Brimstone Hill, which was blown up by the magazines takeing fire by lightning. I have just now an account of Sir John Jennings being at Montserrat. Three of his ships are in sight, comeing to this Island. I shall stop the packetts a few hours for them. Signed, Daniel Parke. Recd. 7th, Read 10th Feb., 1706/7. 6 pp. [C.O. 152, 6. No. 75; and 153, 9. pp. 449–457.]
Dec. 9.
St. Christophers.
654. Governor Parke to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Acknowledges letter of Sept. 26. I shall order another day of Thanksgiving. In reply, quotes letter of July 15. A ship would have brought me time enough cou'd I have gott one, for tho' they were ten to one when landed, and the best Genll. in the world could not have saved the Island then; yet 50 men might have prevented their landing, had they had the resolution to have opposed them; there are but two places at Nevis on the Leeward side to land on, the town and the place where they landed; the town had a great number of gunns planted all along the shore, tho' but indifferently disposed; at the place where they landed there are such rocks and sholes, soe far off the shore that they cou'd not land under the cover of the gunns from their ships, and cou'd send but one boat at a time, so that had there been but 50 men there, they might have killed every boat's crew as they came; but nobody had resolution enough to look them in the face, the Lieut. Governour was not there, and nobody wou'd command, there was but one man kill'd and one wounded, and that, as they tell me, by randome shotts, a parcell of madd sailors that got in an open fort drunk fired upon the French, when they were got into the Town, and that was all the firing on our side. Repeats part of Oct. 31. I found everyone accused the other, soe that I thought it for ye service to endeavour to make all freinds, and desired them to doe their duty for the future. I order'd guards and rounds, but I could not bring them to it. I desired them to send their negroes to remove some gunns the French had not broke, to protect their Harbour, but to noe purpose, they expect the Queen should do everything, and they not endeavour to help themselves. Severall that had grants from Col. Codrington for French lands in this Island, which are now expired, desire[s] me to renew them, and others desire other French lands, but as I have received your orders to doe all I can to resettle Nevis, I have refused them all, for shou'd I lett them have French lands, Nevis wou'd be deserted. I have examined the arms, and find hardly any fitt for service, there are not six swords in this Regiment, except what the officers have, severall have deserted to the French for want of provision, and this Island has it not, I hope things in time will mend. Repeats part of preceding. Signed, Daniel Parke. 4 pp. [C.O. 239, 1. No. 17.]
Dec. 9.
Navy Office.
655. Navy Board to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to letter of 6th inst. Criticise Mr. Bridger's proposals (cf. Dec. 20). If stores cannot be imported from the Plantations, not only as good, but also as cheap from other countrys, premiums etc. included, it will be a burthen to the Navy, and not a service. The importation of stores by commission hath been never used upon choice and always found very chargeable. The Navy even in time of warr does not expend ¼ of the tarr in a year he mentions, supposing him to mean but 40,000 barrels instead of 400,000 as he has exprest, so that 3 parts of his supposed savings are lost in that very article. As to his calculations of the charge of that commodity it appears plainly to us to be more in the first cost and freight only than it has been, and, in our opinion, will be bought for, without the risque of ye seas and enemys, the charge of customs, commission and other contingencies, and without advancing money for the same, which he has taken no notice of etc. Besides, were it for the service of ye Navy to go to market by commission for such goods, this gentleman has not recommended himself to such a trust by his behaviour in his former employments. Signed, Tho. Littleton, Ri. Haddock, Daniel Furcer, B. Tymewell, Geo. Tollet, Cha. Sergison, D. Lyddell, W. Lee. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 10, 1706. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 864. No. 82; and 5, 912. pp. 216–222.]
[Dec. 10.]656. Sir C. Hobby to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays for copies of any charges made against him by Governor Dudley. Signed, Charles Hobby. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 10, 1706. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 864. No. 81.]
Dec. 10.
Admiralty Office.
657. Mr. Burchett to W. Popple. Reply to Dec. 6. The complaint against Capt. Miles will be strictly enquired into when the ship comes to England. I have writ to him not to be guilty of such irregularities for the future, and let him know that both the Tryton's prize and Lowestoft being put under the immediate directions of the Governor, he ought to have obeyed his commands, etc. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 11, 1706. 1 p. Enclosed,
657. i. Same to Capt. Miles. Above letter and this enclosure set out, N.Y. Docs. IV. pp. 1188, 1189. [C.O. 5, 1049. Nos. 20, 20.i.; and 5, 1120. pp. 512–514.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
658. Circular letter from the Earl of Sunderland to the Governors of Plantations. H.M. has appointed me her Secretary of State in the Southern Province. I desire that you will transmitt to me from time to time an account of everything material that occurs in your parts, especially whatever may relate to H.M. service and the benefit of the Government under your care, that I may give H.M. due information, and lett you know Her pleasure thereupon. I shall be very ready to do you any good offices that my station may qualify me for. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. pp. 1, 2.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
659. Same to Mr. Pen, the Governor and Company of Rhode Island, Governor and Company of Connecticut, Lords Proprietors of Carolina and Bahama Islands. Same as preceding, omitting last sentence. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 2.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
660. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Upon petition, Dec. 2, represent that Governor Parke has already appointed Col. Hamilton and Col. Lambert. Tho' it was not strictly agreable to his Instructions that he should remove any Lt. Governors from one Government to another, yet forasmuch as this was done at the desire of the inhabitants of both Nevis and St. Kitts and under their greatest exigencies, we conceive that it will be for your Majesty's service that this change be approved. We humbly offer that Col. Smith (see Dec. 2), is very deserving of your Majesty's favour, and may be recommended to Col. Parke for supplying the first vacancy of Lt. Governor that may happen in any of those Islands. [C.O. 153, 9. pp. 422–424.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
661. Council of Trade and Plantations to the President and Council of Barbadoes. Since our letter of Nov. 12 (duplicate enclosed), wee have received none from you. Enclose Orders in Council, June 26, confirming some Acts of Barbadoes, and repealing others. Quote reasons for repeal given June 7. We have of late received severall letters from the Plantations, inclosed in covers directed to the respective Agents, by which method we have many times been delayed in the receipt of our letters, to the hindrance of business, which required a quick dispatch, and that many other letters not relating to our Board have been inclosed in those packets, whereby we are charged with the postage of letters not appertaining to us. We therefore desire for the future the letters addressed to our Board be sent in packets by themselves, and not intermix'd with others, in which we have no concern, and that all Acts, Minutes of Councill, Journals of Assembly and other publick papers and letters whatsoever be directly addressed to us, that so they may immediatly be delivered to us from the Generall Post House separate and apart from all other private letters and dispatches. [C.O. 29, 10. pp. 361–365.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
662. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Handasyd. Since our letter to you of Nov. 12, duplicate enclosed, we have received none from you. We inclose H.M. Order in Council of Nov. 14, repealing the Act for subsisting H.M. soldiers etc. Reasons given. See July 15 and Nov. 14. Repeat Instruction concerning correspondence as in preceding. [C.O. 138, 12. pp. 42–45.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
663. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Parke. Since our letter to you of Nov. 12, duplicate whereof goes by this packet, we have received two from you dated Sep. 22 and Oct. 7, but that letter you mention to have sent touching Col. Johnson's death is not come to hand. But we having received a letter from that Gentleman dated at Antego Jan. 29, giving us an account that the Deputy Provost Marshall of that Island had misbehaved himself, and that Col. Johnson had suspended [him] for the same, and we having thereupon discoursed with Mr. John Perry, Provost Marshal of the Leeward Island, he promised us to write to the said Deputy that he should make his submission to the Governor, and that if he refused to do the same he would nominate another in his place; we desire therefore that when his said Deputy shall have made his submission to you, you take off the said suspension and restore him to his place. Enclose two Orders of Councill, May 2, confirming and repealing Acts of Nevis, and a copy of Mr. Attorney General's Report on the Act passed at Nevis Feb. 23, 170¾, for the establishing of Courts etc., that you may move the Assembly there to pass a new Act according to the alterations and amendments as proposed by Mr. Attorney General, which when returned hither so altered we will lay the same before H.M. We take this opportunity to remind you that you cause the old seal of the Leeward Islands to be broken before you in Councill, pursuant to our letter to you of Aug. 10, and that you transmit the said seal so broken to us etc. As to the want of arms, we desire that in your next you may send us a particular specification of what great gunns and other stores of war are wanting, and for what uses, as likewise what small arms are necessary for the defence of the Islands, which we shall accordingly endeavour to procure. Repeat Instruction as to sending public despatches separate from private correspondence, as in preceding. Refer to Representation Dec. 11. Conclude:—You have no authority to remove any Officer commissionated by H.M. from one place to another. This we doubt not will be a direction to you for the future. [C.O. 153, 9. pp. 424–429.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
664. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Navy Board. Propose a conference on Wednesday. (See Dec. 6 etc.) [C.O. 5, 912. pp. 222, 223.]
[Dec. 13.]665. Mr. Foulerton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays, on behalf of A. Skene, that they will either report that he has been fairly tried and acquitted, or if they doubt the legallity of the trial, order such enquiry, and report of it to be sent them by the Government of Barbados, as shall seem meet. Endorsed, Recd. Dec. 13, 1706. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 9. No. 82; and 29, 10. pp. 366–370.]
Dec. 14.
New York.
666. Governor Lord Cornbury to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Capt. Miles (see Oct. 3, etc.) died on Oct. 20 after 4 days illnesse, his Lieutenant, one Mr. Wilcox, came and acquainted me with it. I ordered him to goe immediatly on board the Triton's prise, and take care of the ship, and all things relating to it, till H.R.H. pleasure should be knowne, and I told him I would write into England to Mr. Burchett, etc., which I did immediatly, by a sloop which was going from this Port to Jamaica. Mr. Wilcocks did not goe on board immediatly as I had ordered him, and in the meantime Capt. Fane sends his own Lieutenant, one Davis, to take possession of the Triton's prise, and grants him a Commisssion to command that ship, reciting an authority from H.R.H. for soe doing, of which I send your Lordships a copy, upon this I sent for Capt. Fane, and asked him by what authority he pretended to grant Commissions here, and perticularly I asked him if he had any perticular order, power or instruction from the Prince to doe it, he told me he had, I asked him to see them, then he told me indeed he had noe perticular Instruction to that purpose, but that Capt. Miles had brought an order from the Prince, directing him, the said Capt. Miles, to follow such orders as he should receive from him, the said Capt. Fane, and that by virtue of that order he would dispose of the command of that ship. I told him that unlesse he could shew me a power from H.R.H. to impower him to grant Commissions, the command of that ship should goe according to the Queen's Instructions to me, and H.R.H. printed orders; Capt. Fane was very uneasy, but did not say much then, the next morning I was obliged to go to Amboy to meet the Assembly of New Jersey, at my return I found that Capt. Fane had put his Lieutenant in possession of the Triton's prise, and had confined Wilcocks on board. Being informed that Wilcocks was confined, I sent a written order for him to appear before me. This order was delivered to him by one Huddleston. Refers to enclosures. By Mrs. Wilcocks's deposition, you will see that Davis took my order from Wilcocks, and presently afterwards forced him away from the Triton's prise, and sent him on board of the Lowestaffe. The next morning I was informed of this violence and sent for Capt. Fane to come to me, that I might know the meaning of that proceeding, but he was gone from his lodgings, and was got on board the Lowestaffe, where he has remained ever since. The Lowestaffe lay ready to sail for Barbados to convoy some vessells that lay ready to sail for that Port, upon this I sent an order to Capt. Fane in writing to send Lieut. Wilcocks on shore to me, this order he refused to obey. The next day I sent him another positive order to send Lieut. Wilcocks on shore, this order he likewise refused to obey. The next day Capt. Fane sailed to the watering place and carried Wilcocks with him, and I could find noe way to compel him to obey orders, but firing upon the Queen's ship, which I did not think proper to doe, though it is certain I could have sunck the ship, for I have from the Fort and the batterys of the towne 38 guns that bear upon one point at the same time, soe that indeed noe ship can go out or come into the harbour but must be tore to pieces, however, I thought it more proper to forbear that, and to acquaint your Lordshipps with this matter, and intreat you as I doe, that I may have some Instructions how to behave myself with respect to the Commanders of the Queen's ships, some of which think themselves under noe manner of controul, but believe they may doe what they please. When first I came to this Province, Capt. Caldwell had his station here, who then commanded H.M.S. Advice, that gentleman by his good behaviour here had the good word of every body in the place. Capt. Stapleton, who commanded H.M.S. Jersey, had the same good luck, and if he had lived, I don't question but all things would have been easy. Capt. Fane at his first coming to this place behaved himself very well, and I may say with truth that he has received more civillity in this place than any Captain that ever came into this place, both from myself and from the merchants here, but now within these 3 or 4 months, he has acted as if he had a mind to fall out with everybody, as soon as I had left this City to goe into New Jersey, he took away all the carpenters that were at work on board of a privatier which some of our merchants had fitted out last year and were fitting out again this year, under pretence that he wanted some work to be done on board the Lowestaffe, now upon all other occasions he used to aply to me for carpenters, and I always took care he had as many as he wanted, without hindring the merchants' business. But in this case I believe the design he had of oversetting the voyage that ship was intended for, was the reason he did not aply to me before I went, that he had such a design appears pretty plain, for upon the application the merchants made to me, I granted them a protection for some men they had occasion for, to work on board their ship, and who would not venture without it. Some of Capt. Fane's Officers met one of those men on an outward bound sloop and pressed him, and carried him on board the Lowestaffe, notwithstanding the fellow shewed them my protection, at my return the merchants complained to me of this violence. I immediatly sent an order to Capt. Fane to discharge that man, but he, instead of that, put him in irons, and soe kept him till the day which he saild, and then sent him on shore, however, this has soe frightned the rest of them, that I believe the merchants will not be able to send their ship out this winter, which will be a very considerable losse to them, this gentleman has likewise pressed some country people who were going out a fishing, soe that at last people were afraid of coming to market, either from New Jersey or Long Island (from whence they must come in boats) for feare of being pressed. Unlesse I may have some directions from H.R.H. my Lord High Admiral, how to proceed in the like cases, noe man can be safe in his house, for a Captain of a man-of-warr may in the night time, take any merchant here out of his house, put him into his boat, and carry him on board his ship, and keep on board himself, till he has a fair wind for sailing, then carry him where he pleases, the Governor may send as many orders as he pleases, the Captain will not obeyed them, and the Governor has noe way to make his orders be obeyed but firing upon the Queen's ship, which I did not think fit to doe. Refers to letter of Oct. 3 and his Instructions, and repeats request for directions in the matter. I only desire to know what I am to doe, and I will take care to observe punctually such directions as I shall receive, and I hope that as I am directed to treat the Captains of H.M. ships of warr civilly, soe they may be obliged to return the same civill behaviour, and that they may not be alowed to say over their cupps, that they don't care a farthing for the Governor, nor the Government, that they will doe what they please, and will presse whom and when they please, these and the like discourses have frequently come from Captain Fane of late; many other things I could say, but am not willing to trouble you too long upon this subject, etc. I sent an Order to Davis, who Capt. Fane had appointed to command the Triton's prise, to deliver the said ship to Lieut. Wilcocks, to whom by the Prince's printed Instructions the command of her does of right belong, but he refused to obey (see enclosure). After that I sent an Order to him to appear before me; this Order he likewise refused to obey. Then I sent a warrant by the Messenger of the Councill to bring him before me, but the Messenger could not meet with him till he went on board the Triton's prise. He should [? showed] him his warrant, but Davis said he would not submit, but would dye upon the ship, unlesse I would goe myself, or words to that effect, upon this I sent a party of souldiers from the Fort to fetch him, he had said the day before that if I sent souldiers he would give them as warm a reception as ever they had in their lives, but he was better advised, for as soon as the officer went on board and shewed him my Order, he surrender'd himself, and being come to towne, he said if I would hear him he did not doubt but he should satisfie me upon all points, I told him it was his own fault that he was not heard sooner, for that the first time I had sent for him it was on purpose to hear what he had to say for his method of proceeding, however I told him that I should never refuse to hear any body and accordingly I did hear him. What he offered was chiefly this, that he accepted of a Commission from Capt. Fane because Capt. Fane told him that he had power from the Prince soe to doe, that after he had taken possession of the ship, he came on shore on purpose to come to me an[d] acquaint me with the whole matter, but that meeting Capt. Fane by the way, he had commanded him on board, and that what he had acted since, he had done it by the advice of Capt. Fane, that he was ignorant of my Instructions from H.M., else he should not have done anything in contradiction to them; he further said that he never asked the Officers of the ship if they would stand by him, as is mentioned in Mr. Wilcocks's affidavit, and indeed the rest of the officers doe say the same, upon this I ordered Mr. Davis to return to the ship, and take the command of her till the Prince's pleasure should be knowne; thus I hope it will plainly appear, that I had noe inclination to put Davis out, to put another in, nor indeed to meddle in that matter at all, till I thought the Queen's Instructions were contradicted; for if I had had a mind to intermeddle, I could easily have granted a Commission to Wilcocks before Capt. Fane could have known of Capt. Miles's death, but I did not think that I was sufficiently impowered to grant Commissions, therefore, when Wilcocks came to me, I gave him only a verball order to take care of the ship, till the Prince's pleasure should be known etc. Signed, Cornbury. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read 29th April, 1707. Holograph. 5 pp. Enclosed,
666. i. Copy of Capt. Fane's Commission to Capt. Richd. Davis to command the Triton prize. Signed, G. Fane. 2 pp.
666. ii. Deposition of Mrs. Wilcocks, New York. On Dec. 7 she found Lieut. Wilcocks under close confinement in his cabin on board H.M.S. Triton prize. Lt. Davis sent for all the other officers and askt them if they would stand by him. They answered, what he said they would swear, upon which he replied, I will break him, meaning Wilcocks. On the 9th, upon receipt of an order from the Governor, Wilcocks was sent on board the Lowestaffe etc. Signed, Elinor Wilcocks. 2 pp.
666. iii. Deposition of J. Huddleston, that he delivered the Governor's Order, referred to in preceding. Signed, Jos. Huddleston. 1 p.
666. iv. Deposition of R. Crannel that on Dec. 11 he delivered to Capt. Fane the Governor's order to send Lt. Wilcocks to him. The Captain answered, he knew no business he had there, and it was for faults he had committed on board, and there he would keep him. Signed, Robt. Crannel. 1 p.
666. v. Deposition of R. Crannel. On Dec. 10 he delivered a similar order to above to Capt. Fane, who replied that Capt. Davis had confined Wilcocks for faults, and he knew no such man as Lieut. Davis. Signed, Robt. Crannell. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1049. Nos. 30, 30.i.-v.; and (without enclosures) 5, 1121. pp. 26–36.]
Dec. 14.
London.
667. Mr. Dummer to Mr. Popple. Gives sailings of the Antego packet-boat. Out and home, 123 days. Admirall Whetstone sailed eight days before she came to Jamaica (Oct. 15), and 2 days before she left (Oct. 28) ye Assistance brought in a French privateer of 24 guns from the Havannah to Port Lewis, laden with provisions, on which was the Rere-Admirall of the Spanish galleons. Signed, E. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 17, 1706. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 6. No. 23.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
668. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Board of Ordnance. Request an account of the stores of war sent to the Leeward Islands within 6 months past or now sending. [C.O. 153, 9. pp. 429, 430.]
Dec. 17.
Office of Ordnance.
669. Board of Ordnance to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In reply to preceding, enclose following. Signed, C. Musgrave, Ja. Lowther, Ja. Craggs. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 19, 1706. Addressed. Sealed. 1 p. Enclosed,
669. i. Account of Ordnance and other Stores sent to the Leeward Islands within the last 6 months. Includes 20 cannon each for Nevis and. St. Christophers, with ammunition. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 152, 6. Nos. 74, 74.i.; and 153, 9. pp. 433–436.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
670. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Parke. We acquaint you with the success of our sollicitations for stores of war, as you will perceive by enclosed account. [See Dec. 17.] [C.O. 153, 9. p. 437.]
Dec. 19.671. C. Ardesoif to the Council of Trade and Plantations. American tar is well suited for making his composition for protecting ships' bottoms against worm etc. Signed, Charles Ardesoif. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 20, 1706. French. 2 pp. Enclosed,
671. i. Printed list of ships which have made successful use of M. Ardesoif's composition, 1699–1706. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 864. Nos. 83, 84.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
672. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose following to be laid before H.M.
672. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Quote Representation of April 26, 1706, relating to convoys for Virginia and Maryland. Conclude: "For which opinion for a stated convoy we are the more at this time confirmed by reason of the great losses the merchants and planters, as also your Majesty's revenue of the Customs have sustained, by the Fleet's coming away from thence so late this year." [C.O. 5, 1362. pp. 87–90.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
673. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. In obedience to your Lordship's directions Nov. 30, we have conferred with the Commissioners of H.M. Navy. The said Commissioners are obliged by their Instructions to purchase where ever they find pitch and tar cheapest, without enquiring from what country such stores are brought, and upon that account they have commonly preferr'd the pitch and tar of Sweden to that of America. For the ensuing year they had contracted for, and were provided with, those commodities. They agree with us in opinion that the produce of those stores from America would be a very great means of lessening their price in general; that it will be a great advantage to the Nation to procure the produce of those goods from H.M. Dominions, and that the building ships in America for the transport of those stores, will be an additional benefit to the Navigation of England. They inform us that they did the last year contract for a quantity of tar from New England, of which they daily expect the arrival, and that upon trial of a former quantity of that commodity from the said Province, they found it to be good and serviceable: and they promise to do all that in them lyes to encourage this beneficial undertaking. And whereas Naval Stores imported from America, upon which the premium is allowed, are required to be good and merchantable, they concur with us in opinion that the reasons for allowing such premiums upon the pitch and tar now imported be signified to the Commissioners of H.M. Customes, that they may make as little exception and scruple as possible in that behalf. Upon which consideration we humbly offer to your Lordship that it may be recommended to the Commissioners of the Customes to put so favourable a construction upon those words "good and merchantable" in the Act of Parliament, that tho the pitch and tar now imported from New England should in some measure fall short of the best Swedish, yet if serviceable and usefull, the importers may not be excluded from the benefit of the proposed reward, least such a discouragement put upon a beginning Trade, become an obstruction to all future improvements. For we doubt not but that within short time, if the premium be not interrupted, there will be Naval Stores of all sorts imported hither, not only from New England, but from Carolina and other H.M. Plantations on the Continent, sufficient in quantity to furnish the whole Navigation of England, and of such quality as shal equalize in goodness the best that are brought over hither from Sweden or Norway. As to Mr. Bridger's particular case, they are of opinion that considering he is to travel such large tracts of land, and will be obliged to have clerks, horses and other necessaries, he may deserve an increase of salary. But as to the management of that trade by commission, as proposed by the said Bridger, they think it will not be for H.M. service at this time. By letters received from America, we understand that since the inhabitants of New England have applyed themselves to the produce of Naval Stores, the woollen manufacture, which was erected there, is greatly interrupted and will in all probability be wholly left off. [C.O. 5, 912. pp. 223–227.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
674. W. Popple to W. Lowndes. Since my last of Dec. 4, the Council of Trade and Plantations have received an Act of Maryland to the like purpose. They send you a copy, and desire you to move my Lord High Treasurer that they may have the opinion of the Commissioners of H.M. Customs thereupon. [C.O. 5, 726. p. 398.]
Dec. 23.
St.Christophers.
675. [Col. Parke's] account of stores of war received from Sir J. Jennings' squadron. 1 large p. [C.O. 239, 1. No. 18.]
Dec. 25.676. Petty Expenses of the Board of Trade, Sept. 30—Dec. 25, 14l. 10s. 8d. Stationer's Account, 16l. 17s. Postage, (including New Year's gift) 34l. 1s. 0d. 4 pp. [C.O. 388, 76. Nos. 12, 14.]
Dec. 26.
Whitehall.
677. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Commissioners of H.M. Navy. Enquire when it will be convenient for them to confer at the Board of Trade upon Naval Stores, as desired by the Lord Treasurer Nov. 30. [C.O. 5, 912. pp. 208, 209.]
Dec. 27.
Jamaica.
678. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I am honoured with your Lorps.' of Sept. 26, and am to return your Lorps. my hearty thanks for your care of our Address, and the notice you have been pleased to take of our homeward bound ffleet, and also of Glover's letter. As to your Instructions to me, that I should prevail with the Assembly to quarter the soldiers, they will neither do that, nor give them any subsistance at all, both officers and soldiers having had no other allowance for these two months past than what we make a shift for among ourselves. Most of the Assembly being Creolians, born in this country, cannot bear English Government, but are still contriving to entrench on H.M. prerogative, as your Lorps. will see by their messages to me in the Minutes of the Council of Dec. 23 and 24, and my answers thereto. They would adjourn themselves for a time without leave from me, which is what has never been practiced before, nor any president known for in these parts, and leave the Queen's business till the last, with a design to make such tacks as I am affraid I never could have comply'd with: I must confess I have very little dependence on the majority of the Councill any more than them, having lately lost two of the Gentlemen of the Councill, Col. John Walters and Col. Charles Knight, who were men of solid sense, and faithfull servants to the Queen. Recommends Mr. Ayscough and Mr. John Stewart in their stead. They are both men of good sense and, substance, and I am very well assured, are loyall subjects to H.M. I hope after the Holy-days, when these Gentlemen meet again, they may be in better temper; the chief ffomentors of all this work are Col. Beckford and his two sons, whom he has got into the House; they have been both tried for murder, and, I am of opinion, were both guilty, tho the Jury would not find it so. The most part of our Senate being composed of men of the like principles, I am of opinion, never any Country had such Representatives, but a little time may produce much, and no pains shall be wanting in me to make every thing easy at the same time having a regard to H.M. royall prerogative, which never must be lost but with my life. We have advice by this packett that Sir John Jennings is come into the West Indies with a squadron of men of war, but have yet no further account of them. Our squadron here under Commadore Kerr has been attended with great mortality, having lost at least betwixt 400 and 500 men. H.M.S. Swan, belonging to Barbadoes, has been mightily disabled by a. French man of warr she met with off Martineco, which has obliged her to come down here, where she is refitting with all speed. The Island has been very sickly, and H.M. Regiment here under my command has had a share of the mortality, and if my Regiment and I are to stay here, I must desire your Lorps.' assistance to the recruiting it, for fear any attempt should be made against us by the Enemy: I shall want 300 men to compleat my Regiment according to the last establishment, and have sent over my son and some other officers to wait on H.R.H. and his Grace the Duke of Marlborough on that purpose. The Spanish trade here goes on very indifferently for want of the English woolen manufacture. Here has been a siezure made of a sloop brigantine for having on board contraband goods, as iron, saddles etc., but I think she is of little value, she has not been tried yet, etc. Encloses Minutes of Council and Assembly. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 17th Feb., 170nfrag;67;. 3pp. [C.O. 137, 7. No. 36; and 138, 12. pp. 59–63.]
Dec. 28.
Kensington.
679. Permits for the Josiah, Thomas, Goodwin and Northampton to proceed without convoy in the West Indies as Dec. 8. [C.O. 5, 210. pp. 4, 5.]
Dec. 30.
Bermuda.
680. Lt. Governor Bennett to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Repeats much of Nov. 16. Signed, Ben. Bennett. Holograph. 3½ pp. Enclosed,
680. i.–xv. Duplicates of Nos. 606.i., iv.-xvii. [C.O. 37, 28. Nos. 2, 2.i.-xv.]