America and West Indies
August 1707, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1916

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518-537

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'America and West Indies: August 1707, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 23: 1706-1708 (1916), pp. 518-537. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73746 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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August 1707, 1-15

Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
1074. The Earl of Sunderland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. You are to prepare Instructions for the Secretaries of the Commissions for Nevis and St. Kitts as proposed July 24. Signed, Sunderland. Endorsed, Recd. Read Aug. 4, 1707. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 7. No. 23; and 153, 10. p. 52.]
Aug. 2.
Whitehall.
1075. The Earl of Sunderland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. H.M. has thought fit to appoint Thomas Hodges Attorney Generall of Barbadoes, etc. as No. 1062. Signed, Sunderland. Endorsed, Recd. Read Aug. 4, 1707. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 29; and 29, 11. p. 91.]
Aug. 2.
Windsor Castle.
1076. The Queen to Governor Handasyd. Whereas by our Order in Councill of Nov. 14, 1706, we did signify our disapprobation of the Act past in the General Assembly of our Island of Jamaica for providing an additional subsistence for our officers and soldiers, and for other uses, and whereas the said Assembly have again past another Act to provide an additional subsistance for our said officers and soldiers from Feb. 1, 1706, to Feb. 1, 1707, with the same clauses as those in the former (an abstract of which clauses are herewith sent you) and whereas we cannot but judge the said clauses as a great burthen and discouragement imposed upon the soldiery, which happens the more unseasonable at this time, when they are upon harder duty by reason of the war, our will and pleasure is that you signify to the Assembly, that we look upon their proceeding herein, after our having signified our disallowance of their former Act, as a high disrespect and disregard to us, in passing such clauses as are so injurious to the officers and soldiers, sent by us for their safety and defence, and therefore you are to move them in the most effectual manner, that they do not make any future Act lay such unreasonable hardships upon the soldiery. Countersigned, Sunderland. Annexed,
1076. i. Abstract of Act of Jamaica, to provide an additional subsistence, etc. The whole, 1½ pp. [C.O. 137, 45. Nos. 87, 87.i.; and 5, 210. pp. 55, 56; and (without abstract) 138, 12. pp. 139, 140.]
Aug. 4.
Antigua.
1077. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have by this packett received a duplicate of a letter from your Lordships of March 11, in which your Lordships think the Islands of Antigua and St. Christopher's allowance for my House is too much. I beleive I have the misfortune to be the first Governor your Lordships ever thought had too much allowed him by the Country for his House. I have no more than my predecessor, nor more than I am allowed in my Instructions to take; for tho they pretend to allow a thousand pounds per ann., 'tis this country mony paid in sugar at 18s. per cwt., wch. is sold in sterling mony at six shill. per cwt., so in reallity I have but 333l. 6s. 8d. I have the least sallery of any of the Queen's Governors except Burmudus; and have four times the trouble, having four Governments, each Island being a seperate Government, I receive but 1,100l. in mony from the Treasury, and that not paid as my Agent informes me, all my perquesites I lett at 60l. ster. per ann., and he that rents it will not give it an other year, this wth. what the Islands allow me for my House is what I have comeing in all manner of wayes. I am forced to keep two Houses, one at Antigua and an other at St. Christophers; everything is so very dear I can hardly live uppon my incomb: and yett I never lived worse in all my life; I came over 26 in family, there is now but 4 left, 5 indead are gone for England, the rest are dead; I myselfe have had the Plague; the Pestilence and bloody flux, and have been out of my bed but 4 dayes of a malignant feaver; I am so weak I can hardly write to yr. Lopps.; cou'd I have foreseen what I was to suffer and how little 'twas possible for me to gett, I wou'd never have come over; I should not think your Lopps.' sallery to much were it 3 times as much as 'tis; and cant but think myselfe very unhappy yt. yr. Lopps. should think myne too great, considering I have no more than my predecessor, and much less than I was promised when I had the Commission given me; the Duke promised me the Government of Virginia at ye Battle of Blenheim, but for some reasons of State, that was given to my Ld. Orkney, and this given to me wth. a promise ye sallery should be the same, wch. is 2,000l. sterl. the year, I find myselfe mistaken and at this distance forgot; all my predecessors have had complaints against them from some Island or other in less than six months after their arrivall, Coll. Codrington had severall in less than three; Sir Wm. Matthew would have had one in less than three had he lived, for they were preparing one before he fell sick. I have been here above a year, and believe you will not be troubled wth. any publick complaint, except the people of Nevis complain yt. I took from them some gunns and armes they did not want, and caryed them to St. John's where they were wanted; I think 'tis my duty not to suffer the Queen's stores to ley useless in one Island when they are very much wanted in an other. In the same letter your Lopps. tax me wth. breaking my Instructions in swearing Major Panton and Capt. Willet of the Council of St. Christophers, when there was ten Councellors on the place, etc. There are the ten names indead, and yett I had but five Councellors; Coll. Lambert is the Governor and is never esteamed as one of the Council; MackArthur, tho made a Councellor both to Sir Wm. and myselfe, yett was dead long before Sir Wm. was made Governor; Sam Crook has been bed-rid a great while, Charles Matthew has been in England above two year and designes not to come back, Clayton was never in my list; I hear he had the Queen's letter to be of the Council, but never would be sworne, he was the most substantial man on ye Island, and shou'd have been glad to have had him of ye Council; now there being but 5 I thought it for ye service to make them 7, for there must be 5 to make a Council, and 'tis great odds but one or two are either off the Island or sick; my Lords these Islands are very different from Barbados or the other Governments, for the people there make their Court to the Governor to be of the Council, and to be Officers in the Militia; here I am forced to Court people to accept of these places; 'tis so little in my power to oblige people that there is no one place in the four Governments but what I am forced to Court them to accept, all places even those of small vallue are given away in England by Patent and are executed accordingly by Deputys, evan ye hangman's place, wch. we call here Marshall. I have received an other letter from yr. Lordshipps, May 9, wherein I am allso accused for breaking my Instructions in ordering Mr. Bellman, Mr. Broadbelt and Mr. Millikin to be sworn of the Council of Nevis, when there were 7 on the place. I must beg leave to inform your Lopps. of your mistake in this as well as the other. I had, 'tis true, 11 in my Instructions for Nevis, but some were dead, others in England, all that were there that wou'd serve were these; Wm. Burt, Jno. Smergin, James Bevon, Wm. Buttler, and Richd. Abbot, of these, Jno. Smergin was bed-rid and has been so some time, so that I had but four, and the adding those three made but seven, one of these refuses to serve, wch. is Coll. Bellman; as for Mr. Minor I don't know him; he has never been swore of the Council in my time; they tell me there is such a man in England, who did formerly trade in Nevis; I have eleaven named for Antigua, but there is but six ever serves, the rest are either dead, off the Island, or laid up wth. the gout, I have desired severall to be of the Council, but they desire to be excused, saying it will give them trouble without either previlege or proffitt; you order me to send you the names of six of the most eminent men in each Island; for this Island there is Wm. Thomas, Richard Oliver, Tho. Williams, Sam. Wattkins, Lucy Blackman, and Geo. Mackennis; if you make them Councellors, you may add Esqr. to their names; when the ffleet arrives I must goe to the rest of the Islands and uppon each Island will send a list of six of those accounted ye most substantial. Your Lordshipp reminds me of my duty in Mr. Baron's Order of Council; wch. is directed to me for Col. Codrington to make restitution of a ship that he seized of Baron's, and yt. if Codrington would not restore her wthout suit at Law, that there should be a special verdict that Baron might appeal for England; I show'd Codrington the Order; he refuses to restore what Baron demands. I acquainted Baron's Attorny wth. it and told him to sue Col. Codrington, he answerd me that 'twould be very expensive, and that Mr. Baron had not sent him any mony, and that he would not lay out any of his own; I have done all yt. was possible for me to do in it, and 'tis Mr. Baron's own fault, or the Law would have long since determined this matter; for my part Codrington, every one knows, has done all he can to make me uneasy; I am not his friend nor he mine; and whenever Mr. Baron begins his suit, he will have very fair play; the stay of the packett will not allow me time to enquire after the affair of Freeman, as soon as I can be master of it, will inform your Lopps. There are as many men fitt to bear armes on Nevis as there was when Monr. D' Bervill took it. All are returned; and had they not had the sickness last year, there would have been nobody miss'd, except every one missing part of his negroes; the reasons why the English decrees on most of these Islands as I conceive are these; the Islands are small, and as some grow rich, they buy out their poor neighbours (first opressing them); an other reason is they breed up their slaves to all manner of trades; and no servants now comes over; and every year there is a sickness, in one or other of the Islands; the People of this Island does give incouragement to poor People, they are exemted from taxes and have lands appropriated for their use; and tax lands to discourage the holding of great quantitys; but the People of Nevis keep up their lands, wch. is in the hands of a few; severall of them live in England, and keep only one Englishman to look after great numbers of slaves; St. Christophers may be made a fine and populous Island; if we keep the French part and the land given in small pieces. I will send a list of all the inhabitants as soon as it can be procured wth. the number of slaves as you order me; but this very thing was the occasion in some measure yt. D'Bervill went to Nevis; for Coll. Johnson sending the account of the inhabitants and the number of negroes, either the original or a duplicate was taken, where they found there was on Nevis 14,000 negroes and but abt. 400 English to defend them; this put them first on yt. project. As I have heitherto followed all yr. Orders as near as 'twas possible for me, I will continue so to do, as long as I stay in these hott, unhealthy Islands. The comodetys are black course sugar, ginger and cotton; and some small quantityes of indigo; Ireland and ye Continent of America furnishes them wth. provesions and lumber, Madera wth. wine, England wth. all other necessaryes; good Custom House Officers will prevent clandestine trade etc. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read Oct. 28th, 1707. 8 pp. Enclosed,
1077. i. List of Councillors of the Leeward Islands that now act as such. Aug. 4, 1707. Note added by Governor Parke:—All these I call Esqrs. being of H.M. Council, but such Esqrs. as some of them are yr. Lopps. never saw. Same endorsement. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 7. Nos. 27, 27.i.; and (without enclosure) 153, 10. pp. 66–76.]
Aug. 4.
Windsor.
1078. Order of Queen in Council. The Council of Trade and Plantations are to hear and report upon any new matter of complaint against Mr. Jones [See June 16]. Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 26th, Read Aug. 27th, 1707. 1½ pp. [C.O. 37, 8. No. 41; and 38, 6. pp. 314, 315.]
Aug. 4.
Windsor.
1079. Order of Queen in Council. Upon Representation of June 13, Judge Cox is discharged from the complaint brought against him. Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 9th, Read Aug. 14th, 1707 1 p. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 31; and 29, 11. pp. 94, 95.]
Aug. 4.
Windsor.
1080. Order of Queen in Council. Upon the Report of the Council of Trade, and the petition of Mrs. Sharpe, the proceedings of Col. Wm. Sharpe are approved, and he is discharged from the complaint brought against him by Messrs. Cleland, Colleton and Holder. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 32; and 29, 11. pp. 95–97.]
Aug. 4.
Windsor.
1081. Order of Queen in Council. Col. Cleland is dismissed from the Councill and all other imployments in Barbados. Warrant to be prepared accordingly. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 33; and 29, 11. pp. 98, 99.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
1082. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose draught of Instructions for the Secretaries of the Commission for Nevis and St. Kitts. In case of the death of one or both of the Secretaries, we submit it to H.M., whether it may not be proper that a power be lodged in the Governor or Commander in Chief of the Leeward Islands for the time being to supply such vacancy or vacancies, by a fit person or persons, to the end there may be no delay in the execution of H.M. Commission. Annexed,
1082. i. Draught of Instructions referred to above. See July 27. [C.O. 153, 10. pp. 53–59; and (covering letter only, with autograph signatures, 2 pp.) 152, 39. No. 117.]
Aug. 4.
Windsor.
1083. Order of Queen in Council. Referring Representation of July 7, relating to privateers at Martinique etc., to the Lord High Admiral for his report. Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 9th, Read Aug. 14th, 1707. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 7. No. 24; and 153, 10. pp. 59, 60.]
Aug. 4.
Windsor.
1084. Order of Queen in Council. Thomas Barrow is to be permitted (upon his making due application to the Governor) to practice as an Attorney at Law in all H.M. Courts in Jamaica, he behaving himself peaceably and with a respectfull deportment to H.M. Governor and the Courts. Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 9, Read Oct. 23, 1707. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 7. No. 59; and 138, 12. pp. 144–146.]
Aug. 4.
Windsor.
1085. Order of Queen in Council. Approving Representation of May 28. The Council of Trade and Plantations are to prepare letters to Governors of H.M. Plantations directing them to oblige Members of Council to a due attendance. Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 9, Read Oct. 21, 1707. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 36; and 29, 11. pp. 110, 111.]
Aug. 5.1086. Sir T. Laurence to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays for a report upon his memorials etc. Signed, Thomas Laurence. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 5, Read Oct. 21, 1707. Holograph. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 716. No. 30; and 5, 726. pp. 474–476.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
1087. The Earl of Sunderland to Governor Parke. Acknowledges letters of Feb. 15 and March 29. What you write concerning Col. Whetham is sent to Mr. St. John. The French squadron by which you have been alarmed is returned to Brest, and so good care will be taken for your security that I hope you will not any more have occasion to be under any apprehensions of this kind. Signed, Sunderland. P.S.— Refers to Commission of Enquiry into losses at Nevis and St. Kitts. If either of the Secretarys should dye, you will do well to appoint some fitting person to supply his place. Encloses H.M. letter for the removall of Capt. Pogson, etc. [C.O. 5, 210. pp. 58, 59.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
1088. Same to Governor Handasyd. Acknowledges letters of March 8 and April 21. H.M. approves of what you have done in relation to the Assembly, and as to what relates to the regiment, it is referred to Mr. St. John, etc. The French ships have returned etc. as in preceding. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 59.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
1089. Same to Governor Crowe. I have reced. your letter from the Maderas and those wrote to me from Barbados, May 15 and June 5. I agree with you that Mr. Holder is represented as one that has been very active in promoting the disorders in that Island, tho I must tell you by the way that he was recommended by Mr. Bromley, Mr. Walters and Mr. Kendale. However, when the matter is laid before the Queen, I doubt not but H.M. will give such orders therein as will be most conducive to the ease and satisfaction of her subjects there. I doubt not of your care to quiet those disturbances and settle the tranquillity of the Island in the doing of which you may assure yourself of all the assistance and encouragement from hence. H.M. has approved of the report of the Council of Trade against Mr. Cleland, and that in justification of Mr. Sharp and Judge Cox, which I hope will have a good effect in the Island, and with your prudent government will serve to quiet the disturbances there. H.M. is very well pleased with your resolution to preside in person in the Courts of Justice to prevent the irregularity's and riots which have of late been committed there; and the answer you gave to the Address of the Assembly has been commended as very prudent and a judicious one. As for the Chartel, I shall enquire for it at the Councill of Trade, and I will acquaint you with H.M. pleasure as soon as it comes to my hands. H.M. has been pleased to appoint Mr. Hodges to be Attorney Genll. in your Island in the roome of Mr. Chilton, deceased. He is a person of a very fair character, and has been so well recommended to the Queen that I do not question but he will answer the trust that is reposed in him. Signed, Sunderland.[C.O. 5, 210. pp. 57, 58.]
Aug. 8.
Barbadoes.
1090. Governor Crowe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The incloseds are duplicates of my last, to wch. I humbley crave referance, and begg your Lordships in your next to send me H.M. pleasure how I should governe myselfe in the Courte of Chancerey; wheather to sitt sole Judge there, as by the Seale, Commission, Instructions, Petitions and Decrees of thatt Courte I now apprehend; and only to take the Counselors' oppinions in all matters of equity that may come before thatt Court, or as it has been usuall take theire voates and oblidged thereby to singe a Decree contraqrey to my judgemt. and oath. If H.M. should thinke itt for her servisse thatt the Governour should be sole Chancelor, it would be nessisarey to give him power to constitute another in casse of sickenesse or other extreordinarey occations, or thatt ye first Counselor should offisiate. My Lords, any ill desingeing Gouvernour will screne himselfe under ye votes of the Counsell, and a just one will never doe anything contrarey to his contiance. In Sir B. Granvill's time the Barresters (who are not above seaven gott an order contrarey to an Ackt of this Island, thatt none should plead in any Courte but them, by wch. some old practissioners of ye Law were silenced, and theses 6 or seaven Gentlemen made a minopeley of the whole, refuseing to plead under such exorbitant sums as seldome has been heard off, soe that many poore people has been oblidged to forgoe theire right for want of money to fee them. And altho there is a Law for settling Atturneys' fees (who when that Ackt past wear and are still accounted lawears and plead hear) the Barresters apprehend they are not oblidged thereby. I have in conformety to said Law given licence to all thatt formerly had any to plead againe, for eayse of ye poor and good of the Island. Your Lordships will find this greavance amongst thosse complayned of by the Grand Jurey. I shall endeaver to regulate ye rest as time will permitt. Indeed, if some meathud be not taken for cleareing the Bridge Towne Road, itt will be imposseble in few years to load any suggrs. from the wharfes. It would be verey nessisarey and save H.M. a greate sume yearely, to have a person apoynted, with a small salerey of 50l. per annum to muster the men of warr, who often demand more men then they realy want of their compliments, and afterwards desposse of them att greate rates to the merchant shipps. In examineing ye Pattent offices, I find none for ye Clarke of ye Merkett, nor Causeuall Revenew, soe thesse places are supplyed with fitt persons untill H.M. pleasure be further knowne. I have seen all the forts and fortifications of the Island and desinged to have sent your Lordships platts thereof with this, butt they cannot be finished in time, shall goe per next man of warr. The Island is soe much in debt thatt they will not be able to compleat St. Anns, without H.M. would be gratiously pleased to grant them some allowance out of the 4½ p.c. I compeute 5,000l. exclusive of negros' laboure would finish itt. Col. Lilley, who is a verey ingeanious deserveing man, has showne me some other places verey nessisarey to be fortified, but we are not in a condition to efeckt itt, and indeed there has been such abuisses in the manidgemt. of the Publicke money thatt dishartens the inhabitants from engageing in any greate work. The Planters have brought a petition agst. the late Act, wch. was desinged to reamedy the paper creaditt, wch. has been soe destruckfull to this place, hearewith I send a coppy of the Aturney Ginerall's opinion thereon. The Counsell has made a suplementall Bill to reamedey whatt is found wanting in said Act, espeaceley to reinstate thosse H.M. was pleased to order should not be sufferers by parteing with there just debts or leagall securetyes, said bill now lyes before the Assembley for there concurrence. By the adjoyned Adresses and answears, with the Mineuts of the Counsill and Assembley, your Lordships will perseave whatt has been done since my arrivell, and how much of my time has been taken up in rectifieing former mistakes wch. required immeadiate inspection; I am sorey to tell your Lordships there has not an Act past in the President's time but wants amendment. I have desired the merchts.' advice as to trade, and soe soune as this Fleet sayles, I hope they will thinke on whatt I have recommended to them. I begg your Lordships' directions on the Assembly's bill aboute the alteration of the coyne. By the storekeeper's Accts. of the Magasine, your Lordships will perseave there wants seaverall things there, and whatt a small quantity of powder remaines. Everey Coll. and Capt. ussed to fire the guns in the forts att theire pleasure, wch. I have wholly restrained. There is aboute 200 barrells more in the severall devitions thatt the Coll. keeps for the usse of the Battereys. I sent downe H.M.S. Crowne and Medstone to creusse of St. Vincents and Domineco, who have brought me up some of the cheafe Indieans from both Islands, who I have cloath'd and been kinde to. They tell me have been and will continew verey loyall to H.M. but I observe they understand more French then English, and Capt. Clarke says he saw some little whitte flaggs out att St. Vincents soe soune as his ship appear'd, but could not learne that any French weare setled there. The Blacks and Indieans have been for some time att warr there. I intend to send the pretended Kings of both Islands a presant, and send H.M. Union flagg to be hoysted on any occation, and keep the best correspondance I can with them. There is not above 3 writts of error, and your Lordships will perseave ye few causses now depending in the Chancery list. All the Inferier Courts are duely held. I have not since my arivall had any complaint agst. them. Last Fryday I proclaimed the Unieon with all the solemnity this place could afford. It's above two monthes since I ordered the Churchwardents of each Parrish to bring me an exackt list of all the Inhabitants, both Christians and slaves, and how many of each weare fitt to bear armes, as also the number of horsses fitt for servisse, but there has been such a generall destemper throughout ye whole Island, that 4 of ye Parishes has not been able to comply with said order; I hope to have itt ready agst. next man of warr sayles. This sicknesse has prevented me from vewing the Malitia, wch. I shall per first opertunity, and advisse your Lordships of there number and condition. Att present the French have noe men of warr thatt I can hear of in thesse partes, but dayly anoy our trade with there sloops from Martineco, wch. are two nimble for our men of warr. The Deale Castle is not yeet returned. There is a Committe of ye Counsell and Assembly apoynted to examine into ye publicke debts, and how ye money raysed thesse last three years has been expended, as soune as finished shall be sent your Lordshipps. Findeing by the Assembley's inclosed resolves and the Counselors' owne confession, their gilt in voateing for the paper Act, I shall obay H.M. Instructions in turneing out Messrs. Sharpe, Cox, Mills, and Walker, and place Coll. Wm. Wheeler, Coll. John Hallett, John Colleton and Timothey Salter in theire roomes, who are all Gentlemen of the best estates fittly quilified, and weare noewayes conserned in ye latte unhappy devitions. Signed, M. Crowe.Endorsed, Reed. 8th, Read Oct. 24, 1707. 5 pp. Enclosed,
1090. i. Address of Assembly of Barbados to Governor Crowe. Duplicate of No. 961.i.
1090. ii. Governor Crowe's Reply. Duplicate of No. 961.ii.
1090. iii. Governor Crowe's Speech to the Grand Jury of Barbados. Concludes:—I am much concerned to find not onely ye first petition layd before me in Councill to be for a very scandalous contempt of H.M. authority placed in the hands of her Ministers of Justice, but that allso ye first cause of this Sessions should be of ye like nature etc. Endorsed, Recd. Oct. 8, 1707. I¾ pp.
1090. iv. Address of the Grand Jury of Barbados to Governor Crowe. Express their satisfaction at his appointment. Before your Excellency's arrivall we grounded our great expectations of blessings in your Government on the relations which the world has heard loudly proclaimed of your eminent services to the Crowne, and the remarkable successes the Allies have attributed to your negotiations; and yet since your desired arrival your Excellency has showne us that we expected but part of the felicitys we are to enjoy. Your unwearied diligence in the service of the publick, your impartiall determinations, and just proceedings, your wise enquiry into the causes of the condition you found us in (which we tremble to thinke of) and your vigorous application of proper remedys, raise our hopes above all that has been in our view. We make no doubt soon to see divisions heal'd, all the inhabitants led to a due obedience, your Excellency's endeavours of restoreing credit and advanceing trade prove(s) successfull, and (in imitation of your great actions in Catalonia) we shall be inspired with courage still to defend our Island. Especially seeing your Excellency is graciously pleased in your charge to us to assure us that you will promote Religion by requireing those in authority to be exemplarly pious, which will certainly encourage inferiours to imitate them and make us all happy. Signed, Rd. Walcott, Ralph Sadlier, Richd. Farre, Jas. Browne, Jno. Hooper, Wm. Rayner, Sam. Mapp, Wm. Rollock, Jno. Eastmond, Joseph Hannis (=Hannie or Hannay), Timothy Salter, Hen. Lintott, Wm. Dottin, Wm. Allamby, Jno. Frere, Richd. Parsons, Tho. Affleck. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 1 large p.
1090. v. Presentments of the Grand Jury of Barbados. (1) That the laws discountenancing swearing and profanation of the Sabbath be duly put in execution, and that for an example, the clergy and magistracy be particularly circumspect in their lives etc. (2) That all due encouragement for the advancemt. of good literature, so much mentioned in former presentments, be no longer delayed. (3) That the highways be mended, and surveyors severely punished for failures in their duties. (4) The neglect of the inhabitants of St. Michael in not keeping clean the streets and common shores of the same is a great cause of the frequent sicknesses, which disheartens strangers to resort amongst them, and consequently is no small discouragement to trade. (5) That persons who are owners of tottering and decay'd buildings in and about the towns be obliged either to rebuild or pull them downe. (6) That for the commodious lading and unlading of vessels a strict enquiry be made into the condition of the wharfs. (7) That of late years the lawyers, and other persons concerned in most publick offices, have augmented their fees to such an exorbitant degree that the inhabitants are soe far discouraged from prosecuting their debtors as to loose their debts rather than goe to law for their just demands, and that a regulation of their fees be speedily taken into consideration. (8) That vestrymen and parish officers be discouraged from expending moneys levyed for the necessary and emergent occasions of their parishes and for the support of their poor, in feastings. (9) That Forstallars, Regrators and Ingrossers be punished according to Law, and that all due encouragements be given to those that shall detect such persons who shall be found guilty of such pernicious practices. (10) That the great bridge leading from the towne to Carlisle Bay be speedily built at the publick charge. Signed and endorsed as preceding. Copy. 1 large p.
1090. vi. Address of the Grand Jury of Barbados to the Queen. Congratulate H.M. on defeating her enemies and the yet greater glory of uniting her subjects. Return thanks for sending so great a Minister as H.E. Mitford Crowe to command us etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding. Copy. ¾ p.
1090. vii. Capt. Clarke to Governor Crowe. H.M.S. Crown. Carlisle Bay, July 20, 1707. Describes a cruize with the Crown and Maidstone, June 18 ff. After detaining for examination a flag of truce for Antigua from Martinique, and an abortive attempt to cut out some ships riding in Backsterr (Basse Terre) Road, Guadeloupe, we made our way to St. Vincents. We stayed there July 6–10, then made for Barbados. In our passage we lookt into Port Royal Harbour, Martinique, where we saw 3 sail, one of them a ship of force. I have some Indians on board of Dominico and St. Vincents, but it appears plainly they are very hearty to ye French interests. Wee could not get none from Sta. Lucia for fear of not returning within the time I am ordered to saile with ye Barbados Trade for England etc. Signed, Robert Clarke. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 2 pp.
1090. viii. Captain Fane to Governor Crowe. H.M.S. Lowestoffe, Barbados, May 10, 1707. Being bound for New York, the station appointed by H.R.H., and haveing found the inconveniency of stayeing there the winter season, by the desertion of the greatest part of my men, wch. render'd the ship of no use part of the next summer, I desire your Excellency to recommend it to my Lord High Admiral that we may have leave to come to Barbados the winter season, returning in the spring with such traders that are bound to the northward, wch. in my opinion will be of great use to this Island, as well as a security to the Northern traders. Signed, G. Fane. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. ½ p.
1090. ix. Memorandum of points offered by Governor Crowe to the Merchants of Barbados for their advice thereon. Same endorsement. 1½ pp.
1090. x. Governor Crowe's second Speech to the Assembly. I little expected after yr. first Adress such a coldness in dispatching the publick affaires, ye delays whereof you then soe much complained of, and more particularly the unhappy divisions, which I fear are rather augmented then heal'd, much contrary to my hopes of your wholly applying yrselves for ye remedying both. After soe many delays and breach of trust reposed in you by ye people and neglect of duty to H.M. in my express orders transmitted to you by your most worthy Speaker for ye summoning of a house, wch. proved unefectuall, I must plainly tell you, Gentlemen, that ye Queen sent me here to heal and not permitt her Royall authority and good subjects to suffer by yr. private and unhappy divisions. Therefore I expect you will lay aside everything that may encline that way, and let me experiance (what I only aime at and wish for) your speedy assistance in redressing of all grivances, and ye promoting such wholesome Laws as may for ye future secure you from ve ill designs of those who have heretofore made a prey of ye country. Mr. Speaker, there is one thing more that I must particularly recommend to you, that is, ye exact observance of ye rules of yr. house, as the only thing yt. can suport yt. part of ye authority granted by H.M. etc. Same endorsement. Copy. 1 p.
1090. xi. Abstract of proceedings of the Grand Jury of Barbados, June 10–13, 1707. 20 cases. Signed, Norman Mackaskell, Dy. Clerk. Same endorsement. 1 p.
1090. xii. Opinion of the Attorney General of Barbados upon an Act for ascertaining the payment of the Bank Bills. It is contrary to H.M. Instructions and contains many provisions which are legally impossible. It is of so extraordinary a nature and so repugnant to the Laws of the Land, the rights of the Kingdom, the liberty of the subject, your Excellency's authority and H.M. prerogative that it ought not to be put into force till H.M. pleasure be known, etc. Signed, Wm. Rawlin. Same endorsement. Copy. 4 large pp.
1090. xiii, xiv. Accounts of Stores received and delivered out of the Magazines in Barbados, 1695–1706. Same endorsement. 18 double pp.
1090. xv. Copy of an Act of Barbados for the encouragement of the importation of money. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read Oct. 24, 1707. 1½ pp.
1090. xvi. List of Gentlemen of good estates proposed by Governor Crowe for vacancies in the Council:—Col. Allemby, Thomas Maxwell, Coll. Lilley (the Ingineer), Christopher Warren, Simon Lambert, John Freer, jr., Saml. Maynard, Wm. Roberts, Wm. Moore, Daniel Leight, Wm. Cole, Reynard Allen. Endorsed, Recd. Oct. 8, 1707. ½ p.
1090. xvii. List of Causes depending in the Court of Chancery of Barbados. 8 cases, July 1, 1707. Signed, Will. Davies, Dep. Reg. Same endorsement. 1 p.
1090. xviii. Resolves of the Assembly of Barbados against the promoters of the Act for a Paper Credit. (Journal of Assembly June 5, 1707.) William Sharpe, with his brother-in-law, James Cowse, contrived this pernicious law, and with Alexander Walker, in Council, and John Holder, in Assembly, were the principle promoters thereof. Sharpe received 500l. from the office erected by virtue of the Act of Credit, and gave the bond in the usual form, but whether this was merely a cloak for receiving that sum from Holder for his assistance in passing the law, does not appear. By amendments in Council they altered the trust of management from the Treasurer for the time being, and vested that power solely in Holder's hands, Walker was to receive from Holder a great proportion of the profits, and did actually receive 527l. Samuel Cox, Councillor, warmly supported the Act, and since its repeal has endeavoured to excuse his error by saying that, if he had not consented to passing this Act and the Triennial Act, he would have been suspended from the Council. He has thereby demonstrated his own unworthiness. He did propose to be one of the three Managers intended in the first project of a Paper Credit by Major Dudley Woodbridge. John Milles and Middleton Chamberlain, Councillors, supported the Act, before and since its passing, with intent to obtain advantagious credit to themselves, and they received from the office erected thereby 2,877l. 11s. 3d. and 1,854l. respectively. John Holder endeavoured to bribe Major Woodbridge with 1,000l. out of the public money. It does not appear what James Cowse was paid for framing the Bill; but it is apparent that William Walker did receive 200l. from his brother, Alexander, by consent of Holder, for soliciting support for the Bill in the House. The promoters of the Triennial Act designed thereby to continue the Paper Act. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 24th Oct., 1707. Copy. 4½ pp.
1090. xix. Address of the Council and Assembly of Barbados to the Queen. Congratulations on the Union of the two Kingdoms, etc. Endorsed, Recd. Oct. 8, 1707. ¾ p.
1090. xx. Address of the Council and Assembly of Barbados to the Queen. Returns thanks for "the great and happy alteration your Majesty's subjects in this Island have received by the prudent and wise management of affairs under Mr. Crowe," etc. Same endorsement. ¾ p.
1090. xxi. Naval Officers' List of Ships entered and cleared at Barbados, March 25–June 24, 1707. 14 bound to England, 60 to the Plantations and one to Guinea, with sugar, molasses, rum, cotton, ginger, lime-juice, salt, alloes and cocoa-nuts; 53 remaining unladen. Same endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 10. Nos. 39, 39.i.–xxi.; and (without enclosures) 29, 11. pp. 119–134; and (Nos. iii.–x., xix., xx.) 28, 43. Nos. 23–27, 31–35.]
Aug. 8.
Barbados.
1091. Governor Crowe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since ye closeing of my packett Mr. Sharpe has brought me his adjoyned answer, wch. he beggs your Lordships would be pleased to peruse. Signed, M. Crowe. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 24th Oct., 1707. 1 p. Enclosed,
1091. i. Wm. Sharpe to Governor Crowe. Reply to above resolves of the Assembly (No. 1090. xviii.). The charges against me are contrary to their own vote of confidence in me Jan. 29, and the Minutes of their own House, whereby it appears that the first project of paper money was introduced into this Assembly by Major Woodbridge. (1) A bill passed two readings in that house before I ever saw it. When that Bill was rejected on the third reading, and I understood that there were some other projections for establishing a Paper Credit, which upon examination I did not approve, and perceiving that the Assembly were fully bent upon some project of that kind, I did several times discourse Mr. Cowse whether it might not be possible to continue a scheme more beneficial to the public than any we had at that time been acquainted with. He then drew up a bill which was approved by Sir B. Granville as the best he had seen, but there were many essential differences between his draught and the Bill as it passed. The paper bills, for instance, were to carry interest at 5 p.c. per annum. (2) These charges are groundless aspersions. I never met those Gentlemen on the occasion of the Bill but once, and that publickly, etc. (4) A disingenuous insinuation. It was to serve my necessary occasions I borrowed the money, and entered into bond, as they admit, in the same form as all others, and repaid it within a few weeks with interest for a whole year, as the Bank book shows. (5) I am proud to own it. It is notorious to all who are acquainted with Barbados that the Treasury has been the bone of contention wch. has given birth to all our factions and divisions, and if there had been such struglings to obtaine it for the advantages that Office had been usually attended with, I had reason to believe it would occasion far greater divisions when such a profitable post as the managemt. of the Bank should be suspended to it. I was well perswaded of the integrity of Col. Holder, and the indubitable security he was able to give. The consequence has shewn that I was not much mistaken. That this and the other amendments made by the Councell were improvements of the Bill will appear from the different reception it met with when sent down to the Assembly from what it had at its first passing that House.
When I perceived the inconveniencies of that Law, as soon as I had the honour to preside in H.M. Councell here (which was long before H.M. pleasure was known therein) I did not only publickly declare my opinion agt. to the Councell and Assembly, but also did what I could to have it remedy'd, and when the Assembly refused to consider a bill to that effect, upon the repeated importunitys of the majority of the Island, I at last dissolved them. Upon the arrival of H.M. Order for the repeal of that Act, I found the present Assembly, so far from redressing the grievances of it, that they were for reenacting and continuing the Bills for 12 months, altho' they now pretend soe much to dislike it. This was lookt upon by myselfe and the Councill as an act of disobedience, whereas the passing the Law at first was but an error in judgment, and therefore we rejected there Bill, which was the first occasion of offence I perceived they took against me. That I voted for the Triennial Bill with intent to support the Paper Act is false in fact, and impossible for them to know without the aid of divination etc. Signed. Wm. Sharpe. Quotes Addresses of the Grand Juries Dec., 1704, June, 1705, Dec., 1705, June, 1706, June, 1707, expressing confidence in him, and Addresses from the inhabitants of St. Michael's etc. demanding a General Election, etc. Signatures. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 24th Oct., 1707. 18 large pp.
1091. ii. S. Cox to Governor Crowe. Reply to the Assembly's charges (No. 1090. xviii.). I did consent in Council to the passing the Paper Act, being fully perswaded that by reason of the scarcity of money, it was absolutely necessary. As the Bill passed the Assembly it was in need of many amendments, and I was the first person at the Council to move such. Details. The Act has been very prejudicial to the Trade of this Island, yet as that consequence could not be foreseen, I hope I shall not be condemned for what has since happened, especially seeing I neither proposed any private advantage to myself by it, nor ever received any. When I observed its fatal influence, I warmly and publickly declared that it ought to be repealed. I consented to the Triennial Bill because I really believed it would conduce to the peace and welfare of the Island. It has no more answered my expectation than the former, and I have long since expressed my dislike of it by concurring with the late President in dissolution of the last Assembly, etc. Signed, Saml. Cox. Endorsed, Recd. Oct. 8, 1707. 3 pp.
1091. iii. John Milles to Governor Crowe. Reply to same. He voted for the Paper Act because he was firmly persuaded that nothing could prevent the ruine of this Island but the establishing another measure of commerce in the room of the cash which had drained from us, etc. Signed, John Milles. Same endorsement. 1½ pp.
1091. iv. Col. Walker to Governor Crowe. Reply to same. Criticises action of Assembly in bringing such accusations without hearing the parties. My support of the Bill was dictated not by private expectation but by the conviction that it was necessary. Describes his part in preparing and promoting it. Signed, Alexander Walker. Same endorsement. 8 pp. [C.O. 28, 10. Nos. 40, 40.i.–iv.]
Aug. 8.
Barbados.
1092. Governor Crowe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following:—
1092. i. Col. Holder to Governor Crowe. Reply to the resolves of the Assembly, June 5 (No. 1090. xviii.). Demands evidence at great length. I was chosen for the post of Manager of the Bank without my seeking it,—a compliment to my integrity—and they have not been able to detect the least unfair practice in my management of it. I was ravished to think I had it in my power to exceed Alexander Walker in generosity by making an equal distribution of the profits of his office with him, seeing that he shared my drudgery. I'me greived to my heart that his after conduct was not of a peice with his action in approving my appointment, after having been originally suggested as one of three intended managers himself. There was no corruption in the matter. If Alexander Walker gave his brother 200l., how should that affect me? I did retain the latter as Counsel in cases affecting the Bank. Neither Cowse nor Sharpe directly or indirectly ever received one farthing from me, etc. etc. Signed, John Holder. 30 large pp. Annexed,
1092. ii. Copy of the Rise, Progress and Determination of the Bank of Barbados. By John Holder. 10½ pp.
1092. iii. Copy of the Council's Amendments to the Paper Act, and of the Minutes of Assembly upon them. 8 pp.
1092. iv. Copies of depositions of Wm. Walker and Wm. Sharpe in support of Col. Holder's defence. July 24, 1707. The whole endorsed, Recd. Oct. 8, 1707. 3 pp. [C.O. 28, 10. Nos. 41, 41.i.-iv.]
Aug. 9.
Windsor Castle.
1093. The Queen to Governor Crowe. Warrant for dismissing Col. Cleland from the Council of Barbados. and all other employments. Countersigned, Ro. Harley. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 60; and 28, 38. No. 64.]
Aug. 9.
Windsor Castle.
1094. The Queen to Governor Handasyd. Warrant for restoring Tho. Barrow to his practice as an Attorney at Law in Jamaica. Countersigned, Ro. Harley. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 45. No. 88; and 5, 210. p. 61.]
[Aug. 12.]1095. Some Merchants of Barbados to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Recommend John Pilgrim for the Council of Barbados in the room of Col. Cleland. Signed, Rob. Heysham, Geo. Lillington and 12 others. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 12, Read Oct. 20, 1707. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 35.]
Aug. 12.
Torbay.
1096. Governor Hunter to [?Mr. Popple]. Acknowledges letter of July 1st etc. We are this minute return'd to Torbay, wth. ye whole Fleet, haveing been as far as the Eddystone, and in all appearance shall sail again to-night in order to return again next day. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. Read Aug. 27, 1707. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1315. No. 70; and 5, 1362. p. 259.]
Aug. 14.
Whitehall.
1097. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Parke. Since ours of June 26 we have received yours of June 10, and are glad to find so good an account of the Islands. As to the supply of great gunns you desire, we must on this occasion remind you of orders formerly sent you, to let us have a state of the Ordnance Stores in those Islands, particularizing what are at each fort or platform, and what are wanting, in order to our laying the same before H.M. Recommend Messrs. Rhodes and Estwick, Secretaries of the Commission of enquiry, to his favour and countenance. [C.O. 153, 10. pp. 64, 65.]
Aug. 14.1098. Wm. Penn to Wm. Popple. Esteemed Friend, The inclosed answers to G. Willcoxe's Reasons has been ready above a weeke since, but my wife's great illness in ye country disabled me from waiting upon ye Lords Commrs. with it. I hope ye Lords will upon perusall of it be of an opinion they are frivolous, not to say malicious to our perswasion, since ye drift of yt. Memoriall is to unquallify us for shares in our own Govermt., a most improper as well as an unreasonable thing; and yt. since they came Dwarfs into ye Province, whatever they are now, is it not very hard that these Gentlemen should make us Dissenters in our own Country? and in effect themselves our Lords and masters, for life, Liberty and Property. I will in a few days (God willing) wait upon ye Lords both upon this and ye other subject before them. I am, Thy assured and affect. ffriend, Wm. Penn. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 16, Read Oct. 20, 1707. Addressed. Sealed. ¾ p. Enclosed,
1098. i. Mr. Penn's Answears to ye Reasons offered by Geo. Willcox agst. confirming an Act past at Philadelphia, directing ye qualifications of magistrates, etc. (1) 'Tis evident yt. ye preamble of ye Act is grounded on a reality, for in ye Countys of Chester and Bucks 2 of ye 3 yt. compose the Province, there are at least 4 of ye people called Quakers to one yt. can swear, and in ye later they are not only 5 to one, but there are not able and sufficient men enough other than those called Quakers to execute justice among them, therefore there would be a failure of it if those people were excluded. Besides, this very Law was fully debated in a free conference between ye Councill and Assembly, before ye Governor, a Churchman, at wch. Councill there were 5 or 6 Churchmen and but 3 Quakers, and not one of those Gentlemen soe much as offerd to deny ye superiority of number when urged by ye Quakers, insomuch yt. ye Governor declared himself and ye rest too, satisfied of ye plurality and necessity of their being concerned in ye Administration of ye Govermt.; ye denying therefore yt. ye majority of ye freeholders of ye Province of Pensylvania are such who are sc[r]uplous of taking oaths is at least a mistake, but certainly this Article carrys apparent exclusion in ye very face of it, in alleadging yt. there are a sufficient number of such who are well quallified to exec[ute] all trusts and offices in ye Govermt., who doe not scruple to take and administer oaths: thereby doubtless intending totally to devest and discharge our frds. from haveing any share in ye administration thereof, tho of a Province or Colony of their own making, at ye known hazard of their lives and fortunes and a vast expence and labour for 26 years past, by wch. means a meer wilderness is converted into a usefull and beneficiall Colony to ye Crowne, a poor returne for ye favours shown them by ye people called Quakers. (2) As before, soe I must say it's highly reasonable and according to naturall right, yt. a people which made a country should be estab[lished] therein, neither will their establishmt. therein destroy ye pres[ent] settlemt. as is suggested in this Article, when ye greater part [of] ye ministers are Quakers and ye Legislators almost all, and ye sec[uri]ty of an affirmation wth. them is certainly as valid as yt. of an [oath] with those yt. are free to take it, their incomparable and constant sufferings for not swearing considerd, ye expression of leting in Quakers into ye Govermt. of yt. Province is ridiculous, they haveing had ye whole Govermt. there, and by their humanity and free principles admitted others to a participation wth. them yt. show now they doe not deserve it from them. (3) What is said agst. ye forme of affirmation there 'tis presumed may be alleadged agst. ye affirmation here, wch. seemes a reflection on the wisdom of Parliamt. ye affirmations being worded alike. (4) This clause is only where there is no proper officer on ye Bench yt. can administer an oath, and where almost ye whole are ye people called Quakers. Besides, ye greatest part of ye people of ye Province are as well satisfied wth. ye affirmation as wth. an oath, and hold themselves as much obliged thereby, and therefore there is no shew of any ill consequence from this clause, and further I must say ye whole Province and Territorys had an agreeable distribution of Justice free of oaths for many years wthout any complaint or address to ye Crown in respect of ye mode or manner of ye administration thereof, untill these complainants and their few adherents began to make those people uneasy who made ye Province, wch. has in a great measure made them wt. they are. (5) The clause enacting yt. ye tender of an oath by one Magistrate in ye presence of a Bench of Magistrates shall be esteemed his act only, yet as valid as if done by ye whole, cannot too much extend ye pow'r in any wise of any one Magistrate, as is here suggested, because ye same is limited to ye administration of an oath only. (6) 'Tis presumed ye Quakers hold themselves as firmly bound by an affirmation as others in generall by an oath as before at large, and therefore this reason seemes to carry no weight in it. (7) There is a great deale of reason for yt. clause relating to ye deposition or affirmation of a wittness, being sick or necessitated to goe out of ye Province, for ye people having often occasion, there being many of them traders, to goe to New York, New England, Maryland, Virginia, Jamaica, Rhoad Island, Barbadoes etc., as well as to come to England, and ye Judge before whom such deposition is to be made is certainly thought to be capable of knowing whether there is a necessity of such deposition or not, and if he finds none, then 'tis conceived he will not admitt of it; who is also to summon ye adverse party to appear before him, and will undoubtedly give them sufficient time to appear, else such deposition 'tis presumed would be laid aside by ye Court: Besides this appears only to have a relation to property and to ye life of ye subject; however it seemes to have been coppyed after a Barbados Law yt. has long since had ye Royall sanction, for so I have been informed. All wch. is humbly submitted to ye consideration of this Honble. Board in behalf of ye people called Quakers of ye Province of Pensylvania. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. Nos. 13, 13.i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1292. pp. 13, 14.]
Aug. 14.
Whitehall.
1099. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Crowe. Since our letter of June 26, wee have received yours of May 15 and June 5 last, as also the duplicate of the first of the said letters which was not signed. We think fit to take notice thereof to you, that you may sign all duplicates for the future, least the original shou'd at any time miscarry. We are sorry to perceive the fortifications are in so ill a state, but as the 4½ per cent. is appropriated by Act of Parliament here, it will be difficult to obtain any of it, as you desire, but we think you ought to move the Assembly in the most effectual manner, that they give the necessary supply for putting the said fortifications in the best posture they can, and that you send us over a perfect state of the said fortifications drawn by Col. Lilly, with a computation of what the charge of repairing them will amount to. Wee have perused the copy of the Address of the Assembly to yourself. Wee think it very proper that a full and strict enquiry should be made into the misfeasances and disorders which have disturbed the quiet of the Island, and that all fitting methods should be taken for remedying what is amiss, and prevent the like for the future. But before any such Act passes as is proposed in their Address, we think it convenient that the draught of such a Bill as they desire should be sent over to be considered here, in order to your receiving further directions therein. As to the Cartel with the French, we see as yet no objections to it. We have communicated it to the merchants and others concerned in Barbadoes, who all approve of it, but seeing you did not think fit to ratify it, we expect that you send us by the first opportunity the objections you have to it, that we may thereupon judge what shall be fitting to be done. As to your sitting as Judge at the Grand Sessions, though it may be alledged that the other Governors have done it, we cannot but declare to you that the practice appears to us very irregular, and that it is altogether unfit that the same person should either sit as Judge or otherwise appear on the Bench, or to speak and interpose in the hearing of any cause in the first instance, which may afterwards come before him by way of appeal. This, therefore, we thought fit to take notice of, as a thing that may be lyable to ill constructions, and as what was complain'd of in the case of Col. Codrington then Governor of the Leeward Islands. As to the Act to ascertain the payment of Bills, etc., H.M. hath been pleased to confirm the same, as you will see by H.M. inclosed Order, which you are to cause to be published in the usual manner. As to what you write in relation to coin, we had before the receipt of your letter represented our oppinion to H.M. (copy enclosed). We inclose H.M. Order Aug. 4, discharging Col. Sharp from the complaints made against him by Cols. Cleland, Colleton and Holder; as also another order of the same date, discharging Mr. Cox from the complaints made against him by Mr. Sandford and Mr. Dorn, both which orders you are to communicate to the Councill, and see that they be observ'd according to H.M. directions. H.M. having been pleased to dismiss Col. Cleland from the Councill and all other employments in Barbadoes, a warrant is accordingly preparing for H.M. royal signature which will be sent you by the next pacquet, in the meantime we send you a copy of H.M. Order thereupon for your information. As to what you mention in relation to Mr. Holder's being a Member of the Councill, we must acquaint you that it was as great a surprize to us when first we heard of it, as it seems to have been to you; and we are making an inquiry into that matter, of which we hope soon to give you a further account. [C.O. 29, 11. pp. 99–103.]
[Aug. 15.]1100. A Memorial of the Present Deplorable State of New England, with the many Disadvantages it lyes under, by the Male-Administration of their Present Governour, Joseph Dudley, Esq., and his son Paul, etc. By Philopolites. Printed in the year MDCCVII, and sold by S. Phillips, N. Buttolph, and B. Elliot. Booksellers in Boston. The Governor is accused of countenancing trade with the French and Indians, through his son, William Dudley, and Capt. Vetch, and thereby enabling the latter to continue their depredations etc. Everything is bought and sold betwixt the Governour and his son Paul, and no Justice is to be had without money. There is a general opposition to the Governour thro' the whole country. Affidavits of John Calley, Mariner, Wm. Partridge and Thomas Newton, quoted, "as they were laid before the Queen and Council, relating to the Governour of New England's Mercenary and Illegal proceedings," etc. Concludes with some accounts of outrages by Indians in the E. and W. of New England. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 15, 1707. A pamphlet of 41 pp. [C.O. 5, 864. Nos. 191, 192.]