America and West Indies
October 1707

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1916

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555-579

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'America and West Indies: October 1707', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 23: 1706-1708 (1916), pp. 555-579. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73749 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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Contents

October 1707

Oct. 1.
Councill Office.
1127. Mr. Southwell to Mr. Popple. Encloses copies of Order in Council, Sept. 24, repealing Acts of New England, etc., which has been divided into two parts by Lord Sunderland. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 13th Oct., 1707. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 864. No. 193; and 5, 912. pp. 388, 389.]
Oct. 3.1128. Capt. Chadwell, of the Flying-Horse sloop, to Robt. Holden. Reply to queries concerning the present state of the Bahama Islands. Inhabitants about 600 (300 freemen), dwelling upon Elutheria, Catt Island, Little and Great Exuma, Providence Island etc. They live scatteringly, in little hutts, ready upon any assault to secure themselves in the woods. No administration of Justice: the strongest man carrys the day. The enemy was last October upon Providence Island; they plundered there houses and carryed away there slaves; took abt. 16 guns out of ye Forte, and left 12, whole but spiked up; the Forte whole, not defaced anything. When assaulted flies into the woods. Trade:— braziletta-wood cutting; getting tortoise-shell; hunting for wrecks; rakeing sault, and makeing provission to keep them. The trade is moste from Jamaica, some from Corasao, St. Thomas, Carolina, Bermoodas, for liquor and dry goods. Abt. 20 vessells trades there a yeare of abt. 40 tuns burthen, which load with salt and wood. Exuma and Elutheria are the places for trade. Providence Town is burnt down; abt. 3 houses standing in ye woods, small hutts are in ye town where ye others was burnt, but destroy [ed] last Oct. Forte itself in good condition, ye houses within it burnt, no resorte of trade to town; abt. 20 men on ye Island. Woodwork and iron will be ye greatest expense to make the Fort good. Workmen there. The cost will not be much. The people bravely armed with small arms and ammunition enough; they chuse theyr Commanders as they please; when any alarum is given ym., if not able to resist, retires into ye woods, and there stands upon there guard, and secures what they have by hideing it in ye woods. They have about a dozen of small vessells amongst themselves, some of abt. 16 tuns. They fitted out last Jan. a privateer of about 20 tuns, and went on ye coast of Cuba, Capt. Walker, commander, wth. 35 men, took abt. 5 small vessells, and made abt. 50l. per man. The people would increase much, if a Goverment were settled, rather decrease now, for want of one. They are very desireous of a Governor, and wonders ye Lds. Propriators sends ym. not one; they seem devoted to ye Lds. Propriators and loves ym., for their great privilidges; differences are left to be decided when a Governour arrives. Vessells of 300 tuns and better may trade to Providence; Ryall Harbour for a vessell of abt. 100 tuns, ye best of harbours. Harbour Island has 3 fathom water at low water, fitting for vessells of 200 tuns but showly [=? shoaly] within; Hockin Island for vessells abt. 70 tuns; these all. Providence is ye cheifest place, and ye people generally affects it; ye Forte redily repaired and lies best for bringing trade to; Ryall Harbour ye best for securety, and naturally strong, soon made defenceable, but there is no fresh water there. Harbour Island is easilie fortified, has fresh water plenty. Providence must be ye place. Signed, Saml. Chadwell. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 22, 1707. (With Queries, 1½ pp.) [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 14.]
Oct. 3/14.
Fort Kijkoveral.
1129. Commandant Beeckman to the Dutch West India Company. Signed, Samuel Beeckman. Dutch. 4½ pp. [C.O. 116, 20. No. 8.]
Oct. 3.
Whitehall.
1130. W. Popple, jr., to Governor Dudley. Letters from the Council of Trade and Plantations are sent you by the way of Virginia, their Lordships not knowing then of any other conveyance. Encloses Orders of Council of Sept. 24th. [C.O. 5, 912. p. 386.]
Oct. 8.
Barbadoes.
1131. Governor Crowe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letters of June 26 and Aug. 7 and encloses duplicates, Prays for H.M. pleasure about the Cartell with Martinique, which, as it was mannaged only served the French to gett intelligence and promote their trade; I shall observe H.M. order in admitting Mr. Berrisford into the Councill, as I have done in dismissing Messrs. Sharpe, Cox, Mills and Walker, and putting ye gentlemen I formerly advis'd your Lordships in their places, who are very acceptable to all here, and I doubt not will impartially answer the trust. I find Coll. Cleland, Holder's and the other gentlemen's petition lay before H.M., soe I shall be expecting her Royall pleasure therein from your Lordships per next, and follow Sir E. Northy's opinion in granting administrations, and as soon as possible gett transcripts of the severall branches of the Revenue since 1698, to lay before your Lordships, in order thereto, the Assembly, amongest others, has now a Bill sent them from the Councill for appointing an impartiall Committee to examine all disbursments relating to the publick, the Act formerly pass'd for that end being deficient. But I must observe, that said Assembly, notwithstanding the many admonitions I have given them for promoting peace and union, have spent more time in resolves against private persons, than in dispatch of the pressing publick affairs, or rectifieing the inconveniencys the Island now lyes under for want of some amendments to the Mattross Act that [is] lately sent home, takeing away H.M. prerogative in appointing those that should guard the Forts etc.; Coppy of the amended Bill, as it now lyes before the Assembly, and that of the Paper Credit, your Lordships will find inclosed, as alsoe the names of the severall Forts and Batterys with the guns thereon, and an exact list of all the inhabitants of this Island. I have taken a review of the Melitia, which did not ammount to 3,000 horse and foot, many of them without armes and indeed the meanest men that ever I saw in such a number, the want of money and dearness of all sorts of provisions, haveing distroy'd or banish'd most of the poorer sort, and the Act of Melitia is soe favourable to the rich, that they seldome or never appear, except on alarms. Said Act wants amendments, and in passing of any for the futter, I shall punctually observe your Lordships' directions. I beg your Lordships would be pleased to lay the two inclosed before H.M. for her Royall approbation. I have keept the Courts of Error and Chancery soe exact that there is not now a cause depending in either, and the Judges allwise clear their lists in the Lower Courts. I have ordered the Cheif Baron of the Exchequer to ffinish what lyes before him; The Deal Castell returned about six weeks agoe, and in her Mr. Codrington the late Governour there; The Indians I advised your Lordships of (in my former) upon a disgust (I supose) given by some private person, which I cannot yett find out, took two boats in the night and went away without advising any thereof. I sent down two of H.M. ships, as soon as they could be gott ready to know the reason, and by them the presents I designed for their Cheif; They had good lodgeings, wanted for nothing in towne, and when ere came to see me entertained at my owne table. One great obstruction to the business in the Assembly is, that not withstanding by H.M. Commission and my Instructions, the majority which is 12, should be a quorum, they still keep to their old rule of 15, conterary to the oppinion of the late Attorney Generall Northy, which was transmitted to Sir. B. Granville. I humbly beg your Lordships to send me H.M. pleasure herein; it's a hard matter to gett 15 together out of 22 in this sickly Island which is soe indebted, that the Guners, wch. are now on duty in the Forts, want above 18 months, some 2 year's pay, which, with the necessity of raiseing funds for the other unavoidable suport of the publick, I have often recomended to the Assembly without any other returne then that they will provoid for the same when the publick accounts are settled. I thought it proper to lay this before your Lordships, that H.M. may know I have not been wanting in adviseing them to take care for ffutter events, and I had raither with patiance and perswasions induce them to provoid what is necessary for their suport, then create a new charge and ffresh animositys in the Island, by choosing a new Assembly before the time of this is expired (if it otherwise can be avoided). Indeed my Lords this Island is in a miserable poor condition, the weighing of the money and late pernitious paper Act haveing carryed it all off, and I doe not find a spirit among the merchants to endeavour on any methods to replenish us. My whole time is taken up in redressing of poor petitioners, whose oppression has been the occasion of soe many leaveing the Island. Signed, M. Crowe. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd, Read 26th Jan., 1707/8. 6 pp. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 56; and 29, 11. pp. 161–166.]
Oct. 8.
Antigua.
1132. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. My last to your Lopps. was of the 4th of Aug. Since that time, I have not heard from Europe, and this the only vessell bound for England and tho' but a little inconsiderable slupe and bound to Bristol, I thought it my duty to give your Lopps. an acctt. of the state of these Islands. The people haveing made good cropps began to be in good humour, and they had allmost forgot their losses by the French (wch. hapned to them just before I arrived) but to our great misfortune on Aug. 29, in the night we had a terible storm, wch. is called here a Hurricane; Antigua has the least damage, yett they have suffer'd very much; but in St. Kitts, Nevis and Montserrat, most of the Houses are blown down, and those that stand are miserably shatter'd; for my own part I have lost allmost all I have; ever since I came I have been building a House at St. Kitts, wch. is now blown down, and the ffload has caryed away all the timber into the sea; I had hyred a Plantation there, and am obliged to leave it in repair, wch. will cost me as much as one whole year's sallery and perquesites comes too; all my furniture in my House in Antigua is spoyl'd; I do assure your Lopps. I am now much a poorer man than when I came, wch. is very hard after haveing endured so much sickness and fateague. All the vessells in the Harbours were drove ashore, and one Bristol ship oversett and lost; the Child's Play man of warr drove on shore at St. Kitts and is lost, but the men all saved; the Winchelsea was sent to convoy some vessells; she was seen that evening off St. Kitts, but has not been heard of since; I am affraid she and all her men are lost; for there is come ashore at St. Bartholomew's some part of the wrack of a great ship and one man drown'd wch. by discription was the Capt's. taylor; I have been ever since a prisoner in this Island, for want of a vessel, but I have perswaded the inhabitants to fitt out a slupe wch. I hope will be ready to sayle next week, as soon as she is ready, I will vissit the other Islands. This Island is at a very great expense in quartering of the soldiers, and since this misfortune the people begin to grumble very much, especially since there is no care taken as we hear of for the paying the soldiers, who have not received one farthing pay since they came. Every thing is very dear, and if your Lopps. does not procure us some nimble ffrigotts to protect us from the privateers we shall all starve, for they are so numerous they will take all vessells bound to these Islands. We have expected the London ffleet since July last, God send them safe to us, otherwise we shall be in a very miserable condetion. If H.M. had any money to spare, it would be very great charety in her to send us some provesion, and nayles for to rebuild our Houses. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 11th Dec., 1707. 3 pp. [C.O. 152, 7. No. 28; and 153, 10. pp. 84–87.]
Oct. 8.
Barbados.
1133. Cols. Sharpe, Cox and Walker to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Complain that, by some disingenious misrepresentations of our actions during Sir B. Granville's Government, Governor Crow has been pleased to remove us from the Council, in obedience, as he says, to H.M. positive commands. The things we are charged with, are voting for the late Paper Act, being persons much in debt, and voting for the Triennial Law. We acknowledge, that we voted for the late Paper Act, but utterly deny that it was with any such design as has been most maliciously represented to H.M. The miserable state and condition to which this Island was reduced at that time, through the want of cash, the sale of negroes, cattle and the product of the Island at half the real value, cheifly induced us to consent to that Law, nor could we think of a more proper expedient to prevent that general ruine we apprehended would ensue upon the dayly mellancholly instances we had of men's estates being exposed and sold at publick sale, than to erect some other measure of trade in the room of silver, of which we were drained, etc. Repeat defence as in enclosures of Aug. 2. When H.E. removed us from the Councill, he exprest a great reluctance and concern at the unpleasant office, and gave us the heads of several complaints he said had been preferr'd against us, and a copy of H.M. Instructions to him, relating to the same, which he was pleased to declare was a possitive order, in obedience to which he suspended us. We shall alwayes, my Lords, most chearfully submit to H.M. commands, but we cannot conceale our concern that we alone should be mark't out as proper objects of H.M. displeasure, whilst others as much concern'd in passing the said repealed Laws, who also obstructed the passing the releiving Law, and against whom the other charge would more justly lye, should still be permitted to sit at that Board and enjoy H.M. grace and favour. We presented the inclosed Address to H.E., and prayed the publick seal, in order to lay the same in forme before H.M., but he was pleased to deny us that favour [see Jan. 23, '08], which obliges us to lay the same before your Lordships, humbly desiring your Lordships would be pleased to do us all the good offices in order to our restoration, and that when this affair is layed before H.M. in Councill, your Lordships will be pleased to do us the justice you think we deserve. Signed, Wm. Sharpe, Saml. Cox, Alexander Walker. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 15, Read Feb. 10, 1707/8. 3½ pp. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 64; and 29, 11. pp. 191–196.]
Oct. 9/20.
Fort Kijkoverall, Essequibo.
1134. Commandant Beeckman to the Dutch West India Company. Signed, Samuel Beeckman. Dutch. 2½ pp. Enclosed,
1134. i. ff. Clearings, accounts, requirements, etc. Dutch. 44 pp. [C.O. 116, 20. Nos. 9, 9.i.–xxvi.]
Oct. 10.
Boston.
1135. Governor Dudley to W. Popple. My last letters to your Office were of May 26, since which I have had no letters from their Lordships, nor from my Lord Sunderland's Office, but am every day in hopes of the mast fleet under convoy of H.M.S. Reserve, there being, two days since, a runner out of that fleete arrived, by whom I hope I shall receive their Lordships' commands, and by whom also I may return the year's accounts, having had no opportunity with any safety so to do by any conveyance this year. The forces that I mentioned in my last gone upon the French Settlements to the Eastward are well returned, they went out 1,000 land men, and have been upon the French coast 4 months, have burn'd about 150 good settlements at Port Royall, considerable farms, and destroy'd 1,000 great cattle, besides sheep and hoggs to a greater number, which is all they have, and left nothing standing for their winter support, but thought it not advisable to attempt the Fort, being a regular work and guarded with 600 men, and so impassable is the countrey, that they could not without great difficulty bring up any cannon, nor had I any mortarrs more than two 50 pounders to send with them, which were inferiour to the enimy's in all points. In this whole occasion I have lost but 25 men out of the whole force, who have brought me home more prisoners, and so I must be content for this winter. I hope by the frigott returning to lay the whole matter so before H.M. as to obtain the assistance and cover of some shipps and force from home, which may remove that troublesome neighbour. I have had this summer 20 small partys of the enimy, none above the number of 50 from the French side, Quebeck and Mont-Real, and tho' with great secrecy coming upon the out parts, have been allways mett and defeated; and the last week a fleet of cannoes of 62, containing 300 salvages, making their advance upon the Province of Mayn, were met and diverted with a considerable loss, of which I cannot yet give a particular account. This is by a Virginian that will run the adventure, and I wish it may come safe to your hands etc. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. 19th, Read 22nd Jan., 1707/8. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 864. No. 197; and 5, 912. pp. 397–399.]
Oct. 13.1136. Mrs. Sharpe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. This fleett from Barbados brings me an account that your Lordships will receve from H.E. Mr. Crow, a charge from the Assembly against the Councill in Generall, and also there perticular answers to it. I do not hear ther is any new matter in it, but what has already bin layd before your Lordships by Mr. Sharp etc. I have from Mr. Sharpe some reasons to beleive H.E. espouses an intrest your Lordships have lattely had just reason to condem, and that he desined soone after the departure of the fleett to suspend al those Members of the Councill the Assembly has bin pleast to charge. But would not do it before, to debar them of making ther just complants to your Lordships. Prays for the protection of Mr. Sharpe. Signed, B. Sharpe. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 13, 1707. 1½ pp. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 34; and 29, 11. pp. 104, 105.]
Oct. 13.
Whitehall.
1137. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Dudley. Acknowledge letters of Jan. 1, and May 26. We must commend your care and zeal in promoting the manufacturing of Naval Stores, and doubt not of your further continuance of the same. All that we can say in relation to Mr. Bridger's particular incouragement, and to what he desires in relation to deputies, clerks and travelling charges, is, that we have laid the same before my Lord Treasurer. We know that before his going over he presented Memorials to the like purpose, which were not then complied with, and Mr. Bridger agreed to perform the service for the salary then settled, so that we fear there will not be any new addition made thereunto. In the list of the present Councellors of New Hampshire we find Samuel Penhallow omitted, for what reason we know not, not having heard from you that he was either dead or dismiss'd the Council. Neither do we know how Nathanael Ware and John Hilton came to be Members of that Council, not finding their names upon any of our lists. As to your desire of new Counsellors, it is about a year since a representation was made to H.M. for the admission of Richard Waldron, Winthrop Hilton and Joseph Smith; But no person being appointed here to solicit and take out the warrants for the same, 'tis probable they will not be dispatched till that be done. [C.O. 5, 912. pp. 387, 388.]
Oct. 14.
Whitehall.
1138. The Earl of Sunderland to Governor Crowe. Acknowledges letters of June 5, July 30 and Aug. 8. H.M. being at present at Newmarket, I have not been able to lay them before her, which I will do with the first opportunity, and by the next pacquet boat I will send you a particular answer thereto. Refers to Orders for dismissing Col. Cleland and Mr. Holder. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 65.]
[Oct. 18.]1139. Observations upon the paper entitled the Rise, Progress, and Determination of the Bank of Barbados. In favour of Major Woodbridge and Alexander Walker. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Walters) Oct. 18, Read Nov. 3, 1707. 9 pp. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 48.]
[Oct. 18.]1140. Certificate by Governor Crowe that Patrick Mein deposed that the following documents were sworn to before him. Aug. 7, 1707. Signed, M. Crowe. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Walters) Oct. 18, Read Nov. 3, 1707. 1 p. Enclosed,
1140. i. Deposition of John Holder. Aug. 6, 1707. He never gave William Walker any gratuity for the passing of the Paper Act, nor knew of Alexander Walker doing so, beyond what is mentioned in his reply to the Assembly, etc. Signed, John Holder. ¾ p.
1140. ii. Deposition of Wm. Walker. Before the Paper Act was brought in, or he had seen it, he was told by Sir B. Granville that Alexander Walker and John Holder were to be equal sharers of the profits arising thereby. After the Bill was past John Holder told deponent to send A. Walker to him to settle their parts of the profits. Signed, Wm. Walker. Aug. 6, 1707. 1 p.
1140. iii. Deposition of Alexander Walker. He never paid William Walker, nor knew of his receiving a reward of 200l. for promoting the Paper Act, as the Assembly alleges. Signed, Alexander Walker. Aug. 6, 1707. ¾ p. [C.O. 28, 10. Nos. 49, 49.i.-iii.]
[Oct. 18.]1141. Speech of the Speaker of the Assembly of Barbados to Governor Crowe upon laying before him the Resolutions of the Assembly against the persons concerned in the Paper Act. The visible, eminent and universall desolation of this once fflourishing, but now poor, decayed Island (occasioned by the many invasions made on our rights, liberties and propertys by the avarice of those who ought to have preserved us), and the great violence and oppressions wee laboured under caused almost a totall decay of trade, Justice and legall proceedings, and miserably distracted, discontented and impoverished and disabled us even beyond the hopes of recovering ourselves out of the labyrinth of our amazing confusions. As such hardshipps imposed on us make your Excellency's generous answer to our humble Address shine with the greater lustre, so it hath given us entire satisfaction and content, etc. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Walters) Oct. 18, Read Nov. 3, 1707. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 50.]
[Oct. 20.]1142. Duplicates of Nos. 835, 836. Endorsed, Recd. from Mrs. Sharpe, Read Oct. 20, 1707. [C.O. 28, 10. Nos. 34.i., ii.]
Oct. 21.
St. Johns.
1143. Major Lloyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The men of warr by whom I hoped for ye subsistance and cloathing for ye soldiers here, being not arrived, I pray your Lordshipps' consideration of ye condition of ye Company, that they may be supplied by ye first men of warr that are sent to this land. And whereas in 1705, bedding was sent for ye use of this garrison, it was decayed and rotten to that degree, that severall of ye ruggs would not beare their owne weight. In 1701 there was likewise bedding sent in ye same ill condition, the hardshipps of ye weather, together with ye small number of men allowed for this place, makes ye duty and fateague of a soldier very great, therefore humbly pray your Lordshipps will give orders that their usage may be better, and that bedding (the which they are in great want of) be sent them next year. Inclosed is a muster roll of ye Company and an estimate of ye damages done ye French (in their Northern fishery in this land) by our men of warr; whom I with 40 soldiers joyned at ye request of the merchants and inhabitants, who dureing my absence voluntarily allowed 100 of their men to do duty for ye security of ye garrison. Two years' provisions being sent here in 1705, I did that winter, and likewise ye last, lend to ye inhabitants, to be repaid in like specia, what they had occasion for, the which method saved H.M. a great deal of provisions from being damnified, supported many inhabitants in their necessity, gives the soldiers content and satisfaction in haveing what's new and good, and I hope will meet with approbation of your Lordshipps. It was agreed this year by H.M. Officers here for a generall exchange of prisoners with the Governor of Placentia, which was accordingly done. I beg leave to observe to your Lordshipps two inconveniencies that may attend ye same. First, ye French immediately imploy the prisoners that are returned to them in sloops on this coast, wch. may prejudice our merchants; secondly they may be prevailed on to winter at Placentia, which may endanger ye whole land. Last year the Commodore sent me your Lordshipps' Instructions to him, which, according to his request, I answered according to my judgment. If in any respect I have been amissive in not giveing your Lordshipps an account of this land, it is because I beleive it to great a presumption in me so to doe without your Lordshipps' commands etc. Capt. Robert Latham (who was Ingenire here, being going for England) has at all times behaved himself with utmost diligence, etc. etc. Prays that he may return next summer to ye land, which I presume, by his knowledge of this countrey and love of ye people, will be of great advantage to H.M. interest and service. Signed, Tho. Lloyd. Endorsed, Recd. 28th, Read 29th Dec., 1707. 2 pp. Enclosed,
1143. i. Muster-Roll of the Company at St. Johns, July 25, 1707. Endorsed as preceding. 1 p.
1143. ii. Duplicate of Aug. 30. No. 1. [C.O. 194, 4. Nos. 34, 34.i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 195, 4. pp. 391–394.]
Oct. 21.
Whitehall.
1144. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose following to be laid before H.M. in Council. Annexed,
1144. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Your Majesty having been pleased to dismiss Cols. Cleland, and Holder, there are now two vacancies in the Council of Barbados, and Col. Tobias Frere, formerly one of the Members of your Majesty's said Councill, having at his own desire obtained leave, in Sir B. Granvill's Government, to lay down the said employ, being unwilling to comply with severall things then expected from him, and being now desirous to serve your Majesty again in the same station, we humbly represent that he, being a person of a very good character and reputation, and no ways engag'd in the late disorders which have happened in Barbadoes, and well qualifyed to serve your Majesty as a Counsellor, be restored to his place, with the same precedency he had when he laid down. And Major John Pilgrim having been likewise recommended to us by several of the principal inhabitants and merchants trading to that Island, as a person fitly qualifyed, he being of a good ability, well affected to your Majesty's Government, and having a considerable estate upon the place and noways concerned in the aforesaid disorders, and it being for your Majesty's service that the said Councill should be compleat, we further humbly offer that he be appointed a Member of your Majestie's said Councill. [C.O. 29, 11. pp. 107–109.]
Oct. 21.
Southwark.
1145. Mr. Cox to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following extract from a letter from his brother Samuell Cox of Barbadoes, July 27, 1707:—"I am surprized to find our Chief to be so great a favourer of the Scotch Collonell [? Col. Cleland. Ed.] and his followers, who are utter enemies to the peace and prosperity of this place. The Coll. has often said that when his bird came he would do all our businesses, and make a greater turn than he had done in Sir Bevill's time, when he turned out four of the Councill and a great many Field Officers, and got himself made a Coll. and a Member of the Councill. In short the Scot rules in chief, the Bird has only the title, for everything that the Collonel dislikt in the President's time, he has either reverst or exploded, and he has so far possest our Cheif with an opinion, that the Queen could not give any man a patent for [that] Navall Office, he said, which the Law had given him, that thereupon I was ordered to bring my patent to him, which he read, as also the report of the Commissioners of the Customes and the Lords Committees of Trade to the King and Councill, in favour of the patent, notwithstanding all which our Chief said the Queen could not give away his right, and that he would have it, and in 2 or 3 dayes I found that if I did not comply with him, I should run a great risque of being ruin'd. For the Coll. and his party had so far wrought with some Kts. of the Post that it was openly reported that some things would be sworn against me, that would be my ruine. Wherefore being unwilling to trust them I went to our Chief and submitted the office to his pleasure, on condition that he would let me officiate for him and defend me from the aforesaid Kts., wch. he promised to do, but would not promise to continue me in the Councill, if he should have an occasion of turning out the rest of the old Councill, so that wee daily expect to be suspended that Board, wch. would be no trouble to me, if I could then be sure to live quietly, wch. I much suspect. I pray you to take care that our Chief dos not get my patent for the Navall Office made void. Our Chief was not satisfied with my resignation of the whole profitts of the Navall Office, to be accompted for on the oaths of myself and Clerk, without deducting any charge whatsoever, but he obliged me to give a bond of 1,000l., to pay it to another Scott, Alexander Skeen, the publick Secretary, and would have 300l. per annum during his Government, wch. is more by 50l. per annum than it will make during the war. But my reasons for complying with such hard terms are, that I was willing to keep the office in my custody in case of his death, and another was that my enemies, who knew nothing of it, might not rejoyce at my losse. I desire you to procure H.M. leave for my coming to England, alledging it's for the recovery of my health, for here is no living under such management, for some can do nothing right and others can do nothing wrong, therefore, if there be not a speedy alteration in this Government, above one half of the inhabitants will go off. Patrick Mein, Esq. and severall others are so weary of it that they have offerred to sell their estates a great pennyworth, that they may leave the Island." Signed, Charles Cox. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 21, 1707. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 37; and 29, 11. pp. 111–115.]
Oct. 22.
St. Christophers.
1146. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following to be laid before H.M. The Adress was drawn and signed before I came down, I could not delay the packett so long untill a Councill and Assembly might be called. Otherwise I would have had the compliment they have made me in it left out. The substance of the Adress is true etc. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd, Read 26th Jan., 1707/8. 1 p. Enclosed,
1146. i. Address of the Lt. Governor, Council and Assembly of St. Christophers to the Queen. Return thanks for H.M. bountiful care since the losses sustained from the enemy, although the ships intended for releif of this Island did all miscarry, but one. Thanks for ships and stores of war. Acknowledge Governor Parke's assiduous labours in superintending erection of fortifications, etc. Represent their great losses by the enemy and the late hurricane (see Oct. 8). Return thanks for H.M. care in sending over Col. Lillingston's Regiment for their defence. "But at the same time we lay before your Majesty our incapacitys at present to provide free quarters for any part of the officers and soldiers; But at the request of our Generall (to whom wee will not deny anything in our power), wee have undertaken to give quarters for one company for three months; in that time the Collonel may take care to have them paid, which with some small matter allowed from those in Antigua (who have free quarters allowed them) may very comfortably subsist them. But our greatest discouragement consists in our dread and apprehensions of being injur'd and abused by the insults, depradations and affronts of officers and soldiers, as wee suffer'd by those of Col. Whetham's Regiment (who instead of protecting and defending your Majesty's subjects) did robb and plunder them of their stock, cattle, goods and effects, and (withdrawing themselvs out of your Majestie's garrisons) did incamp themselves in the late French part of the Island, where they committed severall violencies, mischeifs, and insolencies till the arrivall of Col. Park, who to his everlasting honour restrained them, and kept them to their duty in the garrisons. We therefore pray your Majesty to direct that what troops you shall hereafter please to send for ye defence of these Islands, the Collonel come with them and be obliged constantly to pay and cloath them, etc. The cloathing last sent out for Col. Whetham's Regiment were little or nothing worth, and, before they came out, what was bought for the soldiers here by their officers, that the poor soldiers were obliged to pay double the cost out of their pay, above and besides the deduction of ye twopences, and they were without swords, and by that means less fitt for service, having been here five years before they had mountings sent them from home, their firelocks fit for no service. And for want of an Armourer, they could not be mended, and great part never received any pay, nor are ever like to receive any. And whereas there was no Chirurgeon on this Island belonging to Col. Whetham's Regiment, severall of the soldiers belonging thereunto being upon duty in the Fort on Brimstone Hill some time since happened to be wounded and maim'd by the blowing up of the magazeen by lightning. The Commanding Officer then upon this Island, Major William Gore, did possitively neglect and refuse to take any care or make any provision for the said wounded men. The Country therefore (in compassion to the poor distressed soldiers) did employ a chirurgeon to take care of them, and the commanding officer refusing to pay for their cure, the publick have been obliged to pay the said chirurgeon 75l. currt. money." Pray H.M., "in compassion to our present deplorable circumstances, to remit unto us the duty of 4½ p.c. by applying the same to the use of the fortifications of this Island, and that an able gunner upon a fixed sallary may be sent out to take care of and manage the guns, our poor and unhappy circumstances rendring us totally uncapable to encourage by payment or satisfaction such an officer." Pray that an Agent for the Royal African Company may reside amongst them, and that the Company may send them "such quantitys of slaves as our Island can purchase; the want of such conveniency is very detrimentall and prejudiciall unto us, wee being obliged to goe to other Islands to purchase what slaves we have occasion for, and be at severall extraordinary charges for the passage of such slaves bought off this Island, besides other expences as well as the freight of our sugars that must be sent thither for the payment of the same, as likewise the risque of enemies that we run in war-time between Island and Island, besides the discouragement of our trade, by sending our sugars to load vessels that are in other Islands, which might more reasonably be directly shipp'd from hence, they having the name to send so much sugar from their Island, when actually a great part is sent from ours." Pray that when H.M. shall accept of any overtures of a Peace, this Island may be kept whole and entire to the Crown, and the land given to none but those that will come and inhabit the Island etc. etc. Signed, [Council:—] Michael Lambert, Fos. Crisp, Hen. Burrell, Stephen Payne, Jno. Davis, J. Panton, Wm. Willett. [Assembly:—] J. Peteres, Speaker, Francis Phipps, Clemt. Crooke, John Willett, Jno. King, Isaac Jolly, Will. Wooddrop, Jos. Estridge. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 8 pp.
1146. ii. Same to Governor Parke. Pray that above Address may be presented to H.M. with all possible speed. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 7. Nos. 31, 31.i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 153, 10. p. 101.]
Oct. 22.
Whitehall.
1147. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. Presuming your Lordship will think it necessary, upon the late change in the Commission of this Board, that a new Privy Seale be passed for the same, we take this occasion to offer to your Lop. that the business of writing clerks in this office is so much increased, that it is impossible it can be done as it ought without more hands than we have hitherto had, in consideration whereof we have added another clerk as absolutely necessary for the work, and pray your Lordship's favour in the establishment, according to the annexed paper. Although this addition seems to increase the charge of this office to 60l. per annum, yet it is no more than 40l., for your Lordship does now allow 20l. per annum out of the incidents for one of the clerks etc. Enclosed,
1147. i. Proposal for a new establishment for the under office in the service of the Council of Trade. (Increase from 1,110l. to 1,150l.) See B. of T. Journal. [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 334–336.]
Oct. 22.
St. Christophers.
1148. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to letter of June 26. To the uttmost of my power I endeavour to get Monk's Hill fortified. I have been myselfe for six weeks, day after day, looking over the work. But there's no perswadeing them to doe anything, but as they are frighten'd. I have often called on the Deputy Secretary to write me out the Journalls of the Councill and Assembly. I was promised them per this packett—and now they tell me they were done, but in the hurricane they were lost, which I beleive is true; I will endeavour to get them by the next, what can be had; 'tis for my creditt that the Jour[n]alls were read before the Queen and Councill, that it might be seen what pains I have taken to get the Islands fortified, etc. The Queen hath noe Revenue in these Islands, but the 4½ p.c., which is collected by officers put in per my Lord Treasurer. They accompt with the Commissioners of the Custome-house, who have a Commissioner here to overlook them, who when any vacancy happens, has power to put in others. He is also Commissioner for prizes, but he has had nothing to doe, for there has been no prize taken since I came to the Government, there is no such thing since I came as any body fined, in these small Islands, almost all the inhabitants are related; they must be tryed by jurys, who will always clear their friends, even of murther. There is no such thing as Escheats, for they are also to be found by a jury. Since I came I had two jurys summoned to find an escheat, but they would not find for the Queen, though it was a plain case, as I thought. I am to govern them by Law, and if a Jury has no regard for their oaths I cannot help. The Queen has no Quit-rents, as in Verginia and other places; For the Land is held, paying a peppercorn the year, if demanded. I appointed a Receiver for the occational Revenue, but he has not received one farthing since I came. There can be nothing received but by seizure of illegall Traders there has been no one seized since I came, for Col. Codrington has, and is like to pay soe dear for seizeing vessells, that I beleive for the future, hardly any will ever be seized. I have called up the Navall Officer for his Lists. I have every six months sent them to my Lord Treasurer, as I am directed. And the Navall Officer tells me plainly there never was but one given, and he will give no more. That if I would be at the charge of another to send to the Lords of the Trade, I may. Which if your Lordshipps insists upon, I will. But what costs 18d. in England, cost[s] 10s. here; though my sallery has not the same proportion. If ever any part of the old Seal is found, it shall be sent to your Ldpps. I am obliged to your Ldpps. that Col. Hamilton and Col. Lamberts are confirm'd Lt. Governours for though I had no interest, one way or other, haveing put in the next in succession, but yet, if they had not been confirmed, it would have been a slurr upon me. I am not a little pleased your Ldpps. approves of my distributing the Queen's Bounty. I shall observe your order relating to Mr. Pogson, and to probatts of wills etc. I have been hithertoo verry carefull in passing of Laws. All that has past has been sent you, except the temporary laws, for quartering of souldires, and sending their negro's to work on publick works, which they will not be perswaded for to last above six months, soe that before you can receive them, they will be expired. And for the future, I shall observe your Ldpps.' orders in passing all laws; hithertoo I have done the same thing your Ldpps. now orders me, and I think I have followed every Instruction I brought with me, or have received since, soe farr as 'twas possible. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. May 26, Read June 22, 1708. [C.O. 152, 7. No. 44; and 153, 10. pp. 148–150.]
[Oct. 22.]1149. Virginia Merchants to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Suggest method of measuring ships in Virginia by the gun-deck, as, being afloat, they cannot be measured by the keel there. A ship of 400 tuns will not bring above half so many tuns of tobacco, except tunnage of goods be regulated. Signed, Micajah Perry and 5 others. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 22, 1707. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1315. No. 72; and 5, 1362. pp. 262, 263.]
Oct. 22.
Whitehall.
1150. W. Popple, jr., to Rich. Savage. Encloses copies of preceding, and of the clause in the Act of the 6th and 7th William III, for the opinion of the Commissioners of the Customs thereupon. [C.O. 5, 1362. p. 263.]
Oct. 23.
Whitehall.
1151. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose following to be laid before H.M.
1151. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Representation upon the complaint of Sir T. Laurence in accordance with the report of the Attorney General July 31, q.v. We humbly offer that the Act of Maryland, 1704, complained of, being now expired, it will not be proper for your Majesty to repeal the same, but that your Majesty may signify to the Governor, under your Royal Signature, your dislike of the said Law, requiring him not to pass any law for the future whereby the advantage of the Ordinary licences shall be taken from the Secretary's Office. We conceive it for your Majesty's service that at the next Assembly the Act concerning Ordinaries be made perpetual, or at least for a much longer duration than it has hitherto been made, and the benefit of the licences appropriated to the use of the Secretary, etc. as July 31. [C.O. 5, 726. pp. 481–488.]
Oct. 23.
Whitehall.
1152. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose following to be laid before H.M.
1152. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. We have considered the Petition of Richard Budge etc., and humbly take leave to lay before your Majesty the state of the fact as it appeareth to us. Budge, in 1702, being commander and part owner of the Hope, came from the Bay of Campeachy, laden with logwood, and in his voyage towards Holland, whither he was bound, was obliged to put into New Jersey for wood, water and provisions. Lord Cornbury hearing thereof, seized the said ship, and upon pretence of illegal trade caused her to be tryed, condemned and sold, together with her cargo. Budge thereupon appealed to your Majesty's High Court of Admiralty here, where, upon examination of the proceedings had by the Lord Cornbury, the said proceedings and sentence were reversed as illegal and arbitrary, and a decree for restitution accordingly made. Petitioner, not knowing how to get satisfaction, did humbly apply to your Majesty by petition for redress, which petition your Majesty was pleased to refer to Dr. Bramston and Sir John Cook, who reported the illegallity of the proceedings against the said ship and cargo, and that the Lord Cornbury or his Officers ought to make full restitution of the said ship and loading, or the value thereof, which, according to an affidavit made, amounted with charges to 4,200l. 5s. 0d., whereupon your Majesty was pleased to order the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles Hedges, then one of your Majestie's Secretaries of State, to write to the Lord Cornbury, requiring him to make the petitioner satisfaction for the said ship and cargo. Petitioner thereupon returned to New York and delivered the said letter to his Lordship, and petitioned his Lordship for satisfaction according to the tenour of the said letter, but after 9 months' expence of time there, he cou'd obtain nothing, his Lordship only telling him that he must apply to your Majesty for one third part, and to the informer for another, which informer was only nominal, having no share in the prosecution, nor any part of what the said ship and cargo were sold for, as he himself informed the petitioner. Petitioner was hereupon obliged to be at further expence of time and mony in returning to England, in order to lay the hardship of his case before your Majesty, for your Majesty's favourable and effectual directions in his behalf. As a further aggravation, the said cargo of logwood, which was solely owned by the petitioner, and which cou'd not be subject to damage by lying, was, together with the said ship, immediately sold, and at an under value, without waiting for the issue of the said Appeal, which ought to have been done. The loss, including the charges of prosecution, and the petitioner's expences in his voyages to and from New York, amounts in the whole to 4,775l. Petitioner is by such oppressive and unjust proceedings deprived at once of his whole subsistance, which he had acquired by the industry of the best part of his life, and having a wife and five children, they are, and have been for near five years, reduced to the utmost want and necessity. He communicated the abovesaid Petition to the Lord Cornbury's Agent here, for his observations thereupon, but he having signified to us that he had no knowledge of that matter, nor received from the Lord Cornbury any account thereof, and his Lordship not having taken notice to this Board of anything relating thereunto, we are humbly of opinion that the Lord Cornbury has acted illegaly, to the great oppression of the petitioner, and that in so doing he has justly deserved your Majesty's censure, and ought to make reparation for the wrong done, in order whereunto we humbly offer that the judgment upon the Appeal against his Lordship be put in execution according to the ord'nary course of Law. [C.O. 5, 1121. pp. 99–103.]
Oct. 23.
Whitehall.
1153. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose following for H.M. signature. [See Aug. 4.]
1153. i. Circular letter from the Queen to Governors of Plantations. Whereas we are sensible that effectual care ought to be taken to oblige the Members of our Council, to a due attendance therein, in order to prevent the many inconveniencies that may happen from the want of a quorum of the Council to transact business as occasion may require, It is Our will and pleasure that if any of the Members of our said Council shal hereafter wilfully absent themselves when duly summon'd without a just and lawful cause, and shall persist therein after admonition, you suspend the said Counsellors till Our further pleasure be known, giving us timely notice thereof. And We hereby will and require you that Our Royal pleasure be signified to the several Members of Our Council, and that it be entred in the Council Book as a standing rule, etc. [C.O. 324, 9. pp. 147, 148.]
Oct. 24.
Whitehall.
1154. W. Popple, jr., to W. Lowndes. Prays for 20 more copies of the Act of Union for Governors, it being feared that the ship is lost etc. [See Oct. 31.] [C.O. 324, 9. pp. 148, 149.]
Oct. 24.
Whitehall.
1155. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Quote letter concerning raid on the Bahamas. See Sept. 22. This account of the weak state of defence of the said Islands, and the little care taken by the Lords Proprietors for the security thereof, gives us occasion to remind your Lordship of our Representation of June 17, as a thing of such moment to H.M. service, that in our opinion it is necessary H.M. pleasure be declared thereupon. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 15, 16.]
[Oct. 24.]1156. List of persons turned out of the Commission of the Peace at Barbados, and of those put into their places by Governor Crowe:—Col. John Mills, Chief Judge of the precincts of St. Michael's and his 3 Assistants, Lt. Col. Wm. Carter, Major Zach. Shute, and Major Alex. Coningham turned out; Major Danl. Hooper, Lt. Col. Thomas Prideaux, and Henry Evans, all four actors in the tumult at the late Grand Sessions, put in their places. Charles Buckworth, Judge of the Court of Admiralty, a most ingenious man, turned out, and Major Woodbridge putt in his roome, aged 26. Major Thomas Beckles, Cheif Judge of the precincts of Christ Church, and his four assistants, James Ainsworth, Lt. Col. Jos. Sheen, Capt. Wm. Cogan, and Capt. Thomas Terrell, turned out, and Capt. Richd. Brewster (an old Scottish fool), and Lt. Col. John Whetstone, Capt. Robt. Hooper, Othoriell Haggett and Peter Mascall, put in their places; all, except Haggett, were deeply concerned in the said tumult. Raines Bates, Saml. Berresford, and Col. George Peers are not admitted to be sworne in Councell. Col. George Peers' Regiment is given away from Lt. Col. Benjamin Bullard and Major Beckles' to John Hallett, who never served in any office before, and knows not what to do with the Regiment, for none of any knowledge will serve under him. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Cox) Read Oct. 24, 1707. ¾ p. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 42.]
Oct. 24.
Whitehall.
1157. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Collonel Crow having signifyed to us (Aug. 8th) that the Assembly of Barbadoes had prepared a Bill in their House for the encouragement of the importation of money, whereby they propose to raise the rates of foreign coin in that Island, which Bill he had refused to pass, till H.M. pleasure be known, and whereas we represented to H.M. (June 10) that for the preventing of the mischeifs that did arrive by the non-execution in some of the Plantations of H.M. Proclamation for regulating the rates of foreign coin, that an Act of Parliament be pass'd here for the better inforcing of the same, we are still of ye same opinion and desire your Lordship would please to receive H.M. pleasure upon our said representation accordingly. [C.O. 29, 11. pp. 134, 135.]
Oct. 25.
London.
1158. Mr. Dummer to Mr. Popple. Gives sailings of the Frankland packet-boat, out and home, 123 days, having met with contrary winds. Signed, E. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 27. Addressed. ¾ p. [C.O. 323, 6. No. 42.]
Oct. 25.
Customhouse, London.
1159. Mr. Savage to W. Popple, jr. Encloses following, etc. Signed, Richd. Savage. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 27, 1707. ½ p. Enclosed,
1159. i. Order of King in Council. Edward Cranfeild is appointed Clerk of the Navy Office in Barbados. March 15, 1693(4). See Acts of Privy Council, II. No. 528. Signed, Wm. Blathwayt. 1 p.
1159. ii. Commissioners of the Customs to Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Feb. 16, 169¾. Report referred to in preceding. Copy. 1½ pp. [C.O. 28, 10. Nos. 44–46; and (without enclosures) 29, 11. p. 136.]
Oct. 27.1160. Copy of Samuel Cox's Patent under the Great Seal constituting him Naval Officer of Barbados. June 16, 1703. Countersigned, Wrighte. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 27, 1707. ½ p. [C.O. 28, 10. No. 43.]
Oct. 27.
Whitehall.
1161. W. Popple to Josiah Burchett. Encloses extract of letter from Governor Handasyd relating to the misbehaviour of Commodore Kerr, and the sailing of the galleons, to be laid before H.R.H. the Lord High Admiral. [C.O. 138, 12. pp. 154, 155.]
Oct. 27.
Admiralty Office.
1162. Mr. Burchett to W. Popple. In reply to preceding. Last night in Cabinet Councill, H.M. was pleased to lodge the like complaint with H.R.H., and give directions therein. Signed, Jos. Burchett. [C.O. 138, 12. p. 155.]
Oct. 28.
Whitehall.
1163. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Having received a letter from Governor Crow, Aug. 8, wherein he writes, that, finding by the resolves of the Assembly, and the Counsellors' own confession their guilt in voting for the Paper Act, I shall obey H.M. Instructions, in turning out of the Councill Cols. Sharp, Cox, Mills and Walker; we desire your Lordship to lay before H.M. our humble opinion, That the only Instruction to which Mr. Crow can referr is a clause which the late Board were directed to add to the body of his Instructions [No. 612], quoted. This can have no relation to the present case, for by this Instruction he was only to examine into the misbehaviour committed by them in their places as Counsellors; and we are the more confirm'd in this opinion by another standing clause in his Instructions, which with good reason directs him to allow the Counsellors freedome of debating and voting in all affairs of publick concern, that may be debated in Councill. And all the reason that Mr. Crow alledges for his design of turning them out, is their voting for the Paper Act, so that if Counsellors in the Plantations must be accounted criminals barely for voting in their legislative capacity (though they be in an error, which is the case of Col. Sharp and the 3 others above-mentioned) it will be difficult to find persons of any tollerable ability to serve H.M. in these stations. And as a further inducement to our opinion, that the foresaid Instruction was not intended to relate to their voting for the said Paper Act, we must observe to your Lordship, that it was known here before Mr. Crow's Instructions were prepared that these 4 Counsellors had voted for the said Bill, as was accordingly represented to H.M. by the late Commissioners of this Board, notwithstanding which, H.M. was pleased to direct that the said Counsellors should be continued in their places, and that Mr. Crow, upon his arrival in Barbadoes, should examine into their misbehaviour as Counsellors. Besides, we must acquaint your Lordship that as soon as Col. Sharp, and the other three Counsellors above-named, perceived the inconvenience of the foresaid Paper Act, they did even before they had notice of H.M. repeal of the said Act (and particularly Col. Sharp as President) all that in them lay to prevent the said inconveniencies by endeavouring to have a Bill past in the Assembly, for remedying the same, which was still opposed by those who have been concerned in keeping up the divisions in that Island. The crime alledged against them by Mr. Crow being, as we conceive and have reason to beleive, only an error in judgment, we cannot think it a sufficient reason for their suspension from the Councill, and therefore we are humbly of opinion that H.M. letter be writ to Mr. Crow directing him not to displace or suspend the said four Counsellors, and in case he have already suspended them, that he restore them to their places and precedencys in the Councill of Barbadoes. This appearing to us as a matter of consequence for H.M. service, we humbly offer that H.M. pleasure herein be signified to Mr. Crowe by the pacquet boat now ready to sail. [C.O. 29, 11. pp. 137–141.]
Oct. 29.
Kensington.
1164. H.M. Warrant granting Samuel Cox, Naval Officer in Barbadoes, leave of absence for the recovery of his health and to appoint Thomas Beckles his Deputy. Countersigned, Sunderland. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 66; and 5, 210. pp. 67, 68.]
Oct. 30.1165. Capt. Gardner to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The officers of Brigadier Handasyd's Regiment here have rais'd 270 men in order to recruitt the same, which are now in the Savoy and in Tilbury Fort, the nautiousnesse of those places has occasioned feavers by which there must follow a great loss of the officers if not tymely prevented, for the govermt. only allows them 4l. per man for every man they shall embarke on board the packett boat at Plymouth. Prays their Lordships to prevail with the Admiralty to have them carryed to Plymouth with what expedition may be possible, and with Mr. St. John to have the officers' allowance enlarg'd from 4l. to 5l. per man to prevent their ruine, etc. There is alsoe hardships upon the Coll. haveing the off-reckonings of the respitts stopt from him, notwithstanding he has provided cloathing for a compleat Regemt., etc. Signed, Rot. Gardner. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 30, 1707. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 7. No. 63; and 138, 12. pp. 163, 164.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
1166. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Handasyd. Acknowledge letters of June 19, and 25, and Aug. 29. We are sorry to perceive the great quantities of goods you mention to have been brought by the French to the Spanish West Indies, have been furnish'd from hence. Refer to letter of June 26. Looking upon this as a matter of great consequence, we hope you will take all due care on your part to prevent the French from carrying on that trade for the future, and we wish you had given us the causes and reasons which in your opinion have occasioned the decay of our trade in those parts, as likewise your thoughts touching such remedies as are most proper to be apply'd, which method you are desired to observe in the like cases for the future. We are sorry to hear the Militia are so considerably decreased from what they were in Aprill, 1706. As to your Regiment, etc. refer to letter of June 26. We shall take into consideration what you write in relation to Mr. Brodrick and Mr. Oldfield's being appointed Members of Councill in the rooms of Col. Sadler deceased, and Col. Low now in England, and give you due notice thereof. We approve of your care and dilligence in endeavouring to prevent illegal trade, and we hope that the condemnation of the sloop you mention will be a means of deterring others. We must recommend that you do continue as much as in you lyes, to discourage and prevent such practices. We have transmitted what you writ touching the galleons, and Commodore Kerr, to H.R.H., etc. Quote Mr. Burchett's reply, Oct. 27. And as to your desire that we would continue to give you our advice in all matters relating to your Government, you may be sure wee shall not be wanting to doe the same as occasion shall require. P.S.—Since the writing what is above we have been attended by your Agent, Capt. Gardner, etc. See preceding. [C.O. 138, 12. pp. 159–162.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
1167. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Crowe. Since our letter of Aug. 14, a duplicate whereof has already been sent you, we have received yours of July 30 and Aug. 8. We perceive that you still omit to sign the duplicates of your letters, and therefore we must remind you thereof, that such duplicates may be signed for the future, least the originals should at any time miscarry. We are sorry to perceive that the inhabitants have been so remiss in keeping the harbours clean. It is so great an obstruction to trade that we doubt not but you will use your utmost endeavours to perswade the Assembly to pass some Act for remedying the present and preventing the like abuse for the future. As to your enquiry about your sitting as sole Judge in the Court of Chancery, we can only tell you what the constant practice has been, and which you may much better know in Barbadoes, that the Counsellors have always had their votes in all causes depending in that Court, which method being conformable not only to yours, but to all H.M. other Governors' Instructions, we cannot think it fitting to advise any alteration therein. As to your proposal of a fit person to muster the men of war, we agree with you that it might be of service, but as that is a matter in the Province and immediately under the direction of the Lord High Admiral, you should first take your proposal to H.R.H. We desire you to explain that paragraph, wherein you say, that, in examining of Patent offices, you find none for the Clerk of the Market nor Casual Revenue. What you mean by Casual Revenue we want to understand, whether it be the Receiver of that Revenue you mean, or what other office it is, we desire you in your next to explain. In the doing of which we expect that you be particular in letting of us know how that Revenue arises, who has hitherto been the Receiver of it, whether he has acted by himself or deputy, and lastly, whether ever, or when those accounts have been auditted. In the meantime we must take notice that you ought to have inform'd us, who the persons are you have put into those offices, and what the value of them is, that we might have been the better inabled to have laid before H.M. what should have appeared proper upon the examining that matter. We desire you therefore not to omit to give us a particular answer to these inquiries in your next. We shall expect the planns of the forts and fortifications which you promise, and we think it is incumbent upon you to move the Assembly in the most effectual manner, that they do all that in them lyes towards the compleating of Fort St. Anne which will tend so much not only to their honour but security; for we are apprehensive that during this time of war, no great assistance can be allowed out of the 4½ per cent. As to the fortifying the other places proposed by Col. Lilly the Engineer, we think you ought also to endeavour the effecting of it, as soon as the state of the Island will permit. We are sensible that the Act, for remedying the inconveniencies arisen by the Paper Act, was not so full as it might have been; but we are satisfied it was the best the President could then obtain, who has appear'd to us very zealous in that matter, and which H.M. has been pleased to take notice of by the Earl of Sunderland's letters of March 21 last, both to him and to yourself. However, that Act having been approved of by the Merchants and Planters here, H.M. was pleased to confirm the same, as you will have perceived by our letter, Aug. 14. When the supplemental Act you mention comes to our hands, we shall consider the same. You are in the right not to have consented to the Bill for encouraging the importation of coin, which would have been contrary to your Instructions, we have however laid that matter before H.M., whose directions you are to expect as well upon this as upon our representation upon the subject of coin, a copy whereof we sent you in our last. You have done well in restraining unnecessary salutes, which was a needless consumption of the publick powder. We must also commend your behaviour towards the Indians of St. Vincent's and Dominico, and are of opinion that your sending presents to the Kings of the said Indians will be of service. However, we think you ought to be watchfull least the French get too great an interest amongst them. We are glad to understand from you there are so few Causes depending in the Court of Chancery, and that the Inferiour Courts are duly held. We hope your equity in the administration of justice will prevent such complaints as have formerly been made upon that subject. We shall expect by the next conveyance, according to your promise, the list of the inhabitants, distinguishing the number of Christians and slaves etc., but you are to take notice that we do not expect the names of each particular person, as was sent us from some of the Plantations, but only the number in general. We desire you to send us by the first conveyance the report of the Committee appointed to examine into the publick debts, and how the money raised for two or three years last past has been expended, which, as we suppose, coming under ye denomination of the Casual Revenue, will be of use to us. As to your design of turning Cols. Sharp, Cox, Mills and Walker out of the Councill etc. Repeat gist of Representation, Oct. 28. We doubt not but you will receive H.M. directions herein (in case they can be dispatched time enough) by this packet boat. We send you here inclos'd H.M. Order for dismissing Col. Holder from the Councill, etc., which you are to see entred in the Councill Books and observed accordingly. Having been informed that you have claimed the appointing the Naval Officer as your right, alledging that the Queen could not give the same away by patent, and that you have thereupon obliged Mr. Cox to give you a bond of 1,000l. for the payment of 300l. per annum, to Mr. Alexander Skene during your Government, which is alledg'd to be 50l. per annum more than the place is worth during the war; and though this be an extraordinary proceeding and disrespectfull to H.M., yet we are willing to let you know our thoughts thereupon before we represent the same to H.M. We find that from 1676 or 1677, the place of Naval Officer in Barbadoes has been executed by four severall persons, all commissionated under the Great Seal of England, viz., Capt. Abraham Sandford, Capt. Carmichael, Mr. Cranston, and now by Mr. Cox: that Mr. Cox had a patent for the said place from his late Majesty, that the said patent was renewed in the second year of her present Majesty's reign; that he has continued to execute the same during the Government of former Governors without any molestation from them, and without any misbehaviour alledged against him in the execution of that office. Now whether the nomination of the said Naval Officer be in the Crown or in the Governor, we think in this particular you have acted very arbitrarily and contrary to your Instructions one of which directs you, "upon the misbehaviour of patentees or their deputies to suspend them from the execution of their places till you shall have represented the whole matter and received H.M. directions therein; but that you shall not by colour of any power or authority granted to you take upon you to give grant or dispose of any office or place which now is or shall be granted under the Great Seal of England, any further than that you may upon the vacancy of any such office or suspension of any such officer put in any fit person to officiate till the said office be disposed of by H.M."; and therefore you ought in this case to have waited till there had been a judicial determination of this matter in Law, or till you had represented the matter to H.M. and her further pleasure had been declared thereupon. But your claiming the nomination of the said officer, and exacting from Mr. Cox a bond of 1,000l., we can by no means think for H.M. service to be allowed. We are the more surprised at this proceeding for that you have taken no notice of it in your letter to us, nor given us any account of the persons by you turned out of Commission or of those put into office, amongst which last, we perceive Mr. Sandford to be one, and most of the others to have been deeply concerned with him at the riot at the Court of St. Michael's, whose proceedings have been highly disapproved by H.M., as you will have perceived by our letter of Aug. 14. And therefore we must advise you to be cautious how you employ in publick stations persons who have been notoriously guilty of disturbing the publick tranquility of that Island. [C.O. 29, 11. pp. 142–152.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
1168. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Parke. Acknowledge letter of Aug. 4. The first thing you write about is the Acts for House rent. This relates to a letter writ you by the late Commissioners of this Board. However, we shall take the Acts you refer to into consideration, and then let you know our opinion. We perceive that the reason for the late Commissioners taxing you with a breach of your Instructions in swearing Mr. Panton and Mr. Willet into the Councill of St. Christophers, proceeded from their not having from you or the preceding Governor frequent accounts of the state of the Councill in each Island, and that was the same reason for what we writ you in relation to the Counsellors of Nevis. We expect therefore that you give us constant accounts of any alterations that happen in the said Councills either by death, absence, suspension or otherwise. We shall take notice of the persons you have recommended to fill up vacancies at Antegua as occasion shall offer, and shall expect from you the lists for the other Islands that you promised us. H.M. has appointed Mr. Lawrence Crabb to her Council in Antigua. What you write in relation to Mr. Baron shall be communicated to him at the first opportunity. We are sorry for your indisposition, but hope that by this time you will be season'd to the country. We are sensible of the reason you give for the decrease of the people in the Leeward Islands, and therefore we think you ought as much as in you lies to give all manner of discouragement to anything that tends to the depopulating the said Islands; particularly to the breeding up of slaves to handicraft trades, which would be more to the advantage of Great Britain and to the Islands themselves that the natural born subjects of these Kingdoms were imployed therein. We expect from you a list of the inhabitants, expressing what are Christians and what slaves, but not their names, specifying how many males, how many feemales, and how many fit to bear arms. The sending of these accounts cannot be of any prejudice to the Islands, if you do take care to direct the captains of the ships to whom you intrust them, to throw your packets overboard with a weight fastened to them in case of imminent danger from an enemy. [C.O. 153, 10. pp. 76–78.]
Oct. 31.
Customehouse, London.
1169. Mr. Savage to W. Popple, jr. The Commissioners of Customs will reply [to Oct. 22] in a few days. Signed, Rich. Savage. Endorsed, Recd. Read Nov. 3, 1707. Addressed. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 1315. No. 73; and 5, 1362. p. 264.]
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
1170. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Refer to letter of June 13, and quote Capt. Gardner's Memorial, Oct. 30. We desire your Lordship to receive H.M. pleasure thereupon. [C.O. 138, 12. pp. 165, 166.]
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
1171. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. There being reason to fear that H.M.S. Ruby, on board of which were dispatches for the Governors on the Continent of America, has been taken and carried into France, and the said dispatches lost, we desire you will present to H.M. enclosed duplicates of Instructions relating to the devolution of Governments upon the death of Governors etc. for H.M. signature. [C.O. 324, 9. p. 149.]
[Oct. 31.]1172. Messrs. Stehn and Dorrien, of London, Merchants, to the Queen. On behalf of the owners and freighters of a neutral ship, the Betty galley of Stade, pray for a passport for said ship to trade with the Spanish West Indies. Signed, Stehn and Dorrien. Annexed,
1172. i. H.M. refers this petition to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their opinion. Oct. 31, Whitehall. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 389, 19. p. 175.]