America and West Indies
July 1709, 18-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1922

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426-437

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'America and West Indies: July 1709, 18-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 24: 1708-1709 (1922), pp. 426-437. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73805 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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Contents

July 1709, 18-31

July 18.
Windsor.
644. Order of Queen in Council, appointing William Outerbridge to the Council of Bermudas. Signed, John Povey. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 11. No. 40.]
July 18.
Windsor.
645. Order of Queen in Council, appointing John Peasly to the Council of Bermudas. Signed, John Povey. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 11. No. 41.]
July 18.
Windsor.
646. Order of Queen in Council, appointing Samuell Smith to the Council of Bermudas. Signed, John Povey. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 11. No. 42.]
July 18.
Windsor.
647. Order of Queen in Council, appointing Leonard White to the Council of Bermudas. Signed, John Povey. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 11. No. 43.]
July 18.648. Order of Queen in Council, appointing Samuell Shirlock to the Council of Bermudas. Signed, John Povey. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 11. No. 44.]
July 18.
Spanish Town.
649. Governor Handasayd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letters of April 21, and duplicates, etc. The Gentlemen of ye Councill who is Factors for ye Affrican Company, or Factors for the sale of any other negroes, as to yt. matter, Col. Beckford and Mr. Chaplain haveing resigned their Factoridge, I know of none that is concerned but Col. Clark and Col. Thomson, who gave me for answere the last Councill Day, that they did not act for anybody but what is related to their own shipps, but since H.M. last orders is possitive in that case, as soon as I cann have a Councill (which I hope will be in 14 days time, their being severall of ye Councill sick and nott able at present to travill) H.M. commands shall then be nicely observed; as to ye Capts.' commissions of privateers, they are as full as they cann be according to the rules of warr, and everyone that disobeys command, is as lyable to suffer death as if they were on board H.M. shipps of warr, but as they are a headstrong ungovernable people, they must sometimes be led, and sometimes drove; as to what yr. Ldshipps mentions of the prizes, to have an account of the value of each prize, it is wholly out of my power, for in ye first place it being 15 or 16 miles distant, in the next place the frequent disputes that happens between ye captures and others, which offten last for severall months before condemnation, as also the delays in selling, and the last is, those who are appointed for the disposall of these prizes will nott transcribe me out an account under £20 a shipp; as to the Lord High Admirall's being surprized at my writing that the shipps of warr was in health at that time, and that they were in want of men. Since I have been in this Government, their has nott been supernumerary men in their shipps of warr, and never above two men of warr that had their highest complement. I hope my mistake cannott be great, considering the clymt., but they have men dies and desarts here as well as in other parts, and a great many more, as I suppose does appear by their muster, and all the supply which I find is now come, is one man of warr named ye Portsmouth, with the midle of her complement, the men of warr that Admirall Wager designes to leave here will not be capable of doeing any service, for want of men, ye Portsmouth onely excepted, but to be more plain with your Lordshipp the supplying the men of warr has and will be the ruin of H.M. Regiment under my command, considering also the duty which must be done at land. I have sent your Ldshipps. the Publick Account of H.M. Revenue, which I desire yr. Ldships. will order the delivery of to my Ld. High Treasurer, they have been swore to by the Deputy Receiver Generall, Mr. Chaplain, before me in Councill; as to publick affares here we have litle materiall, onely the Island has (for the 3 weeks or a month past) been afflicted with a violent distemper occasioned by a sore throat attended by a violent Feavour, which has carry'd of a great many people of all sorts. There was brought in here abt. 10 days agoe a French [ship] of abt. 160 tunn for ye most part loaded with dry goods from Old France. She touched at Martinego and unloaded some part of her cargoe, she was taken by a Jamaica privateer, Capt. Pinckerman, Commander, the value of her I cannott inform yr. Ldshipps., but beleives she may prove a good prize; our men of warr and privateers has been very diligent, but I think for this 2 or 3 months past ye trayd both to France and Spain seems to be very dead, tho severall of our sloops and vessalls are gone and goeing a traiding upon ye Spanish cost; the gallions yt. escaped last year is still in Carthergena, and ye Laverdecrous Fleet is not yet arived at Havana. I belive they will have a hard peice of work to get past our privateers, who has (for this 4 month) been watching for them. I return your Ldshipps. my hearty thanks for all favours done, to the releife of me and my Regimt., which I hope soon to have an order for, I doubt nott but the Gentlemen who is to succeed me will be better quallifyed to the management of the Queen and Countrey's affares then I have been to the entire satissfaction of all; altho I take God to my wittness I have faithfully endeavoured to give satissfaction to all, except in preserveing H.M. perrogative and the interrest of Great Brittain, as to any other affares here I know of none worth giveing your Ldshipps. the trouble of, etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. Sept. 10, Read Nov. 11, 1709. 2½ pp. [C.O. 137, 8. No. 67; and 138, 13. pp. 46–51.]
July 18.
Windsor.
650. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. 26th, Read 27th July, 1709. 1⅓ pp. Enclosed,
650. i Petition of Robert D'Oyly, administrator to Cope D' Only, late Rector of Williamsburgh, Va., to the Queen. Abstracted A.P.C. II. No. 1100 q.v. Copy. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1316. Nos. 29, 29. i.; and 5, 1362. pp. 399–403.]
July 18.
Windsor.
651. Order of Queen in Councill. Referring following petition to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd, Read 25th July, 1709. 1 p. Enclosed,
651. i. John Bentley of Barbados, and Elizabeth his wife, to the Queen. Pray for relief in case v. Richard Downes, which is tryable only in the Court of Common Please there, where Downes is Chief Justice. See Aug. 2, 8, and A.P.C. II. No. 1099. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 12. Nos. 29, 29. i.; and 29, 11. pp. 477–479.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
652. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Report upon petition of Switzers to be settled in Virginia (v. June 28, 1709). The settlement of such a Colony will be a public benefit and advantage, by strengthning the frontier of Virginia against the French of Canada and Misisipi; and by the increase of Trade and Navigation, and therefore we see no objection why H.M. may not be graciously pleased to grant their desire and to direct her Governor upon their arrival to allot them lands on the southwest branch of Potomac (which is a place not yet seated by any of H.M. subjects) under the like conditions as are by the Charter and Laws of that Colony directed to be made; due care being taken in all such grants, of an equal distribution of the profitable and unprofitable acres, and particularly that every patentee be obliged in the best and most effectual manner to cultivate and improve 3 acres part of every 50 acres granted to them within the term of three years after the passing such grant; and in case of failure thereof, such grant or grants to be void and of none effect according to H.M. additional Instruction to Col. Hunter, Feb. 19, 1709. Provided always that in all things they duly conform themselvs to the several Acts and Laws of Trade and Navigation etc. Set out, A.P.C. II. pp. 608, 609. [C.O. 5, 1362. pp. 396–399.]
July 25.
Windsor.
653. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following petition to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. July 28th, Read Aug. 8, 1709. 1 p. Enclosed,
653. i. John Sober, of Barbados, to the Queen. Governor Crowe behaved indecently to his wife and sister, and then forced him to leave the Island by an unjust prosecution etc. Prays for relief. Copy. 2 pp.
653. ii. Deposition of John Sober. Details of preceding. Signed, John Sober. Copy. 2½ pp. [C.O. 28, 12. Nos. 33, 33. i., ii.; and 29, 11. pp. 490–494.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
654. W. Popple to Mr. Solicitor General. Encloses for his opinion D'Oyly's petition, July 18. [C.O. 5, 1362. p. 403.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
655. Council of Trade and Plantations to Col. Jenings. Acknowledge letters of Nov. 27 and March 21. The accounts of negroes you have sent us will be made use of as occasion shall offer. But it came too late for the last Session of Parliament, where the African trade was under consideration. However, we have reason to beleive that ye next winter that Trade will be further look'd into, and then your accounts will be of service. But there is one particular wherein we are yet in the dark, vizt., you say that the Company have sold their negroes from 20 to £30 a head, and the separate traders from 20 to £35. We wish you had explained the reason of this difference, and therefore desire you to do it the first opportunity. We have considered the Counsell's answers to the several enquiries in our letter to you of May 7th, 1707. As to what they say about patenting of lands on the South side of Blackwater Swamp, and in Pamunkey Neck, you will perceive by H.M. Instructions, March 10, that that matter is now settled, which we hope will prove for the advantage of the Colony. We represented to H.M. what you formerly writ us, in relation to the settling the boundaries between Virginia and Carolina, etc. Quote Representation of Jan. 7, Order of Council Jan. 13, and reply of Lords Proprietors of Carolina. H. M. Letters Mandatory as to issuing out a Boundary Commission will be sent you. As to the exemption you mention to be granted by the Proprietary Governments to people that remove thither from being sued for debts contracted in other places, we hope that matter is remedyed at least in Carolina. For an Act having been past there granting such an exemption, we laid the same before H.M. with our opinion of the ill consequence of such Laws; whereupon H.M. was pleased to repeal the said Carolina Act. But if that practice of protecting creditors [sic] be still continued in Carolina or any other of the Proprieties, you will do well to give us as particular an account thereof as you are able, that we may lay the same before H.M. for her further pleasure therein. In relation to the Tobacco Trade, we doubt not but the merchants have given you and their correspondents an account of what has been done here for the encouragement thereof. However, the enclosed copy of an Order of Councill will explain that matter to you. So that we hope in a little time especially when a Peace shall be made, that the Colony of Virginia will find the benefit thereof. We do not conceive the difficulty the Councill make in returning an account of the quantities of tobacco exported from Virginia, because we beleive it may easily be known from the Naval Officer or Collectors Books. As to the Indian trade for furrs, which you fear is like to be wrested from Virginia by the Government of Carolina, we have writ to the Lords Proprietors thereupon, who have acquainted us that they had no account of that matter, but that they expected it by the first ships. However, when we shall receive the affidavits you promise upon that subject, we shall lay that affair before H.M. for her pleasure therein. We are glad there is no illegal trade carryed on in Virginia, and we desire that you will be as watchfull as possible, and that you will give all the discouragement you can to the setting up of manufactures in that Colony. We have often represented the necessity of regular fleets during the war, which has been ordered by H.M. But the merchants here have such different interests and opinions, that we may justly fear it will not be so punctually observed as it ought. We have laid before my Lord High Admiral what you write in relation to a guard ship, and have been informed by Mr. Burchet that some time since the Guarland, a 40 gunn'd ship sail'd for Virginia, and is ordered to cruize between the Capes, and another ship for the same service is order'd to be bought at New England. You have done well in taking care for the defence of the Colony, and we doubt not but you will have a watchfull eye over the proceedings of the enemy. [C.O. 5, 1362. pp. 405–410.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
656. The Earl of Sunderland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Recommends following. Enquires if they have any objections, etc. Signed, Sunderland. Endorsed, Recd. 8th Aug., 1709, Read 4th Jan., 170 9/10. Enclosed,
656. i. Samuel Berwick to the Earl of Sunderland. Son of a former Deputy Governor of Barbados, having an estate of £1500 a year there, etc., Colonel of the Militia there and Receiver of the Queen's Revenue, he prays to be appointed to the Council. ½ p. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 3, 3. i.; and (without enclosure) 29, 12. p. 65.]
July 27.
Doctors Commons.
657. H. Bendysh to the Council of Trade and Plantations. H.M. Commissioners for receiving and disposing of the mony to be collected for the subsistence and settlement of the poor Palatines refer following for your Lordships' opinion thereon. Signed, H. Bendysh. Endorsed, Recd. 29th, Read 30th July, 1709. 1 p. Enclosed,
657. i. A proposal for settling 200 families of the poor Palatines in Jamaica. That H.M. will be pleased to send immediate orders and instructions to her Governor at Jamaica, to acquaint the Assembly there that it is her royal pleasure that Linches Island at the entrance of Port St. Antonio be forthwith cleared for the building of a town, and that 200 hutts be immediatly made capeable to lodge the said Palatines on their first arrival, which must be performed by each Plantation's furnishing a due proportion of Negroes for that work etc. That whereas there is a large tract of land on the main Island opposite to that place, viz., between the East side of Rio Grande and the East side of Porte Morante, which is at this time the property of the Crown and unoccupied, H.M. will be pleased to grant a parcell of 15 acres of the same to each of the said families, the allotment and distribution thereof to be made by H.M. Governour or Deputy on their first arrival reserving only to H.M. the usual quit rents on such grants to commence after years. That in order to the transportation of the said Palatines, application be made to the owners of the severall ships bound to Jamaica this season, to take on board so many as they conveniently can, and that ships be provided for the remainder to be ready to sail the begining of October. It is humbly conceived that ye charge attending this proposal will be, for transportation of 1000 people at £6 per head, £6,000; for subsistance till their own labour can produce it, £5 per head, £5,000; for tools and other necessaries, £2,000. In all £13,000. It is humbly hoped that a settlement pursuant to this proposal will be of so great advantage, not only to the trade but also to the security of the said Island, as to enable the inhabitants to support and defend themselves, and to ease H.M. of the great charge of maintaining a Regiment there, and that the labour of these people will in a very few years repay to England the present charge many fold in commodities, which we are now obliged to send silver into forreign parts to purchase. Signed, Bartho. Gracedieu, Rd. Harris, Wm. Coward, James Whitchurch, Benj. Way, Lawrence Galdy, Wm. Parrott, Edmd. Watkinson, Samuel Jones. Copy. 3 pp. [C.O. 137, 8. Nos. 45, 45. i.; and 138, 12. pp. 420–424.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
658. The Earl of Sunderland to the Governors of New York, Virginia and New England. It being absolutely necessary for the security of H.M. Dominions in America and of the trade of her subjects thither that the Bahama Islands should be recovered from the enemy if possible, H.M. has commanded me to signify her pleasure to your Lordship that you use your best endeavours for that purpose; and the Commanders of H.M. ships on your coasts have orders to follow your directions in the pursuit of this design, which H.M. commends to your care and diligence, etc. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 163.]
July 28.659. Copy of Landgrave Christopher de Graffenried's Patent for land in Carolina. Cf. Aug. 4. Signed, Craven Palatin, Beaufort Craven for the Lord Carteret, M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson, M. Ashley for Jos. Blake. [C.O. 5, 289. pp. 224, 225.]
July 28.
Admity. Office.
660. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. This night the Queen's and my Lord High Admirall's Orders will bee sent to Virginia, New England and New Yorke, relateing to the Bahama Islands, and they are to bee carred by Capt. Smith of the Enterprize. etc. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. July 28, 1709. ¾ p. [C.O. 323, 6. No. 82.]
July 28.
Custom-house, London.
661. Commissioners of H.M. Customs to the Lord High Treasurer. Report upon the Act of Virginia for setling the towns, ports, wharfs and keys, etc. v. C.S.P., 1704–1706. Refer to Report of March 7, 1704/5. This Board then approved of that Act. Though we are still of the same opinion that it will be more for the ease of collecting ye duties in the country, yet we have great reason to fear from the improvment, in the woollen and other manufactures already begun and still carrying on in Virginia and other parts of the Continent, that the establishment of towns and incorporating the planters and others there with the priviledges intended by this Act will put them upon further improvements in the like manufactures, not only for themselvs but other of the Plantations, and take them off from planting tobacco, which would be of a very ill consequence to this Kingdom, both in respect to the exports of clothing, and all other necessaries from hence thither, and their dependance on this Kingdom, but lessening the importation of tobacco hither for the home consumption and supply of foreigners, besides a further injury in point of shipping and navigation, and therefore, rather than put this trade upon such hazardous points, we would humbly advise that the said Act may be rejected, and that all due encouragement may be given to the Planters for turning their hands to manuring and cultivating their wast lands for tobacco, and diverting them from other manufactures. P.S. We are of the like opinion relating to the Act of Maryland for settling ports, etc. Signed, J. Stanley, Will. Cullyford, Jo. Werden, M. Dudley, J. Shute. Endorsed, Recd. Read Nov. 18, 1709. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
661. i., ii. Duplicates of C.S.P. 1706, Nos. 642, 674. [C.O. 5, 1316. Nos. 37–39; and 5, 1362. pp. 432–436.]
July 28.
Carolina. [1708.]
662. Tho. Nairne to [? the Earl of Sunderland.] Since my last, my ffortunes have mett with a strange turn, haveing had the misfortune to fall into the hands of such persons as are well known never to lett an opportunity escape of being revenged on those, who have ever opposed any of their actions, tho never so irregular. It is the great unhappiness of this Countrey, ever since the reign of the present Governor to be divided into two parties, the most violent whereof haveing the Govermt. and Courts of Justice in their hands, often use their power to crush others, as is notoriously known. It was my fortune to be one of that party who look'd upon Governor Johnson's administrations to be in great measure destructive to ye Collony, and naturally tending to confusion and depopulation. I was against his excludeing Act, and drew and brought into ye Assembly Addresses to thank H.M. and the House of Lords for their goodness and justice in repealing them: things of this nature have laid me open to ye hatred of ye Governor. It is our custom in this Province to make merchandize of such other savages as they of our party take in the warrs. But not content with this, those English traders, who live among them, had gott a trick of setting them to surprize one another's towns, by that means to have the quicker sale of their goods for the prissioners taken, and to the end they might never be punished for actions of that kind, usually had the address to procure a present to be made to the Governor of the booty so gott. In particular, one James Child about two years agoe raised the people of some of the Chereckie towns, and led them to cutt off two or three small towns of our freinds, pretending 'twas the Governor's order, they destroyed the towns, took about 160 slaves (besides the slain), 30 of which came to Child's share, these he brought and exposed publickly to sale in Charles Town, pretending still to have an order from the Governor, and that half were for him, the Assembly then sitting sett the people free, examined Child, who could (or would) show no sufficient commission, they sent Address after Address that the fellow might be prosecuted, but nothing could prevail with the Governor so much as to hinder him from goeing again among the Indians (who have since killed him), this made people mightily exclaim and gave great reputation to the private whispers that the Governor privately encouraged these kind of actions. This and others of this kind, lying before the Assembly made them dread the consequences of such actions, and being by these methods led into one Indian warr, especially since the French settlement on the Mississipi, whereupon on July 19, 1708, they presented the Governor with £400 and £100 per annum for passing an Act for the rectifying these abuses, this they did with much reluctancy, only fear of danger prevailed with them. By that Act I was appointed an Agent to ride a circuite do Justice, among the traders and Indians, to redress all abuses, this was a peice of magistracy, exposed me at once to the hatred of the Governor and Traders, by my endeavouring faithfully to discharge my dutty which the corruption of the time and place would not bear. This made two of these loose fellows (one whereof. I had formerly committed for buggery) swear against me severall I things, relateing to scandelous words spoke against the Governor, but these presently blew over, which made them have recourse to a peice of perjury, that would effectually answer their master's designs, and give him large scope to pursue his malice to my thorough destruction. The words they pitched upon for that purpose were, that I said the Prince of Wales was King James' son, one added Right Heir to the Crown, the other did not. Upon which I had a mittimus made clapt into close goall for high treason, and pursued with the most violent injustice ever was heard of in America. I petitioned either to be speedily tryed here, admitted to bail or sent to England, but the malice of the Governor was so great that he denyed to allow either, pretending he would send to H.M. for orders what should be done with me, which in plain English was, you shall [?lie] like a dog in a hot hole, which in this warm countrey will soon make an end of you, while I still pretend not to have heard from England, and in the meantime your small estate will be entirely ruined. This is my present condition. I have profferr'd £10,000 secureity either to go for England, or to appear at the next Sessions here, but could be admitted [to] neither, for the Governor knows well that what is alledged against me will appear in its proper colours before any Court of Justice, nothing more blind then malice, else any man would be ashamed to make use of such evidences or talk of dethroneing a great prince among the pine trees 4000 miles from her. I showed both Law and reason for being admitted to the benefit of a writt of Habeas Corpus, but to prevent anything of that, my mittimus was wrote contrary to the deposistions, tho' at the same ye Governor acknowledged, there never had been any Law arrived in this Countrey, that would reach my case, only he had heard of one in England, and would send for it. My circumstances are hard, for by this usage no doubt my enemies will soon gett me out of the way, if am not speedily releived from England. I never was in England, have neither friends nor acquaintance, nor know to whom to apply myself. By means of Mr. Boon's letters from London, I have been acquainted with your Lordship's noble character, that yr. Lordship is an enemy to all illegall and unjust oppressions. This gives me confidence to begg yr. Ldsp's. protection, in being pleased to lay open my case to H.M. and entreating the following favours—to procure an order for that I may be speedily admitted to a tryall here; where all parties are well known, and for preventing all illegalities, by delaying the sessions or keeping of evidences, that I may be admitted to bail. The Orders must be very positive, and clear, or else a thousand pretexts will be sett on ffoot to elude them, for tho in England the course of law is open, and the powerfull cannot easily wrong others, yet here it is quite otherwise, and now more then ever. The better to comprehend how arbitrarily Governor Johnson reigns, especially in my case, yr. Lordship may please to observe that it's a generall rule of Law, taken up in this place, that no English Act of Parliament is in force here untill made so by an Act of this Province. This is upon many occasions insisted upon, and by none more then by the present Governor who would not so much as let the Statute of Bankrupt be pleaded in Court against Lt. Col. Wm. Rhett, because it was never passed into a law here, and that the better to vindicate his proceedings, took pains himself to procure subscriptions to papers sent to England, to show that to be the Law of the Collony. If your Lordship please to compare this with my case, you will conclude the Law here is a strange sort of Proteus capable of putting on all shapes and figures as occasion requires etc. etc. He well knows no Jurry will hang a kitten upon the oaths of his evidences, and knows my principles to be quite opposite to what is alledged etc. Signed, Tho. Nairne. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 306. No. 4.]
[July]663. Lt. Governor Usher to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since mine in March lastt, have onely to ad H.M. gracious sending to reduce the French, and apointing Col. Nicholson to take care for effecting thereof, exceding joyfull to all in N. Engld., who are redy and willing contribute there assistance to soe glorious an undertakeing, pray God may have success. Col. Nicholson, to admiration neglects noe time nor spares any exspence for promoteing design, his procedeings formerly well known for courage, justice, honour and endeavoring prosperity of place, thatt the Generall wishes he may have Govermtt. N. Engld., and itts the desire of all H.M. true loyall subjects. The vastt sums raised from H.M. subjects and all to litle purpose by reason wantt of good judgmtt. and conductt, the people of N. Engld. groanes under burden thereof. George Vaughan returnd, giving accott Mr. Allen castt, lostt the Province and same confirm'd to the people, and a finall issue, I suspend beliefe thereof; knowing in all raines Mr. Mason's title judged good, consequently Mr. Allen's, judges and jurors being all partys will never give the case nor find a spetiall verdictt, butt hope ways may be found for releife, if nott, liberty to apeal for Greatt Brittain noe advantage butt a ruin, charges of same being greatt; I know 2 cases where spetiall verdictt denied, vizt., one of Crown's for some thousands pounds for prize mony, jury gave for Deft., other Mr. Allen's case. As to procedeings in Courtt, one Langstaf for Walderen apeared in Courtt sworne, as to title poscestion, Mr. Allen desired Langstaf mightt be examined, whether he did nott come to N. Engld. as one Mason's servatts., and did setle the country, build fourtts, etc., judges refused to examin saying was onely summoned to give evidence for Walderen, wch. I judge contrary to practice of Engld.; thus the Crown as well as subjectt, may be denyed justice and noe releife. I presume all lands to be held from Crown, Mason's title from the Crown, I would have Mr. Allen resign up his claime for a sum of mony with arears of all dues, for case has bin 30 year in Law, if H.M. perchase same, then from Naumkege, wch. is Salem, to Eastward would be att disposeall of H.M., and a quitt-rent may be raised, wch. with the dutys of imposte and excise may amountt to above £2000 per anum. Mr. Allen mortgaiged the Province for monys I advanced and ingaiged for to vallew of £1500, and now with interestt is above £1700: on receiptt of my mony will resign mortgaige to the Crown, all the Fishery, mastts, timber for building, and trees of turpentin, for roisin, pitch and tar, land for hemp and flax, doth all lay from Naumkege soe eastward; H.M. King Charles would have perchased Province Main, ytt being the Govermtt's. is now the Queen's, and haveing Hampshire, will bring all more depending on the Crown. And a quitt-rent may be laid for suportt of Govermtt. if H.M. reducess Nova Scotia and Acada, there are cole mines of greatt vallew, fireing in N. Engld. soe dear ytt. will be forced to burn coales. We have had an Actt of Parlimtt. here published relateing to mony passing at 17½ dwt.; noe reguard to the Actt, all mony still att 15 dwt., soe merchatts. makes a prodigious advance on goods, ye country impoverished, and in issue prove a damage to Kingdome Great Brittain as to woollen manufactury, for from H.E.'s family to meanestt peasantt home-spun is worne. A Governour cant be suported with a small salary if the lawes of Engld. be nott putt in due execution. Mr. Allen when had his comistion from King Wm. for Governour, in itt I was apointed Lt. Governour; Mr. Allen did agree to allow me £250 per annum, was there 4 years, spentt my estate and time, never had one peny. Mr. Allen being keptt outt of his rightt, could nott pay the money; he tendered me 1000 acres lands uninclosed and unoccupied att Little Boares Head, a draughtt of dede drawen, butt before accomplish ye same dyed, if H.M. perchase ye place, desire care may be ytt. I have the £1000 or 1000 acres land. There are many persons pretend to greatt tractts land. One lays claime to 18000 acres by town grants, same noe ways improved, a greatt hinderance in setleing and peopling place. I humbly offer to your Ldships.' consideration a quitt-rentt how to be laid. H.E. is pleased to kepe me ignorantt as to anything relateing to the Govermtt., ytt he makes my comistion onely a cipher, however in all things shall redily yeild obedience to any commands from Crown, or H.E., waiteing and hopeing for better times, etc. Signed, John Usher. Endorsed, Recd. Sept. 8th, Read Dec. 12, 1709. Holograph. Addressed. Sealed. 2 pp. Enclosed,
663. i. Mr. Usher's scheme for quit-rents at 6d. on ye pound, as agreed with Mason, etc. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 865. Nos. 34, 34. i.; and 5, 913. pp. 145–152.]