America and West Indies
August 1709

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1922

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437-457

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'America and West Indies: August 1709', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 24: 1708-1709 (1922), pp. 437-457. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73806 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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Contents

August 1709

Aug. 2.
Whitehall.
664. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Representation upon petition of John Bently etc. See July 18. Governor Crowe ought not to have referred the case to Richard Downes, the principal person interested. Recommend as ordered Aug. 8. q.v. [C.O. 29, 11. pp. 480–482.]
[Aug. 2.]665. Mr. Onslow and Mr. Lloyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Proposals for settling Palatines in Jamaica elaborated. v. July 27. Endorsed, Recd. Read Aug. 2, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 8. No. 46; and 138, 12. pp. 424–426.]
Aug. 2
and 12.
Boston.
666. Col. Vetch to [?the Earl of Sunderland.]Refers to letter and journall of June 28. After having finished everything at New York relating to the service of that part, all the troops being gone to Albany, and the advanced detatchment of 500 men having been employed in making a Fort, storehouse and building canoes and boats att Wood Creek, I sett out for Boston June 29, hoping to have found the Fleet arrived before I could reach that place, Coll. Nicholson and the Lt. Governour of New York being to sett out for Albany in a day or two after me, in order to give the necessary directions there to meete the five Nations of Indians, and deliver them H.M. present sent by my Lord Lovelace, with the addition which we judged absolutely necesary to make upon this juncture; the French having laboured so much to bring them over to their intrest, or at least to make them newtrall. In three days after I left New York I arrived at Road Island by sea in a sloop hyred for that purpose; I found their quota of troops were gone to Boston by seen by sea and had been arrived there tenn days; upon which I made all possible dispatch to Boston by land, being about 80 miles distance, being by sea 200, and very dangerous, for privateers, upon my arrivall at Boston which was in two days more, making the 3rd of July, I formed the 3 regiments which had been agreed upon before I left Boston, and where I had left an officer to exercise every batalion, which I found upon reveiwing the troops, they had performed very diligently. The Assembly upon a memorial I had left with the Governour representing the advantages of their being uniformly cloathed as the Regular troops, had ordered every man to have a blew or red coat as the Colls. inclined, so after their being armed, cloathed and regimented, I have seen them every day exercise by the three officers whom I left with them, and who are since commissioned as second Majors to the sd. three regiments, so that I can now without the least boast assure your Lodp. that they both do the manuall exercise and fire in platoons and battalion equall to most regiments in the service. I have like ways formed 3 companies of granadiers fitted with everything as in the armie, as I did at New York to the regiments there before I left that place. The bodys of men are generally better then those in Europe, and I hope their courage will prove so too, so that nothing in humane probability can obstruct the success of this glorious enterprice, save the too late arrivall of the Fleete, our transports, flatt-bottom'd boats, whale-boats, as well as our troops being all ready att 12 hours warning; and because the fleet is so long a coming that the lateness of the Expedition may endanger some of the ships in their return to be blown off the coast, the Assembly upon my representation have allowed their troops six months provisions besides what they now use, every man having 8d. per day punctually payd him for his victuals besides 9s. per week pay, and most of them have had £12 per man levy money, so that it is a vast expense to the Goverments here; but what they chearfully pay in hopes of being freed forever hereafter. All that they have now to do is to fast and pray for the safe and suddain arrivall of the Fleet, for which they have already had two publick fast days kept. I acquainted your Ldshp. in my last of the vast expense I have been at in travelling neare 900 miles from Boston to the Jersies, and back again by sea and land: as well as the carrying along with me 7 officers whose expense I was necessitate to defray all the way to New York, which being absolutely necessary for the good of the service, I assure myselfe your Ldshp. and the Ministry will not scruple the payment of the same: I have charged but 20s. per diem during the time of my departing from Boston untill my return; all which together with my own pay I have spent on the journey, and £5 to each officer that went with me, etc., etc. Prays for a suitable reward when success has been achieved. By my last advices from Col. Nicholson att Albany, of July 20th, the troops were mostly all advanced to the side of the Lake, and had finished their forts, canoes, and almost the necessary forts, as well as made a waggon-road all the way to the Wood Creek from Albany, and all of them but especially the Indians grew impatient to be in action; by the long delay of the Fleete, and our people's being upon the French frontiers (which hath sufficiently alarm'd them) they have had time to prepare themselves to give us a warme reception; but if the fleet arrives so as we can reach Quibeck before the latter end of September, I doubt not to give your Lordsps. a good acct. of the affaire, providing the French have not sent a considerable reinforcement from Old France. Portroyall in the neighbourhood of this place proves a little Dunkirk in disturbing their commerce, and taking their vessels, having taken 8 or 9 within this month; had I supposed the Fleet would have taryed so long, I would have proposed with the men of warr which waits here for the Fleet, and the three regiments of this place, together with a company of matrosses (which I have levied here and at New York, consisting of 80 etc.) to have gone and attacked that place, which I doubt not but to have caryed. Repeats requests of June 28, etc. The too late arrivall of the Fleet would be the last dissappoyntment to all H.M. Colonies who have so heartily and at so vast an expense complyed with Her Royall orders, and would render them much more miserable then if such a thing had never been projected or undertaken, etc. I have conforme to H.M. Royall Instructions for the same provided here a considerable quantitie of provisions for the troops to be left in garrison in Quibeck and Mountreall, particularly bread and flower, which begin to grow dearer here, by reason of the great price it gives in Portugall, whither they ship off a great deal as well as to the west Indies; I have drawn upon my Lord Treassurer for what I have bought; but would not adventure to buy up the quantity requisite nor the pork, nor beeffe untill I have certain news of the Fleet being sayled; I doubt not but my Ld. Treasurer will honour the bills, it being both H.M. positive orders, and absolutely necessary for the good of the service, etc. P.S. Aug. 12. Since the date of the above arrived here the Guernsey man of warr, in her Capt. Moody, via Newfoundland, whom I have desired to acquaint your Ldsp. at large with his negotiation, etc. I shall only presume to acquaint your Ldsp. how vastly uneasie all H.M. loyall subjects upon the Continent are, att the not arivall of the Fleet, which is like to dissappoynt the great expectation and faire prospect they had of securing to themselves and their posteritie a lasting happiness and tranquility, as well as an advantageous trade both to themselves, and all the Brittish Empyre; the hopes of which made them so readilie and heartily comply, nay, outdoe H.M. orders, by me signified to them att so vast an expense, that it cost H.M. subjects embarked in this affaire £100,000, besides the loss of their trade, which the embargo upon all shipping for these three months past hath occasioned. Add to this the alaraming the French (which could not be evited, after our advanced party went to the Wood Creek) hath given them occasion to fortifie both places better then ever they were before, pray God hasten in the fleet, otherways the vast service I had the hopes of doing them, and of which they were highly sensible, will prove the reverse of it: but as the fault does in no ways lye at my door, haveing in everything performed my part, so I hope, should it miscarrie by the too late or not arivall of the Fleet, I shall not loose a just reward, etc. By an express from the armie upon the Lake side, of the 29th of July, I am advised that Coll. Nicholson and the whole army are there fitted and ready to embark in their canoes, and flatt boats for Mountreall, upon the first orders from hence, which they impatiently wait for: they have had some scirmishes in canoes, with some partys of French and Indians, who came over with designe to burn our boats and canoes, and so frustrate the designe for this summer, but were repulsed with loss, they are quite impatient for the arivall of the Fleet, the transportation of their provisions to the lake side costs as much as the provisions itselfe. Signed, Sam. Vetch. Endorsed, R. Oct. 1st. 4 pp. [C. O. 5, 9. No. 27.]
Aug. 3.
Whitehall.
667. W. Popple to Mr. Bendysh. Encloses following to be laid before H.M. Commissioners, etc. (v. July 27). Annexed,
667. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to H.M. Commissioners for the settlement of the poor Palatines. We have considered the proposal of Sir B. Gracedieu and other merchants and traders to Jamaica, for settling of 200 families of poor Palatines on that Island, referr'd to us by your Lordships, and have been attended by some of ye said proposers and heard what they had to offer thereupon. We have likewise been attended by Mr. Onslow and Col. Lloyd who, in behalf of themselvs and other planters of that Island, have made some objections to the said proposal, and have delivered to us one of their own. They think it a great hardship that a power should be lodged in the Governor or Assembly to oblige the planters to send their negroes (some perhaps 100 miles or more) to clear the land and build a town on Linches Island, for the settlement of the said Palatines, while their own plantation work shall stand still for want of the said negroes. The first proposers seem to agree in the same opinion, and therefore do not desire any such compulsory power to be lodged either in the Governor or Assembly. But they think it reasonable, and therein we concur with them, that the Governor have H.M. directions to move the Assembly to raise a fund for clearing the land and making plantations for the said Palatines. The next objection is, that Linches Island is the property of the heirs of Sir Thomas Linch, who besides the said Island, had a grant of a great number of acres of land at or near the said place now in the possession of Mr. Woodcock. But forasmuch as those lands have never been cultivated by the respective owners, nor the conditions of the grants performed, 'tis conceived the owners may be compounded with to surrender their rights at very moderate rates, and this wee look upon as a thing that ought in the first place to be taken care of, that the title to the lands where the settlements are to be made, be cleared, to prevent any future disputes concerning the same. We have communicated the proposals offered to us by Mr. Onslow and Col. Lloyd, to the persons who made the first proposal to your Lordships. They agreed to the 3 first articles, but as to the 4th, they think that 1½ years provisions to be allowed the Palatines upon the publick charges (with which opinion we also concur) will be too much; and that a provision for their subsistence one year will be sufficient, for that there are pease and several other sorts of pulse that come to perfection and may be gathered in 6 weeks after they have been sown, besides that there is plenty of fish on the coast, and wild hogs etc. in the woods. They likewise agree to Article 5, but Article 6, which is, that this settlement be made wholy at the charge of this Kingdom, we think unreasonable, for that the inhabitants of Jamaica, besides their security and defence will have a proportionable and more immediate share in the advantage that will accrue from the said settlement. Article 7 relates to the charge. They agree to the transportation of 1,000 persons at £6 per head, but we suppose it may be done cheaper, considering the number, and that several of them are small children. As to subsistence, they think £5 a head for one year sufficient. For buying cloths, tools, netts for fishing, fuzees, powder and shot, they think £2 per head will suffise. As to clearing the land the charge whereof is estimated at £3 per acre, they think it ought to be left to the Assembly to provide for the defraying thereof. Upon the whole we are of opinion that the place agreed upon for this settlement is very commodious and proper for that purpose, but as we conceive they ought rather to be seated on the Main Island than on Linches Island, their abode there ought only to be provisional till their plantations on the Main can be perfected; that such a settlement may be rendred very advantagious to this Kingdom and to Jamaica by the increase of the product of that Island (and particularly of indigo) and by the consumption of the British manufactures there, and therefore it ought to meet with all due and fitting encouragement. It will be of great advantage to the better carrying on of this design that H.M. be humbly desired to direct her Governor there to move the Assembly in the most effectual manner to contribute a sufficient summ to be employed in building of hutts on Linches Island, and in falling and planting 400 or 500 acres of land on the Main Island, as is mentioned in Article 3 of Mr. Onslow and Mr. Lloyd's proposal. And for the better security of the said Palatines at their first arrival against the insults of the French and Spaniards from Hispaniola and from their privateers, 'tis conceived that it will be needfull a party of H.M. soldiers of about 30 or 40, or what number shall be thought most expedient, be drawn down to Linches Island, which commands Ports St. Antonio, with an Ingineer or other Officer, and there to erect a small fort with some guns for the security of the harbour, and the protection of the planters in their new settlements. [C.O. 138, 12. pp. 427–433.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
668. The Earl of Sunderland to Mr. Jennings. Acknowledges letter of March 21. I hope you are long before this time eased of the apprehensions you had from the enemy, tho' it will be but prudent to be upon your guard; as to the ships you desire, you may depend upon it My Lord High Admiral will do the best he can for you, but there being at this time so many services, and some of them very pressing to employ H.M. Navy, it is not possible so good provision can be made for all of them as might be wisht, and this ought to redouble your diligence in providing for your own defence, in which I doubt not but you will employ your zeal and application. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 156.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
669. Same to Governor Handasyd. I am to acknowledge your letters of Feb. 1, April 6, May 1and 25, and to return you my thanks for the particular accounts they contain of occurrences in your parts, I have procured H.M. warrant for a pardon to the poor serjeant of your Regiment, as you desired, and shall always be very ready to do anything in my power that may be for your service, or upon your recommendation. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 156.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
670. Same to Governor Dudley. I am to acknowledge the receipt of yours of March 9; your care for the encouraging the trade for tarr and preserving the timber is certainly to be commended, but it is thought it had been better not to have given the Assembly of Massachusets Bay an opportunity of refusing to enact a law for the latter, since that was sufficiently provided for by the Charter; your endeavours for the defending your Frontiers from inroads of the enemy are a very good service to H.M. and the Colony, and the further providing for their security has not been unthought of here; as you will have been fully informed by Col. Nicholson and Col. Vetche, but the juncture of affairs would not admit of doing all that was designed. You may be sure all the assistance will be given you that is possible, but in the meantime you must not be wanting to yourselves in making the best provision you can for preventing and disappointing any designs the enemy may have against you. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 157.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
671. Same to Governor Seymour. Acknowledges letters of Sept. 10, 1708 and March 10, 1709. You are certainly very right in the care you take to observe the Roman Catholioks in your parts, who like them of the same profession elsewhere, tho' they enjoy the benefit of H.M. protection, the equity of the laws and mildness of the Government, cannot forbear giving manifest signs of their disaffection thereto. The several matters you write about in relation to the Assembly, the County Courts and your Boundary, naturally fall under the consideration of the Council of Trade, to whom I take it for granted you have written on that subject, as the allowance to the itinerant Judges does under that of My Lord Treasurer, and you shall be acquainted with H.M. pleasure, when she is come to any determination therein. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 158.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
672. Same to Governor Park. I have received yours of May 2 and 4, the former requires no particular answer, and as to what you mention in your last of the complaints against you, you may depend upon a fair hearing and examination of them and justice being done you, which is all the service your friends can do you, and if your conduct has been as fair as I hope it has, is all you need desire of them. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 158.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
673. Same to Lt. Governor Bennett. Acknowledges letters of Oct. 29, 1708, and March 12, 1709. Your care in relation to the French prisoner Peter Gremot (of whom care will be taken in the way you mention) is very commendable, as is likewise your diligence in sending notice to the Governor of Carolina of the intelligence you had of the enemy's designs on that Colony, which I doubt not have been disappointed, as I am persuaded any attempts on your Island would be by your care and diligence in providing for its security. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 159.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
674. Same to Mr. Bridger. Acknowledges letter of March 29. The matters it contains lying before the Council of Trade, I have nothing to add, etc. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 159.]
Aug. 4.
Craven House.
675. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the Deputy Governor of North Carolina and John Lawson, Surveyor General. We have thought fit to create the Hon. Christopher Graffenried a Landgrave of our Province of Carolina, and granted to him and his heirs 5000 acres of land in North Carolina, he having paid to us £50 purchase money for the same. You are to sett out for his use 5000 acres contiguous to each other where he shall think proper, and reserve a quit-rent of 5s. per 1000 acres to us, our heirs and assigns, etc. Signed, Craven Palatine, Beaufort, M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson. [C.O. 5, 289. p. 221.]
Aug. 6.
Windsor.
676. H.M. Warrant granting John Perrie, Provost Marshal of the Leeward Islands, a further two years leave of absence, on the grounds of ill-health, he appointing a deputy approved of by the Governor. Countersigned, H. Boyle. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 160.]
Aug. 6.
Windsor.
677. The Queen to Governor Crowe. It cannot but be very displeasing unto us to receive repeated complaints of your disobedience to our commands as we have now lately done by the petition of Manuel Gilligan etc. We doe hereby command you, as you will answer the contrary at your peril, forthwith to obey our Order of March 31. etc.Cf. July 18, 1709. Countersigned, H. Boyle. [C.O. 5, 210. pp. 160, 161.]
Aug. 6.
Windsor.
678. The Queen to Governor Hunter. Instructions to appoint boundary Commissioners to act with those of Carolina, etc. as Order in Council, March 31, 1709. Countersigned, H. Boyle. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 10, Read Oct. 12, 1709. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 34; and 5, 1362. pp. 422–424; and 5, 210. pp. 161–163.]
Aug. 6.
London.
679. Mr. Dummer to Mr. Popple. The Resolution West India packet boate arrived at Penzance Aug. 2, after a tedious voyage out and home of 130 days. There is nothing extraordinary but the action of the Portland upon the Coventry, wherein was found 78 chests valued at £75,000. That the Sapanyards haveing been pinched by our privateers are cautious of their coasting trade, and verry litle purchase gotten, soe yt. as they have spoyled the honest trader and the Jamaica trading, soe in likelyhood will ruine themselves. The postmaster Generall and myselfe have concluded to send orders this day sennett, for ye saileing of ye Pearle packett boate. Signed, E. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 8, 1709. Addressed. Postmark. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 6. No. 83.]
Aug. 6.
Treasury Chambers.
680. Mr. Taylour to Mr. Popple. My Lord Treasurer taking notice of the great charge that H.M. is at for the reliefe and subsistance of the poor Palatines and of the slow steps that are made towards setling of them, in a Commission so very numerous as is appointed for that purpose, desires the Council of Trade and Plantations to make a proposal for the speedy disposing of them, in such manner as may soonest lessen the expence the Government is now at for their subsistance, etc. Signed, J. Taylor. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 8th Aug., 1709. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 76. No. 84; and 389, 36. p. 439.]
Aug. 8.
Windsor.
681. Order of Queen in Council. Richard Downes is to be removed from being Judge of the Common Pleas, St. Michael's, Barbados, and Governor Crowe is to see that there is no delay in the case of John Bently, etc. See Aug. 2, and A.P.C. II. No. 1099. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. 5th, Read 10th Nov. 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 45; and 29, 12. p. 46.]
Aug. 8.
Craven House.
682. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The ship call'd ye Loyal Johnson (which we so long expected) being now arrived at London, we have made enquiry into the seizure of goods belonging to Virginian Indian Traders (v. Feb. 2, 1709), and are informed that there was a law pass'd there, wherein a small duty was laid upon all skins that should be exported out of Carolina, which duty was laid for the support and maintenance of the Clergy, by virtue of which law some skins were stopt till the said duty was paid, but immediately upon the payment of the said duty they were discharged. We know of no law that prohibits any of the Queen's subjects trading in Carolina, but all H.M. subjects have the same liberty and freedom of trading there as any of the inhabitants. It shall be our constant care not to allow of any law to ye contrary. Signed, Craven Palatin, Beaufort, M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson. Endorsed, Recd. Read Aug. 9, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 76; and 5, 1292. p. 143; and 5, 289. p. 222.]
Aug. 8.
London.
683. Thomas Dummer to Mr. Popple. The Sophia, West India packett-boate, arrived at Fallmouth ye 4th of this month, 116 dayes in all. There is nothing of moment from thence, save yt. the trade on ye cost is totally spoyled by our privateers. Signed, Tho. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 8, 1709. Addressed. Postmark. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 6. No. 84.]
Aug. 9.
Barbados.
684. Governor Crowe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have not had the honour of any from you since my last of June 20. H.M.S. Norwich, Greenwich, Burlington, and Hector, with 30 mercht. men under their convoy, arrived here July 2nd, they load but slowly, by reason of ye litle quantity of sugar, so fear some of them will not be able to sail with H.M.S. Weymouth, and Larke, whose time will be out, Sept. 2, by them I shall send your Lordps. all my dispatches. Everything is now very quiet here. By this packet I received H.M. directions about the Marshalsea of the several Courts, which shall be obeyed. Signed, M. Crowe. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 28th Nov., 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 52; and 29, 12. p. 57.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
685. W. Popple to Mr. Taylour. In reply to Aug. 6, encloses following. Annexed,
685. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. Propose that a premium of £5 per head for every Palatine be given to any parish or particular person who shall be willing to receive or employ or otherwise provide for any family etc.; that the charge of conveying them thither be defrayed by H.M. etc. Hardly any parish will care to receive these poor people without some consideration, lest they should become chargeable to such parish in case of sickness. etc. [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 440–443.]
Aug. 10.686. W. Peopple to Sir James Mountague. Encloses 5 Acts of Pensylvania passed in 1705 (see. Sept. 8) for his opinion in point of Law, as soon as may be, for that by the Charter the Queen is limitted to declare her pleasure upon the Laws of that Province in 6 months after they have been laid before Her, etc. [C.O. 5, 1292. p. 144.]
Aug. 11.
Craven House.
687. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Application being made to us to give encouragement to some poor Palatines who had a mind to be transported and settled in Carolina, and we being willing to encourage the making of silk, planting of rice, vineyards, fruit and naval stores, came to these resolutions, vizt. (1) We will give them 100 acres of land a head for men, women and children, free from any quitt-rent for 10 years, and from thence forward to pay 1 penny an acre per annum; (2) If they will settle in towns now, or hereafter, to lett them land for building and improvement for the term of three lives or 99 years, which shall first expire, at a pepper-corn rent, with their own liberty to renew in case the lives dye. Signed, Craven Palatin, Beaufort, M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson. [C.O. 5, 289. p. 223.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
688. W. Popple to Col. Laws. The Council of Trade and Plantations having under consideration some matters relating to Jamaica, they are very desirous of speaking with you on Munday or Tuesday next, etc. [C.O. 138, 12. p. 433.]
Aug. 13.
Bo ton in New England.
689. Governor Dudley to [? the Earl of Sunderland.] Duplicate of account given Aug. 16, of preparations for the expedition against Canada. Prays for his Lordship's patronage. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, R. Oct. 1st. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 9. No. 28.]
[Aug. 15.]690. Synopsis of the case of the three Suspended Councillors of Barbados, Messrs. Sharpe. A. Walker and Beresford. Endorsed, Recd. from Wm. Walker, Read Aug. 15, 1709. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 36.]
Aug. 16.
Boston in New England.
691. Governor Dudley to Mr. Popple. This is an adventure by a simple mercht. ship via Ireland. On April 29th arrived here Coll. Nicholson and Col. Vetch with H.M. most acceptable commands for the rayseing of 1200 of our best men for a descent upon Quebeck by sea, and 1500 for the land service to march by the way of Mont Real. The 1500 drawn out of New York, Connecticutt etc. are upon the death of my Lord Lovelace, at the united desire of all H.M. Governmts. put under the command of Col. Nicholson, and are some time since marched to the Wood Creek, the head of Mont Real Waters on the side of Albany, and have built themselves 3 forts and lodgemts. and have made ready boats and canoes sufficient to make their descent as soon as they shall be inform'd of our comeing by ye way of Canada River. H.M. commands repeated by the Earl of Sunderland arriv'd June 22. And the 1200 men from the Governments of the Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island have been in armes ever since May 20, well clothed and exercised every day from that time, and 22 transport ships, briganteens and decked sloops with 6 months provissions on board for their embarcation lye ready to sayle at 10 hours warning. We are in daily expectation of the fleet and forces from Great Britain. The season is very far advanced, and the winter begins early in those northern provinces, which makes us impatient of their delay least ye time be lost. I hope Col. Vetch will do H.M. Governors and all her good subjects of these Provinces the justice to represent their duty and readiness in everything for so important a service to the Crown, and the future establishment of these Colonies. I have always humbly represented to H.M. the unspeakable benefit to the British Nation to have all the North America in H.M. hands, of which there is now a very fair prospect, by ye favour of Almighty God, if the fleet and forces might arrive seasonably and in health. The French privateers from the West Indies have much infested the Continent from Virginia to this place in the present summer, and have surprized several of our coasting provision vessels, notwithstanding all care and vigilance to observe and pursue 'em, some of which have very narrowly escaped our ships of war by the advantage of sayleing, being light slender vessells, and haveing Port Royal so near at hand to run in for shelter; which will always be a pest to this Country, whilst in the hands of the French. Sir, I am lately intimated from Governor Saltonstal that the Government of Connecticott have a memorial or complaint lying before H.M., referring to the Southern line of this Province drawn into question upon a contest arisen between their people of the town of Windsor and ours of the towns of Suffield and Enfield, which border on that line, the Windsor men haveing several times entred into the lands of those towns, and seized upon and imprison'd divers of the inhabitants, and carryed away the fruits of their labour; and upon tryals had within that Colony, their own Courts and Jurys have determined once and again in favour of our people, who have very much to plead for their just right and title to the lands controverted about; which they long since derived by grant from the Governmt. of this H.M. Province, who have from time to time made proposals and concessions to the Governmt. of Connecticott for a neighbourly and friendly accommodation of that matter. There is a memorial from the Council and Assembly of this Province relating to that affair in the hands of John Chamberlayne Esq. with direction to him upon a visit to yourselfe to acquaint you thereof, but not to make further use of it, unless anything offered from Connecticutt should come under consideration; which you'le please to intimate to him, if any such there be. The line in controversy was made by skilfull artists 20 or 30 years before Connecticut had a Charter, and the people of this Province hope H.M. will not give them away out of this Government, and will desire to be heard, my share in it will be only obedience. I shall send the years papers by a safe conveyance. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. Oct. 1, Read Dec. 8; 1709. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 20; and 5, 913. pp. 82–86.]
Aug. 16.
692. Mr. Solicitor General to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Opinion on the case of Robert D'Oyly (July 18). Petitioner is not capable of being guardian to his brother's children, as he asks, because the inheritance may descend to him, etc. There is the less occasion for H.M. interposing in this matter, because the children and their estates are put under the care of a Court of Justice; and the Laws of Virginia have made very good provisions for the benefit of orphans, etc. Signed, R. Eyre. Endorsed, Recd. 16th, Read 18th Aug. 1709. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
692. i. Mr. Popple's letter, July 27. [C.O. 5, 1316. Nos. 31, 31. i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1362. pp. 411, 412.]
Aug. 17.
Boston.
693. Mr. Bridger to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The mast[s] cutt by Mr. Collins Factor are now more than 300, besides those left in the woods, wch. are a great many, all lying perishing and rotting, and are like so to do. Mr. Collins have not yet loaded one mast since I made the seizure of those masts, neither will he this year, his mast shipps being employed in the transport service, and impossible for them to be here this winter (there was one shipp loaded last year, but on Mr. Richard Eyton's account, wch. is since gone of) by the next many of those, if not all will be made unservisable to H.M. I most humbly pray your Lordshipps' leave to dispose of those masts that are now under seizure, before they are wholly spoyled, or so many as will reimburse me of the sume I layd before my Lord Treasurer, and for my travailing charge. I have not received your Lordshipps' answers about a deputy. One person cannot preserve all the woods, on the whole frontiers, the inhabitants thereof living cheifly on geting loggs etc. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Recd. Oct. 1, Read Dec. 9th, 1709. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 29.]
Aug. 19.
Whitehall.
694. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Enumeratecomplaints against Governor Crowe and his proceedings tending to delay an enquiry into them, as stated by Messrs. Sharpe, Walker, Beresford, Cox and Pilgrim. As in the meantime your Majesties' subjects may suffer by a continuance of the administration of that Government in the hands of one against whom there are so many other great complaints, we humbly represent. (1) That ye said Governor has taken upon himself out of Court to set aside orders solemnly made in ye Court of Chancery. Quote case of Manasses Gilligan, etc. (2) Ye Governor has rented out the office of his private Secretary for an excessive annual summ greater than the legal fees would amount to, and ye better to enable his Secretary to pay his said rent, fees were exacted from plaintiff and defendant, and ye Governor took sole cognizance by way of petition of matters cognizable only in your Majesties Courts of Law and Equity etc. Quote cases of Summers, Bamfeild and Waterman etc., and refer to Representation concerning Alexander Skene, April 10. Quote cases of Summers, Bamfoile and Waterman, etc. (3) While suits have been depending in ye Courts of Chancery, Error and Grievances, the Governor has received considerable presents from partys concerned in such suits, as in ye case of Mr. Slingesby, Mr. Chamberlain and Mr. Gibbes and others, which practice hath drawn his justice very much in question. (4) The Governor hath taken upon him to imprison Mr. Buckworth, sole judge of yr. Majesties Court of Admiralty there, for supposed contempt in not obeying illegal orders made by him as ordinary etc. (5) The Governor has also imprisoned your Majesties subjects for suggested contempt of his extra judicial orders, has kept them in prison without bayl or mainprize till they have been necessitated to lay down offices of profit, thereby taking an opportunity of conferring ye said places upon his creatures, as in ye case of Mr. Small and Paul Manier. (6) He has obliged Masters of ships to have their petitions to him for leave to sail drawn by his private Secretary, even when they had their petitions already drawne by others, so that they have doubly payd for the same, which is a burthen upon trade. (7) This they say may be proved by Masters of ships that were then there. Refer to representation of February 18, 1709. (8). By frequent and unusual adjournment of ye Assembly to prevent their complaints of ye Governor's undue administration, the Excise Bill for 1708 was not renewed till several months after the expiration of ye former, during which time a considerable quantity of liquors was imported without paying the dutys. (9) The Governor has made many and unreasonable changes in the Militia in turning out the best qualifyd Officers of the Island, and granting commissions to others to serve his private ends. etc. There are several other articles which have been in like manner proved. Upon the whole matter, it appearing that the Governor has been guilty of such high crimes and male administrations as are contayned in ye severall articles of complaint against him, and in regard he is involved in many lawsuits there in right of his wife, which have had an influence upon him in the administration of justice, to which we must add that he has not payd that due obedience to your Majesties express comands as he ought to have done, wee do therefore humbly submit it to your Majestie whether a person under such, circumstances is to be any longer intrusted with the administration of your Majesties Government of that Island. Set out, A.P.C. II. pp. 577–581. q.v. [C.O. 29, 12. pp. 1319.]
Aug. 20.
Windsor.
695. The Queen to Governor Crowe. Instructions in the case of Bentley and for the removal of Downes, as in Order in Council Aug. 8, 1709. Countersigned, H. Boyle. [C.O. 5, 210. pp. 164–166; and 319, 1. pp. 105–107.]
Aug. 22.
Windsor.
696. Order of Queen in Council. Upon reading Representation of Aug. 19, ordered that Governor Crowe be instructed to come over without delay, to make his defence before H.M. in Councill upon the severall complaints against him, and that the complainants be at liberty to take such proofs and depositions upon oath before such Judge or Chief Magistrate as they shall think fitt, to be transmitted under the seal of the Island, etc. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 25th, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 44; and 29, 12. pp. 35, 36; and 319, 1. pp. 101–104.]
Aug. 22.
Windsor.
697. Order of Queen in Council. Upon Representation of July 25, the Governor of Virginia is to allot lands to the Switzers from Berne, as therein recommended. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. 5th, Read 10th Nov., 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 36; and, 5, 1362. pp. 431, 432.]
Aug. 22.
Windsor.
698. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 16th, Read 17th Nov. 1709. 1 p. Enclosed,
698. i. Norman Mackaskell to the Queen. Governor Crowe has not obeyed H.M. Order in Council Feb. 27 last (q.v.), but has ordered petitioner to be tried at a Court of Grand Sessions for the same matters, and has superseded several J.P.s out of the Commission of the Peace, thereby to expose him to greater hardships at his trial, etc. Copy. 2½ pp. [C.O. 28, 12. Nos. 47, 47. i.; and 29, 12. pp. 49–51.]
Aug. 24.699. Col. Laws to the Council of Trade and Plantations. If a good number of Palatines are sent to settle and plant in Jamaica, they will save the Crown the charge of keeping standing forces there in time of war, increase the customs, navigation and trade. To do that, transport ships must be provided, that they may be free so soon as they set foot on shore in that Island, and enjoy all the priviledges in common with the present settlers there and be subject to and governed by the same Laws. That so much land be assigned for their use as will afford 5 or 6 acres a head, for every person in each family, and granted them from the Crown in fee to them and their heirs for ever. To that end I propose that all that tract of land, with a salvo to those already settled betweene the North East of Rio Grandy and the South East of Port Morant. And that the harbour of St. Anthony be made a port of entry. For the immediate reception of those people it will be necessary that Lynches Island, att the mouth of St. Anthony, which makes two good harbours and contains about 60 or 80 acres, be recommended to the present inhabitants of Jamaica to fall and clear all the wood and build small thatch'd houses and hutts for them to dwell in untill they can fix themselvs on their own land and freehold. From this harbour the windward passage to England is easily gained, and may be practiced all the year round, and planting, which is the mother of trade, may be improved in Jamaica to the loading 1,000 or more ships yearly. It will be needfull for those people to have £8 or £10 a head given them in money to purchase cloths, bedding and tools, such as hoes, bills, axes, nails, locks and keys, and many other usefull things for them to begin with, and that every man may have a gun given him with about 10lb. of powder and shott in proportion for their defence and use. That they be encourag'd to settle in partnerships, as 3 or 4 to Joyn in one plantation, so that one may be hunting, fishing or fowling while the rest are falling and planting the land. This land is all in wood and will afford the labourers boards, plank timber, staves and heading for suggar hogsheads, which will yeild ready money at Port Royal or Kingston at all times, besides peimento or fusteck wood for merchandize, which naturally comes in their way. And in 18 months or 2 years the ground so clear'd and planted will produce quantities of ginger, cotton, indigo, tobacco, annotto, rice and other commodities. As for sugar, it is indeed a work of longer time and great expence, but that will follow at last, and as the people grow able to purchase negroes and cattle. Those people, once settled in that part of the country, will effectually secure both the North and South side of that Island from any great attempt of the enemy, and they being once got on the improving side, and well settled in planting, will quickly reimburse the Crown and nation to advantage, not only by the consumption and use of English goods but the customs arising on their produce, which may in 8 or 10 years amount to £16,000 or 20,000 per ann. in customs to H.M. and advance yearly in some degree besides the benefit of freight comission to merchants, and many other proffits. As for instance this year, 1709. The custom freight comission and petty charges of 1 hhd. of sugar is about £7; on 1000 of ginger about £7–10–0; on 100 of indigo about £3–10–0; on 100 of cocoe about £3–10–0. And all other comodities of the West Indies comes within the same, or such like estimates of advantage to the nation, besides the proffit to the planter or importer, which all centers att last in England. It may be objected how shall the Crown be reinvested in that tract of land proposed to be given to those people, since the greatest part thereof is already granted by Letters Patents to others. And it is very true most of it is in such proprietors' hands as have had it 20 or 30 years and never made the least stepp toward settling it, and seldom if ever paid the quitt-rent, to the great injury and loss of the publique and revenue, and without any advantage to themselves as time and experience has too fattaly made appear. Soe that it may be presumed if no other way can be found to reinstate the Crown in those lands, that the present owners will for so great a good freely resigne 2/3 or ¾ of each grant, especially when they consider that what remains will be of ten times greater value by those people settling there, then the whole can ever be without them. But in case this method, or something like it, cannot be accomplished, as I am fully perswaded it may, from a sence of their own interest and the general good, then the Government of that Island should have directions to recommend them to and distribute them in the severall remote parishes, as St. Elizabeth, Westmoreland, St. James, St. Anns, St. Mary's and St. Georges, where the people are thynly settled and land enough to entertain great numbers, and much wast in the Queene's gift, and no doubt the planters will gladly receive them, and not only give them land, but help them to settle, as indeed tis their interest so to doe, for they know they want nothing but numbers of white people and neighbours to make them as happy and rich as any in the world. Otherwise those people may be for some time subsisted on the deficiences as the souldiers are now, while they can provide for themselves or be otherwise settled by the Country. But this way or the other must be in a great measure referred to the Governour, Councill and Assembly, and the people must be assured of the money and other encouragements above proposed. And it would be convenient some English or Scotch were mixt with them on the same foot and encouragement. I am told there is a Law to oblidge every body to pay their quitt-rent within a certain time therein exprest, or the land shall be forfeited and returne to the Queene. And perhaps much has fallen upon that foot, but then great care should be taken in the regranting it, and that settling and planting be the cheif condition, els it will run into the same evil they intended to rectify. And it may be confidently affirmed that unless some such expedients as these be put in practice, and this oppertunity of sending the Palatines and others promoted, that Island which alone is capable of makeing England rich, must sinck to be lost. And then farewell all the advantages the Nation has in the Spanish West Indies, either in peace or warr. Endorsed, Recd. Read Aug. 24, 1709. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 137, 8. No. 47; and 138, 12. pp. 434–439.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
700. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Recommend, upon Sober's petition, July 25, that Governor Crowe be instructed to transmit his answer and proofs to a Secretary of State, and in the meantime that Sober be allowed to return to Barbados without any further molestation, etc. Set out, A.P.C. II. pp. 607, 608. [C.O. 29, 12. pp. 20–22.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
701. W. Popple to W. Lowndes. Encloses extract of Col. Ingoldesby's letter, July 5, relating to the minister's salary at New York. [C.O. 5, 1121. p. 386.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
702. Same to Josiah Burchett. Encloses extract and enclosures from Col. Ingoldesby's letter, July 5, relating to the pressing of seamen, for the Lord High Admiral's information. [C.O. 5, 1121. p. 387.]
Aug. 30.703. Mr. Attorney General to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have no objection to make to the 5 Acts of Pensilvania (v. Aug. 10) etc. Signed, Ja. Mountague. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 30, Read Sept. 2, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 77; and 5, 1292. p. 145.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
704. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer of England. In our proposal to your Lordship of Aug. 9 for the speedy settling or disposing of the poor Palatines, we mentioned the having under our further consideration how the same might be done, and having accordingly applyed our thoughts to the perfecting so good and necessary a work, and having reconsidered our Report of Aug. 3 to H.M. Commissioners for the settlement of the said Palatines, we now take leave further to propose; that they be transported at H.M. charge to Lynch's Island, at the mouth of St. Antonia River, there to continue till they shall be settled on the Island of Jamaica, in the manner herein proposed, and that the harbour St. Antonio be made a port of entry. That to prepare the said Lynch Island for their reception H.M. royal pleasure be signifyed to the Government of Jamaica, to recommend it in the most effectual manner to the Councill and Assembly, by some Law to be forthwith pass'd there, to make provision for the clearing the ground and building of hutts on Lynch Island sufficient for such number of the said Palatines as shall be sent thither. This as we are informed, may be done without any great charge, and therefore have reason to beleive the present inhabitants will readily agree to it on account of the great benefit they will receive by this increase of people, as well in regard to their trade as to the security of that Island. It is agreed that Lynch Island being the property of Mr. Cotton as heir to Sir Thomas Lynch, this cannot be done without his consent, but we presume there will be no difficulty in obtaining it for this use, since that Island is not, or ever was of any benefit to him, whereas by what is now proposed he may expect a considerable improvement of his estate in that part of Jamaica where these poor people are to be settled. If a Law cannot be procured there for clearing the ground and building hutts on Lynch Island, nor the inhabitants be willing to undertake that work freely at their own charge, in such case if H.M. shall be pleased to bear the expence thereof, we are informed that it will not exceed the rate of £3 per acre for clearing the ground, which were the whole Island consisting of about 80 acres to be cleared, will not amount to above £240, nor can the building of a sufficient number of hutts, where there is such plenty of timber, add much to the expence. And as to the number of acres to be clear'd or hutts built, if done at H.M. charge, we are of opinion it may be left to the Governor and Councill to direct the doing thereof, with regard and in proportion to the number of Palatines to be sent thither. This being only a provisional or temporary lodgment proposed for them till they can conveniently be settled on the Main Island of Jamaica, in order thereunto we further propose that within the tract of land lying between the North East of Rio Grande and the South East of Port Morant, a sufficient number of acres (not already seated) be granted under the seal of the Island to the said Palatines and their heirs for ever, not exceeding 6 acres per head for every person in each family, which proportion of acres we conceive may, when cultivated be a reasonable maintenance for them, by the produce of ginger, cotton, indigo, anotto, rice and other commodities, not to mention the present proffit that will arise upon clearing those lands, by boards, plank timber, staves and heading for sugar hoggsheads, which will at any time yeild ready money at Port Royal or Kingston, and from peimento or fustick wood for merchandize. As for sugar, the produce thereof is a work of time and great expence, yet they may fall into it as they grow able to purchase negroes and cattle. Such a settlement will effectually secure the North and South side of that Island from any attempt of an enemy, and when those people are well settled in planting, they will soon reimburse the Crown and this nation, as well by their consumption of Brittish manufactures, as by the duties arising on their produce, which after 8 or 10 years may be a considerable increase of the customes, besides the benefit of navigation, etc. Quote Customs etc. for 1709. Cf. Aug. 24. It may be objected that the greatest part of that tract of land is already granted by letters patents to others. To which we answer, 'tis true that the same is at present in the possession of such proprietors who have held it for 20 or 30 years past without making the least step towards settling it, and seldome if ever paid the quit rent, to the great injury and loss of the publick and of H.M. Revenue there, and without any benefit to themselvs. So that (not to have recourse to any other method for revesting those lands in the Crown) it may reasonably be presumed that the present owners will for so great a good freely surrender to the Crown 2/3 or ¾ of the lands so granted to them, especially when they consider that what remains will be of a much greater value from such a settlement than the whole is like to be without it. But in case they shall not comply herein, then we propose that the Governor and Councill be directed to recommend ye said Palatines to be distributed throughout the several remote Parishes, as St. Elizabeth, Westmorland, St. James', St. Ann's, St. Mary's and St. George's, where, the people being thinly settled, there is land enough to receive great numbers of them, and a considerable quantity of waste land in H.M. gift, and there is reason to beleive that the Planters will not only receive these Palatines and give them land, but help them to settle it, as 'tis their interest so to do, they being sensible how much they want numbers of white people in that place. On this occasion we take leave to observe that, by a Law of Jamaica made in 1682, every Master of slaves, for the first five working slaves, is obliged to keep one white working manservant, overseer or hired man for three months at the least, for ten slaves two whites, and for every ten slaves over and above the said number one white to be resident on the Plantation where the negroes are imployed, on penalty of £5 for every servant that shall be wanting. Which Law, being not complyed with by many of the said Masters, such of them as are deficient in their respective proportions of white men are compelled to quarter a soldier belonging to H.M. regular forces in that Island for every white man he wants of his quota, or else to allow to every such soldier 5/- per week. Wherefore we take leave to offer it to your Lordship's consideration, whether as a temporary provision for these Palatines or for a good number of them, till they shall be otherwise settled, it may not be proper to recommend it to the said Governor, Councill and Assembly to subsist them on such deficiencies whereon soldiers are not already charged. And whereas great tracts of land have been granted by the Crown to persons who have neglected to seat or plant the same to the great prejudice of that Island, for prevention of the like mischeif for the future, it will be necessary that in every grant to be made to the said Palatines or to any other persons, there be an express proviso that the lands so granted shall be seated and planted within a reasonable time to be therein prefixed, or on failure thereof, such grant to be void and the lands to revert to the Crown. It will be requisite that these poor people, before they begin their voyage, be supplyed with convenient cloathing, bedding and tools, viz., hoes, bills, axes, nails, locks and keys and such like utensils, the charge of which is computed at about £8 or £10 per head. Beside which it will be necessary that every man have a gun, with about 10lb. of powder and a proportionable quantity of shot for his defence and use, and that they be encouraged to settle in partnership, that is, three or four families on one Plantation, whereby some may hunt, fish or fowl, while others clear and plant the land. In regard they will not be able to maintain themselvs out of the produce of their labour till 12 or 18 months after the clearing and planting of the ground, it will be necessary that such of them as shall not be placed on deficiencies or otherwise provided for as aforesaid, be subsisted at the rate of £5 per head, which charge or a great part thereof, may reasonably be defrayed by the inhabitants, in consideration of the great benefit that will accrue to that Island by such settlement, particularly in gaining the Windward passage to Great Britain, which may be made at any time of the year, and consequently the trade from thence very much facilitated and increased. While these Palatines are at Lynch Island, the passage over the mainland is so small that they may easily be supplyed with provisions and other necessaries for their subsistence and may frequently cross over and help to clear the land, on which as 'tis cleared, they may by degrees seat themselvs. And for their further encouragement thereto, it will be necessary that the Governor be directed upon their arrival to grant them letters of naturalization without fee or reward, that may enjoy all such priviledges and advantages as are enjoyed by the present inhabitants of Jamaica. In this manner we hope those poor people, or a considerable number of them, may be disposed of and settled to the benefit not only of Jamaica, but of the trade of this Kingdom, the persons themselvs gain a comfortable livelyhood by their industry, the Crown eased of that heavy charge it is now at in the subsisting of them and reap a considerable advantage by the increase of the customs. [C.O. 138, 12. pp. 440–448.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
705. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. In case the above proposal be not approved, tho we do not at present foresee any objections but what may arise from the greatness of the charge (which nevertheless we have lessned all we can), or if it shall not be thought convenient to settle the whole number of the poor Palatines in Jamaica, we offer to your Lordship's consideration, that such of them as shall not otherwise be disposed of, may conveniently be settled upon Hudson's River, New York, where H.M. has very large tracts of waste lands. In order whereunto we further propose that they be transported thither at H.M. charge, which for so great a number, partly made up of small children, may be done at between £3 and £4 a head, one with another. That they be supplied here with all necessary tools for husbandry, and with nails and hinges and other iron work for building their timber houses, to enable them to begin and make settlements, which emptions may be computed at 40/- per head, as in the case of the poor Palatines sent to the same place the last year. That the Governor or Commander in Chief of the said Province be directed, upon their arrival there, to grant unto every one of them, under the seal of that Province, without fee or reward, the usual and like number of acres as was directed to be granted to every one of the Palatines lately sent thither upon the like terms, etc. But as these people are very necessitous, they will not be able to subsist there till they can reap the fruit of their labour (which will not be till after one year) unless assisted by H.M. bounty; for we doubt there is little relief to be expected from the inhabitants of that Province under its present circumstances, and therefore these poor people must depend on H.M. royal bounty for their subsistance for one year after their arrival in New York, which charge may be computed at about £5 per head. Further, we propose that before their departure they be made denizens of this kingdom, that they may enjoy all the priviledges and advantages as are enjoyed by the present inhabitants of New York accruing thereby. It may be objected that, should these people be settled on the Continent of America, they will fall upon woollen and other manufacturies to the prejudice of the manufactures of this Kingdom now consumed in those parts. To this we answer, that the Province of New York being under H.M. immediate Government, such mischievous practice may be discouraged and chequed much easier than under any Proprietary Governments on the said Continent, as has been found by experience; and, as a further provision against any such practice, a clause may be inserted in the several patents so to be passed to the said Palatines, declaring the same to be void, if such patentee shall apply himself to the making the woollen or such like manufactures. If it be thought advisable that these poor people, or any number of them, be settled on the Continent of America, we are of opinion that such settlement, especially if made at H.M. charge, should be in Provinces under H.M. immediate Government, and we know no place so proper as Hudson's River on the frontier of New York, whereby they will be a good barrier between H.M. subjects and the French and their Indians in those parts, and in process of time, by intermarrying with the neighbouring Indians, (as the French do), they may be capable of rendring very great service to H.M. subjects there, and not only very much promote the fur trade, but likewise the increase of naval stores, which may be produced in great plenty at New York, wherein Mr. Bridger may be directed to instruct them. Lastly, we take leave to observe that in Virginia and some other parts of the said Continent, where the air is clear and healthfull, wild vines do naturally grow and afford plenty of grapes, which, if cultivated and improved by husbandry, would produce good wines. Wherefore, if some of these Palatines, who are vine dressers, were settled there and imployed in that sort of husbandry, a new and proffitable trade might be introduced to the benefit of this Kingdom. [C.O. 5, 1121. pp. 387–391.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
706. Mr. Popple to Mr. Lowndes. Encloses extract of Mr. Byerley's letter, June 30, complaining of Col. Ingoldesby's proceedings against him in relation to the payment of salary to the Lord Cornbury, etc. [C.O. 5, 1121. p. 397.]
Aug. 31.
Maryland.
707. Council of Maryland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. On July 30th last it pleased Allmighty God to take away our Governour, Col. John Seymour, after a long lingring indisposition of a continued feavour, etc. Pursuant to H.M. Commission to him, wee have taken upon us the execution of the Government, etc. Signed, Edwd. Lloyd, Wm. Holland, Will. Coursey, Tho. Ennalls, Sam. Young, Tho. Greenfield, Cha. Greenberry, Jno. Hall. Endorsed, Recd., Read Dec. 20, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 1; and, 5, 727. pp. 158, 159.]