America and West Indies
January 1710, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1924

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4-18

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'America and West Indies: January 1710, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 4-18. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73825 Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


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January 1710, 11-20

Jan. 11.
Admiralty Office.
18. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. The Convoys to the Plantations are not all yet settled, but are designed to rendezvous at Spithead, etc. Therefore it may be proper for you to send the new seals to Portsmouth, etc. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 12, 170 9/10. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 8; and 29, 12. p. 72.]
[Jan. 11.]
Windsor.
19. The Queen to Governor Crowe upon Mr. Bentley's petition. Aug. 20, 1709. cf. July 18, Aug. 8, 1709. Countersigned, H. Boyle. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 11, 170 9/10. Copy. 2½ pp. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 7; and 29, 12. pp. 68–70.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
20. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Reply to Dec. 28. There was no vacancy in the Council of Barbados at the time we received your letter of July 27, nor is there yet, etc. We minuted Mr. Berwick to be considered when any vacancy should happen, and have no objection to him, etc. [C.O. 29, 12. p. 71.]
Jan. 11.
Virginia.
21. Lt. Governor Jenings to the Council of Trade and Plantations. On the 3rd past I had the honour to receive yr. Lordships' of July 27 by the way of Boston, the Enterprize man of war, which brought it continuing still there, being disabled by the loss of some of her masts in the voyage, and not like to come hither till the spring. I am sorry my letter of Nov. 27 concerning the negro trade hath given your Lordps. the trouble of a new enquiry. The difference in the price of negros between the Company and the separate traders was occasioned by the dilligence of the latter in sending their ships early, and thereby gaining the advantage, once or twice, of a better market than the Company who came after them; for when negros come in about the beginning of the summer, the planters are abundantly more fond of them, and will give greater prices for them, because they are sure of the advantage of their labour in that years crop, whereas negros bought at the latter end of the year, are of little service till the next Spring, and this is the true reason of that difference of price, and not that the Company have been at all more favourable to the planters in the sale of their slaves than the separate traders, for both have sold as dear as they could. I am now to give your Lordps. the unhappy news of the loss of H.M.S. Garland. She had been out a cruising on the coast for some time, and in her return to the Capes on Nov. 29th about one in the morning unfortunately run ashore on a sand-bank or Island a little to the Southward of Corrotuck inlett, the Officers and all the men except 15 were saved, and the Captain had hopes to save great part of the rigging and stores, for wch. purpose I ordered him all the assistance I could from this Colony, and a letter of credit to the Government of Carolina, where the wreck is, for further assistance there; but the season of the year was too far advanced for that service, so that it must be laid aside till the spring. This unfortunate disaster has deprived this H.M. Colony of the protection which we had all imaginable reason to expect from the dilligence of Capt. Cook the Commander of that ship, and more especially after being join'd with H.M.S. the Enterprize, which my Lord High Admiral has been pleased to order hither for that purpose. I hope the Enterprize will arrive early in the spring, to prevent the attempts of the enemy's privateers; but I humbly beg leave to acquaint yr. Lordps. that that ship alone will not be sufficient for the guard of this coast without the assistance of a smaller vessell of 10 or 12 guns; the greater part of the privateers on this coast are sloops and brigantines, wch. being pursued by a ship of force, make their escape into the flatts and shoal water, where they may ly secure even in sight of a man of war; but might easily be dislodged by such a vessell as I have proposed; and I humbly pray yr. Lordps. favourable interposition with my Lord High Admiral in this particular. Notwithstanding the bad prospect we had at the Fall of the scarcety of corne, wch. occasioned the prohibiting its exportation, yet I thank God that scarcety is not so great as was apprehended, and there has been application for permitting corne to be exported; but I have nott thought fitt to grant it, till I am fully informed how the country in general is supplyed. The countrey is at present in quiet, but many parts of it afflicted with a contagious distemper, which rages most in the coldest weather and has swept away many of the inhabitants. In my last by the Fleet, I gave yr. Lordps. the Council's opinion on H.M. late instruction for granting of land, and I think it my duty now humbly to represent that such a seating as is therein proposed will be attended with very great prejudice to H.M. service, and to this Colony; for though it might be practicable, yet while the Proprietary Governments are not under the like regulation, people will (as they now do) flock thither where they can take up land on much easier terms; those Governments finding that the indulging people in that particular is the most effectual means to carry on their interests, which in many respects are inconsistent with the interest of the Crown and of the Colonys under H.M. immediate Government: and therefore I would humbly propose that H.M. may be moved to suspend that Instruction untill the whole Governments as well under the Crown as the Proprietors can be brought under the same regulations in respect of granting land. Since the first doubts arose about H.M. Instructions to Coll. Nott, there has been no patents for land sign'd: some of those patents are for land granted before any alteration was proposed, others are called including patents, that is, where a man had formerly a patent for land adjoining to some waste land, wch. he thought fitt afterwards to take up, or to land purchased from some other person who had a former patent for it, and now is desirous to have both tracts included in one patent: and these as well as all other patents still remain unsign'd, because yr. Lordps.' directions were general that no grants should be made, but upon the conditions there prescribed. Tis thought hard that such restrictions should be made to look so as to burthen grants made before their promulgation, and that wanted only signing (wch. is a thing of course) to make them compleat. These reflections with the consideration of those new conditions of acquiring land, as they have been the occasion that many have left the country and settled in Carolina, so they have caused some murmuring amongst the inhabitants, wch. I'm afraid may break out more openly upon the meeting of an Assembly: for preventing of which I humbly hope H.M. will be graciously pleased to permitt the patents already prepared to pass as formerly without any other limitation or condition than has been customary heretofore, att least that there be no stop at any time hereafter to the passing of renewed patents on the terms of the first grants, and if H.M. shal be pleased graciously to condescend to these particulars for the ease and satisfaction of this H.M. Colony (and wch. will also considerably advance H.M. Revenue of quitt rents) I humbly pray yor. Lordps. that H.M. pleasure therein may speedily be made known here. Not hearing anything from the Captain of the Enterprize, I thought it necessary to send an express to him over land, and hope it will be with him time enough to hasten him hither before the enemy's privateers come on the coast: but if he should fail, I beg yr. Lordps. to be assured that I shal not be wanting in putting the countrey in the best posture of defence I can, to prevent the attempts of the enemy. Signed, E. Jenings. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 20th April, 1710. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 44; and 5, 1363. pp. 172–179.]
[Jan. 12.]22. Mr. Rayner to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Duplicate of petition Feb. 2, q.v. Signed. Jno. Rayner. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 12, 170 9/10. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 150.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
23. Mr. Popple to Isaac Townsend. (fn. 1) Encloses new seals to be forwarded to the Governors of the Leeward Islands and Barbados, etc. [C.O. 29, 12. p. 73.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall:
24. Same to Mr. Burchett. Prays that Mr. Townsend may have directions as preceding, etc. [C.O. 29. 12. p. 74.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
25. Same to the Postmasters General. To same effect as preceding. [C.O. 29. 12. p. 75.]
Jan. 13.26. George Gordon, Provost Marshall of Barbados, to Mr. Popple. There having some mistake happend in the Order of Councill, June 9 last, for repealing part of the Act pass'd in 1667, I therefore begg that my petition now before the Lords Comrs. of Trade may be withdrawn, being in hopes that the same will be shortly sett to rights. Signed, Geo. Gordon. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 16th Jan. 170 9/10. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 9.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
27. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. Enclose incidental charges of the office, and pray for payment of their own salaries, "there being an arrear of five quarters due to us at Christmas last." v. Journal of Council under date. 6 pp. [C.O. 388, 76. Nos. 92–95; and 389, 36. pp. 453–455.]
[Jan. 16.]28. Abstract of letter from M. Gashet to Mr. Duport, relating to the seizure of the Society sloop. v. Dec. 15, 1709. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Duport), Read Jan. 16, 170 9/10. 3 pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 2.]
[Jan. 16.]29. Copy of the trial of the sloop Society in the Court of Admiralty, Antigua, June 17, 1708. Endorsed as preceding. 8½ pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 3.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
30. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Samuel Brise, of New England, now of Ratcliff Cross, Mariner, having attended the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations in order to discover several illegal practices in the Trade in H.M. Plantations (cf. Nov. 4) but being under apprehension that he may be press'd, he dares not attend their Lordships as often as is necessary, they therefore desire you to move the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty for a protection for him, etc. [C.O. 389, 21. pp. 19, 20.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
31. Council of Trade and Plantations to the President of the Council of Maryland. Acknowledge letters. We shall consider the two vacancies in the Council filled by the late Col. Seymour, upon H.M. appointing a new Governor. We are sorry to perceive (March 10) that he cou'd not prevail with the Assembly then sitting to make a necessary provision for the itinerant Justices; but we hope at their next meeting those, who then opposed the doing thereof, may be brought over and made sensible of the benefit and advantage that Province do's receive from such Judges, and thereupon join with the other members of Assembly to settle such allowance on the said Judges, as their services do require. And we doubt not but you will contribute as much as in you lyes towards so good a work, and give us timely information thereof, that we may lay the same before H.M. Enclose Orders in Council Dec. 15, 1709, repealing 4 Acts, with the reasons therefor: also duplicate of letter March 26, 1707, which Col. Seymour (Jan. 10, 1709) acquainted us that he had not received. The Queen having by her Order in Council, June 23, 1709, determined the dispute between the Lord Baltimore and Mr. Penn touching the boundaries of the Provinces of Maryland and Pennsylvania, we send a copy of H.M. said Order, upon which we hope such care has been taken by the parties concerned, that the disputes between the people of both Provinces relating to the said boundaries will wholly cease. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 164–166.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
32. The Earl of Sunderland to Governor Hunter. The Queen has commanded me to send you the enclosed papers relating to the poor Palatines now at New York, and to recommend them to your charitable care, H.M. leaving it entirely to your discretion to continue them in their present establishment or to employ them in the same manner as those you are now carrying thither with you, and she thinks that as to their Minister, he may be made to share in the labours of the other, who otherwise would have so much a larger congregation, and be put upon the same establishment, but however leaves this matter entirely to you. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 195.]
Jan. 16.
Portsmouth Dock.
33. Mr. Townsend to Mr. Popple. Acknowledges letter and packets of Jan. 13th, etc. Signed, Isaac Townsend. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 17, 170 9/10. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 10.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
34. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Dudley. Acknowledge letters of March and Dec., 1708, and March, Aug. and Oct., 1709. As to what you write in relation to H.M. not supplying the vacancies of Counsellors in ye Massachusets Bay, we are to acqt. you that the mistake you mention in that matter arose from a circular letter which was, on May 7th, 1707, written to all the Governours, but the clause should have been left out to you for the Government of the Massachusets Bay. We are glad that the Province is supplyed with what commodities they want directly from this Kingdom, and doubt not but you will continue as much as possible to prevent the inhabitants from being furnished with those commodities from any other parts, and that you will as much as in you lies discourage their going upon the woollen as well as any other manufactures, wch. if not timely prevented, may prove very prejudicial to Great Britain by lessening the consumption of such manufactures. We are glad to perceive that Mr. Bridger is from time to time encouraged and assisted by you in the execution of ye Trust reposed in him, which encouragement you will do well to continue, it being so much for H.M. service. As to the Act past in New Hampshire for the better preservation of all mast trees, etc., we have laid the same before H.M.; and have likewise upon the Assembly of the Massachusets Bays refusing to pass a like Act (for the reasons set forth in one of your forementioned letters) proposed the passing of an Act of Parliament here for the more effectual preservation of mast trees in H.M. woods in New England. We have now under consideration the Act for the encouragment of the inhabitants of New Hampshire in the making tar, etc., and shall as soon as possible lay it before H.M. for her pleasure therein. As to what you write concerning the barbarities of the French and Indians in scalping H.M. subjects that fall into their hands, we cannot but approve of the methods you have taken to prevent the like inhumanities for the future. We are glad to hear you have had so little disturbance of late from Canada, which we perceive is owing to your prudent care and watchfulness to prevent any surprise by the enemy, and we doubt not but you will continue the same during this present war. Having received information that Mr. Vaughan is returned to New England, we doubt not but he will have acquainted you that we were not wanting on our parts to forward the affairs he came about, and have reason to believe he will give a satisfactory account of his negotiations to those who sent him over. The account of the ordnance and stores of war that are in the Castle of the several forts in New England, and of such of the said stores as have been expended in the service of the country, we have received; and you have done well to transmit the like accounts to the Board of Ordnance, under whose inspection that matter properly lyes. As to Mr. Allen's claim to lands in New Hampshire, the same is still depending before H.M. In a letter we have received from Mr. Usher, he acquaints us that there are many persons, who pretend to great tracts of land by town grants in that Province, and therefore he proposes a quit-rent to be paid for the same. But as what he writes touching this matter is not clear to be understood, we send you here inclosed an extract, and desire that you will in your next to us explain his meaning, and then we shall take the same into consideration, and do what shall be found necessary therein. He likewise acquaints us that the Act of Parliament for regulating the rates of foreign coines is not complyed with in New England. And whereas Col. Cranston, Deputy Governor of Rhode Island, has informed us that the execution of the said Act is suspended in that Colony, till they shall see what methods are taken in New England relating thereto, we have written to Col. Cranston by this conveyance not to delay upon any pretext whatsoever the paying a due obedience to the said Act, and at the same time acquainted him that we have written to you to see the said Act duly put in execution throughout your Governments, which we hope will be done by you accordingly, and that those who shall transgress be punished according as that Law directs.
P.S.—Jan. 24. Since the signing of this letter we have considered the Act of New Hampshire for encouraging the making of tar, etc. We take notice that the price of every barrell of good tar in cask of just assise was set for 1709 at 20s. If that be no more than the current price of tar in that Province, we have no objection thereunto. But if it be above the current rate, we are of opinion that it will not only be prejuditial to the Publick funds, which are to be paid in that commodity, but will also make such tar come dearer to market here; and instead of being an encouragement, will be a hindrance to the sale thereof, you would have done well therefore at the same time you transmitted us the said Act to have informed us of the current price of tar in New Hampshire, however as the Act is expired, we shall not lay the same before H.M. [C.O. 5, 913. pp. 153–160.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
35. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lt. Governor Usher. We have received two letters from you, one of March 23, 170 8/9, the other without date, and are glad to perceive thereby the good disposition of the Province to join in the intended expedition against Canada. The character you give of Col. Nicholson is no more than we expected from his integrity, courage and zeal for H.M. and the publick service. We are glad Mr. Vaughan is returned to New Hampshire, who we doubt not will have given such an account of his negotiations here as will be satisfactory to those who sent him. We have considered what you write in relation to persons pretending to great tracts of land, and laying claim thereto by town grants, together with your proposal about quit-rents. But as that matter is not clearly expressed, we desire you to explain it more fully in your next, and we have also written to Col. Dudley to do the same. We are sorry to perceive that there is not a due obedience paid to the Act about coine, and have therefore written to Col. Dudley by this conveyance to use his best endeavours for putting the said Act in execution. [C.O. 5, 913. pp. 160–162.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
36. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Bridger. Acknowledgeletters of July 6, 1708. March 27 and Aug. 17, 1709. We have had under our consideration the method proposed by you for encouraging the making of tar and pitch in New England. But as there are now 3000 Palatines going from this Kingdom with Col. Hunter, appointed governor of H.M. Province of New York, who are to be employed there in the production of Naval Stores, you will upon his arrival receive further information in that matter. The draught of an Act for preserving of masts in the Massachusets Bay, which you mention to have sent us in order to its being past by the Parliament here, is not come to our hands. But having received from Col. Dudley an Act past in New Hampshire for the preservation of mast trees etc. (as also a copy thereof from you) we have laid the same before H.M., and proposed for the more effectual preventing of spoiles in H.M. woods on the Continent of America, and for preserving all white pine-trees growing there, the passing of an Act of Parliament here for that purpose, no provision having been made for the same in the Act for the importation of Naval Stores. And so soon as H.M. shall have declared Her pleasure on the said proposal, you shall be acquainted therewith; in the meantime we shall take into consideration what you write about the impossibility of your proving what trees are cutt on publick lands. And we doubt not but you will continue as much as in you lyes with Col. Dudley's assistance to prevent ye wastes committed in the said woods. But as to the expence and travelling charges you are at in the doing thereof, we can say nothing to that matter, the same being more immediately under the direction of the Lord Treasurer, to whom your Agent is now applying. We are glad to perceive the progress you have made in the raising of hemp, and the probability there is of improving that commodity, and hope in a few years by your prudent management therein, the same may be brought to perfection. As to what you say we wrote to Col. Dudley, touching an information of your conniving at the cutting mast trees and converting them into logs, etc., which he communicated to you, we are to acquaint you that having had such an information, we only writ the same by way of caution. We shall not be wanting on all occasions to countenance you as much as in us lyes, in the performance of your duty. We cannot give any order in relation to your desire of leave to dispose of such masts as are under seizure. [C.O. 5, 913. pp. 162–165.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
37. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Governor and Company of Connecticut. Acknowledge letters of Jan. 24 and 26 and Feb. 19, 170 8/9;, containing full and satisfactory answers to what we wrote to you; and we shall from time to time expect the account you promise us, as well in relation to negroes as other matters concerning the Colony under your care; and we do assure you on our parts that nothing shall be wanting to contribute as much as in us lies to the welfare and prosperity thereof. In relation to the number of inhabitants in Connecticut, we observe you say that according to the best computation that can be made, they do amount to about 4000, 2000 whereof at their own desire have been admitted Freemen, and in a subsequent paragraph you compute the number of Militia, which consist of all above 16 that are capable to bear arms, to amount to 4,500. You will do well to rectify this mistake in your next, when we shall expect the body of Laws you promise us, etc. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 200, 201.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
38. Same to Major Tynt. We have received a letter from Sir N. Johnson, Tho. Broughton, and others, dated Sept. 17, 1708, which came not to our hands till Dec. 1st last, and was in answer to one we had writ to the Lords Proprietors May 7, 1707, desiring frequent informations of the state and condition of Carolina, which they having fully done by the said letter, we shall only desire that from time to time you would send us the like accounts, particularly in relation to the Trade of that Province, and whatever else may be of use for our information. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 201, 202.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
39. Same to Governor Cranston. We have considered 3 letters from you, Dec. 5, 1708, containing full and satisfactory answers to what we wrote to you; and we shall from time to time expect the accounts you promise us, as well in regard to negroes, as other matters concerning the administration of the Government under your care, to the welfare and prosperity of which we shall contribute as much as in us lies. As to what you write about the suspending of the Act for settling the rates of foreign coins, you ought not on any account to delay the execution of the said Law, but to pay an exact and punctual obedience thereunto. We do write to Col. Dudley by this conveyance, that he do take care the said Act be duly complyed with. So soon as the several Acts of the Colony shall be finished, we expect that you will transmit the same to us; as likewise all such other Acts of Assembly as shall be passed for the future, as opportunity shall serve. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 202, 203.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehaven.
40. Merchants of Whitehaven, Cockermouth and Penrith trading to H.M. Plantations in America, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The constitution of the Isle of Man, which renders it forreign to Great Britain, entitling all debenture goods that are exported thither to a drawback, and the small duties that are paid for them there, together with its scituation, so near the northern parts of Great Britain and Ireland, makes it so opportune a place for the unfair traders, that great quantities of debenture goods, especially tobacco, are daily exported thither, so vastly disproportionate to the consumption of that Island, that there is no room to doubt (if there were no other evidence of fact) that they are lodged there, only to be run off again to the adjacent parts of Great Britain and Ireland, etc. The great advantage which those concerned in this destructive practice make to themselves, has of late much encreased their number and they despise the penalties of the Laws now in being … They have done it to such a hight that the prices of tobacco in the northern parts of Ireland and of Great Britain as far as York are now generally fallen to about 7d. per lb. for the best wrapper, the fair trader who pays the Queen's duty cannot possibly sell at those rates. This practice has already had so ill an effect, that whereas we heretofore usually fraughted about 10 ships yearly from Whitehaven to Virginia and Maryland, upon our own account, we have not dared this year to freight more than one, and have no prospect of freighting any the next. 27 Signatures. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 28, Read Feb. 1, 1709. 2 pp. Enclosed,
40. i. Proposals for securing the tobacco trade against running and other frauds. No debentures to be allowed for any tobaccoes exported to the Isle of Man. Penalties for infringement, etc. 1½ pp. [C.O. 388, 12. Nos. 74, 74 i.; and 389, 21. pp. 44–46.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
41. The Earl of Sunderland to Governor Hunter. Having a very good character of Mr. John Rigs, your Capt. Lieutenant, as having been a Commission Officer above 21 years and gained a general esteem at New York, I recommend him to your protection etc. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. pp. 195, 196.]
Jan. 19.42. Samuel Brise to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Enumerates cases of illegal trade carried on between St. Thomas, Curacoa and the British Plantations, 1704–1708. Signed, Samuel Brise. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 19, 1709/10. 1¾ large pp. [C.O. 388, 12. No. 66.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
43. Mr. Popple to Mr. Addington. Acknowledges letters of March 15, 1708 and Oct. 26, 1709, by Col. Nicholson, who will no doubt make a just Representation to H.M. of the pressing circumstances the Provinces [of the Massachusetts Bay and New Hampshire] at present labour under, as well from the disappointment of the intended expedition against Canada, as from the great losses those Provinces have sustained by the incursions of the enemy, which Representation I hope will have the desired success. For my own part I shall contribute everything in my power towards the same. [C.O. 5, 913. pp. 166, 167.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
44. Same to Mr. Plaisted. Acknowledges letter of April 12, 1709, q.v. The Council of Trade and Plantations are very sensible of Col. Dudley's care in giving you all the assistance he can by sending out scouts, and a sufficient force to cover your men in the cutting such masts, from the insults of the enemy. And their Lordships do not doubt but upon the arrival of Col. Hunter at New York, such further care will be taken by him, that you will not meet with any molestation in the performance of your duty for the future. [C.O. 5, 913. pp. 167, 168.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
45. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lt. Governor Bennett. Acknowledge letters Sept. 30 and Oct. 30. But we have not received your letter of May 30, nor the proceedings in the Admiralty Court on two vessels condemned for illegal trade, which you mentioned to have sent us by the way of Barbadoes. You will do well therefore to transmit us duplicates thereof. We shall expect the accounts of stores and of the fortifications which you promise us, and at the same time, that you transmit those accounts to us, you ought also to send duplicates thereof to the Board of Ordnance. We take notice of what you say in relation to the mony found by John Hilton, and you will do well to make what further enquiry you can in that matter, and to send us an account thereof. You will undoubtedly have heard from your brother, Sir John Bennet, how the matter between you and Mr. Jones stands, so that we need not be particular in giving you an account thereof. All that we need add is that we shall do you justice as the nature of the thing requires. [C.O. 38, 6. pp. 485, 486.]
Jan. 19.
Admiralty Office.
46. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Encloses following etc. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. 19th, Read 20th Jan. 170 9/10. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
46. i. Mr. Townsend to Mr. Burchett. Portsmouth Dock, Jan. 17. Enquires whether there is a new seal for Jamaica, etc. Signed, Isaac Townsend. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 11. 11 i.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
47. Circular letter from the Council of Trade and Plantations to the Governors and Proprietors of Plantations. Having received information that a clandestine and illegal trade has and still continues to be carryed on by several persons in the [——] under your Government to Curacoa and St. Thomas, by which means the French Islands and their privateers are furnished with goods and provisions to the great prejudice of H.M. subjects, we send you an extract of such information that you may make strict enquiry into the truth of the severall matters of fact alledged therein, and if you find sufficient ground, that you cause such persons as have been concerned in such illegal trade to be prosecuted according to law. By the said extract you will see how a trade is carryed on with Martinico by means of their flags of truce. We think it therefore necessary that you take all possible care, when any flags of truce shall arrive at [——], they be not permitted to trade during their stay there, or allowed to go on shore to examine the strength and condition of your Government, and you are to give us an account from time to time of your proceedings herein. Annexed,
47. i. Extracts from 3 memorials (? by Peter Holt, etc.) relating to illegal trade carried on between Curacoa, St. Thomas and the British Plantations in America. From the English Plantations upon the mainland the inhabitants of Curaçoa have all sort of provisions, as bread, flower, butter, cheese, pease, rice, beef, pork and corn; from Pennsylvania and New York strong and small beer; from Carolina and New England pitch and tarr; from the Charibbee Islands and Jamaica rum, sugar, cotton, ginger, indigo, and tobacco; in return of which our Plantations have chiefly cocoa, linnens, muslins, silks and other goods for wearing apparel, with great quantity of riggings, sail, canvas, anchors and other sorts of iron-work, powder and shott, which is never taken notice of by our men of war, when they meet with any sloop from thence. There is commonly at this Island 1600 sea-faring men and 2 of them English, some of them having run away from men of war, and some from merchantmen, and some having been taken prisoners and brought to St. Thomas's come down to Curaçoa for subsistence, which always makes Curaçoa full of men; for when a sloop comes down from any of our Islands, they commonly bring three times their complement of men, and at the same time our own ships at Barbadoes, Antigua, Mountserat and Nevis have offered £25 and £30 for only the run home from the West Indies, and cou'd not have men for that; and their men at Curaçoa have gone without shoes upon their feet or shirts upon their backs, their common wages being 14 pieces of 8/8 per month; and when they have been out 5 or 6 months, and have about 70 pieces of 8/8 to receive, they cannot stay on shore a month before all their mony is gone, which makes so many English in so poor a condition; and shou'd an English man of war come into Curaçoa, and offer to impress any men, the Governor wou'd not suffer him. Several merchants told me that they had not less than 12 or 1500 tun of bread and flower, and as much beef, in one year from us; and that they cou'd never see, but one time with another, it was as dear among our own Islands as at Curaçoa; and that if they had not provision from us, their trade wou'd be ruined. In 6 months (that) the inhabitants wou'd be forced to go down to Jamaica, for Holland cou'd not supply the place with provision, so that their trade wou'd be of advantage to them, they having had commonly £50,000 in provisions in a year from our Plantations, which has most of it been returned in Dutch goods; besides rum and sugar, cotton and indigo, and pitch and tar, to above 2 times the value, which the merchants at Curaçoa wou'd much wonder at, that our European trade shou'd suffer so much, and not be taken notice of. They have but 3 sloops at the Island, but what was built in our Plantations; at Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvanya, Carolina, Bermudas, and the Bahamas, and most of them the best sailers in America. This is the chief of their trade with the English Plantations, without which they cou'd not live. Had Jamaica such a supply of provisions as Curaçoa has, and a stock of goods for the Spanish trade, it wou'd in a little time be the finest Island in the world, it lying as convenient for the Spanish trade as Curaçoa, and more convenient for the Leeward trade, Porto Bell lying near S.S.W. from Port Royal, which is the chief place for selling great quantities of goods, and slaves, for ready pieces of eight, there being only that in return. There are many vessels from the Northern parts of America that take in wine at Maderas for Curaçoa, and so return home, but sell their Mediterranean passes to the Dutch, who put in an Englishman master, and the men all Englishmen, and go under English colours for Madera or the Canaries. There is hardly any Plantation in America that belongs to H.M. but has a correspondence with Curaçoa, and not many but what have raised themselves by it. The last part of the trade the Dutch have with the Spaniards is, the Spaniards come to Curaçao with their own sloops, and bring them mony for goods. Curaçoa loads home for Holland in one year about 50 sail of ships, and most of them are richly laden, and a great part of their loading comes out of the English Plantations, chiefly sugar, cotton, tobacco, indigo and ginger; of their own produce by trade with the Spaniards, cocoa, hides, tobacco, logwood, stockfish wood and mony. When a fleet is loading at Curaçoa, the Charibbee Islands have a good trade for what they bring down to Curaçoa; sugar commonly 4½ pieces 8/8 per hundred, cotton and indigo runs higher than at other times, and provision much carryed away by ships that have laid long in the harbour, which are obliged to our Plantations for that, to carry them home. When two sail of our northern vessels come in together with provision, the Jews will blow upon it, if not consigned to them. I cannot say that the Jews are owners of most of the vessels that supply that place with provision (because I never sailed in that Trade, only from Antigua), but they have that power over most of them when they are there, that they can turn out, or put in what Master they please. If sailors have a mind to leave an English vessel at Curaçoa, to stay in the place, a complaint to the Governor will get them their wages and discharge, whether it be due or no; and any servant may run away from his master, and no remedy for it. And if provision be scarce, the Governor will oblige the bringer to take his price, or carry it away again, and if he can find anything against them, he makes them pay dear for it. They commonly run many hazards in not entring all their goods, the masters not being sworn to what they have on board, nor any constant waiters to look after the loading of anything. April 18, 1707, came in to Curaçoa a brigantine and a sloop, both French. The sloop about 6 weeks before had sailed out of Curaçoa, and belonged to one James Handes of this place, an Englishman. The sloop had been taken and carryed into St. Domingo and condemned to the French, and these two vessels were sent to Curaçoa to be sold. When Mr. Handes saw his own sloop come into the harbour, he went to the Governor and demanded her again, but the Governor wou'd not let him have her, but put both brigantin and sloop out of the harbour, and when out, they lay by, and in 3 hours time sent on shore a canoe with a considerable quantity of mony, which was landed at one Philip Senyor's, a Jew merchant, and the Governor's chief favourite, which was to buy provision for them to carry to Martinico. July 1st came in a flag of truce from Martinico, laden with furs and claret, and lay in the harbour all night, and next day went out to little Curaçoa (a small key S.E. 2 leagues from Curaçoa) and one Samuel Brice, an Englishman, was sent with a sloop of Philip Senyor's after her, and brought her lading to Philip Senyor, and two days after carryed the Frenchman, his sloop's loading of provision. This flag of truce had but two prisoners, which he brought down with him. But that is the way, when they want provisions at Martinico, and there is none to be had at St. Thomas's, to fit out their privateers. Aug. 1706, a sloop named the Tempest came down from Barbadoes laden with beef and rum and sugar. About this time came in a flag of truce from Martinico, having but 3 prisoners, but laden with French brandy and claret, and carryed provision; and while he lay in the Harbour had the liberty to go on board of the Tempest, and measured her decks, and told the men that belonged to her, it shou'd not be long before he had that sloop, (she being the best ship in America), and on Christmas Day afterwards, lying at the Planton Keys, 12 leagues to Leeward of Carthagena, Capt. Burnee that commanded the French sloop, met the Tempest and fought her with two French privateers, and after 5 hours fight, the commander and 30 men killed outright, the sloop was taken, the French privateers fighting under Dutch colours all the time of the engagement. The cargo of this sloop that was taken was valued at 270,000 pieces of 8/8 when she went out of Curaçoa. [C.O. 324, 9. pp. 422–429; and 153, 10. pp. 452–458; and 319, 1. pp. 181–186; and 138, 13. pp. 79–81; and 29, 12. p. 76; and 5, 1122. pp. 150, 151; and 5, 1292. pp. 204–207; and 5, 1363. pp42, 43; and38, 6. pp. 487–489; and319, 1. pp. 181–186.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
48. Annexed to above letter and enclosure to Governor Handasyd. Details of illegal trade between Jamaica, Curaçoa and St. Thomas etc., 1705, 1706. [C.O. 138, 13. pp. 81–84.]
Jan. 19.49. Annexed to above letter and enclosure to Governor Crowe. Details of illegal trade between Barbados and Curaçoa, 1705–1707. [C.O. 29, 12. pp. 77, 78.]
Jan. 19.50. Annexed to above letter and enclosure to Governor Hunter. Details of illegal trade between New York and Curaçoa, 1704–1707. [C.O. 5, 1122. pp. 151–154.]
Jan. 19.51. Annexed to above letter and enclosure to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Details of illegal trade between Carolina, St. Thomas, and Curaçoa, 1707, 1708. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 205, 206.]
Jan. 19.52. Annexed to above letter and enclosure to William Penn. Details of illegal trade carried on between Pennsylvania and Curaçoa, 1704–1707. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 207, 208.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
53. Council of Trade and Plantations to Col. Jenings. Acknowledge letter of Oct. 8. We shall expect the estimate of the charge of laying out the boundaries of Carolina, the particulars of what has been disbursed for the brigantine, and the accounts of H.M. Revenue, which you promise us. As to what you write about H.M. additional Instruction relating to the granting of lands, we do not see any cause to alter the method proposed therein. That Instruction was drawn conformable to the Representation made by you and the Council to us, with this addition only, that every Pattentee be obliged to cultivate and improve 3 acres part of every 50 acres granted to them, within 3 years after the passing of such grant. This we thought so reasonable, that we could not imagine either you or the Councill would have made any objections to it, for when a person takes up land, it must be either to improve it, or it is a detriment to the Colony in preventing others from seating; and we are still of opinion that the cultivating of one acre a year during 3 years for a grant of 50 acres is as little as can be expected; and therefore we do not think it advisable to offer to H.M. that any alteration be made therein. We have laid what you write in relation to the sloop to be bought for the service of Virginia before the Rt. Hon. the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty for their directions therein. In our letter, Oct. 12, you will receive H.M. Order in Councill, Sept. 20, 1709, etc., q.v. Since you had so great reason to be apprehensive of a scarcity of corn in the Colony, we think you have done well to issue out such Proclamation as you have sent us for prohibiting the exportation of it; and hope the same has been done so early, as to prevent any want of that commodity to the inhabitants. We are sorry to here the cropp of tobacco is like to fall short, and that the Colony of Virginia has been afflicted with a pestilential feaver. Repeat circular letter concerning illegal trade as preceding, Jan. 19.
Add:—P.S. Enclose Order in Council Dec. 15, 1709, repealing Act for establishing ports, etc., with reasons. [C.O. 5, 1363. pp. 39–43.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
54. Mr. Popple to Thomas Byerley. In answer to your letter of March 9, 170 8/9;, the Council of Trade and Plantations are very glad the late Lord Lovelace had restored you to your places, and don't doubt but Col. Hunter will confirm and support you in them etc. [C.O. 5, 1122. pp. 154, 155.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
55. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose following for H.M. Signature. Annexed,
55. i. Draught of Additional Instruction for Governor Hunter for settling Palatines at New York, as proposed Dec. 5. [C.O. 5, 1122. pp. 155–158.]

Footnotes

1 Commissioner of H.M. Navy at Portsmouth.