America and West Indies
January 1710, 21-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1924

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18-34

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'America and West Indies: January 1710, 21-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 18-34. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73826 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


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January 1710, 21-31

Jan. 21.
Admiralty Office.
56. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. By an Order in Council, Jan. 22, 1707, it was directed that 6 of H.M. shipps of good force should be sent to Newfoundland that year, for protecting the fishery and the harbours. The Lords Commrs. of the Admiralty desire to know from the Lords Commrs. of Trade, whether, upon their discourse with the persons tradeing to Newfoundland, and the present circumstances of our affaires there, it may be necessary to send soe many of H.M. ships thither this year. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed. Recd. Read Jan. 23, 170 9/10. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 194. 4. No. 104; and 195, 5. p. 122.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
57. Wm. Popple to Isaac Townsend. The Jamaica seal is not yet finished. You will please deliver those for Barbados and the Leeward Islands to Capt. Spann, who is to touch there. [C.O. 29, 12. p. 79.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
58. Same to Mr. Burchett. Encloses copy of preceding and prays that Capt. Spann may have directions accordingly. [C.O. 29, 12. p. 80.]
Jan. 21.
Admiralty Office.
59. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Orders will be given to Capt. Spann as desired, in preceding, and receipts for the seals transmitted to you. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 23, 170 9/10. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 12.]
Jan. 23.
Boston.
60. Mr. Addington to Mr. Popple. Refers to publick papers sent by H.M.S. Reserve. Signed, Isc. Addington. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read April 21, 1710. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 40; and 5, 913. pp. 204, 205.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
61. Mr. Secretary Boyle to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their consideration and report. Signed, H. Boyle. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read 27th Jan., 170 9/10. 1 p. Enclosed,
61. i. R. Jackson, H.M. Commissary at Stockholm, to Mr. Secretary Boyle. Reviews the history and conduct of the Swedish Tar Company, which, by its monopoly of pitch and tar, and its partiality in supplying France, and refusing supplies to H.M. Navy, is of dangerous consequence to Britain. Their excluding wholly all H.M. subjects out of the trade was so highly resented that it gave rise to the Act of Parliament pass'd the next Session to encourage the importation of Naval Stores from America, which had at first that good effect that the Tar Company was obliged immediately to fall the prices of their pitch and tar at London very considerably. By what I have learnt here, both from themselves and others, their chief and only aim in selling since that time at any moderate prices, is to prevent the effects of the advantages the said Act gives to the importers of such stores from British Plantations … However, I reckon that all due encouragement continues to be given to the importers of such stores from thence, and that by the assistance of some quantity brought that way, the providing H.M. Fleet is less precarious than formerly, and not subjected altogether so much as it used to be to the caprice of a few Swedish merchants, who if at any time hereafter find their interest in disappointing H.M., they will not, I fear, have more regard for Her service than there are instances of in 1701 and 1702, when the Tar Company would not deliver any pitch or tar for the use of H.M. Fleet, tho' they were sufficiently told how much it was wanted, but first sent themselves some quantity to France, nor would they load English ships, tho' they frequently employ Holland's ships, etc. Urges the turning of the British pitch and tar trade into other channels and the abolition of the Tar Company by Treaty, etc. Signed, R. Jackson, Stockholm, Dec. 29, 1709. Copy. 9 pp. [C.O. 388, 12. Nos. 71, 71 i.; and 389, 21. pp. 27–38; and (copy of enclosure only) 5, 3. No. 37 ii.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
62. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Parke. Acknowledge letters of Nov. 14 and 19. We are very sorry to perceive the inhabitants are so remiss in providing for their own defence, especially at a time when they are threat'ned with attempts from the enemy. However in case any attempt should be made, we will not doubt of your exerting yourself for H.M. service. You say you have received no letter from us since Aug. 12, and as we find that we writ no letter on that day, we suppose that must be the day that some of our letters came to your hand tho' it does not appear of what date those letters were. However, that you may know what letters we have writ you since January last, they are as follows etc. We have laid before H.M. what you write concerning the taking of St. Eustatia. We are very sorry for the villanous attempt upon your person, which was not only an injury to yourself (and that of the highest nature) but an indignity to H.M. by affronting her authority, and we heartily wish that the actors and contrivers of that design may be discovered, that they may be prosecuted and punished with the utmost severity of the Law. As to your desire of directions in relation to the Assemblies insisting on their Speaker's having a negative voice in the passing of laws that is, of signing after you; wee did, Nov. 25, acqt. you with our opinion that you had done well in supporting the rights of the Crown, and, Nov. 29, we acquainted you that in relation to the irregularity of the proceedings of the Assembly of Antigua, and their pretending to assume privileges which of right do not belong to them, we could only advise you to pursue your Instructions, etc. This we thought wou'd have been sufficient for your direction, but since you desire something further, we have only to add that by one clause in your Commission which is under the Broad Seal of this Kingdom, the negative voice is solely lodged in you or the Commander in Chief for the time being. Clause quoted. So that the Assemblies insisting on a privilege which H.M. has reserv'd to herself, and only deputed to you and the Commander in Chief for the time being is an undutifull attempt upon H.M. Royal Prerogative, which is contrary to the constant usage here in Great Brittain, and what none of H.M. other Plantations in America have ever pretended to. Their allegation that other former Governors have done it ought not to weigh with you. Their neglect of their duty in giving up the rights of the Crown, is a president we hope you will never follow, and therefore we have only to advise you to acqt. the Assembly with the forementioned clause, and that their pretending to assume the right of their Speaker's signing last will never be allowed of here, you will doe well therefore to continue to assert H.M. right, and to insist peremtorily upon it. As to your desire of having the original Articles against you sent to you, we have only to acquaint you that the original was never with us, what was referred to us being only a copy. [C.O. 153, 10. pp. 471–475.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
63. W. Popple to the Mayors of Bideford, Barnstable, Exeter, Dartmouth, Bristol, Plymouth, Weymouth, Fowey, Poole, and to Solomon Merret. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire you to consult with the merchants of Biddiford, etc. trading to Newfoundland, and thereupon to let me know as soon as possible how many ships they intend to send this year upon that Fishery, as also what convoys they think necessary for the protection of the several harbours and trade there. [C.O. 195, 5. p. 123.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
64. W. Popple to Josiah Burchett. Acknowledges letter of Jan. 21 and informs him of the enquiries being made in preceding. [C.O. 195, 5. p. 124.]
Jan. 26.
Admiralty Office.
65. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. Signed, J. Burchett, Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 27, 170 9/10. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
65. i. Receipt for seals for Barbados, Bermudas and the Leewards Islands. Signed, Jona. Spann. Capt. of H.M.S. Rupert and C. in C. of the ships going to Jamaica, etc. ½ p. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 13, 13 i.]
Jan. 26.
St. James's.
66. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 1st, Read 3rd Feb., 170 9/10. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
66. i. Petition of George Gordon to the Queen. Prays for the repeal of the whole Act of Barbados, 1708, appointing a Committee for settling the public accounts, cf. June 9, 1709. Set out, A.P.C. II. p. 604. q.v. Signed, Geo. Gordon. Copy. 2 pp.
66. ii. Petition of Merchants and others of Barbados to the Queen. By the original constitution of the Courts of Judicature in this Colony, all the process and writts issued by the said Courts were executed and served by the Provost Marshall General nominated and appointed by Letters Patents from your Majesty's Royal Predecessors or the Proprietors of this Island. For severall years last past the Cheif Judges of the respective Courts, have nominated and appointed the Marshals of the several Courts, whereof they are respective judges. Since such nominations many and great inconveniencys have happened to your Majesty's subjects of this Colony, the said Marshalls being generally persons indigent and not fit for so great a trust. Pray that the judges may not for the future be permitted to nominate the Marshalls, who are generally creatures and dependants of their own, but that persons of credit may be nominated by H.M. Signed, Wm. Sharpe, Saml. Cox, Wm. Cleland, Raynes Bate, Edward Morgan, Tho. Stewart, A. Skene, Benj. Bullard, Dudley Woodbridge, Tho. Edwards, Jos. Salmon, Edwd. Cordwent, John Merring, Patrick Thomson, Jos. Salmon jr., Chr. Fowler, John Scott. 1½ pp. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 14, 14 i., ii.; and 29, 12. pp. 81–85.]
Jan. 26.
St. James's.
67. Order of Queen in Council. Affirming the acquittal of William Walker, and stopping proceedings against him and Norman Mackaskall in Barbados. (v. following). Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 15th Feb., 170 9/10. 2¼ pp. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 18; and 29, 12. pp. 88–91.]
Jan. 26.
St. James's.
68. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations, who are to report to H.M. in Council what they shall judge most requisite and proper to be done for preventing any irregular proceedings in H.M. Courts of Justice in Barbados. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 5th, Read 7th Sept. 1710. ¾ p. Enclosed,
68. i. Copy of Address of the General Assembly of Barbados to the Queen. George Lillington (cf. C.S.P. Dec. 13, 1705 ff.) was in the time of Sir B. Granville cruelly persecuted, with a designe to force from him £2,000. The instrument made use of was William Walker, then your Majesty's sworn Council at Law, who by money, menaces and threats compelled Lillington to give him that sum to save his life and liberty. Which matter having been fully proved against Walker, and a Bill of Indictment found against him at the last Court of Grand Sessions, we did hope that the matter would have come to a full and final tryal by a petty jury, when the major part of the justices commissionated to hold the said Court did in effect vote that it was not a legal Court to any intent or purpose whatsoever, thereby keeping Walker from being tryed, whereby Walker has for the present avoyded his tryal and escaped the justice of your Majesty's Laws, to the evill example of all others, and to the great disquiet and terror of your Majesty's good subjects. The said obstruction of Justice has happened by the majority of those persons commissionated to hold the said Court, who were the most forward instruments in the hardships put upon your Majesty's subjects in the time of Sir B. Granville, and particularly concerned in the oppression of Lillington. Pray H.M. protection, that H.M. Courts of Justice may no more be made use of to punish ye innocent, and to clear and protect criminals by feigned tryals, etc. Jan. 6, 1708,(9). Signed, William Grace, Clk. of the General Assembly. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 36, 36 i.; and 29, 12. pp. 260–264.]
Jan. 26.
St. James's.
69. Order of Queen in Council. Approving Representation of Feb. 3, 1709, (q.v.), and the merchants' petition relating to the Bahamas (Dec. 30, 1708). Orders given accordingly for appointing a Governor and defending the Islands. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 20th, Read 21st Feb., 170 9/10. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 95; and 5, 1292. pp. 214, 215.]
Jan. 26.
St. James's.
70. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 31, 170 9/10. 1¾ pp. Enclosed,
70. i. Sir T. Laurence to the Queen. Petitions against Ordinance of Assembly of Maryland and oppression of Governor Seymour and his instrument. Wm. Bladen, etc. v. Acts of Privy Council, II. p 523. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 717. Nos. 4, 4 i.; and 5, 727. pp. 167–170.]
Jan. 26.
St. James's.
71. H.M. Additional Instruction to Governor Hunter. You are to take care that the scheme for settling 3000 Palatines (Dec. 5) be duly put in execution, etc. [C.O. 5, 210. pp. 196, 197.]
Jan. 26.
St. James's.
72. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed. Recd. Jan. 31st, Read Feb. 3, 170 9/10. 1 p. Enclosed,
72. i. Alexander Skeen to the Queen. Petitions against the Act of Barbados. 1667. directing how the Clerks of Common Please shall be appointed and paid, which was never confirmed by H.M., and in disuse for 30 years, but which has recently been revived, and thereby encroaches against the privileges of the Secretary. Signed, in behalf of petitioner, Row. Tryon. Copy. 1 p.
72. ii. Copy of Letters Patent appointing Alexander Skene Secretary of Barbados. April, 1702. Copy. ½ p. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 17, 17 i., ii.; and (without enclosure ii.), 12, 29. pp. 86, 87.]
Jan. 27.73. Commissioners of H.M. Navy to Mr. Burchett, concerning the Swedish Tar Company. v. Feb. 14. Endorsed. Recd. 3rd, Read 7th Feb. 170 9/10. Copy. 1½ pp. [C.O. 388, 12. No. 76.]
Jan. 28.
Bristol.
74. Mayor of Bristol to Mr. Popple. Reply to letter of Jan. 24. The number of ships designed this spring to goe to Newfoundland are about 12 sayle, and they desire the convoy to be at Milford by March 10, etc. As to the number of men of war requisite to send to the Land, they conceive four fourth-rates to lye at St. Johns, Ferriland, Carbonere and Trinity for security of those harbours, and two or three fifth-rates to cruise from Ferriland to Cape Bonivista to secure the Trade bound thither to take in fish for a market. Signed, Robert Bound. Endorsed, Recd. 30th, Read 31st. Jan. 170 9/10. Addressed. Postmarks. ½ p. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 106.]
Jan. 28.
Poole.
75. Mayor of Poole to Mr. Popple. There are 9 ships intended for Newfoundland this yeare. Three of which are ready to join the Isle of May convoy as soon as shee shall arrive at Spitthead. The other 6 are intended to sayle directly for ye Newfoundland from Spitthead with the convoyes which it's desired may be at Spithead March 10, and proposes 5 men of war for Newfoundland, etc., in detail. Signed, Wm. Skutt. Endorsed, Recd. 30th, Read 31st Jan., 170 9/10. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 107.]
Jan. 28.
Bideford.
76. Mayor of Bideford to Mr. Popple. They are fitting out from hence 12 or 14 sayle of shipps for Newfoundland. Since ye warr, the harbours they fish in are generally Ferryland and Fermoose, wch. will require a 4th rate man of warr at each place for their protection there; and doe alsoe think it absolutely necessary that sd. two men of warr bee ready to joyne them at Milford by ye 24th proximo, haveing found by sad experience that their haveing convoy soe late the last season, their ffishing voyages were utterly ruined. All our merchants and traders agree that a less number then 8 sayle of men of warr will not bee sufficient for ye protection of all ye severall harbours and the trade there. Signed, John Clifton. Endorsed, Recd. 2nd, Read 3rd Feb., 170 9/10. Addressed. Sealed. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 115.]
Jan. 29.
Dartmouth.
77. Mayor of Dartmouth to Mr. Popple. Reply to query as to convoys for Newfoundland, Jan. 24. Proposes that 4 men of warr at least proceed from England, vizt. two from the South Coast and two from the North by March 1st at the furthest, another from Lisbon at the same time, and another from England in the summer with the Scots' ships. 2 men of warr lyeing off St. Johns, one off Ferryland, and one off Trinity will be enough to guard the Fishery. There are 8 sail of considerable ships now fitting out here. Signed, Tho. Newman. Endorsed, Recd. 2nd, Read 3rd Feb., 170 9/10. Addressed. Sealed. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 113.]
Jan. 30.
Weymouth.
78. Mayor of Weymouth to Mr. Popple. The merchants trading to Newfoundland will have 4 ships from hence thither, and they do conceive it necessary to have foure ships of warr as convoys, vizt. one for the Isle of May, one for St. Johns, one for Ferryland, and one for Trinity Harbours. Signed, Isaac Hanwy. Endorsed, Recd. 2nd, Read 3rd Feb., 170 9/10. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 14.]
Jan. 30.
Fowey.
79. Mayor of Fowey to Mr. Popple. Wee have noe ships in this porte for maney yeares passed which have traded to Newfoundland, butt are most part taken and lost by this unhappy warr, soe that wee have noe trade att all. Signed, Stephen Wenmoth. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 7th Feb., 170 9/10. Addressed. ½ p. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 122.]
Jan. 31.
Barnestaple:
80. Mayor of Barnstaple to Mr. Popple. The merchants here that trade to Newfoundland, intend to send 4 ships, this yeare, to fish there; they humbly conceive 6 convoys will be necessary for the protection of the severall harbours and trade there, and desire that convoy may be as timely ready as possible, for that late going thither hath heretofore prov'd not only a great hindrance but prejudice to the traders. Signed, Richd. Gread. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 7th, 170 9/10. Addressed. Postmark. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 121.]
Jan. 31.
Boston in New England.
81. Governor Dudley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. My last general letters were by Capt. Riddell in H.M.S. the Falmouth, who being well arrived, I hope your Lordships had the past years papers and accounts to your Lordships' satisfaction. This comes by Capt. Teate in the Reserve, who brings home ye Mast Fleet and other ships from these Provinces, and your Lordships' packetts now humbly presented. Refers to enclosures, including accounts of the Revenue and taxes granted to H.M. for the support of the present war, which is this year grown to a very great sum. The last year's expence amounted to £30,000 for the ordinary service by sea and land in the defence of ye Province, and the thousand musquetiers that in obedience to H.M. commands were raysed in these Provinces with transports and provisions for them amounts to another £30,000, of which H.M. good subjects have not been impatient, but readily granted the payment thereof to the officers. and souldiers and saylors with all chearfulness, in hopes H.M., if the war continue, will please to revive that expedcon in the Spring, there being no manner of doubt, with the favour and blessing of Almighty God upon H.M. armes, of the reduction of Canada and Nova Scotia to H.M. obedience, and all the trade of Naval Stores, enough for all Europe, will be entirely in H.M. disposition, and if a Peace should intervene, it is humbly prayed that H.M. will insist upon the rendition of Quebeck, Port Royal, and ye dependencys. The standing in armes of abt. 3000 men in all these Northern Provinces during the whole summer, and the march of the one halfe of them to a place called Wood Creek (100 miles from Albany) where they raysed a fortification and dwelt four months, so amused the French that they have stood in their armes all summer, and not suffered any party's of their own, or the Indians to march upon the frontiers, as in all times past, so that I am got into the winter, which is my time to visit them, if to be found, and my snow shoes are ready to march upon every intelligence of their motion to their hunting ground, about 200 miles distant from this place, where tho' we do not always meet them, yet they see our tracks and are sensible so much of their danger, that in August last 50 familys of the Eastern Rebels, who have been perswaded by the French to forsake their allegiance to the Queen, marched from Panobscott in the East to the Maquas Country, which must needs be 6 or 700 miles, and in the presence of some Gentlemen from Albany acquainted the Maquas that they had been drawn into the war by the French missionary's, that Mr. Voudreuil, the Governor of Quebeck, promis'd to support them, and march halfe French with them, in their expeditions, but instead thereof he had neglected them, and they were all driven from their country these seven years past by the New Englanders, and had not gotten one bushell of corne in all that time, and were now come to dwell under the Maqua's feet. However, the Maqua's told them they were Rebels, and had murthered their bretheren of New England, and they would not receive them, and forced them to proceed to the Sinekars, the furthest of ye Five Nations, where they are setled, and I hope I shall not have any further trouble with them, so far as their number will go, because the Sinekar's will be their masters, and while the Five Nations maintain their friendship with us, we must be safe of them, but there is danger of the whole body of the Maquas least they desert us, upon the faylure of this years expedition, they are an eager, jealous, false people, and are very hardly steadyed in their dependance upon New York, the French missionaryes are so constantly amongst them. I hope Col. Nicholson and Capt. Moody are arrived long before this date, who came hither Voluntiers in H.M. service for the expedcon. to Canada, and who I am well assured will justly represent the readiness and obedience of these Provinces to H.M. commands for the Expedition to Canada, and humbly to represent the great cost of that preparation, and to pray H.M. most gracious consideration and assistance in the past charges as well as the further proceeding in that expedition, for the removal of the French Colony's of Quebeck and Nova Scotia, without which it will be impossible for us to proceed either in our trade at sea or our inland settlements, which the industrious people of these Provinces are very capable of, and ready to proceed in to the advantage of Great Britain, as well as the quiet and repose of the inhabitants here. I have since my last letters by Capt. Riddell, the honour of three of your Lordships' letters, the first is dated Jan. 12, 170 8/9, the first clause whereof refers to Naval Stores, etc. I most humbly acknowledge your Lordships' favour to me in acceptance of my service therein. I shall continue it with utmost diligence, as your Lordships sees in the New Hampshire Act referring to the paymt. of tarr into the Treasury in all publick taxes sent home with Capt. Riddell, and the other Law in the same Province, putting the penalty of £100 for any breach upon ye dimensions of mast trees. I have not yet made any further process in the Assembly of the Massachusetts to obtayn it to be enacted there, because at the same time that I represented that matter to your Lordships, I also gave my Lord Sunderland account thereof, as was my duty, and his Lordship in his answer, Aug. 4, 1709, after his very favourable acceptance of my service to H.M. in the business of Naval Stores, seems to be of opinion that I had better have omitted the offer to the Assembly of the Massachusetts, and let it have rested upon the provision in the Charter, as being sufficient agreeable with what your Lordships have written, which I humbly confess I had better have done, if I had expected the least doubt or delay in the Assembly's obedience to the very words of the Charter, which I keep strictly unto for fear of any demur, but my reasons why I offered it, I shall humbly submit to your Lordships' censure, and do therein further as your Lordships shall command me. Upon an action and presentment of a trespass by Mr. Bridger, H.M. Surveyour, brought against certain tresspassers, the partys pleaded that there was no Law of the Province enacted and published whereby they were made breachers, and secondly that Mr. Surveyour was not in Law the prosecutor so established and declared, both which exceptions, tho there be nothing in Law of weight in them, prevailed with the Court, and therefore I thought to obviate and remove them by this Act, which was also Mr. Bridger's earnest desire, that he might proceed with the less difficulty. I humbly refer the matter to your Lordships' consideration, and shall do therein as your Lordships command. The buisness of Councellours for New Hampshire mentioned in that letter labours still. I have but seven in that list, two of them near four-score, and Waldron, Hilton and Smith have not yet taken out their warrants, if Mr. George Vaughan, who lately attended your Lordships, and George Jaffryes were admitted, or all five of them, it would be a service to the Province, they are men of the best estates and loyalty in the Province, and without some of them, in case of the death of Mr. Coffin and Mr. Ware of the great age I mentioned above, I shall with difficulty get a quorum of the Council for ye necessary service of the Province. The Act referring to a duty upon negroes, imported, is a clause in an Act to prevent a spurious issue, brought in upon several complaints that several negroes had lain with white women, and has been since transmitted in 1706 by Capt. Matthews, and in 1707 by Capt. Stucley, and Mr. Secretary Pople acknowledges the receipt thereof in his letters on file, and tho' the reason that I formerly assigned of negroes running from us seems to be equal with Carolina and other Colony's, the force of it continues because they will always run to the Southward for warme weather, and as the cold is disagreeable to them, so it demands of ye master much more cloathing, and gives him much less service for 6 months in the year.
Your Lordships' next letter is of Feb. 11, 170 8/9, referring to H.M. bounty in the supply of ordnance and stores for ye Province of New Hampshire, wch. are all since well arrived and disposed by a Committee, Major Vaughan of H.M. Councill, Mr. Penhallow Treasurer and Commissary General, and Capt. Hunkins Speaker of the Assembly. The Ordnance in the fort, and the powder in two places for fear of danger. Refers to enclosed accounts etc. also sent to the Board of Ordnance. Your Lordships' last letter is of March 28, 1709, referring to the further encouragemt. of the production of Naval Stores, and to have consultation thereupon, in obedience where unto I have had several meetings of the principal merchants and traders in those commodities, and inclosed is what they have humbly to propose. I shall not fayle to use all possible endeavours to better those commodity's, and encrease the trade of them, but while the war lasts, it will not rise so fast, the tarr burners are forc't to straggle in ye woods, and are often in danger of the enemy where they work, as well as that they are necessarily taken off from their labour into the service of the war, to guard the frontiers, and this year especially to that degree that every fifth man in the Province was obliged to serve, there being 2000 of this Province in armes, and our lists of the whole in ordinary make but 10,000. I hope Mr. Bridger does me right to acquaint your Lordships that in all his visitations he has as often as he desires, guards of musquetiers and troopers to secure him (as I have myselfe) and wa[rrants] to all Sheriffs, Constables, etc. to assist him in seizing and discovering any trespass, and securing the trespassers, [there] is yet some misunderstanding between him and Mr. Collins' Agents, whose warrants to provide masts for [H.M.] service are come to hand, but there is yet but one ship of three arrived to take up the masts, which [if] kept too long in the posture they are here in, will suffer damage, how the delay of the ships happens, we [have] here no account, unless that they are otherwise diverted, and if so, other ships must be gotten, least [the masts] be hurt by the Indians, or suffer wth. being undrest, or by lying part in and part out of ye water, I am [sensible] the bringing home of masts at this time is a great service to H.M., and therefore have [thought it] my duty to cover the labourers in the woods, wth. good guards, these seven years past, without [which they] must have been left to the enemy, every day they used an axe in the woods, and I should [be sorry], after all that labour, any of them should be lost. I am informed there is before H.M., I suppose at your Lordships' Board, a complaint [from] the Government of Connecticutt, referring to the line parting the two Provinces. The General Assembly here have earnestly desired that they may be heard thereupon, and doubt not to sett that matter [in a] true light to H.M. satisfaction. The question is 70 year old, and nothing [new since my] arrival, nor am I any otherwise concerned in it then to know H.M. pleasure and see it [obeyed]. I shall trouble your Lordships but with one short article or two more, the first is ref[erring to the] supply of H.M. ships of war with men, which notwithstanding the late Act of Parlia[ment] forbideing the takeing of any men out of privateers or ships tradeing in the Plantations, and notwithstanding the heavy war upon these Provinces by the French and Indians, as well upon the frontiers inland as upon the coast by sea, which the last year imployed so many, H.M. Commanders of the men of war, particularly Capt. Teate now returning thinks himselfe hardly dealt with that he has no men supplyed to him from hence, which is impossible for me to do, unless I take the Planters from the plough or tradesmen from their stalls, notwithstanding I have allowed him to beat up his drums for voluntiers, and encouraged him to see his Fleet [well] man'd, and to borrow in case of necessity a man or two out of each ship, it being for their own [defence], and to restore them again at his first port in Great Britain, which is all that is in my [power] since the Act of Parliamt. has otherwise provided for his supply. I should be wanting to my duty if I should not here subjoine that Capt. Teate, for the three [years] last past has behaved himselfe with all diligence and to my satisfaction in his at[tendance] upon the coast. The other Article is referring to 1000 small armes that H.M. of [her great] bounty and favour sent hither for the expedition to Canada, and with which 1000 effec[tive men] were armed for that service, and are now taken and secured by the officers, that they may [if that] service do not proceed, be taken in and kept at H.M. Castle of this place, for the d[efence of] the Province in any future expedition, which will be a great strengthning of the Country, and [always] ready for ye service, and if otherwise absolutely given to the soldiers, as by some is expected, [will be] soon lost or disposed, beyond any power of the Governmt. to bring them into the service [again]. I humbly submit this Article to your Lordships' consideration, to move H.M. there[in if it] be agreeable to your Lordships' better judgment therein. My Lords, in the defence of this Country these seven years past, I have done the utmost to defend [the] Province, and have had good success therein, and have endeavoured to put forward the rayseing of Naval Stores, and in this last summer have had my quota of men superiour to any H.M. Governmts., my neighbours, and shall not faile, if I may have H.M. commands for the revival of that expedition, and I humbly pray that my service may be acceptable to your Lordships, and that your Lordships will please to represent me well to H.M. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 20th April, 1710. 3 large closely written pp. Edges rubbed. Enclosed,
81. i. Principal Merchants of the Massachusetts Bay to Governor Dudley. Proposals for the further encouragement of Naval Stores from New England. The premium to be paid in a short set time. Convoys to sail in April. Fixed prices to be paid for stores delivered in the Thames and such stores to be certified by the Surveyor General before shipping, as fit for H.M. service, and accepted as such in H.M. Stores. Endorsed as preceding. 2 pp.
81. ii. List of causes and judgments in the Inferior Courts in New England, 1708, 1709. Endorsed, Recd. April 3rd, 1710. 22 pp.
81. iii. Account of charges accruing to the Massachusetts Bay, from the intended expedition to Canada:—
£s.d.
To wages and subsistence of 973 officers and souldiers, May 18—Oct. 1412927188
To wages and subsistence of 3 Ministers 19 weeks7060
3 doctors and assistants etc. 5 months.403111
To an acct. of coats, given by ye Generall Assembly to the souldiers, each of them one, further to encourage ym. in the service88803
To the hire of transports, etc. 5¼ months5272109
To an acct. of beer and water with cask, etc., put on board the transports.669410
To an acct. of fitting transports, etc46771
To 16 whaleboats etc.16000
To a sloop equipp'd for warr improved in convoying provisions for the expedition, taken by the enemy, her value wth. wages and subsistence815100
To 2 vessels equipt to guard the coast, H.M. having ordered the Province galley to attend ye expedition, their wages etc.1701170
To provisions (wth. utensils etc.) on board the transports530168
To 38 drums with cases83120
To building of barracks to entertain the forces10658
To charge upon 6 Maquas that came down to see the fleet10900
To an acct. of clothing shipp'd for the expedition171526
To ammunition12000
£30, 811126
Dated at the Commissaries Office, Boston, Oct. 12, 1709. Signed, Andr. Belcher. Endorsed as preceding, 1 p.
81. iv. Account of Ordnance Stores and of powder spent, Fort Anne, Salem, June 24, 1709. Signed, Stephen Sewall, Capt. Same endorsement. 1½ pp.
81. v., vi. Account of Ordnance stores and of powder spent at H.M. Fort at Marblehead, June 24, 1708–1709. Signed, Edward Brattle, Capt. Same endorsement. 1½ pp.
81. vii.–ix. Account of Ordnance Stores and of powder spent at Fort William and Mary, Newcastle, New Hampshire, June 24, 1708–1709. Signed, Shadrach Walton. Same endorsement. 3 pp. (including duplicate).
81. x., xi. Account of Ordnance Stores and powder spent at H.M. Castle William, Boston, June 24, 1708–1709. Signed, Adam Winthrop, Capt. Same endorsement 1 p. (including duplicate).
81. xii. Proclamation for a General Fast, Sept. 15, in the Massachusetts Bay upon occasion of the scorching drought and the losses and delay of the Expedition against Canada. Signed, J. Dudley. Boston, Aug. 27, 1709. Printed. 1 p.
81. xiii. Proclamation for the recovery of deserters from H.M. ships. 20s. reward offered for each. Signed, J. Dudley, Boston, Oct. 20, 1709. Printed. 1 p.
81. xiv. Proclamation for a General Thanksgiving in the Massachusetts Bay, for the great measure of health vouchsafed, a more plentiful harvest than could reasonably be hoped for by reason of the sore scorching drought, and protection of open towns from the insults of the enemy, etc. Signed, J. Dudley, Boston, Nov. 5, 1709. Printed. 1 p.
81. xv. Duplicate of No. 81 i.
81. xvi. Address of the Governor, Council and Assembly of New Hampshire to the Queen. Portsmouth, Dec. 6, 1709. Return thanks for the stores of war sent them, and the dismissal of Mr. Allen's claim to the soils Continues: And whereas your Majesty out of a gracious reguard to this and other your Provinces in these parts of America, was pleased to forme a designe against the French settlements at Canada and Nova Scotia, but a more important service in Europe requireing your Majesty's forces, which were intended hither, whereby that designe is laid aside for the present, wee most humbly pray your Majestie that it may consist with your Royal pleasure to revive the said designe, and that the expedition lately intended may be prosecuted seasonably the next spring, and that your Majesties armes in America may have a like glorious successe as in Europe, to the utter confusion of your enemies and lasting repose of all your Majesties good subjects inhabiting this Continent, etc., etc. Signed, Cha. Story, Secretary; Mark Hunkin, Speaker. Endorsed, Recd. April 3, 1710. Copy. 2½ pp.
81. xvii. Address of the Governor, Council and Assembly of New Hampshire to the Queen. Portsmouth, May 12, 1709. Your Majesties most loyal and dutiful subjects of this poor Province are deeply sensible of your Majesties ffavour and justice in the dispatch and decision in the tryal between Mr. Allen and Mr. Waldron referring to the estate of land of the said Waldron, wherein all the proprietors of this your Majesties poor province are equally concerned, and which has been in the challenge of Mr. Mason and Mr. Allen for 30 years last past, tho' the same was long before that planted and subdued by your Majesties good subjects now here inhabiting, and by themselves and their fathers and predecessors defended with their lives and estates for more than 60 years past and to this day. Return thanks for powder, feild peices and stores. And above all wee are unspeakably indebted to your Majesties' great care and concerne for the preservation and defence of your Majesties good subjects, the inhabitants of these parts of America in formeing the present designe against the French settlements at Canada, etc., of which wee are advised by Col. Nicholson and Col. Vetch, to the promoteing whereof wee hold ourselves in duty bound to contribute our utmost endeavours, being well satisfied the successe of this undertakeing will produce a lasting quiett and repose of all your Majesties' Provinces in New England. And further wee with all admiration adore the Divine power in the glorious successe of your Majesties' armes in Europe, and pray to Almighty God the same may attend them in America, etc. Signed, Cha. Story, Secretary, John Pickerin, Speaker. Same endorsement. Copy. 1¾ pp.
81. xviii. Governor Dudley to Wm. Vaughan, Saml. Penhallow and Mark Hunkin. Gives instructions as to the proportion of Ordnance, ammunition etc. to be issued for New Hampshire, and the disposition thereof. Signed, J. Dudley, Boston, Oct. 15, 1709. Same endorsement. Copy. 3 pp.
81. xix. Duplicate of preceding letter, without details. [C.O. 5, 865. Nos. 36, 36 i.–xix.; and (without enclosures) 5, 913. pp. 169–192.]
Jan. 31.
Boston in New England.
82. Governor Dudley to Mr. Popple. Refers to preceding. I must be pardoned for my long letter because I can write but once a year. there being no other safe conveyance for our great bundles of papers. I had your letters in the spring, dated July 23, 1709, with my own packets, and those for York, Maryland and Virginia, which I carefully and speedily dispatcht. It has been a very hurrying year, besides my standing forces, to keep 1200 men in arms for 6 months, tho' I hope for the same to be repeated next month, etc. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 20th April, 1710. Addressed. Sealed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 37; and 5, 913. pp. 192, 193.]
[Jan. 31.]83. Samuel Brise to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Further memorial giving details of illegal trading with St. Thomas and Curaçoa. of. Jan. 19. Signed, Samuel Brise. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 31, 170 9/10. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 388, 12. No. 72].
Jan. 31.
London.
84. Mr. Dummer to Mr. Popple. Gives sailings of the Sophia packet, out and home, 110 days. What of publique matters occurs in the West Indies by this packett boate, wholely concernes the multitude of privateers upon and about the Leeward Islands, by whome they fear every day to be plundrd, as Estatia has been. And from Jamaica they say their trade with the Spanyards is nearly ruined by our owne privateers, for under that licence all Nations, French, Dutch, Spanish and English consort together, and have settled upon some of the Sambola Islands to above 500 strong, and are comanded by one Capt. Mitchell, a privateering fellow from the Canaryes. Brigadier Handasyd has sent out proclamations to pardon all that will come in to little effect. The Governor of Carolina gives commisions to ye same purpose, who come and man at Jamaica as a small vessell lately did, and carryed away 100 stout fellows upon the same adventure, which tends to the ruine of all our trade, and breeding a nest of pyrates. Signed, E. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 9th, 170 9/10. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 6. No. 96.]
Jan. 31.85. Mr. Campbell to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to enquiry as to convoys needed for the Newfoundland Fishery. I believe that protection by sea only hath never been sufficient either to encourage or secure that Fishery, especially since the French posess't themselves of Placentia, and the warr broke out. For I look upon the advantage that merchants reap by a consumption which the inhabitants of that Colony make of manufacturs and other goods imported thither from £50 to 100,000 annually. And the dependance they have on the industry of these inhabitants who provyde at least one half, if not two thirds of all the fish and train oyle throughout the year, to be very main and solid encouragements of that Fishery. Those inhabitants when duely protected make not only from 70 to 80 quintalls of fish per boat even in ye winter season, and then cutt and prepare timber for stages, boats, flakes, oares etc., and go a furring, but early in the spring they make much greater quantityes of fish and train before the merchant-ships and men of warr can adventure on that coast, all which they find ready when they come in barter for the provisions and comoditys they bring. Refers to French raids from Placentia in the winter, and in summer too, burning the settlements and carrying away the fishermen in the hight of the fishing season, even when the men of warr and merchant ships are there. The present condition of the inhabitants is very deplorable. The people, besides their former sufferings, are much impoverished by the insults and exactions of the French last year, and lye now exposed to ye mercy of the enemy without Forts, arms or ammunition, and very little provisions, while the enemy is growen stronger. The stone wall round Placentia is finished, severall new fortifications added and furnished with ye arms, ammunition and provisions of St. Johns Fort and Castle, the garrison increased with 200 men from old France, who designed to posess themselves of the English setlements last spring, and may not improbably now accomplish it, or at least bring the people under new contributions for the ensuing fishing. A regular strength and force at land summer and winter is [therefore] absolutly requisit to maintain that Fishery. My opinion is, that a regular Fort be built in ye most convenient place and established with a garison of 150 men at least, from whence the other harbours may receve assistance in ye summer, and to which ye inhabitants may all safely retire with their effects in the winter. And I have been informed by a great many competent judges, such as Sr. John Gibson, Capt. Moody, Dr. Fleming, Mr. Archibald Cuming, my brother, and severall masters of ships, that Ferryland is the most proper place, and all these gentlemen together with Col. Nicholson have told me that a fort at St. Johns is not capable of answering these ends. The present precarious state of that Colony, and the ignorance and uncertainty that merchants remain under about the security thereof for the futur will discourage them from sending any considerable number of ships thither this year, either to make or purchase fish, however some will no doubt run all hazards and go, and therefore the usual compliment of convoys, at least, should proceed thither, two whereof to saile from Plymouth by the beginning of Aprill at furthest, for ye early reliefe and incouragement of the inhabitants. More frequent occasions of correspondence between England and Newfoundland would be a very great advantage to that trade and Fishery, which may be performed by ye New York pacquet boats without any great expence of time or money. Signed, Ja. Campbell. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 31st, Read Feb 3, 170 9/10. 3 large pp. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 116.]